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Updated: 2 hours 57 min ago

Health Information Outreach Award Recipients Announced

Thu, 2018-05-31 08:49

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region is pleased to announce the recipients of the Health Information Outreach Award. The purpose of this award is to provide support for projects that improve health information literacy and increase the ability of patients, family members, students and members of the general public to find and use health information; or improve health professionals’ access to, awareness of, and skills for locating high quality biomedical and health information.

Recipients of the award are:

Augusta University, Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Augusta, GA

  • Project Title: For the Public Good: Connecting Research and Community
  • Project Manager: Peter Shipman, Dental Medicine and Cancer Librarian
  • Budget: $10,381.80
  • Project Description: This project is designed to provide a series of presentations regarding public participation in clinical research studies, partner with public libraries and federally qualified health centers as community resources, increase awareness of the All of Us research program, and increase public interest and participation in clinical research studies.

Augusta University, Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Augusta, GA

  • Project Title: Augusta-Richmond Community Health Outreach Project
  • Project Managers: Ansley Stuart Allied Health Librarian, Steph Hendren Nursing Information Librarian, and Tracey Busbee Cataloging and Metadata Librarian
  • Budget: $1,638.00
  • Project Description: This project is designed to provide reliable and free access health information to residents within the Richmond County. Using the public libraries as a host venue, various speakers and officials will teach participants about health issues relevant to the Augusta area such as opioid use, Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular disease, domestic abuse, and diabetes.

Virginia Commonwealth University, Center on Health Disparities, School of Medicine, Richmond, VA

  • Project Title: Collaborative for Health Literacy: East End Consumer Health Outreach and Computer Access
  • Project Manager: Marcie Wright, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor
  • Budget: $14,917.80
  • Project Description: This project promotes National Library of Medicine resources for online consumer health in interdisciplinary collaboration with public libraries, state and local health agencies. The project will provide community trainings at neighborhood centers in a historically African American, low-income, food and resource desert community of Richmond, Virginia. Participants will receive small group health literacy education via a mobile computer lab to enhance technology access, health application knowledge, and connection to health services and providers.

East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

  • Project Title: Development and Dissemination of a Health Information Literacy Training for Rural Youth
  • Project Manager: Melissa Cox, Assistant Professor
  • Budget: 14,838.71
  • Project Description: This project seeks to develop a health information literacy training tailored to rural youth. Media specialists (library and information science professionals) in middle and high schools across rural counties of Eastern NC will be instructed on how to deliver the training, thus providing increased access to high-quality health information to youth and their families. Training will include multiple NLM resources and creative activities to engage youth in locating and evaluating health information while focusing content examples on substance use disorders, which is a heightened concern in rural counties of NC.

South Central Educational Development, Inc., Bluefield, WV

  • Project Title: Project TORDS-Technology Outreach to Reduce Heath Disparities and Stigma
  • Project Manager: Darryl Cannady, Executive Director
  • Budget: $15,000
  • Project Description: The purpose of Project “TORDS” is to increase health technology literacy access in rural and underserved communities in southern West Virginia. “TORDS” will focus on disenfranchised and marginalized communities with limited access to internet and smart phone connections. The program will also train participants in identifying trustworthy, up-to-date, and accurate health information.

MaFlo’s Health & Awareness Team, Georgetown, SC

  • Project Title: Internet/Computer Training Pairing Teenagers with Senior Citizens
  • Project Manager: Marilynn Lance-Robb, Administrator/Founder
  • Budget: $15,000
  • Project Description: Educate and train participants on the use of different technologies to access reliable health information online using MedlinePlus.gov and other NLM websites to help reduce health disparities in the community.

Please take a moment to congratulate this year’s Health Information Outreach awardees!

Categories: RML Blogs

Medical Library Project Award Recipients Announced

Wed, 2018-05-30 14:48

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region is pleased to announce the recipients of the Medical Library Project Award. The purpose of this award is to strengthen and promote the library’s involvement in institution-wide health information initiatives and stimulate collaboration within the organization to address local health information problems.

Recipients of the award are:

Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL

  • Project Title: NSU-MD Annual Hackathon “NEHAT” at HPD Library
  • Project Manager: Julia Sarpy, Reference and Liaison Support Librarian
  • Budget: $14,983.40
  • Project Description: This project is designed to host a healthcare hackathon, a multi-day event, in which a large number of students will meet to engage in a collaborative environment to address community health issues, stimulate university-wide inter-professional partnership and promote a culture of exploration and innovation. The healthcare hackathon will bring together NSU students for a 48-hour innovation marathon in an effort to address local health care concerns, specifically pertaining to patient education and bridging the gap between knowledge and practice.

