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Archive for the ‘Minority Health Concerns’ Category

Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the release of the Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda, a first-of-its-kind collaborative tribal-federal blueprint that highlights the extent to which behavioral health challenges affect Native communities, in addition to strategies and priorities to reduce these problems and improve the behavioral health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Native communities experience disproportionately high rates of behavioral health problems such as mental and substance use disorders. In addition, these communities’ behavioral health needs have traditionally been underserved. Mental and substance use disorders – which may result from adverse childhood experiences, historical and intergenerational trauma, and other factors – are also reflected in high rates of interpersonal violence, major depression, excessive alcohol use, suicide, and suicide risk. Overall, these problems pose a corrosive threat to the health and well-being of many American Indians and Alaska Natives. The document is available for free at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/1b80

Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Populations

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

The Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is offering a one-day public workshop that will feature presentations and discussion on facilitating health communication related to immigrant, refugee, and migrant populations through the use of health literate approaches. Issues related to cultural competence, language access, and understanding the U.S. health care system may be included in the agenda. March 15, 8:00am – 5pm PT. The workshop will be webcast live and will be available for viewing starting at 8:30 AM Pacific Time. Free but register to attend the in person event or watch the live webcast at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/qyij

Suicide Prevention in Indian Country

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

A fact sheet describing suicide prevention in Indian Country, and how the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention can align with tribal communities, is made available from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. For tribal audiences and the agencies that work with them, the fact sheet reviews suicide prevention strategies for communities: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/3qoz

Diversity Toolkit from US Administration on Aging

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

The AoA provides a Diversity Toolkit for the Aging Services Network and its partners to act as a starting point for conversations regarding how to better serve diverse populations of older adults. However, the toolkit also has appeal for other community organizations and institutions.  It assists “with every stage of program planning, implementation, and delivery of diverse population services.” The toolkit walks service providers through four steps – Assessments, Identifying Resources About the Community, Designing Services, and Program Evaluation – and the Diverse Community Questionnaire can be tailored for your specific communities to aid in each of the four steps. For more information about the toolkit, visit AoA Diversity webpage.

Funding opportunity for community partners: All of Us

Monday, February 6th, 2017

From the National Institutes of Health:

“The National Institutes of Health has announced a new opportunity for organizations interested in helping engage volunteers in the All of Us Research Program, part of the Precision Medicine Initiative. This funding opportunity, open to national and regional organizations, as well as local community groups, will support activities to promote enrollment and retention in the All of Us Research Program across diverse communities.

All of Us is an ambitious effort to gather data over time from 1 million or more people living in the United States, with the ultimate goal of accelerating research and improving health. Unlike research studies that are focused on a specific disease or population, All of Us will serve as a national research resource to inform thousands of studies, covering a wide variety of health conditions. Researchers will use data from the program to learn more about how individual differences in lifestyle, environment and biological make-up can influence health and disease. By taking part, people will be able to learn more about their own health and contribute to an effort that will advance the health of generations to come.”

More information about the All of Us Research Program and the funding opportunity: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/g52c

Health Disparities: You know there’s a need, now prove it! (webinar)

Monday, January 30th, 2017

From the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region:

Most of us can see with our own eyes that inequity exists, including in health access and outcomes. How do we prove it to policy makers, grant funders and other decision makers? Are there model interventions that we can replicate? This entry-level presentation will explore online sources of reliable health statistics, research and evidence-based community interventions. The emphasis of this presentation will be on free information resources and may be of particular interest to community-based organizations, public health workers, public library staff and others who do not have access to academic library resources.

Feb 24, 2017
12:00PM – 1:00PM ET
Instructor:
Kate Flewelling

Health Information for All

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

Healthcare consumers are dissatisfied with the state of health care information in their lives, according to a survey supported by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Oliver Wyman, and conducted by the Altarum Institute. The survey found that vulnerable US health citizens are health information-compromised. This group of people tends to be uninsured, Spanish-speaking, caregiving, and enrolled in Medicaid. The lack of health/care information access jeopardizes care access and quality, putting people at-risk for worse health outcomes, eventual higher costs, and greater burden of disease compared with people who enjoy health information access. Learn more about key findings and how to deliver patient-centered care: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/ml4b

 

NIAMS Community Outreach Website

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

Whether you are a health care provider or community organizer, this website will connect you with free resources about bones, joints, muscles, and skin as you plan your outreach efforts and community events. The information on this website has been organized to make it easier for you to find the resources you need to educate your patients and community members about bone, joint, muscle, and skin health. See upcoming health observances, use the e-toolkit, and get help from experts: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/6z1v

Health Equity Change Makers

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017

From the Office of Minority Health, Health Equity Change Makers is a program that was developed for people to share their personal stories that “illustrate the far-reaching impact of health disparities — and the ways that we all, as individuals, in our families and communities, and as a nation — are making change happen every day.”  These are “everyday people who have been personally affected by health disparities, and who have used their experience to raise awareness and inspire change.” To read these inspiring stories go to https://nnlm.gov/bhic/akp2

Also visit the Health Equity Change Makers toolkit to learn more about what you can do to help accelerate health equity in your community https://nnlm.gov/bhic/u2uv

Native STAND Educator Training Program

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Native Students Together Against Negative Decisions (STAND) is a culturally-relevant, inter-tribal curriculum for high school-aged (14-18 years old) teens that draws on cultural teachings and values from across Indian Country. The curriculum holistically addresses healthy decision-making and develops knowledge and skills for healthy relationships and self-esteem, preventing STDs and early pregnancy, and avoiding substance abuse.

The Oregon Health & Science University Center for Healthy Communities is partnering with the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board to recruit Tribes and AI/AN organizations from around the country to receive training on the delivery of Native STAND and to participate in the Native STAND Dissemination, Implementation, and Evaluation Project. Successful applicants will receive one week of training in Portland, Oregon with expenses paid for travel, lodging and meals. For more information, visit https://nnlm.gov/bhic/626d

Text adapted from Oregon Prevention and Research Center Native STAND website