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Chemicals in Cigarettes (in English and Spanish)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has created a set of videos and interactive tools to lay the foundation for an important public health goal: to publish a list of the harmful and potentially harmful chemicals in tobacco in a way that is easy to understand. These videos provide the opportunity to explore the production of cigarettes from plant to product to production to puff. These education tools are also available in Spanish from the FDA website: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/yyn2.

Information about Multiple Sclerosis for Kids

Having a parent, grandparent or other loved one with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be difficult or confusing for children. The National MS Society has activity guides and newsletters to help children and the adults in their lives learn about the disease together.

Keep S’myelin (National MS Society): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/1uv3

 

Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign

The Centers for Disease Control’s Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign has fact sheets, brochures and posters to promote regular colorectal cancer screening tests among people over the age of 50. The materials are available in English and Spanish and can be downloaded or ordered in bulk.

Screen for Life: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/qitz

Keeping pets healthy

Many people think of their pets as members of their families. Here are some resources for keeping your pets healthy.

Pet Health (MedlinePlus): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/fwj9

Healthy Pets Healthy People (Centers for Disease Control): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/ju8n

Is My Dog or Cat a Healthy Weight? Important Questions to Ask the Vet (Food and Drug Administration): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/g6aq

Flu Expected to Continue Several More Weeks

According to the latest CDC Update, flu is expected to continue for several more weeks. Influenza activity in the United States began to increase in mid-December, remained elevated through February 4, 2017, and is expected to continue. To date, influenza A (H3N2) viruses have predominated overall, but influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and influenza B viruses have also been identified.

CDC collects, compiles, and analyzes data on influenza activity year round in the United States. Timing of influenza activity and predominant circulating influenza viruses vary by season. For more details, see the article itself.

Blanton L, Mustaquim D, Alabi N, et al. Update: Influenza Activity — United States, October 2, 2016–February 4, 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;66:159–166.
https://nnlm.gov/bhic/zlg2

Out-of-Pocket Expenses for Chronic Conditions from AHRQ Stats

Among adults with health care expenses in 2014, those treated for multiple chronic conditions had average out-of-pocket expenses that were more than three times as high as expenses for adults with one or no chronic condition ($13,031 versus $3,579). This is according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Brief #498: Out-of-Pocket Expenditures for Adults with Health Care Expenses for Multiple Chronic Conditions, U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population, 2014.)

Some Highlights:

  • Among those using medical care, mean per person out-of-pocket expenditures for the U.S. civilian adult population who had multiple chronic conditions were more than double for those adults who had no or one chronic condition.
  • White, non-Hispanic adults with multiple chronic conditions had the highest per person out-of-pocket expenditures in comparison to black non-Hispanic, Hispanic, Asian non-Hispanic, and other non-Hispanic adults with two or more chronic conditions.
  • High income adults with multiple chronic conditions had higher out-of-pocket expenditures than those who had lower family income.
  • Among non-elderly adults who received medical care in 2014, those with multiple chronic conditions who were uninsured had higher mean out-of-pocket expenditures per person than those who had only public insurance.

Entire report is linked here: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/ilim

HHS announces the Move Health Data Forward Challenge Winners

The Department of Health and Humans Services’ Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) announced the Phase 2 winners of the Move Health Data Forward Challenge. Winning submissions will now move on to the challenge’s last phase to develop applications that will allow individuals to share their personal health information safely and securely with their health care providers, family members or other caregivers.

Phase 1 of the Move Health Data Forward Challenge required applicants to submit their plans describing how they would develop solutions to help with the flow of health information. The ten Phase 1 winners were awarded $5,000 each and moved on to Phase 2, which required participants to demonstrate a viable solution to achieve those goals by allowing for the safe and secure exchange of consumer or provider health records.

Each Phase 2 winner below will receive a $20,000 award: CedarBridge Group LLC, EMR Direct, Foxhall Wythe LLC, Live and Leave Well, LLC, and Lush Group, Inc. Some of the projects entail smart phone or web-based application for consumer mediated health data exchange.

The five Phase 2 winners now move to Phase 3 which will award $50,000 for up to two winners based on the participant’s ability to implement their solution through the development of a mobile or web-based application.

For more information and to read the descriptions of the projects, see https://nnlm.gov/bhic/6xj5

Rural Mortality and Preventable Deaths – Insights from the CDC MMWR Rural Health Series webinar

Date: Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Time: 8:00am Pacific, 9:00am Mountain, 10:00am Central, 11:00am Eastern
Duration: approximately 90 minutes
Register: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/ztay

This webinar will feature the lead authors of the rural health series CDC MMWR report and companion commentary, who will address the research findings and recommendations for reducing potentially preventable deaths. Also featured will be a program funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy to share best practices and successes in their endeavor to reduce obesity, one of the major risk factors contributing to a number of the leading causes of death as cited by CDC.

Text adapted from RHIhub.

The Roundtable on Health Literacy’s Workshop on Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Populations

March 15, 2017 at 8:30 AM Pacific
Online at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/dpgg or in-person at East Bay Community Foundation in Oakland, CA

This is a one-day public workshop that will feature presentations and discussion on facilitating health communication related to immigrant, refugee, and migrant populations through the use of health literate approaches. Issues related to cultural competence, language access, and understanding the U.S. health care system may be included in the agenda.

Text from the Health and Medicine Division (HMD) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Grants to support interventions with minority youth

Minority Youth Violence Prevention II (MYVP II): Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Community Policing Approaches

Due April 4 2017

Minority Youth Violence Prevention II (MYVP II) provides grants to identify innovative approaches to significantly reduce the prevalence and impact of youth violence among racial and ethnic minority and/or disadvantaged at-risk youth.  MYVP II will support project interventions tailored to at-risk racial and ethnic minority and/or disadvantaged youth (ages 12-18 years at the start of the project). It requires a coordinated, multi-disciplinary approach, including at a minimum a public health agency (a public health department or community-based organization focused on public health), a local school (a primary school, a secondary school, or an alternative/non-traditional school) or school district, a state, county or local law enforcement agency or government agency that has demonstrated collaboration/partnership with law enforcement (e.g., mayor’s office, county government, board of supervisors) and an institution of higher education or learning. For more information, review the grant requirements at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/j3og

 

American Indian/Alaska Native Health Equity Initiative

Due April 3 2017

The AI/AN Health Equity program will support programs that demonstrate effective promising practices that increase resiliency and protective factors within AI/AN youth, as well as build capacity among AI/AN serving healthcare professionals and paraprofessionals about providing trauma-informed, culturally appropriate health care services and interventions to AI/AN youth.

Eligible applicants include: Native American tribal governments, Tribal organizations, Tribal colleges and universities, Institutions that serve Native Alaskans, Tribal epidemiology centers, Urban Indian health programs and urban Indian organizations

For more information, visit https://nnlm.gov/bhic/uk79