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Archive for the ‘Health Information Literacy’ Category

Funding Opportunity: Personal Health Libraries for Consumers and Patients

Monday, February 13th, 2017

The National Library of Medicine seeks applications for novel informatics and data science approaches that can help individuals gather, manage and use data and information about their personal health. A goal of this program is to advance research and application by patients and the research community through broadly sharing the results via publication, and through open source mechanisms for data or resource sharing.

Areas of development suggested below are not meant to limit the scope or creativity of proposed projects.

  • Constructing a personal health library: informatics approaches that help a person gather together different types of health data/information/knowledge into a single, searchable resource for personal use, including intelligent mapping tools for vocabulary used to describe elements of the library.
  • Managing a personal health information library: novel informatics approaches that make it easy for an average user to expand or remove entries, make notes or corrections, including intelligent tools that alert the user to new information about topics covered in a personal health information library.
  • Using a personal health library: data science and informatics approaches that make it easy to find and use the information stored there, including visual tagging, text summarization, graphics translation, knowledge mapping, suggestions for tutorials, analytic and visualization techniques that make the information understandable based on characteristics of the individual user or group.
  • Digital librarian/assistant for personal health library: data science and informatics approaches that bring machine intelligence to the management and use of a personal health information library through personalized alerts and suggestions, literacy aids, translators or other approaches, taking into account characteristics of the individual user or group.

For more information, read the complete PAR-17-159 Funding Opportunity Announcement.

Easy-to-Read Drug Facts website

Monday, February 13th, 2017

The February 2017 NIH News in Health lists Easy-to-Read Drug Facts as its featured website. From the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “this easy-to-read website talks about drug use, addiction, and treatment. It has pictures and videos to help readers understand the text. The website also can read each page out loud. The pages are easy to print out to share with people who do not have computers.”

Description from Easy-to-Read Drug Facts: About This Website

Is it Really FDA-Approved?

Friday, January 27th, 2017

How can you know for sure what the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates? FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by regulating human drugs and biologics, animal drugs, medical devices, tobacco products, food and animal feed, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. The guide provides information on how the FDA regulates products and what the agency does and does not approve. To access more information, please see: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/gn76

Youth-created PSA music video on perils of unprotected sex

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

The North Omaha Area Health (NOAH) Clinic interns created a music video PSA, Moment of Passion, about the “perils of unprotected sex” and the importance of STD screenings. All production, music, and acting were done by the interns. The end of the video has some specifics about the clinic but the rest may appeal to young adults around the country.

What to Ask Your Doctor Before Taking Opioids

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

Every patient should ask questions when getting a new prescription. This is especially important when your doctor, dentist or other health care professional prescribes you an opioid, such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, codeine and morphine. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) provides information to assist health care consumers to dialog with their physicians before taking opioids. Information is also available in Spanish. Learn what to ask at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/09p3

Tools for Bringing the Dog Genome Project Into the Biology Classroom

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

Dr. Elaine Ostrander’s lab at the National Institutes of Health is trying to understand disease susceptibility, behavior, and variation that occurs throughout domestic dog breeds. A collection of helpful online resources for coming up to speed with the dog genome and its promising findings chosen to help both teacher and student. These include a recent videos of Dr. Ostrander presenting her findings, important published research, and powerful images for use in talks or handouts. Access the collection of online resources https://nnlm.gov/bhic/kg6u

Genetic Testing for Breast or Ovarian Cancer- Making Sense of Health News

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

In the last few months, some news media have reported the controversial advice that all women should be tested for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, not just those with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer. This review (from HealthNewsReview.org) of that news coverage contains information and viewpoints helpful to women who are considering BRCA testing, regardless of their family history.   Read the review https://nnlm.gov/bhic/imxx

Health Equity Matters (newsletter)

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

From the Centers for Disease Control:

Health Equity Matters is a quarterly newsletter “intended to promote awareness of minority health and health equity work at CDC and in the broader public health community, support the achievement of our goal to eliminate health disparities, improve women’s health, support diversity and inclusion in the public health workforce, and foster ongoing communication and collaboration with our partners and the public.”

Read the current issue: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/7zeg

Public input for NLM strategic planning

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

It’s been at least a decade since the National Library of Medicine issued a long-range plan. Significant advances in biomedical informatics, data science, precision medicine, open access to biomedical information, and changes in our country’s health systems, and previous public input have informed NLM’s current strategic planning process.

That’s why NLM is requesting public input for priorities and future directions on four themes:

  1. Role of NLM in advancing data science, open science, and biomedical informatics.
  2. Role of NLM in advancing biomedical discovery and translational science.
  3. Role of NLM in supporting the public’s health: clinical systems, public health systems and services, and personal health.
  4. Role of NLM in building collections to support discovery and health in the 21st century.

To find more information and instructions on how to submit a response, visit https://nnlm.gov/bhic/70qb

Text adapted from https://obssr.od.nih.gov/nlm-requests-information-as-it-finalizes-its-strategic-plan/ 

AHRQ Teach-Back Strategies Help Primary Care Providers Engage Patients and Families

Friday, October 28th, 2016

To learn more about how clinicians use “teach-back” to improve communication with patients, access AHRQ’s Guide to Improving Patient Safety in Primary Care Settings by Engaging Patients. The new resource features evidence-based interventions for implementing the teach-back technique in primary care practices.  With teach-back, clinicians ask patients or family members to explain in their own words what they need to know or do. It is more than repeating what patients or family members heard—clinicians ask them to teach it back. Effective communication is a clinician’s first step to helping a patient with a health problem. The evidence-based, low-technology teach-back technique can be the gateway to better communication and better understanding, and ultimately it can improve patient outcomes. For more information, please visit: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/anop