University of Alabama at Birmingham Libraries, Birmingham, AL

  • Project Title: Supporting Student and Faculty Exploration of Bio-printing in UAB Libraries
  • Project Manager: Dorothy Ogdon, Assistant Professor, Reference Librarian & Liaison to the School of Dentistry
  • Budget: $13,832.06
  • Project Description: The project is designed to provide students and faculty access to new technologies by making an Allevi 1 bioprinter and the associated software and knowledge base available to members of the UAB community. Having access to these tools in the library will enable interested students, faculty, and staff to explore potential applications for these technologies in current instructional settings, as well as providing a forum for faculty who have read about these new tools in the health sciences literature to visit the library to build a basic set of skills and understanding of potential applications as a route to developing new research interests.

Augusta University, Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Augusta, GA

  • Project Title: Collaborating to Host a Research Data Management Symposium
  • Project Manager: Kathy Davies, Associate Director for Research
  • Budget: $14,816.10
  • Project Description: Greenblatt Library will conduct a needs assessment of the University researchers and stakeholders to assess the current climate and knowledge of data management on campus. Using the assessment results, the library will partner with the University’s Vice-President for Research, Biostatistics, IT, Cancer Center, and Center for Nursing Research to host a day-long research data management symposium. National and local speakers will be invited and the format will include breakout sessions, a panel discussion, and displaying National Library of Medicine data science resources.

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

  • Project Title: Transforming Libraries Using Implicit Bias Training
  • Project Manager: Shannon D. Jones, Director of Libraries
  • Budget: $5,360
  • Project Description: This project will help support a presentation focused on implicit bias. Attendees with be given an overview of implicit bias, the impact it has in libraries and in health care, and more importantly how it stands in the way of diversity and inclusion initiatives on our campuses. An implicit bias occurs when we have attitudes towards people or associate stereotypes with them without our conscious knowledge.

Please take a moment to congratulate this year’s Medical Library Project Awardees!

Categories: RML Blogs

Congratulations to the 2018 MLA Awards, Grants, and Scholarships Recipients!

Tue, 2018-05-29 09:39

Congratulations to the recipients of the 2018 Medical Library Association (MLA) awards, grants and scholarships! Many of this year’s recipients are within the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA):

The President’s Award
Task Force to Review MLA’s Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success: Gale G. Hannigan, AHIP; Paula Raimondo, AHIP; Christopher Childs; Martha Earl, AHIP; Kate Kelly, AHIP; Elizabeth Laera, AHIP; Susan Lessick, AHIP, FMLA; Terri Ottosen, AHIP; Jodi L. Philbrick, AHIP; and Caitlin Ann Pike, AHIP

New MLA Fellows
Patricia E. Gallagher, AHIP, FMLA | Gerald J. Perry, AHIP, FMLA | Elaine R. Martin, FMLA

Marcia C.Noyes Award
Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, FMLA

John P. McGovern Award Lecture
William Powers

Janet Doe Lecture
Elaine R. Martin, FMLA

Annual Meeting Grants
Ysabel Bertolucci MLA Annual Meeting Grant
Alexandria C. Quesenberry

EBSCO/MLA Annual Meeting Grants
Sarah Clarke, AHIP | Kelsey Leonard Grabeel, AHIP | Alice Jean Jaggers | Jessica A. Koos, AHIP

Professional Development Grants
Naomi C. Broering Hispanic Heritage Grant
Dede Rios, AHIP

Continuing Education Grant
Natalie Clairoux

Hospital Libraries Section/MLA Professional Development Grant
Carrie D. Adams | Celene Soudant

Medical Informatics Section/MLA Career Development Grant
Carl Leak

Scholarships
MLA Scholarship
Justin Fuhr

MLA Scholarship for Minority Students
Donna Baluchi

Rising Stars 2017/2018
Laura Menard | Hanna Lee Schmillen | Rachel Keiko Stark, AHIP | Nicole Theis-Mahon

Written Works
Ida and George Eliot Prize
Whitney A. Townsend | Patricia F. Anderson | Emily C. Ginier | Mark P. MacEachern | Kate M. Saylor | Barbara Lowther Shipman | Judith E. Smith

Erich Meyerhoff Prize
Vicki F. Croft, AHIP, FMLA | Suzanne K. Whitaker, AHIP

Rittenhouse Award
Kelsa Bartley

International Awards
Cunningham Memorial International Fellowship
2018: Biliamin Oladele Popoola | 2017: Tam Ha

Librarians without Borders/Elsevier Foundation/Research4Life Grants
Emily J. Glenn | Xan Goodman, AHIP | Jill Barr-Walker | Phuntsho Norbu| Mboni Amiri Ruzegea

Librarians without Borders Ursula Poland International Scholarship
Kristine M. Alpi, AHIP

