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Archive for the ‘Mental Health’ Category

OMH Funding Opportunity: Communities Addressing Childhood Trauma (ACT) (MP-CPI-16-002)

Friday, February 5th, 2016

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services has announced the availability of funds for Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 for grant awards for the Communities Addressing Childhood Trauma (ACT) Program (Announcement Number: MP-CPI-16-002). ACT is intended to test the effectiveness of innovative approaches in promoting healthy behaviors among minority and/or disadvantaged youth at-risk for poor health/life outcomes due to childhood trauma. These innovative approaches (including curricula) should be designed for minority and/or disadvantaged youth ages 5 to 15 years who have been exposed to childhood trauma, as well as support services to their families. ACT seeks to address unhealthy behaviors in minority youth and provide them with opportunities to learn coping skills and gain experiences that contribute to more positive lifestyles and enhance their capacity to make healthier life choices.

A technical assistance webinar for interested applicants will be on March 9, 2016 at 3:00 – 4:00 pm ET. Information on accessing the webinar will be posted on the OMH Website:

Visit for more information and to submit an application:

Webinar: Supporting LGBTQ Youth: What Peer Educators Need to Know

Friday, February 5th, 2016

Please join the Office of Minority Health Resource Center and Administration for Children and Families grantee Northwest Network of Bisexual, Transgender, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse as they share innovative approaches to working with LGBTQ youth to build healthy relationships and communities. Attendees will learn about Love+, a domestic and sexual violence prevention project that works with young people to build violence prevention messages and explore what peer educators can do to support LGBTQ youth and envision a world where all people can have access to loving equitable relationships and communities.

Webinar: Supporting LGBTQ Youth: What Peer Educators Need to Know
Tuesday, February 9, 2016, 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EST

NREPP Priority Topics and Areas of Focus

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

Make Your Voice Heard on NREPP Priority Areas by January 29

From the Suicide Prevention Resource Center
You have an opportunity to help set priorities at Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). In addition to reviewing submitted programs, SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP) will be conducting independent literature reviews to identify important substance abuse and mental health programs and treatments. NREPP has identified a list of topics, many of which are relevant to suicide prevention, and is asking the public to rate the priority of each area. Suicide prevention is not specifically listed, but you can suggest it (and other topics) by adding them in an open text field.

SAMHSA welcomes comments from community organizations, clinicians, practitioners, advocates, researchers, city, county and state agencies, and all other stakeholders regarding which topics they would like to see addressed in the new NREPP.

The deadline for feedback is January 29, 2016. To access the form, visit:

NREPP was developed to help the public learn more about evidence-based interventions that are available for implementation. If you would like more information on NREPP, please visit:

Improving Cultural Competence

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) has release a new publication, Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 59: Improving Cultural Competence.  This free resource will benefit you and your organization by assisting professional care providers and administrators in understanding the role of culture in the delivery of substance abuse and mental health services by enabling opportunities to discuss racial, ethnic, and cultural considerations and the core elements of cultural competence. To access this publication go to

Resources for Coping with Disasters, Violence and Traumatic Events

Friday, December 4th, 2015

Most everyone has been through a stressful event in his or her life. When the event, or series of events, causes a lot of stress, it is called a traumatic event. Traumatic events are marked by a sense of horror, helplessness, serious injury, or the threat of serious injury or death. Traumatic events affect survivors, rescue workers, and the friends and relatives of victims who have been involved. They may also have an impact on people who have seen the event either firsthand or on television. [CDC]

Resources for Coping with Disasters, Violence and Traumatic Events
NLM: Coping with Disasters, Violence and Traumatic Events –
MedlinePlus: Coping with Disasters –
SAMHSA: Disaster Distress Helpline –

The National Institutes of Health Supports New Studies to Find Alzheimer’s Biomarkers in Down Syndrome Volunteers

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has started an initiative to identify biomarkers, track the progression of Alzheimer’s and the latter effects of dementia in persons with Down syndrome. Researchers will use brain imaging, as well as fluid and tissue biomarkers in research that could lead to effective solutions for those facing dementia.

For more information:

Autism and Exercise: Launch of New Video Series

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) and the Exercise Connection launched a new video series, Improving the Lives of Individuals with Autism through Exercise.   The goal of the series is to help parents, caregivers, educators and therapists introduce exercise to their children or students.  The series can be found on NCHPAD’s YouTube Channel.

OAH Adolescent Health: Think, Act, Grow (TAG)

Friday, October 2nd, 2015

Office of Adolescent Health’s Adolescent Health: Think. Act. Grow. (TAG) builds on previous national initiatives in adolescent health. OAH convened leaders of national organizations in the fields of health, social services, faith-based communities, and education; and parent and youth serving groups to develop and implement TAG. These groups identified the five essentials for adolescent health and possible roles and responsibilities that, together, have helped inform this national effort. TAG calls upon organizations and individuals working with adolescents to prioritize activities that improve adolescent health, including physical, social, emotional, and behavioral health.

OAH Adolescent Health: Think, Act, Grow (TAG):

SAMHSA Regional Behavioral Health Barometers

Friday, October 2nd, 2015

SAMHSA has announced the availability of a new series of Regional Behavioral Health Barometers. These barometers divide existing SAMHSA data into separate reports for each of the 10 HHS regions of the United States. Each report uses data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), collected annually. Topics addressed in the reports include youth substance use, youth mental health and treatment, adult mental health and treatment, substance use, and substance use and treatment.

SAMHSA Regional Behavioral Health Barometers:

Promoting Emotional Health and Preventing Suicide

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2015

SAMHSA’s free resource has been updated: “Promoting Emotional Health and Preventing Suicide, A Toolkit for Senior Centers” offers strategies senior centers can use to integrate suicide prevention into activities that support the well-being of older adults. Describes activities that increase protective factors and explains how to recognize the warning signs of suicide. Access the toolkit here: