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News for Network Members in Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, U.S. Virgin Islands, Virginia and West Virginia
Updated: 1 hour 6 min ago

Gain Perspective on Pandemics with the NNLM Reading Club

Thu, 2020-08-06 12:54

Diving into fiction can help us understand more about the realities we face. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to shape daily life, NNLM Reading Club calls your attention to three literary works focusing on the impact of pandemics or infectious disease.

The NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network is pleased to announce its three book selections for August:

The Murmur of Bees by Sofía Segovia, translated by Simon Bruni
Severance: A Novel by Ling Ma
A Song for a New Day by Sarah Pinsker

Set within the 1918 influenza pandemic and the Mexican Revolution, The Murmur of Bees continues the Latin American tradition of magical realism associated with writers like Gabriel García Márquez and Isabel Allende. Severance is more dystopian, but with a sense of satire amid the outcomes of an apocalyptic plague. A Song for a New Day explores a musician’s experience in a pandemic that makes public gatherings illegal and concerts impossible.

While you are exploring fictional stories amid outbreaks, we encourage you to stay informed about real-life infectious disease. To learn more about each of these titles and to download book discussion guides, promotional materials and infectious disease information, visit the NNLM Reading Club.

NNLM August Reading Club

The Murmur of Bees by Sofía Segovia | Severance: A Novel by Ling Ma | A Song for a New Day by Sarah Pinsker

Categories: RML Blogs

COVID-19: Health Literacy and the Misinformation of the LatinX Community

Tue, 2020-08-04 10:38

Date and Time: Monday, August 31, 2020 2 PM ET/1 PM CT

Description: The COVID-19 pandemic has created an opportunity for the spread of misinformation to the general public. This is even more prevalent in underserved and diverse populations where low health literacy skills and unique health information needs play a part in making people in these groups more vulnerable to predatory practices. This webinar will focus on the LatinX community and how misinformation about COVID-19 affects its members. Join Brenda Linaries, MLIS, MBA, AHIP from the University of Kansas Medical Center, Dykes Library as she discusses the challenges members of the LatinX community face accessing reliable health information, especially during the pandemic.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

• Examine the health information needs of the LatinX community
• Assess the unique aspects of misinformation in the LatinX community
• Describe the characteristics of effective COVID-19 health information online resources for the LatinX community

For full details and to register, please visit: https://nnlm.gov/Zny

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – July 31, 2020

Fri, 2020-07-31 11:17

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars August 5 – August 12

Webinars August 18 – August 26

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Get Ready: Tropical Storm Isaias Brings Heavy Rain, Flooding to Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands

Thu, 2020-07-30 16:00

Tropical Storm Isaias is bringing bands of heavy rain to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, with winds in those rainbands gusting at 50 mph or higher at times.

The heavy rain has triggered serious flash flooding in several areas of Puerto Rico. Multiple fallen trees, mudslides and flooding was reported in southwest Puerto Rico, according to local emergency management. River flooding has been recorded by USGS gauges in several locations in Puerto Rico.

Current projected path of Tropical Storm Isaias

Current projected path of Tropical Storm Isaias

At a Glance

  • Tropical Storm Isaias is bringing heavy rain to parts of the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico.
  • Tropical storm warnings and watches are posted from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.
  • First impacts could be felt in parts of Florida as soon as Saturday.
  • Other parts of the U.S. East Coast could also eventually see impacts from Isaias next week.

State and Territory Resources

Visit the NNLM SEA Page for additional Federal and State Emergency Management Contact Resources.

Puerto Rico

U.S. Virgin Islands

NLM Disaster Information Management Resource Center (DIMRC)

We encourage you to visit the following pages from the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). You can embed the content from both of these pages on your own Website by accessing the Health and Human Services (HHS) Content Syndication Storefront. When we update any of these pages, your pages will be automatically updated as well.

MedlinePlus

Reliable Resources for Tornado Preparedness & Response

Mobile Apps

NNLM SEA Resources

Categories: RML Blogs

Apply by July 31: All of Us Health Ambassador Award

Tue, 2020-07-28 10:14

The All of Us Research Program’s goal is to learn how differences between us might lead to different types of treatments. With a goal to have one million people participate in this study, researchers may use this information to improve the health for everyone. As part of a partnership with the All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NNLM SEA) is pleased to offer the All of Us Health Ambassador Award.

Amount: Up to $19,000

Awards Available: 3

Application Deadline: Friday, July 31, 2020 at 11:00pm Pacific Time.

The purpose of the SEA All of Us Ambassador Award is to support libraries for projects that improve health information and digital literacy, improve access to, awareness of, and skills to locate high quality biomedical and health information, and improve understanding and importance in participation of clinical trials, including All of Us through a train-the-trainer model. As an ambassador, you may be asked to support additional outreach to help train and empower NNLM Network Members in your local community.

Potential Project Ideas

Project proposals should focus on the following project ideas:

  • Purchasing web-accessible computers/tablets for libraries that will be used for offering trainings on NLM databases and NNLM professional development courses.
  • Presenting training using one of the NNLM consumer health classes at local library professional development in-service meetings or library organizational events, or virtually.
  • Training unaffiliated, minority, urban or rural health professionals and All of Us partners in effective use of electronic health information resources for evidence-based practice, with an emphasis on NLM databases and resources.