Achievement Awards
Virginia L. and William K. Beatty Volunteer Service Award
Molly Knapp, AHIP

Estelle Brodman Award for the Academic Medical Librarian of the Year
Holly K. Grossetta Nardini

Clarivate Analytics/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award
Michael R. Kronenfeld, AHIP, FMLA

Lois Ann Colaianni Award for Excellence and Achievement in Hospital Librarianship
Edward J. Poletti, AHIP

Consumer Health Librarian of the Year Award
Erica Lake, AHIP

Carla J. Funk Governmental Relations Award
Julie A. Schneider

Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award
Mary E. Edwards

Research
Clarivate Analytics/MLA Doctoral Fellowship
Megan Threats

Research Advancement in Health Sciences Librarianship Awards
University of Illinois – Chicago | University of Saskatchewan-Saskatoon, Canada

David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship
Erica Lake, AHIP

Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship
Sue Yeon Syn

MLA Research, Development, and Demonstration Project Grants
Emily Brennan | Nadine Dexter, AHIP | Shalu Gillum, AHIP | Deedra Walton, AHIP | Natasha Williams, AHIP | Pamela R. Herring, AHIP | Terri Gotschall

MLA Section Project of the Year Award
Dental Section

J.A. Majors/MLA Chapter Project of the Year
Mid-Atlantic Chapter of MLA

All recipients were honored during the MLA Annual Conference in Atlanta, GA. Please take a moment to congratulate them!

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – May 24, 2018

Thu, 2018-05-24 11:15

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

Top Items of Interest

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

Webinars: May 28 – June 1

Webinars: June 4-8

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars and classes.

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Focus on Substance Misuse

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guideto understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that recordings from NNLM available on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Memorial Day Closings – May 28, 2018

Mon, 2018-05-21 13:19

The National Library of Medicine, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region and the National DOCLINE Coordination Office (NDCO) will be closed on May 28, 2018 in observance of the Memorial Day holiday.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – May 18, 2018

Fri, 2018-05-18 07:54

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

Top Items of Interest

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

Webinars: May 28 – June 1

Webinars: June 4-8

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars and classes.

Past Webinars Available on YouTube** 

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Focus on Research Data Management

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guideto understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that recordings from NNLM available on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

5 Free (online) PubMed CE Webinars from the NNLM Training Office

Tue, 2018-05-15 10:05

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO) is offering a series of 5, free, online CE webinars called PubMed for Librarians (PML). Take one or more (or all) of the classes. Follow the links to register.

Details are below. All times are Eastern (please adjust for your local time zone).

PubMed for Librarians: Introduction (1.5 CE)

June 6, 2018 1 PM – 2:30 ET

  • Learn the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE
  • Brief introduction to MeSH, Automatic Term Mapping and Subheadings
  • Citation sensors

PubMed for Librarians: MeSH (1.5 CE)

June 13, 2018 1 PM – 2:30 ET

  • Learn about the National Library of Medicine’s Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database
  • 4 different types of MeSH terms
  • We’ll investigate the structure of the MeSH database (spoiler alert…it’s a hierarchy) and look at the components of a MeSH record

PubMed for Librarians: Automatic Term Mapping (1.5 CE)

June 20, 2018 1 PM – 2:30 ET

  • Learn how PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) to map your keyword searches to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database.
  • Learn how ATM helps you search effectively with keywords.
  • We will also look at the MeSH explosion feature
  • We will explore how to search for phrases in PubMed (spoiler alert…there’s a phrase index)

PubMed for Librarians: Building and Refining a Search (1.5 CE)

June 27, 2018 1 PM – 2:30 ET

 

  • This class will focus on using some of the tools and features built into PubMed that are designed to help you search more effectively.
  • We will look at Coordination techniques used by the Indexers
  • We’ll explore the Index feature to build a search
  • We will explore the Filters Sidebar and Topic-Specific Queries as tools for building a focused search.

PubMed for Librarians: Using PubMed’s Evidence-Based Search Features (1.5 CE)

July 11, 2018 1 PM – 2:30 ET

  • Looking for a specific type of study? This class will explore the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used for indexing clinical studies
  • We’ll explore 3 PubMed features that facilitate searching for literature that supports evidence-based medicine
  • Explore the Clinical Queries tool that includes a Systematic Review search hedge (PubMed calls it a filter)
Categories: RML Blogs

SEAside Webinar: Gauging the Quality of Open Access References in PubMed: The MEDLINE, PubMed Central, and PubMed Connection – June 21, 2 PM ET

Tue, 2018-05-15 09:58

Date/Time: Thursday, June 21, 2018, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM ET

Presenters: Carolann Lee Curry, Library Assistant Professor, Reference & Outreach Librarian and Anna Krampl, Library Assistant Professor, Head of Public Services & Reference Librarian, Skelton Medical Library, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA

Contact: For additional information or questions, please contact Ashley Cuffia.

