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Archive for the ‘Children and Teens’ Category

Tips for Healthy School (and Work) Lunches

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Do you pack a lunch for you and/or your kids? Many prepackaged meals are full of salt, added sugar and extra calories. Here are tips for building healthier lunches and keeping food safe until lunchtime.

School Lunches (Nemours): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/z4ai

Back to School Fuel (The Nutrition Source, Harvard School of Public Health): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/8xfc

Color Me Healthy

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Coloring books for both children and adults have become very popular lately. A blog post from NLM’s Circulating Now: From the Historical Collections of the World’s Largest Biomedical Library highlights this trend with references to The Latest Greatest Coloring Book about Lice from the National Pediculosis Association, CDC’s Express Your Health and The Non-Color AIDS Color Me Deadly Coloring Book, and Skeeter Beaters about preventing Zika mosquitoes. Coloring books are popular health education tools for children used by organizations to teach everything from proper eating habits to what to expect during hospital stays.

NLM also has an adult coloring book featuring images from the History of Medicine. To read more, see https://nnlm.gov/bhic/gpqb

Epilepsy Resources for Schools

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Over 400,000 children in the U.S. have epilepsy. School personnel can use the Centers for Disease Control to get Seizure training, download first aid instructions and find other information to support students with epilepsy. For additional information about epilepsy, including resources for children and teens, check out MedlinePlus.

Epilepsy in Schools (CDC): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/vjcq

Epilepsy (MedlinePlus): https://nnlm.gov/bhic/uyrj

Open Use Playgrounds and Schoolyards

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

Salud America provides a toolkit for communities to work towards open use of school fields, playgrounds and other recreational facilities outside of school hours. The toolkit outlines how to talk to school leaders to consider how to create an open use policy to increase and encourage physical activity which can improved health and lower the risk of disease. Download the toolkit here:  https://nnlm.gov/bhic/0il7.

 

1,000 Grandmothers Project

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

Every year, some 3,500 Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUIDs), or deaths among infants under 1 year of age that happen suddenly, occur in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The American Indian/Alaska Native population has the highest rate of SUIDs of any racial/ethnic group in the United States. The International Association for Indigenous Aging, a nonprofit working to improve the health and well-being of AI/AN populations, implemented the 1,000 Grandmothers Project to engage Native elders (specifically grandmothers) in reducing the rate of SUIDs by educating and mentoring young Native parents and future parents about safe sleep practices for infants during traditional activities. Learn more and access the project resources at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/o4yh

 

New Disaster Resources for K-12

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Specialized Information Services (SIS) K-12 team compiled a list of resources to teach K-12 students about disasters and disaster preparedness. You’ll find lesson plans, activity sheets, and age-appropriate information on drought, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, landslides, tornadoes, wildfires, and general disaster recovery and preparedness. For the list of resources, visit the NLM SIS K-12 Science and Health Education page and expand “Disasters.”

K-12 Plastics Videos

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

From the National Library of Medicine (NLM) K-12 Education Connection

Plastics Videos are Here!

Last summer our crew of witty high school science teachers and students took on the subject, PLASTICS! Through some, not so conventional storylines, the staff set out to explain the dangers behind the use of certain plastics and how, through recycling, we can help alleviate the amount of toxins in our environment. Each storyline is a spoof on a popular game app or video game and teaches students about various aspects of plastics including: the chemistry of plastics, how plastics differ in toxicity, the different types of plastics, and recycling.  Use these animations to jump start a conversation about educating the community on safe use and disposal of these everyday materials.

View the videos on the Environmental Health Student Portal under Chemicals: Plastics. To sign-up for the NLM K-12 Education Connection e-newsletter, visit https://sis.nlm.nih.gov/outreach/k12.html and expand “Get the latest news!” You can also follow the NLM K-12 Team on Twitter @NLM_K12.

 

New Resources for Families on Choose MyPlate

Friday, August 26th, 2016

It’s back-to-school season and ChooseMyPlate.gov just launched new resources to help families eat better together. It’s also a great time for families to establish a new routine and work together toward a healthier lifestyle. Check them out here: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/nmu3.

Healthy Native Youth

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Healthy Native Youth — a website produced in collaboration by the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc., and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston — uses culturally relevant health information to develop educational programs for Native Alaskan and American Indian youth. Intended for use by health educators, teacher and parents, the project provides training and tools for age appropriate programs on sexual health. More heath topics will be added in the coming year: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/ckfq

GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

The Featured Website from the August 2016 NIH News in Health

GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery

Want to know more about genes and how they work? Or learn about DNA forensics, biotechnology, and related careers? This educational website has up-to-date information, animations, games, interactive tutorials, and teacher resources designed for students and educators in grades 9 to 12.