Preference will be given to libraries and organizations with established relationships with public libraries and should be mentioned within the proposal.

Projects must also provide awareness of All of Us, such as including the use of informational materials about All of Us in programming, events, classes and other activities offered as part of the project or distributing All of Us brochures to patrons. Standard informational materials will be provided to awardee at no cost. Applicants are encouraged to utilize resources available from the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network and, when possible, partner with other All of Us partners in the community. SEA staff will help connect you with potential All of Us partners.

SEA staff are available for consultations. Please email NNLM SEA to schedule an appointment.

Please visit the All of Us Ambassador Award description and the FAQ document for details regarding the award, eligibility, and to access the application.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – July 24, 2020

Fri, 2020-07-24 12:24

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars July 29 – August 5

Webinars August 12 – August 18

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – July 17, 2020

Fri, 2020-07-17 10:25

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars July 24 – July 31

Webinars August 5 – August 12

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

NIDA Request for Information

Thu, 2020-07-16 11:52

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is the lead federal agency supporting research on drug use and its consequences. Our mission is to advance science on the causes and consequences of drug use and addiction and to apply that knowledge to improve individual and public health. In alignment with this mission, NIDA developed a draft outline for the FY 2021-2025 Strategic Plan to communicate a vision for advancing the Institute’s mission over the next five years.

As part of the strategic planning process, NIDA has issued a Request for Information (RFI) for feedback on an initial outline of the plan, which includes both Scientific Goals and Cross-cutting themes.

We would like to hear from the community of researchers, clinicians, patients, policymakers, members of the public, and other stakeholders. We will review and consider the comments that we receive as we draft the full Strategic Plan. We hope you will take a few minutes to share your perspectives, and to encourage interested stakeholders to share theirs as well.

The RFI can be found at this link: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-DA-20-059.htmlComments will be accepted through August 7, 2020.

You may submit your suggestions via email to: NIDAStrategicPlan@nida.nih.gov

Thank you for your support of NIDA’s research mission.

Categories: RML Blogs

DOCLINE Update | Authentication Renovation: NIH iTrust “Login” Portal changing

Tue, 2020-07-14 14:39
The NIH iTrust portal
used for DOCLINE sign in
will be replaced on Monday, July 20, 2020

This post was originally published on the National DOCLINE Coordination Office Blog

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) user authentication (Login) portal has been updated to make it easier to access NIH resources, including DOCLINE. This completely revised sign in page will be introduced July 20.

This new web page (Figure 1) will replace the existing login page (Figure 2). Users should continue to log in as they did previously.

Figure 1: New NIH Login

New NIH Login Screen

“Account Types” number size descends by count of users. 

Please Note! After successfully signing into DOCLINE with one account type or method, users can NO LONGER use a different sign in method to access DOCLINE. Login.gov is available but is not fully supported for DOCLINE. Only the indicated methods are supported.

Little or no user impact is anticipated at this time.

Figure 2: Old NIH Login

Current iTrust Log in screen

Questions about DOCLINE? See the DOCLINE System home page for quick tour videos, FAQs and more.

Contact your Coordinator for help using the system.

Write to the Help Desk with feedback or to report technical issues.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – July 10, 2020

Fri, 2020-07-10 12:08

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars July 14 – July 15

Webinars July 16 – July 29

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Member Spotlight: Why Meharry Medical College Library is Open During COVID-19

Thu, 2020-07-09 13:12

Guest Post By: 

Sandra Martin Parham
Library Executive Director
Meharry Medical College Library

Introduction

During the 2020 COVID-19 outbreak, nearly all medical library physical structures across the United States closed, and resources and services were delivered digitally. Conversely, the Meharry Medical College Library (MMCL) remained open. Its administrators designated the library as “essential.” Although librarians were not “required” to maintain a physical presence on the Meharry campus, they were “expected” to provide digital services and to maintain communication with faculty and students. Library personnel faced this conundrum bravely and performed their duties valiantly, of course, following the protocols for social distancing and keeping the environment sterile.

The role the library plays in the success of a viable medical college is well recognized. Librarians are there to serve both faculty and students as they engage in research. A primary duty of librarians is to assist the persons they serve to navigate through the vast resources of medical data. It is common knowledge that the LCME and regional accrediting bodies require medical school libraries to participate in the curriculum process and provide instructional classes to enhance critical thinking. Meharry had just hired an embedded librarian who was specifically developing instructional programs designed for the colleges of medicine, dentistry, and graduate studies. The embedded librarian would offer all that the literature suggests: literature searches, databases instruction, research consultations, and the opportunity to include library resources on faculty BlackBoard pages. All plans were well underway when COVID-19 hit. The nation and countries around the world went on “Stay at Home” mode. Only services deemed “essential” would continue to function, albeit, with newly mandated safety practices.

When a natural disaster occurs or an unthinkable pandemic such as the COVID-19 outbreak consumes the globe, the medical library certainly must be named among services deemed “essential.” The term essential is defined as “absolutely necessary; extremely important; crucial, fundamentally vital, so important as to be indispensable” (Oxford English Dictionary 269).