Presentation Summary: The rise of open accessing publishing has brought with it many advantages, including faster publication and enhanced visibility and impact of one’s research. However, along with its benefits, the publishing model has also seen significant abuses. The issues of what constitutes reliable and scholarly from potentially predatory and fraudulent grows more complicated every day. With the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy, a significant number of open access contributions have been deposited in PubMed Central, making this a relevant concern for those working in the health sciences and biomedical fields. This session will explore the relationship between MEDLINE, PubMed Central, and PubMed and the implications of questionable citations from potentially predatory journals in PubMed search results.

Presenter Bios: Anna Krampl serves as the Head of Public Services at the Mercer University Skelton Medical Library in Macon, Georgia. She is a member of the Georgia Health Sciences Library Association (GHSLA) and currently serves as secretary. She is also a member of the  Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association (SC/MLA) and the Medical Library Association (MLA). Her research interests include evidence-based medicine, telehealth/telemedicine, literature searching, and scholarly communications.

Carolann Lee Curry works at the Mercer University Skelton Medical Library in Macon, Georgia as the Reference & Outreach Librarian. She is an active member of the Georgia Health Sciences Library Association (GHSLA), currently serving as the Continuing Education Chair, is an active member of the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association (SC/MLA), currently serving on the Public Relations and Membership committees, serves on the MLA Books Panel, and also serves on the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Southeastern Atlantic (SEA) region’s Medical Library Program Advisory Committee. Her research interests include evidence-based medicine, searching the medical literature, scholarly communication, health information literacy, and consumer health outreach. Outside of professional activities, Carolann is an avid horror movie and book fan and enjoys spending time with her husband in their ever-growing multi-cat household in Lizella, Georgia.

Upon completion of the SEAside Webinar, each participant will receive 1.0 contact hour of continuing education credit award by the Medical Library Association. Participants will receive a code to which they will enter in medlib-ed.

Pre-Register: Pre-registration is strongly recommended, but not required. Visit our registration page to sign up!

To Join the Webinar:

To Join the Training Session 
——————————————————-
1. Go to https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=t6a4dc75c653c80ff53635addc6d5ec7e
2. Enter your name and email address.
3. Enter the session password: nnlm.
4. Click “Join Now”.
5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.
To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link
https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=tdefde6cc7af6ec5883007cd7ec3caecf
——————————————————-
To Join the Session by Phone Only
——————————————————-
To receive a call back, provide your phone number when you join the training session, or call the number below and enter the access code.
Call-in toll number (US/Canada):1-650-479-3208
Global call-in numbers: https://nih.webex.com/nih/globalcallin.php?serviceType=TC&ED=672828197&tollFree=0
Access code: 622 464 742

To add this session to your calendar program (for example Microsoft Outlook), click this link:
https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=tc1b6b73ba32d6ee616fffd109c396b1f

Categories: RML Blogs

SCR CONNECTions Webinar – A New Kind of Village: Combating Loneliness among Older Adults – June 13, 2018 11 AM ET

Mon, 2018-05-14 09:18

Title: A New Kind of Village: Combating Loneliness among Older Adults

Guest Speaker: Sheila Zinck, Advocacy Programs Manager, IBM

Date: Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Time: 10am CT / 9am MT

Description: Loneliness among the aging population has been shown to have health risks equivalent to those of smoking and diabetes, with an overall 26% increase in mortality. In the report, “Loneliness and the Aging Population: How Businesses and Governments can Address a Looming Crisis,” IBM’s Institute for Business Value examines how organizations can better understand this issue and take action to mitigate it. Join us as we explore how government agencies, solution providers, healthcare, education and multiple other industries can act together to develop solutions designed to help people rebuild social connections and engagement with their communities.

Speaker Bio: Sheila leads research and analysis for accessibility initiatives and collaborates with clients, partners and universities to build new innovations supporting people of all ages and abilities. Her past studies include the 2016 “Outthink Aging” report, which examines how cognitive technologies can improve the lives of older adults. Sheila can be reached at zincks@us.ibm.com.

For more information: https://nnlm.gov/scr/professional-development/connections. No registration is required for this class.

