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NEO Shop Talk

The blog of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Evaluation Office

Archive for 2013

Institute for Research Design in Librarianship: 9 days in southern CA; full scholarships available

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Do you want to learn about how your user groups and communities find and use information? Do you want to gather evidence to demonstrate that your work is making a difference?

Exciting news! You can work on these questions, and questions like them, June 16-26, 2014!

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship is a great opportunity for an academic librarian who is interested in conducting research. Research and evaluation are not necessarily identical, although they do employ many of the same methods and are closely related. This Institute is open to academic librarians from all over the country. If your proposal is accepted, your attendance at the Institute will be paid for, as will your travel, lodging, and food expenses.

The William H. Hannon Library has received a three-year grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to offer a nine-day continuing education opportunity for academic and research librarians. Each year 21 librarians will receive instruction in research design and a full year of support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The summer Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) is supplemented with pre-institute learning activities and a personal learning network that provides ongoing mentoring. The institutes will be held on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California.

The Institute is particularly interested in applicants who have identified a real-world research question and/or opportunity. It is intended to

“bring together a diverse group of academic and research librarians who are motivated and enthusiastic about conducting research but need additional training and/or other support to perform the steps successfully. The institute is designed around the components of the research process, with special focus given to areas that our 2010 national survey of academic librarians identified as the most troublesome; the co-investigators on this project conducted the survey to provide a snapshot of the current state of academic librarian confidence in conducting research. During the nine-day institute held annually in June, participants will receive expert instruction on research design and small-group and one-on-one assistance in writing and/or revising their own draft research proposal. In the following academic year, participants will receive ongoing support in conducting their research and preparing the results for dissemination.”

Your proposal is due by February 1, 2014. Details are available at the Institute’s Prepare Your Proposal web site.

Factoid: Loyola Marymount is on a bluff above the Pacific Ocean, west of central LA.

New, Improved, and Available Now!

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

The 2nd Edition of the Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects series of 3 booklets is now available online:

Getting Started with Community-Based Outreach (Booklet 1)
What’s new? More emphasis and background on the value of health information outreach, including its relationship to the Healthy People 2020 Health Communication and Health Information Technology topic areas

Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects (Booklet 2)
What’s new? Focus on uses of the logic model planning tool beyond project planning, such as providing approaches to writing proposals and reports.

Collecting and Analyzing Evaluation Data (Booklet 3)
What’s new? Step-by-step guide to collecting, analyzing, and assessing the validity (or trustworthiness) of quantitative and qualitative data, using questionnaires and interviews as examples.

These are all available free to NN/LM regional offices and network members. To request printed copies, send an email to nnlm@uw.edu.

Non-508 compliant pdf versions of all three booklets are available here: http://nnlm.gov/evaluation/guides.html#A2 .

The Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach series, by Cynthia Olney and Susan Barnes, supplements and summarizes material in Cathy Burroughs’ groundbreaking work from 2000, Measuring the Difference: Guide to Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach. Printed copies of Burroughs’ book are also available free—just send an email request to nnlm@uw.edu.

Brush up on your Excel skills

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

“There’s probably a better way of doing this.” How many times have you muttered this statement while using Excel to analyze a database download or a spreadsheet of class evaluation data?

Or maybe you would like to try your hand at some of the hot new trends in data visualization, such as data dashboards or infographics, but find that your lack of familiarity with Excel holds you back.

Whether you are a novice or experienced Excel user, you should check out Emery Evaluation’s “Excel for Evaluation” web page (http://emeryevaluation.com/excel/) with its series of videos demonstrating efficient ways to use Excel for data analysis and reporting. These videos, created by Ann Emery, are 1-4 minutes long and demonstrate a single Excel function, such as the formula to recode data or a technique for merging data from two separate files. The videos do use the 2010 version of Excel, so if you are working with an earlier version, some of the videos may not directly apply. Her videos are organized around the  steps of good data analysis: importing your data, organizing and cleaning the data, recoding, looking for patterns, calculating statistics, and creating charts.

I’ve been using Excel since 1988, and I STILL always feel as though I’m taking the long way around to completing an analysis. These videos confirmed that I was, indeed, right.  There are better ways to use Excel, and Emery’s videos show how.

How clinicians use information resources at the point of care–a grounded theory study

Monday, September 9th, 2013

An interesting study by clinicians of how clinicians use information resources has appeared in a recent issue of JAMA Internal Medicine:

Cook DA; Sorensen KJ; Wilkinson JM; and Berger RA. “Barriers and decisions when answering clinical questions at the point of care: A grounded theory study.” JAMA Intern Med, published online August 26, 2013. [epub ahead of print PMID: 23979118] This article provides details about steps that the researchers took in their qualitative study of how 50 primary care and subspecialist internal medicine and family medicine physicians use online information resources (such as UpToDate, MD Consult, Micromedex, and publicly available Internet resources) to answer clinical questions at the point of care. You can find details here about how the focus groups were conducted, how the participants were selected, and how data was collected and analyzed. This article provides a great template for an approach to collecting qualitative information via focus groups, and ends with an unsurprising conclusion:

“Physicians perceive that insufficient time is the greatest barrier to point-of-care learning, and efficiency is the most important determinant in selecting an information source.”

Last updated on Monday, June 27, 2016

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under Contract No. UG4LM012343 with the University of Washington.