History and Geography

There are two medical educational institutions in Nashville, Tennessee—Meharry Medical College and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Founded in 1876 as the Medical Department of Central Tennessee College, Meharry was the first medical school in the South for African Americans with the primary mission to train black physicians (About Meharry Medical College). From its founding, Meharry has trained and graduated approximately one-half of all the black doctors in the United States (Summerville, Preface xi).

During the post-Civil War Era, the health condition of freed slaves was so dismal that Nashville earned the unenviable distinction of having the highest mortality rate in the country. The abysmally disproportionate rate of death and disease among the ex-slave population was a result of scant available medical care. Consequently, “there was a critical need for an institution to educate Negro medical professionals to address this lack of health care.” Further, this institution would play a major role in garnering information and managing the public health of Nashville, the South, and ultimately, the nation. Meharry Medical College became the institution to take on this daunting, monumental task (Epps 1).

Nashville needed two medical colleges during its early history because of the terrain of the city. The bed of limestone on which Nashville was built inhibited the development of comprehensive water and sewer lines (Kreyling 2).

By the turn of the century, Nashville had become a hot bed for disease and vague viruses. One such disease was Pellagra. The 1910 Journal of the National Medical Association notes . . .

It is a new and grave problem with which the profession in this country is now grappling, and particularly in the South where it is assuming alarming proportions. This strange disease is Pellagra. The indefinite and pervasive character of its etiology, the vague manifestations of its pathology, with the lack . . . not only of any specific treatment but the apparent inefficacy of all treatment, made [Pellagra] indeed the medical mystery of the day (Townsend 65).

While Pellagra was contagious to blacks and whites, the outbreak largely was attributed to the “Southern Negro.” In 1910, the city and county health officers of Tennessee assembled and made the startling statement, “The Negro is the reservoir of disease in the South.” It was upon this declaration that Meharry Medical College began its journey on the road to prominent research (Townsend 70).

The Meharry Response 

Following the accusation printed in Journal of the National Medical Association citing the Negro as “the reservoir of disease in the South,” Dr. Arthur Melvin Townsend wrote an immediate response to this scathing accusation:

Herein it seems to me that a strange and somewhat peculiar mission is now being evolved for the Negro physician. This new mission for the Negro physician is to defend his race from the impressions now being made and the efforts put forth to prove us a menace to society and the nation on the theory that “the Negro is the reservoir for disease in the South.” It is therefore imperative on the part of the Negro physician to find out for himself if such charges are true. If true, then work to alleviate them; if false, let the world know it (Townsend 70).

In brief, Dr. Townsend sent a clarion call to Negro physicians to destroy an unfair, racist, rush-to-judgment accusation that targeted the black race. Moreover, Dr. Townsend eloquently defended the integrity of black physicians by urging them to disprove the “almost universal opinion” that black physicians were not researchers.

We must prove that the Negro physician . . . is not like a cistern, good to hold the thoughts of others alone and when the time comes that it is forced to rely on itself [the cistern] has no power to do so; but, that [the Negro physician] is like a river, which is being constantly fed by its own springs and when the learning of others comes to it, unites with its waters, and its stream widens and deepens as on it flows (70).

Dr. Townsend was uniquely positioned to trumpet these calls because he had been appointed chairman of the Commission on Pellagra among Negroes. He had moved to Nashville in 1891, and in 1898, he graduated from a Nashville area high school as valedictorian of his class. After high school, Townsend entered Meharry Medical College where he earned the M.D. degree with honors in 1902. Immediately following graduation, Townsend remained in Nashville where he began to distinguish himself as a practicing physician. For eleven years (1902-1913), Townsend was a member of the Meharry faculty and was appointed the chair of pathology and materia medica. During this time, he developed an early concern for diseases and their cures which prompted him to publish his research findings (Cobb 323).

Dr. Townsend subsequently answered his own call to find out if the Negro was “the reservoir of disease in the South.” He developed and conducted surveys appropriate to respond to the questions that needed to be answered. Townsend’s research resulted in a report followed by two articles: “Pellagra” and “Report of Commission for Study of Pellagra.” Both were published in the Journal of the National Medical Association, the same year the journal had cast a disparaging accusation only about Negro victims of Pellagra despite the fact there were white victims suffering the same malady.

The language of Townsend’s findings and the documented expositions that followed are clear indications of the physician’s modern orientation, scientific competence, and sense of responsibility. His writing strongly indicates that Townsend likely would have made further significant contributions to scientific medical advances if he had worked in a more cohesive and racially equal climate. Nonetheless, Dr. Townsend enjoyed a stellar career as a physician, researcher, administrator, and author. For the last 36 years of his life, he was a member of the Meharry Medical College Board of Trustees and holds the distinction of being the first alumnus appointed to this post (Cobb 323).

Today a Meharry Medical College scientist, Dr. Donald Alcendor, one of the scientists who worked on a successful anti-virus to the Zika virus a few years ago, says he is in the process of testing an anti-viral drug that may prevent COVID-19, according to NBC News.

“The process is understanding how the virus gets into your system, where it goes and how it infects,” Alcendor told NBC News about developing an anti-viral drug. “The struggle is that [the virus] is a single-strand that produces tremendous inflammation. The patient will feel like he’s drowning.”

Alcendor’s goal is to have the anti-viral treatment created within the next two weeks. Then it will progress to clinical trials, and, if successful, be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within a “few months.”