To Join the Meeting

  1. Go to WebEx.
  2. Enter the session number: 627 485 740 and password: webinar
  3. Please provide your name and email address.
  4. You may have to download and install a web add-on or run a temporary application depending on the browser you use.
  5. Select your audio connection preference:
    *Call using computer – Adjust settings and test the connection
    *Call from WebEx – Enter your direct phone number and press 1 when prompted
    *Call in – Call: 1-650-479-3208 (US/Canada toll number)
    Enter access code: 627 485 740 #
    Enter the Attendee ID on your screen and press #
  6. If you are using a mobile device, your access code is: webinar

For live captioning, please use http://livewrite-ncc.appspot.com/attend?event=cit001

For any technical issues, please call: 817-735-2223.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – May 11, 2018

Fri, 2018-05-11 07:28

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

Top Item of Interest

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

Webinars: May 14-18

Webinars: May 28 – June 1

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars and classes available for you to attend.

Past Webinars Available on YouTube** 

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Focus on Precision Medicine/NIH All of Us Initiative

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM accountprior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunitiesto register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guideto understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that recordings from NNLM available on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Big Data in Healthcare – Opportunities for Librarians

Wed, 2018-05-09 14:12

by Douglas J. Joubert, Informationist, NIH Library, Washington, DC

Over the last seven weeks, in the Big Data in Healthcare – Opportunities for Librarians, we learned about big data and data science within the context of five distinct disciplines. This essay will provide an overview of big data and data science within each of the five disciplines, with a focus on how librarians can support researchers working in these fields.

Although not focused exclusively on Big Data, a recent report has strongly advocated for an increased role for librarians in the field of data science (Burton, Lyon, Erdmann, & Tijerina, 2018). This report outlines a multi-faceted framework for understanding the internal (within the discipline) and external (within the broader science disciplines) drivers that are changing the way in which we think about data.

Data science is one those terms that can take on different meanings, based on a particular practice area. One of the more popular representations of data science is that of Drew Conway. Conway represents data science as the intersection between three primary domains [Figure 1]. It is not vital that librarians be experts in each of the three domains that comprise this Venn diagram, nor is it even possible. What is important, and serves as the primary thesis of this essay is that librarians be grounded in how researchers in each of these areas produce, organize, and analyze data.

The Data Science Venn Diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: The Data Science Venn diagram[1].

This course introduced us to a number of different perspectives on the topic of big data. The first view was provided by a data informationist (Lisa Federer) who works for a large biomedical research center. She defined big data as having a number of distinct qualities. This first of these qualities is the amount of data being produced, commonly referred to as its volume (Federer, 2017). The second quality is the variety of the data, specifically, pulling data from many different sources, in many different formats (Federer, 2017). The third feature of big data is the rate in which the data is being produced, or its velocity (Federer, 2017). Last, is data veracity. This refers to how much trust we place in the source of the data and the data quality (Federer, 2017). Additional definitions were provided by two social scientists, a practicing clinician, and a nursing researcher.

The nursing perspective provided some additional insights that are worth exploring. First is the unique role that nurses play in the delivery of health care, and how this role influences big data research (Brennan, 2015). Second, Dr. Brennan emphasized that terms like the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K), big data, and precision medicine mean different things to different people (Brennan, 2015). The role for nursing to play is making these terms meaningful to patients and their families. Last, she emphasized that these tools need to be understood from the nursing experience, which takes a more humanistic approach when compared to the traditional medical model of health care delivery. Nurses are focused on getting the goals of precision medicine into the “hands of the people” (Brennan, 2015). All of these different perspectives are needed to fully understand the role of big data and how big data is changing the way that we conduct research, deliver health care, and make informed decisions.

Using three elements from Martin’s User-Centered Data Management Framework for Librarians, I will advocate for the increased role of librarians in both data science and big data initiatives. These elements are: (1) Service, (2) Best Practices for Data Management, and (3) Literacy (Martin, 2016).

Libraries have a long and rich history of providing services to different user groups. Adding data services as a component to more traditional library services allows libraries to respond to an increased demand for specialized levels of support for data science. Potential roles for librarians could fall into the following categories (1) data extraction, (2) data wrangling, (3) data analysis, or (4) data visualization (Hamalainen, 2016). Some of these skills, like data extraction or data analysis, can be performed without much additional training. Data wrangling and data visualization are not out of reach for most librarians, if they get supplemental training. These four areas also require the least amount of overhead when compared with, for example, hosting a data repository.

Also, many data service questions are very similar to the types of reference questions that librarians have traditionally answered. For example:

  • Knowing where to find authoritative and curated datasets
  • Knowing the best methods for searching datasets
  • Knowing how to choose the best software solutions
  • Knowing about current metadata schemas for data

Each week in this class presented us with a different challenge for managing data, and innovative solutions for dealing with these challenges. We also learned that these challenges are being addressed by local and national initiatives. At the federal level, a 2013 report was released by the Office of Science and Technology that outlined a number of important policy principles (Holdren, 2013). Many of these principles align to the work of libraries, and present us with numerous opportunities. The first is helping researchers comply with changing grant requirements. Second is working with researchers in efforts to maximize transparency and accountability in terms of collecting and storing data. Last is connecting researchers with tools like the Open Science Framework to support data sharing and increasing reproducibility.

