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Free Health e-Newsletter from Johns Hopkins

This monthly e-newsletter will provide health information and insight from Johns Hopkins experts. Each issue features information on common health topics and interests, health tips, patient stories, updates in medical research and clinical trials, upcoming events, a healthy recipe, and more. Sign up at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/55gf

Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the release of the Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda, a first-of-its-kind collaborative tribal-federal blueprint that highlights the extent to which behavioral health challenges affect Native communities, in addition to strategies and priorities to reduce these problems and improve the behavioral health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Native communities experience disproportionately high rates of behavioral health problems such as mental and substance use disorders. In addition, these communities’ behavioral health needs have traditionally been underserved. Mental and substance use disorders – which may result from adverse childhood experiences, historical and intergenerational trauma, and other factors – are also reflected in high rates of interpersonal violence, major depression, excessive alcohol use, suicide, and suicide risk. Overall, these problems pose a corrosive threat to the health and well-being of many American Indians and Alaska Natives. The document is available for free at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/1b80

Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Populations

The Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is offering a one-day public workshop that will feature presentations and discussion on facilitating health communication related to immigrant, refugee, and migrant populations through the use of health literate approaches. Issues related to cultural competence, language access, and understanding the U.S. health care system may be included in the agenda. March 15, 8:00am – 5pm PT. The workshop will be webcast live and will be available for viewing starting at 8:30 AM Pacific Time. Free but register to attend the in person event or watch the live webcast at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/qyij

Community Commons webinars – New Data and Using Data for Advocacy

New Data Spotlight: 500 Cities and ACS 2011-2015
Thu, Feb 16, 2017 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CST
Register at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/z18z

This webinar will highlight the newest data available on Community Commons – including the recently released 500 Cities Data and the American Community Survey five year estimates from 2011-2015.

About 500 Cities Project from Community Commons: The 500 Cities Project is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the CDC Foundation. The 500 Cities project aims to provide city- and census tract-level small area estimates for chronic disease risk factors, health outcomes, and clinical preventive service use for the largest 500 cities in the United States. Small area estimates allow cities and local health departments to better understand the burden and geographic distribution of health-related variables and to plan for public health interventions.

 

Beyond Needs Assessments: Using Community Commons Data for Advocacy and Program Development
Tue, Mar 14, 2017 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CDT
Register at https://nnlm.gov/bhic/sut3

This webinar will explore how to use Community Commons data for advocacy and program development.

Funding Opportunity: Personal Health Libraries for Consumers and Patients

The National Library of Medicine seeks applications for novel informatics and data science approaches that can help individuals gather, manage and use data and information about their personal health. A goal of this program is to advance research and application by patients and the research community through broadly sharing the results via publication, and through open source mechanisms for data or resource sharing.

Areas of development suggested below are not meant to limit the scope or creativity of proposed projects.

  • Constructing a personal health library: informatics approaches that help a person gather together different types of health data/information/knowledge into a single, searchable resource for personal use, including intelligent mapping tools for vocabulary used to describe elements of the library.
  • Managing a personal health information library: novel informatics approaches that make it easy for an average user to expand or remove entries, make notes or corrections, including intelligent tools that alert the user to new information about topics covered in a personal health information library.
  • Using a personal health library: data science and informatics approaches that make it easy to find and use the information stored there, including visual tagging, text summarization, graphics translation, knowledge mapping, suggestions for tutorials, analytic and visualization techniques that make the information understandable based on characteristics of the individual user or group.
  • Digital librarian/assistant for personal health library: data science and informatics approaches that bring machine intelligence to the management and use of a personal health information library through personalized alerts and suggestions, literacy aids, translators or other approaches, taking into account characteristics of the individual user or group.

For more information, read the complete PAR-17-159 Funding Opportunity Announcement.

Easy-to-Read Drug Facts website

The February 2017 NIH News in Health lists Easy-to-Read Drug Facts as its featured website. From the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “this easy-to-read website talks about drug use, addiction, and treatment. It has pictures and videos to help readers understand the text. The website also can read each page out loud. The pages are easy to print out to share with people who do not have computers.”

Description from Easy-to-Read Drug Facts: About This Website

Pregnancy Social Media Toolkit

The Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Women’s Health provides a new toolkit for agencies and organization to use to get out the word in social media about health concerns during pregnancy. Sample tweets, suggested Facebook posts, and suggested blog entries are included for healthcare consumers and for healthcare professionals. Download the Pregnancy Social Media Toolkit (PDF) here: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/zpm0.

Suicide Prevention in Indian Country

A fact sheet describing suicide prevention in Indian Country, and how the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention can align with tribal communities, is made available from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. For tribal audiences and the agencies that work with them, the fact sheet reviews suicide prevention strategies for communities: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/3qoz

Rural Health Workforce

Maintaining the healthcare workforce is fundamental to providing healthcare quality and access in rural areas. Recently updated by the Rural Health Information Hub, this “Rural Healthcare workforce” topic guide covers a wide range of issues related to the healthcare workforce in rural areas, including supply and demand, workforce distribution, characteristics of the rural healthcare workforce, strategies to meet workforce needs, and more: https://nnlm.gov/bhic/pdfc

Diversity Toolkit from US Administration on Aging

The AoA provides a Diversity Toolkit for the Aging Services Network and its partners to act as a starting point for conversations regarding how to better serve diverse populations of older adults. However, the toolkit also has appeal for other community organizations and institutions.  It assists “with every stage of program planning, implementation, and delivery of diverse population services.” The toolkit walks service providers through four steps – Assessments, Identifying Resources About the Community, Designing Services, and Program Evaluation – and the Diverse Community Questionnaire can be tailored for your specific communities to aid in each of the four steps. For more information about the toolkit, visit AoA Diversity webpage.