The success of the Zika virus anti-viral drug makes Alcendor optimistic that his work can help and drastically lower the COVID-19 death rate. A vaccine will take up to 18 months to produce, but an anti-viral drug will be used to treat patients once they become infected.

“This is bigger than COVID-19,” said Dr. Linda Witt, senior associate vice president for development at Meharry. “We are called to serve on the front lines. For Meharrians, it’s natural to go into black communities. Meharry exists in a black community. But [our presence] is at a heightened level now. Having an HBCU presence, voice, and expertise are essential” (Bunn).

Currently, Dr. James Hildreth, president and CEO of Meharry Medical College, brings his expertise to wage war against COVID-19. Hildreth has been engaged in warfare against viruses for four decades—first as a Rhodes Scholar earning his Ph.D. in immunology, then as a researcher and physician bringing better medical care to fight against AIDS, particularly in the African American community.

As an infectious disease scientist, Hildreth knows and understands better than most that the contagious coronavirus would be most volatile in people with existing health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, and other medical issues prevalent in black communities. “I have been pushing for pre-emptive screening with health officials to go into the underserved communities to start testing. Early testing is a way to get in front of [the virus before it attacks] the most vulnerable public,” said Hildreth. “If someone has a pre-existing auto-immune disease and other . . . health issues, the outcomes are much more severe. Vulnerable people are exactly who we have in [black] communities. The burden of the disease is so much higher” (Bunn).

These two eminent scientists, Dr. Alcendor and Dr. Hildreth, voice the same concerns today as did Dr. Townsend in 1910. The factual evidence that virus outbreaks are more prevalent in African Americans leads frontline scientists, physicians, and health care workers to voice the sentiment Dr. Townsends stated 110 years ago. Paraphrasing his words, herein is a mission evolving for the African American physician to solve.

Why We Remain Open

As such a time as this, herein is a mission evolving for the African American medical library. The narratives of doctors Townsend, Alcendor, and Hildreth are indicative that Meharry physicians have a history of being first-line responders to catastrophic viruses and diseases. Therefore, without a doubt there must be an entity to assist in the research. The decision to avoid disrupting the research of students was an agreed upon decision by President Hildreth and Dr. Dexter Samuels, Senior Vice President for Student Affairs & Executive Director, Center for Health Policy. The two designated MMCL as “essential” because the services provided by the library are authentic and do not duplicate services rendered elsewhere on campus.

Realizing the urgent need for library support, the MMCL remained open, and the library hours did not change. The library was staffed from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Let me reiterate that Meharry library and staff were not required to come to the library to work. We could work remotely from home as did staff members in libraries across the nation. Nevertheless, realizing the immense value of their work to the current circumstances, Meharry librarians and library staff have opted to rotate coming to work to accommodate faculty and student research. Yes. We practice social/safe distancing; we wear personal protective equipment (PPE), and we wash our hands frequently. But we also look one another in the face and reassure each other saying, “We are going to get through this.” Although students have had to transition to attending remote classes, they still have the option to visit the library to study, utilize technology, and most important, take a break from isolation and enjoy friendly, helpful, human contact.

While a part of me agrees with and applauds all commentary that recognizes the rationale that supports closing libraries, I must admit, I am proud that my work is deemed “essential.” It is a heady experience for librarians and staff to be invited to join scientific researchers and physicians who have convened for the sole purpose of brainstorming how Meharry Medical College will play a significant role to alleviate COVID-19.

Conclusion

Meharry Medical College continues to deliver its more than 144-year-old mission, that is, for African American doctors to take on the “imperative” to alleviate the diseases and viruses lurking and wreaking havoc in communities of color. Today, the charge is to attack and alleviate the suffering caused by COVID-19. The majority of Meharry graduates hold to the commitment of the founding fathers by practicing medicine on men, women, and children who live in underserved urban and rural communities.

History substantiates that African American research scientists and physicians have practiced their professions in controversial climates. In today’s climate, all scientists and physicians who suggest taking radical steps to stop the exponential spread of COVID-19 are facing insensitive political forums nationally and in some places around the world. “However, the pasts suggest these periods are cyclical, giving hope for a brighter future when times are hard” (Epps 119). Indeed, these are hard times. Meharry scientists, physicians, faculty, students, and staff understand far better than most that African Americans are susceptible to the COVID-19 virus more than most other segments of the U.S. population. Thus, research into the disease entities that overwhelmingly affect people of color must continue until those entities are controlled, if not eradicated. Without research and support, progress will be slowed or may never occur.

All personnel associated with the daily operations of MMCL are committed to the mission launched by Dr. Townsend and carried on by Drs. Alcendor and Hildreth. Three written histories speak poignantly about what drives Meharrians to fulfill the needs of black communities: The Spirit of a Place Called Meharry: The Strength of Its Past to Shape the Future by Charles W. Johnson, An Act of Grace: The Right Side of History by Anna Epps and Patricia Morris-Hammock, and Educating Black Doctors by James Summerville. Johnson has a chapter in his book titled “On Their Shoulders.” Today, Meharry scientists, physicians, and other health care professionals stand on the broad shoulders of the many forebearers of the torch that ignites the spirit that dwells in this place called Meharry. Johnson, Epps, and Hammock have eloquently defined the spirit of Meharry that has existed throughout the ages. Especially noteworthy is Johnson’s heartfelt commentary concerning the medical college:

The spirit of this place emerges from a set of vague attributes which contribute to both its uniqueness and that of all its peoples, i.e., the Meharry family. The spirit of this place encompasses a distinctive kind of atmosphere which represents a special and pervasive sort of ambiance. This environment is energizing and conducive to the rearrangement of the undisciplined potential of individuals into something equal to or exceeding their dreams or at least to something in excess of what society has expected of black people. The atmosphere which is characteristic of the spirit contributes to the development of a special kind of togetherness which is bonded by the hope and dreams as well as a strong belief in the potential for transcending both self and harsh realities.