As someone who has spent a great deal of his professional life teaching library users, this topic resonates the most with me. Also, I feel that librarians make some of the best teachers. Teaching about data literacy, data analysis, and data management offers incredible potential for librarians. It has been my experience that starting small is the best entry point into teaching these topics, for example, working with a colleague to develop a data literacy class, or volunteering to serve as a teaching assistant or back-up for a more seasoned teacher. Teaching a class in R or Python are admirable goals. However, it might not be the best place to start, nor is it necessarily the right solution for your library. Finally, look for both formal and informal professional development opportunities. This MOOC (Big Data in Healthcare[2]) and Best Practices for Biomedical Research Data Management[3] are just two recent examples of librarian-led data management classes. However, Meet Up groups[4] and connections developed through Social Media are also wonderful way to learn and network.

References

Brennan, P. (2015). Big Data in Nursing. Bethesda: NINR Big Data Bootcamp.
Burton, M., Lyon, L., Erdmann, C., & Tijerina, B. (2018). Shifting to Data Savvy: The Future of Data Science in Libraries.
Federer, L. (2017). Data Science 101. NNLM Beyond the SEA Webinar Series.
Hamalainen, H. W. (2016). Geoscience Librarianship 101: Making Sense out of “GeoReference.” Baltimore.
Holdren, J. P. (2013). Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research. Retrieved from https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/ostp_public_access_me mo_2013.pdf
Martin, E. (2016). The Role of Librarians in Data Science: A Call to Action. Journal of eScience
Librarianship, e1092. http://doi.org/10.7191/jeslib.2015.1092

 

[1] http://drewconway.com/zia/2013/3/26/the-data-science-venn-diagram
[2] https://nnlm.gov/moodle/enrol/index.php?id=703
[3] https://learn.canvas.net/courses/1854
[4] http://www.datacommunitydc.org/calendar/  or https://www.meetup.com/find/s

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Resource Picks: Healthy Aging – Promoting Healthy Living in Older Adults through Quality Health Information – May 30, 3 PM ET

Wed, 2018-05-09 09:48

Date/Time: May 30, 2018 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET

Presenters: Stephanie Dailey and Olivia Kent from National Institute on Aging and Andrew Plumer, from the Reference and Web Services Section, NLM

Contact: For additional information or questions, please contact Kay Deeney.

Abstract: This webinar focuses on seniors and their use and access to Quality Health Information. Resources from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and NLM’s MedlinePlus will be highlighted. NIA offers a variety of health information for seniors including exercise and physical activity campaigns such as Go4Life and Fit4Function, and resources such as the Talking with Your Doctor Toolkit. MedlinePlus has various resources of seniors.

By the way, May is Older Americans Month, so this webinar is fitting!

To register please visit: https://nnlm.gov/class/nnlm-resource-picks-healthy-aging-promoting-healthy-living-older-adults-through-quality-health

Categories: RML Blogs

Seaside Webinar: NLM Strategic Plan – A NNLM SEA Network Member Forum – June 6, 2018

Tue, 2018-05-08 14:59

Date/Time: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 2 PM ET

Hosts: Aimee Gogan, Health Professionals and Evaluation Coordinator and Tony Nguyen, Technology and Communications Coordinator

Abstract: Earlier this year, the National Library of Medicine released A Platform for Biomedical Discovery and Data-Powered Health National Library of Medicine Strategic Plan 2017–2027.

The NNLM SEA Region is interested in ideas and suggestions on how we can support the region with the new strategic plan. Do you have ideas of how your institution intends to support the strategic plan? Please join us in this open forum of idea sharing.

The forum will be structured around the three pillars outlined in the strategic plan.

  1. Innovate, create, and maintain a sustainable digital ecosystem to keep pace with the data demands of the research enterprise.
  2. Engage a wide range of audiences to ensure the right information gets delivered to them at the right time.
  3. Inspire and empower the data-driven workforce of the future.

This is a great opportunity to share your thoughts with other network members and NNLM.

To register: https://nnlm.gov/class/seaside-webinar-nlm-strategic-plan-nnlm-sea-network-member-forum/8415.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Welcome New All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator

Mon, 2018-05-07 13:19

We are happy to announce that, on April 16th, April Wright joined the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic Region as the new All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator. She is responsible for working with public libraries to build programs and awareness around the All of Us National Research Program and health information literacy.

