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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

Grants to support interventions with minority youth

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Minority Youth Violence Prevention II (MYVP II): Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Community Policing Approaches

Due April 4 2017

Minority Youth Violence Prevention II (MYVP II) provides grants to identify innovative approaches to significantly reduce the prevalence and impact of youth violence among racial and ethnic minority and/or disadvantaged at-risk youth.  MYVP II will support project interventions tailored to at-risk racial and ethnic minority and/or disadvantaged youth (ages 12-18 years at the start of the project). It requires a coordinated, multi-disciplinary approach, including at a minimum a public health agency (a public health department or community-based organization focused on public health), a local school (a primary school, a secondary school, or an alternative/non-traditional school) or school district, a state, county or local law enforcement agency or government agency that has demonstrated collaboration/partnership with law enforcement (e.g., mayor’s office, county government, board of supervisors) and an institution of higher education or learning. For more information, review the grant requirements at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/j3og

 

American Indian/Alaska Native Health Equity Initiative

Due April 3 2017

The AI/AN Health Equity program will support programs that demonstrate effective promising practices that increase resiliency and protective factors within AI/AN youth, as well as build capacity among AI/AN serving healthcare professionals and paraprofessionals about providing trauma-informed, culturally appropriate health care services and interventions to AI/AN youth.

Eligible applicants include: Native American tribal governments, Tribal organizations, Tribal colleges and universities, Institutions that serve Native Alaskans, Tribal epidemiology centers, Urban Indian health programs and urban Indian organizations

For more information, visit https://nnlm.gov/bhic/uk79

Informed Consent Training Available for Health Professionals and Leaders

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

Many individuals do not understand the benefits, harms, and risks of treatment, even after signing a consent form. This raises patient safety and liability concerns, and runs counter to person-centered care. AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) has developed two interactive training modules that teach clear, comprehensive, engaging communication strategies that hospitals and clinical teams can use to ensure that people understand the benefits, harms, and risks of their alternatives, including the option of not having any treatment. AHRQ has also developed an implementation guide to provide guidance for implementing the training modules using a quality improvement (QI) approach. To access more information and a link to the free training, please see: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/hhye.

Communicating About Food in Culturally Sensitive Ways

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

A “Health Literacy Out Loud” podcast is available in which Janet Ohene-Frempong, MS, a plain language and cross-cultural communications consultant and Helen Osbourne discuss:

  • Communicating about food in a multicultural world and why this matters today.
  • Issues to consider such as whether foods are available, affordable, convenient, appropriate, and familiar.
  • Examples of respectful and inclusive ways to communicate about food and why doing so is not only appropriate but also can be deeply satisfying and gratifying.

Additional resources are also provided. Please see: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/pxpe.

 

Protect Yourself from Health Scams

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

The National Institute on Aging has information on protecting yourself from health scams, particularly for older adults as they are often targeted. Today, there are more ways than ever to sell untested products—online, TV, radio, magazines, and newspapers are just a few examples. Actors portray doctors and patients on infomercials. You might even get an email urging you to try a product. It can be hard to tell what’s an ad. The problem is serious. Untested remedies may be harmful. They may get in the way of medicines prescribed by your doctor. They may be expensive and a waste of money. And, sometimes, using these products keeps people from getting the medical treatment they need. Learn more here: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/f1g6.

 

Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the release of the Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda, a first-of-its-kind collaborative tribal-federal blueprint that highlights the extent to which behavioral health challenges affect Native communities, in addition to strategies and priorities to reduce these problems and improve the behavioral health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Native communities experience disproportionately high rates of behavioral health problems such as mental and substance use disorders. In addition, these communities’ behavioral health needs have traditionally been underserved. Mental and substance use disorders – which may result from adverse childhood experiences, historical and intergenerational trauma, and other factors – are also reflected in high rates of interpersonal violence, major depression, excessive alcohol use, suicide, and suicide risk. Overall, these problems pose a corrosive threat to the health and well-being of many American Indians and Alaska Natives. The document is available for free at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/1b80

Community Commons webinars – New Data and Using Data for Advocacy

Monday, February 13th, 2017

New Data Spotlight: 500 Cities and ACS 2011-2015
Thu, Feb 16, 2017 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CST
Register at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/z18z

This webinar will highlight the newest data available on Community Commons – including the recently released 500 Cities Data and the American Community Survey five year estimates from 2011-2015.

About 500 Cities Project from Community Commons: The 500 Cities Project is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the CDC Foundation. The 500 Cities project aims to provide city- and census tract-level small area estimates for chronic disease risk factors, health outcomes, and clinical preventive service use for the largest 500 cities in the United States. Small area estimates allow cities and local health departments to better understand the burden and geographic distribution of health-related variables and to plan for public health interventions.

 

Beyond Needs Assessments: Using Community Commons Data for Advocacy and Program Development
Tue, Mar 14, 2017 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CDT
Register at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/sut3

This webinar will explore how to use Community Commons data for advocacy and program development.

Antibiotic Resistance Investment Map

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Learn how CDC is investing in your area to combat AR: Use the Antibiotic Resistance Investment Map, a public web app that provides information on CDC’s key AR activities by state.

Screenshot of CDC Map of Key Investments to Combat Antibiotic Resistance.

Text is from the CDC Antibiotic Resistance Solutions Initiative

Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. The CDC has a number of resources to aid in education and prevention campaigns

 

Love is respect. Teen dating violence awareness from VetoViolence.

Women and Heart Disease Month

Saturday, February 4th, 2017

To make women more aware of the danger of heart disease, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is sponsoring a national program called The Heart Truth®, in partnership with many national and community organizations. The program’s goal is to raise awareness about heart disease and its risk factors among women and educate and motivate them to take action to prevent the disease and control its risk factors.

The centerpiece of The Heart Truth is the Red Dress®, which was introduced as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness in 2002 by the NHLBI. The Red Dress® reminds women of the need to protect their heart health and inspires them to take action to lower their risk for the disease.

For more information about women and heart disease, see https://nnlm.gov/bhic/pir7

Fact sheets on winter health dangers

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

APHA’s Get Ready campaign has fact sheets on winter storms, cold weather safety, and cold and flu. The PDF documents are available in English and Spanish.

Not familiar with APHA Get Ready? This American Public Health Association (APHA) campaign “helps Americans prepare themselves, their families, and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including pandemic flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies.” (from Get Ready: About)