The spirit of this place includes all those special forces and elements which are hidden beneath the surface of reality, giving rise in part to what might be called the “expertise of deprivation.” Development and utilization of extraordinary skills and ideas are required for survival and coping in a society which is frequently considered to be unfavorable. Components giving rise to a spirit of place are richly diverse and complex. These elements emanate from the energies and offerings of both identifiable and anonymous participants. Contributions from this expansive family enables the institution to develop an inner life which has a special kind of vitality and identity. This spiritual state persists in the midst of job turmoil and in time of change. It might even appear stronger and bolder in instances of increased stress. These components are derived from both the struggles and joys of our prior existence. They are derived from knowledge of the committed service and loyal and proud predecessors who worked with limited tools.

An invisible force, like a spark of electricity, emanates from this place, Meharry Medical College. It transforms the lives of individuals and the communities to which these individuals belong in both tangible and intangible ways. The spirit of place is the product not only of all who are a part of it now but all who were a part of Meharry years ago and whose names may no longer be remembered. The spirit of place, here and now, and in years to come will empower those of the Meharry family to achieve and accomplish that which might not be possible in the absence of membership in this or a similar medical and scientific community. The nurturing quality of the spirit of this place enhances germination and growth of the seedlings of fuller individual humanity.

These are the reasons MMCL doors remain open. Present-day Meharry family have internalized the spirit of this place. And the Spirit moves us to selflessly contribute to the medical health, welfare, and safety of communities of color and beyond. The spirit of community and family gives Meharrians the farsighted vision to look beyond ourselves and look into each other’s eyes with conviction and say, “We are in this together.”

References

“About Meharry Medical College.” Meharry Medical College, 4 May 2020, https://home.mmc.edu/about/. Accessed 4 May 2020.

Bunn, Curtis. “Black Scientists Hope to Begin Testing Antiviral Drug for Coronavirus in Two Weeks.” NBC News, 16 April 2020, www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/black-scientists-hope-begin-testing antiviral-drug-coronavirus-two-weeks-n1181101. Accessed 4 May 2020.

Cobb, W. Montague. “Arthur Melvin Townsend, M.D., 1875-1959.” The  Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 41, no. 4, 1959, pp. 323-24.

Epps, Anna L. Cherrie and Patricia Morris Hammock. Introduction and Epilogue. An Act of Grace: The Right Side of History, by Epps and Hammock, 2009.

“Essential.” The Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed., Oxford UP, 1997, p. 269.

Johnson, Charles W., Sr. Introduction. The Spirit of a Place Called Meharry: The Strength of Its Past to Shape the Future, by Johnson, Hillsboro Press, 2000, p. 5.

Kreyling, Christine, et al. Prologue. “Nashville Past and Present.” The Plan of Nashville: Avenues to a Great City, Vanderbilt University Press, 2005, p. 2. Nashville Civic Design Center, www.sitemason/com/files/hYGg61/ PON_History_PastPresent.pdf. Accessed 4 May 2020.

Summerville, James. Preface. Educating Black Doctors: A History of Meharry Medical College, by Summerville, University of Alabama Press, 1984, xi.

Townsend, Arthur M. “Pellagra.” The Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 11, no. 2, 1910, pp. 65-70.

Townsend, Arthur M. “Report of Commission for Study of Pellagra.” The Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 11, no. 2, 1910, pp. 252-64.

Weber, Lauren. “A Top Immunologist on Why Coronavirus is Killing More African Americans.” Washington Post, 22 April 2020, www.wsj.com/amp/articles/a-top-immunologist-on-why-coronavirus-is killing-more-african-americans-11587556800. Accessed 4 May 2020.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Reading Club Explores Racism and Health

Tue, 2020-07-07 11:02

Bring your book-discussion group into one of the central conversations impacting our nation as the NNLM Reading Club focuses on Racism and Health for its July reading selections, with special attention to Black maternal health.

The three selections explore motherhood through the experiences of Black women in different ways. NNLM encourages you to use one of them to start a conversation about racism and health or keep an existing discussion going.

First-time mother Dani McClain sets out to understand how to raise her daughter in what she knows to be an unjust and even hostile society in We Live for the We: The Political Power of Black Motherhood. Nefertiti Austin recounts adoption for a single African-American woman in Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America. Finally, researchers and doulas from an organization known as Black Women Birthing Justice bring together the birth experiences of more than 100 California women to make recommendations for improving care in Battling Over Birth: Black Women and the Maternal Health Care Crisis.

To select your title and get your book club conversation started, visit the NNLM Reading Club.