April has worked both in and on behalf of public libraries including work with Lubuto Library Partners, a Washington, DC-based nonprofit which takes a holistic, culturally relevant approach to library services for vulnerable children in Zambia.  Locally, she is active in various community literacy initiatives. She enjoys art, writing, music, birding and cooking.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Research Data Management Webinar Series: Research Data Management Services: Beyond Analysis and Coding – June 14, 2:00 PM ET

Fri, 2018-05-04 10:10

Date/Time: Thursday, June 14, 2018, 2:00 PM ET/11:00 AM PT

Presenter: Margaret Henderson, Health Sciences Librarian, San Diego State University Library, San Diego, CA

Contact: For additional information or questions, please contact Tony Nguyen.

Abstract: There is more to RDM services than the technical skills necessary for data management. Soft skills and non-technical skills are very important when setting up RDM services, and continue to be important to the sustainability of services. Reference skills, relationship building, negotiation, listening, facilitating access to de-centralized resources, policy knowledge and assessment, are all important to the success of a service. Margaret Henderson will discuss these skills and show you how to start RDM services, even if you don’t feel confident about your statistical skills or knowledge of R.

Presenter Bio: Margaret Henderson was recently appointed Health Sciences Librarian at San Diego State University Library. She is liaison to the College of Health and Human Services and is also working with other Librarians at SDSU to set up RDM services. Previously, she spent three and a half years setting up RDM services at Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries. Margaret has been a biomedical librarian for over 30 years and is a Distinguished member of the Academy of Healthcare Information Professionals. She has presented and written on many library topics over the years, and wrote the book, Data Management: A Practical Guide for Librarians (2016, Rowman & Littlefield).

Registration: Please visit our class page to sign up!

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – May 4, 2018

Fri, 2018-05-04 07:22

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

Top Items of Interest

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

Webinars: May 7 – 11

Webinars: May 14-18

Webinars: May 28 – June 1

On-Demand Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

In addition to the webinars listed, the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office provides webinars for subscribers to the Digital Library. Visit the NPHCO Calendar for training opportunities available.

Past Webinars Available on YouTube** 

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Focus on Data

Focus on Precision Medicine/NIH All of Us Initiative

Focus on Substance Misuse

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM accountprior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunitiesto register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guideto understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that recordings from NNLM available on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Beyond the SEA Webinar: LGBTQ Communities: Your Best Resource to Reduce Health Disparities – June 7, 2018

Thu, 2018-05-03 16:04

Date/Time: Thursday, June 7, 2018 2:00 PM ET

Presenter: Juan Carlos Vega, MLS. Founder, Alianza Ciudadana en Pro de la Salud LGBTTA de Puerto Rico (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual and Allied. LGBTTA Citizens Health Alliance of Puerto Rico)

Contact: For additional information or questions, please contact Ashley Cuffia.

Abstract: With special attention to health justice among communities of color and LGBTQ populations, Juan Carlos will explore how the lack of information, data, and resources directly affects the health, social and economic parity for these communities. You will learn about the importance of understanding local LGBTQ community resources and other non-traditional sources can be the best tool to reduce health disparities.

Presenter Bio: Juan Carlos Vega, MLS, is a librarian and public health advocate dedicated to identify opportunities, convert them into actions, and create change at the local level. His involvement with health promotion and health disparities began in 2001 Mr. Vega transitioned into the non-profit world after 10 years of working for academic libraries and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. His experiences in health issues include tobacco, alcohol, cancer, obesity, influenza, and health disparities. In 2010, he helped establish the Citizens Alliance Pro Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual, and Ally Health nonprofit organization to help reduce health disparities among local Latino/a LGBT communities in his native Puerto Rico.

Pre-Register: Pre-registration is strongly recommended, but not required. Visit our registration page to sign up!

To Join the Webinar:

To Join the Training Session:

  1. Go to: https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=t5e9dd761b2ecca8bf487e43677451aa6
  2. Enter your name and e-mail address (or registration ID)
  3. Enter the session password: nnlm
  4. Click “Join Now”
  5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

To Join the Session by Phone Only:

To receive a call back, provide your phone number when you join the training session, or call the number below and enter the access code.

To add this session to your calendar program (for example Microsoft Outlook), click this link:

https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=td8e60e2585391814f498eca48691ff0a

Technical Briefs – Important Information Prior to the Use of WebEx:

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Reflections on Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles

Thu, 2018-05-03 08:15

Written by: Paul Levett, Reference and Instructional Librarian, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, George Washington University, Washington, DC

Do you think health sciences librarians should get involved with big data in healthcare?