July 2020 Reading Club Selections

We Live for the We by Dani McClain l Battling Over Birth l Motherhood So White by Nefertiti Austin

Categories: RML Blogs

Funding Spotlight: La Casa de la Salud

Mon, 2020-07-06 12:09

Guest Post By:

Antonio M. Villa Payares, MD, MPH
Adjunct Professor
Department of Kinesiology and Health Sciences
Virginia Commonwealth University

In the Central Virginia area, access to reliable and high-quality health information has been one of the top health needs identified for the Hispanic/Latino community through diverse needs assessment in the last 10 years. It is known that one of the main priorities for underserved communities in Virginia is to reduce health disparities. Reducing health disparities requires using community engagement strategies such as clinical preventive services access and providing health information in Spanish to empower individuals and families for self-management and health promotion.

La Casa de la Salud’s mission to contribute to health improvement and wellbeing of the Hispanic Community achieved its goal of providing relevant health information by engaging about 2,000 Hispanic individuals and families. A partnership with VCU Libraries Health and Wellness Library allowed us to provide training to Community Health Workers (CHWs) to find reliable health information in the Spanish language. This increased La Casa’s ability to serve the Hispanic community with high-quality health information resources. Combining the strategy of empowering the Hispanic community with health information as well as access to health services and programs, LCS holistic model focused on healthy lifestyles and hopes to contribute with improved health of the Hispanic community and lower healthcare system costs.

We learned from this project that we not only need to promote services via a website, but also through the combination of other channels such as radio, social media, and calling services. Through these tools La Casa can create effective channels of communication to impact positively the general community.

Health information that is relevant, current, and easy for the layperson to understand builds credibility between the community and LCS. La Casa de La Salud regularly updates its website as well as its Facebook page with reliable health information. However, we recognize that the message is often received more effectively in-person, so it encourages its CHWs to remain active in the community. LCS has used its website to help increase knowledge about several severe illnesses, including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and mental health issues. In many cases, these diseases can be prevented or reduced in severity if the proper lifestyle model is followed. An informed community can be more proactive in preventing severe illness and death using reliable and accurate health information.

LCS will continue to prioritize its partnerships with churches and the VCU Health and Wellness Library to sustain and support CHWs and leaders with relevant, scientific, and reliable health information.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – July 2, 2020

Thu, 2020-07-02 14:32

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars July 8 – July 14

Webinars July 15 – July 16

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Funding Announcement: All of Us Health Ambassador Award

Mon, 2020-06-29 14:33

The All of Us Research Program’s goal is to learn how differences between us might lead to different types of treatments. With a goal to have one million people participate in this study, researchers may use this information to improve the health for everyone. As part of a partnership with the All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NNLM SEA) is pleased to offer the All of Us Health Ambassador Award.

Amount: Up to $19,000

Awards Available: 3

Application Deadline: Friday, July 31, 2020 at 11:00pm Pacific Time.

The purpose of the SEA All of Us Ambassador Award is to support libraries for projects that improve health information and digital literacy, improve access to, awareness of, and skills to locate high quality biomedical and health information, and improve understanding and importance in participation of clinical trials, including All of Us through a train-the-trainer model. As an ambassador, you may be asked to support additional outreach to help train and empower NNLM Network Members in your local community.

Potential Project Ideas

Project proposals should focus on the following project ideas:

  • Purchasing web-accessible computers/tablets for libraries that will be used for offering trainings on NLM databases and NNLM professional development courses.
  • Presenting training using one of the NNLM consumer health classes at local library professional development in-service meetings or library organizational events, or virtually.
  • Training unaffiliated, minority, urban or rural health professionals and All of Us partners in effective use of electronic health information resources for evidence-based practice, with an emphasis on NLM databases and resources.

Preference will be given to libraries and organizations with established relationships with public libraries and should be mentioned within the proposal.

Projects must also provide awareness of All of Us, such as including the use of informational materials about All of Us in programming, events, classes and other activities offered as part of the project or distributing All of Us brochures to patrons. Standard informational materials will be provided to awardee at no cost. Applicants are encouraged to utilize resources available from the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network and, when possible, partner with other All of Us partners in the community. SEA staff will help connect you with potential All of Us partners.

SEA staff are available for consultations. Please email NNLM SEA to schedule an appointment.

Please visit the All of Us Ambassador Award description and the FAQ document for details regarding the award, eligibility, and to access the application.

Categories: RML Blogs

Apply to Host a Library Carpentry Workshop for Your Organization!

Mon, 2020-06-29 10:15

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern Atlantic region (SEA) is pleased to offer Library Carpentry workshops for up to ten SEA member institutions to support the development of data science and computational skills.

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective and reproducible data and software practices.

Note: Library Carpentry workshops are traditionally offered face-to-face, but they’ve been adapted to an online format. Due to COVID-19, the NNLM SEA strongly recommends organizations host remote sessions.

Logistics

Workshops are approximately 16 hours long. For remote workshops, the Carpentries organization recommends four 4-hour sessions. Workshops can accommodate up to 20 learners. We encourage workshop hosts to invite information professionals from neighboring institutions to fill the 20 spots if your organization is unable to fill all spots. The Carpentries organization requests two months of planning time for each workshop.