Of the four V’s: velocity, volume, variety, value, described in Cognitive Class (n.d.), it is value where medical librarians come into a discussion about Big Data because we add value to unstructured data, we bring order to chaos! Traditionally librarians have done this by creating metadata about learning objects, e.g. cataloging, finding aids, & infographics. However data mining, cleaning, analysis, and visualization requires computer programming, mathematics, and statistics skills not part of library school MLS programs.  

Burton & Lyon (2017) point to a technical skills gap that prevents librarians from contributing to big data initiatives. They promote the NCSU Data Science and Visualization Institute and Library Carpentry workshops to provide knowledge and opportunity to practice. But the NCSU Data Science and Visualization Institute lasts just one week, nowhere near enough time to develop and practice computer programming language, math, and statistics skills. Library Carpentry workshops typically are one-off instructional sessions that offer even less time, although I appreciate that the course material is available online at http://librarycarpentry.github.io/.  

If we look at the argument should librarians be doing data science, you can argue data science skills do touch on all the domains identified by Drummond et al (2015, Fig. 3 p.15) in the national librarian education needs assessment. Were I invited to suggest a program for developing the necessary skills to work in Big Data in Health Care Information Systems I would suggest a program like the MSc Data Analytics program in the University of Sheffield Department of Computer Science, that provides opportunities to study R and Python programming and statistical analysis and work on a real world project to apply those skills over a one year timeframe. Students on this program apply advanced Mathematics skills which is why the program requires an undergraduate degree in mathematics, economics, accounting, physics, chemistry or engineering.  

This suggests a need for the creation of a data scientist specialty role, but I am not convinced the Library actually is the best home for that role. Recently Simmons College (2017) surveyed 1117 graduates of their MLS program about core librarian professional skills and knowledge, of whom nobody rated data science as a core or a specialized skill, 14 mentioned statistics/working with data, only 6 mentioned data science/curation/management. As recently as last November in the IMLS (2017) meeting on positioning MLS programs for the 21st century there was lots of discussion about increasing the diversity of the profession but only one mention of data curation.

Tsakalos (2017) described Data wrangling as “the process of importing, cleaning, and transforming raw data into actionable information for analysis. It is a time-consuming process that is estimated to take about 60-80% of analysts’ time.” I feel the current push for librarians to develop data wrangling skills is perilously close to an admission from data analysts they want to offload what appears to be an onerous burden. This role would better fit someone working in University Departments of Computer Science, Mathematics, Statistics, or Epidemiology and Biostatistics.  It’s critical for librarians to manage expectations that the library is not a raw data processing warehouse but instead is a knowledge repository.

Where should librarians get involved?

There may be a role for librarians to pass on to Hospital IT departments information about updates and changes to important biomarkers where those need to be manually set as parameters by programmers building clinical decision support on top of EHR systems, however as this enters the realm of medico-legal responsibility the onus should be on EHR software developers to perform this necessary ongoing maintenance role.

Krumholz (2014) described how observational non-experimental studies generate data to support causal inferences and he points to comparative effectiveness studies as a potentially useful application of cluster analysis on large clinical data sets. A systematic review should be a pre-requisite for any health policy comparative effectiveness study, and this is where I as a librarian could best employ my literature search skills.

Librarians could be trained and certified to deliver RedCAP training, the data capture form design issues are similar to Microsoft Access, librarians would benefit by developing a deeper understanding of study design issues such as timing follow-up, patient data protection principles, and setting automated reminder parameters, while the enterprise would benefit from additional trainers to further spread the use of the RedCAP clinical trial data collection tool.

Sources

Burton, M., and Lyon, L. (2017). Data Science in Libraries. Research Data and Preservation (RDAP) Review. Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 43(4) 33-35.

Cognitive Class/Fireside Analytics (n.d.). Big Data 101. Retrieved from  https://cognitiveclass.ai/courses/what-is-big-data/

Drummond, C., Clareson, T., Gemmill Arp, L., and Skinner, K. (2015). Libraries, Archives, and Museums (LAM) Education Needs Assessments: Bridging the Gaps. Retrieved from https://educopia.org/sites/educopia.org/files/publications/MtL_LAM_EducationNeedsAssessments_20151104_0.pdf

U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) (2017). Positioning MLS programs for the 21st century. Retrieved from https://www.imls.gov/news-events/events/positioning-library-and-information-science-graduate-programs-21st-century

Krumholz, H. M. (2014). Big data and new knowledge in Medicine. Health Affairs, 33(7): 1163-1170

Simmons College (2017). Librarian professional skills and knowledge survey April 2017. Retrieved from http://slis.simmons.edu/blogs/unbound/2017/05/17/core-skills-lis/

Tsakalos, V. (2017). Data wrangling. Retrieved from https://www.r-bloggers.com/data-wrangling-cleansing-regular-expressions-33/

Categories: RML Blogs

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