If you are selected, the Carpentries organization will provide for remote workshops:

  • Four instructors to lead lessons
  • Planning, scheduling, and registration support
  • An informational webpage for your workshop participants
  • Pre and post workshop evaluation

You will be responsible for:

  • Providing your own video conferencing platform (Zoom, WebEx, etc.) if possible (accommodations can be made if you do not have access to a video conferencing platform through your organization)
  • Finding two volunteers who are familiar with the subject matter in the lesson plans, to attend the workshop as helpers
  • Advertising your workshop to potential participants
  • Completing an Activity Report for NNLM SEA after the event

If you are interested in hosting an in-person workshop before April 30, 2021, please discuss additional requirements and considerations with the Carpentries organization if awarded.

More Information

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. The instructors put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower researchers and enable data-driven discovery. Even those with some experience will benefit, as the goal is to teach not only how to do analyses, but how to manage the process to make it as automated and reproducible as possible. Biomedical and health sciences librarians and LIS students are encouraged to participate.

In this interactive, hands-on workshop you will learn core software and data skills, with lessons including:

Eligibility

Your organization must be a NNLM Network Member. If your organization is not a Network Member, they can join for free!

All participants must be prepared to observe The Carpentries Code of Conduct in workshops.

Apply Now

Applications are open now! The deadline to apply is Friday, July 3, 2020.

For questions, please contact Kiri Burcat and Tony Nguyen.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – June 26, 2020

Fri, 2020-06-26 11:41

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars July 8 – July 14

Webinars July 15 – July 16

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Find Trusted Health Information in Spanish for Your Patrons / Encuentre Información de Salud Confiable en Español para Sus Usuarios

Thu, 2020-06-25 11:27

When library patrons ask you for health information in Spanish about COVID-19 or other issues, NNLM has resources to get you started.

Available tools range from Spanish-language videos featuring Latino medical professionals to resources selected by trusted members of the Spanish-speaking community. The materials come from reliable sources like the National Library of Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Many of these resources are recommended by promotores, members of the community who serve as connections between them and healthcare systems, information, and resources. Because promotores are the heart of their communities, they are able to deliver assistance where it is needed the most.

Vision y Compromiso (VyC), is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting, training, and most importantly celebrating promotores across the nation. Vision y Compromiso is marking 20 years of work devoted to improving the lives and health of their communities.

In response to the pandemic affecting Spanish-speaking communities Vision y Compromiso developed a series of webinars for participants to learn about trusted places to find health information, myths about COVID19, and how to take care of oneself during these safer at home times.

You can find the recorded webinars and resources on the Vision y Compromiso COVID-19 page. The NNLM PSR shares the promotores mission of building healthier communities and created a page with Spanish Language COVID-19 health information materials to support Spanish speakers as well. The PSR has previously collaborated with promotores, described by Yamila El-Kkayat, in this video about outreach work in Arizona.

The JUNTOS Center for Advancing Latino Health at Kansas University Medical Center has created JUNTOS Radio, an ongoing series of podcasts in Spanish on health topics. The podcasts feature interviews with Latino health professionals about issues of concern to the Latino community in Kansas and elsewhere.

JUNTOS partnered with a health sciences librarian to include credible and authoritative consumer health information resources that were relevant to the different health topics discussed in each episode. Brenda Linares, health sciences librarian at the A.R. Dykes Library, pictured below, also recorded a Health Literacy and evaluating websites episode.

Topics so far include COVID-19, child obesity, Alzheimer’s disease and exercise at home. Each podcast also includes information on the All of Us Research Program, an effort to enlist one million or more people from across the U.S. to help speed up medical research by sharing their medical information.

They are posted on Podbean, iTunes and in video format on YouTube and Facebook. You can access the podcasts at the JUNTOS Podbean page, on iTunes, on the JUNTOS YouTube channel for the JUNTOS Center for Advancing Latino Health, or on the JUNTOS Facebook page.

To get an English auto-translation on the YouTube version, go to the settings for the video. Then select Subtitles, Auto-translate and finally English.

Encuentre información de salud confiable en español para sus usuarios

Cuando sus usuarios le pregunten por información de salud en español sobre COVID-19 u otros temas, la NNLM tiene los recursos que usted necesita.

Los recursos incluyen videos en español con médicos profesionales latinos y una selección de recursos en español seleccionados por miembros de la comunidad de habla hispana. Estos materiales vienen de fuentes fiables como la Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina de Estados Unidos y los Centros para el Control y Prevención de Enfermedades.

Muchos de estos recursos son recomendados por las promotoras, quienes son miembros de la comunidad que sirven como conexión entre el sistema de salud, la información, y los recursos disponibles. Como las promotoras son el corazón de sus comunidades, ellas tienen la capacidad de llevar y dar asistencia donde la comunidad lo necesite.

Visión y Compromiso (VyC), es una organización no lucrativa dedicada a apoyar, entrenar, y sobre todo celebrar a las promotoras en toda la nación estadounidense. Visión y Compromiso esta celebrando sus 20 años de trabajo y devoción a mejorar las vidas y la salud de su comunidad.

En respuesta a la pandemia que esta afectando a la comunidad de habla hispana, Visión y Compromiso desarrollo una serie de seminarios web (webinars) para que participantes aprendan sobre lugares de confianza para encontrar información de salud, mitos sobre COVID-19, y cómo cuidarse uno mismo durante este tiempo de quedarse en casa.

Usted puede encontrar las grabaciones de estos seminarios web (webinars) y recursos en la página web de Visión y Compromiso sobre COVID 19. La NNLM PSR comparte la misión de las promotoras de formar comunidades saludables y ha creado una página en español sobre COVID-19 con información de salud y material que apoya a la comunidad de habla hispana.  LA PSR previamente ha colaborado con promotoras. Usted puede ver este video donde Yamila El-Khayat, habla sobre su proyecto y trabajo en Arizona, con las promotoras.

JUNTOS, El Centro para el Avance de la Salud Latina del Centro Médico de la Universidad de Kansas (University of Kansas Medical Center), ha creado JUNTOS-RADIO, una serie de podcasts en español con varios temas de salud.  Los podcasts cuentan con entrevistas con profesionales latinos de salud donde hablan sobre temas de interés para la comunidad Latina en Kansas y otros lugares.

Los temas cubiertos hasta hoy incluyen el COVID-19, la obesidad infantil, la enfermedad de Alzheimer, la hipertensión, y cómo hacer ejercicios en casa.  El equipo continúa produciendo más podcasts con otros temas relevantes para la comunidad Latina. Además de cubrir cada tema en español, cada podcast también incluye información sobre el programa Científico All of Us (All of US Research Program), el cual es una campaña que pretende inscribir a un millón de personas de todo Estados Unidos para ayudar a acelerar la investigación médica,  compartiendo información médica.

Estos podcasts, están disponibles en PodBeaniTunes, y también en el formato de video en YouTube y Facebook.  Usted puede verlos o descargarlos desde la página de JUNTOS-RADIO Podbean, en iTunes, en el canal de YouTube de JUNTOS,  y en la página de Facebook de JUNTOS, El Centro para el Avance de la Salud Latina.

Categories: RML Blogs

Funding Spotlight: Modeling Responsive Librarianship in a Pediatric Behavioral Health Facility

Wed, 2020-06-24 14:14

Guest Post By:

Natalie Taylor, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and MLIS Program Coordinator, University of South Florida
Denise Shereff, AHIP, Instructor II, University of South Florida
Peter Cannon, Ph.D., Communication Officer, University of South Florida

In March 2019, researchers from the University of South Florida’s School of Information’s Responsive Librarianship Lab (RLL) embarked on a project to build a library for the pediatric patients of a local behavioral health facility, the Morton Plant North Bay Hospital Recovery Center. The facility is a 72-bed, co-ed facility and the only freestanding psychiatric hospital in Pasco County, FL. Up to 25 pediatric patients, ranging in age from 5-17 years, can be served at a time for short-term, acute care. Before beginning this project, the pediatric patients only had access to a small bookshelf of books to read during their ample free time. Using Responsive Librarianship (RL), a data-driven research scheme dedicated to the delivery of personalized library services in response to an individual’s mental health concerns, our research group proposed to build a small library for the use of pediatric patients while they are at the facility.

After meeting with administrators and the professional care staff, we were given the go-ahead to start amassing books and technology, and to take steps toward building a catalog for the pediatric section of the facility. The initial cost was low: researchers drew on experiences from building a library and catalog at the Drug Abuse Comprehensive Coordinating Office, Inc. (DACCO) facility in Tampa, FL and we were also able to use books previously held in the collection of the Henrietta M. Smith Library at the University of South Florida’s School of Information. However, we lacked funds to purchase technology to assist in using the catalog on-site and adding digital devices to circulate. With grant funding from the NNLM Southeast SEA Project Award, we were able to purchase this technology and thus were better situated to meet our project goals, which included:

  • Creating a mental health literacy bibliotherapy scheme to deliver texts and library services to the pediatric residents, increasing their ability to recognize, prevent, and manage mental health conditions, thereby empowering them to understand the resources available to them when in their greater community and
  • To develop a model for delivering mental health literacy services through a variety of media as well as adopting new procedures for the delivery these services through mobile technologies.

Starting in late June 2019, the project team began staffing the library multiple times per week. Though, circulation is currently suspended due to the COVID-19 outbreak, we anticipate beginning services again as soon as the facility’s pandemic restrictions are lifted. Between June and March, the HRC had 1016 lendings, circulated 241 titles, and served approximately 558 patrons at the facility. These numbers include only the analog materials. The 17 available Kindles have been circulated 88 times. (Each Kindle, purchased with grant funds, has several books pre-loaded. Patrons are not allowed to access the Internet or download additional books). Researchers regularly conduct readers’ advisory and conduct Responsive Librarianship, assisted by the Decision Support System Catalog (DeSSCat). The DeSSCat now has over 461 individual texts tagged with relevant topical codes and is searchable by the librarian on duty on a computer used in the facility.

In addition to library circulation and readers’ advisory, team members have developed four group session plans focused on the interaction between health literacy, creative expression, reading, and information seeking behavior. These plans were used in four, 30-minute group sessions. Perhaps most relevant to the goals of this particular grant, on November 25, 2019, the team conducted its first mental health literacy program focusing on finding internet sources for topics such as depression. Seven pediatric residents participated in the group activities designed to evaluate predetermined sources (including NLM resources). Individualized attention was made possible for one participant who was unwilling to participate in the group activities through personal interaction with a team member for evaluation of websites using a tablet purchased through this grant.

Overall, we feel the project continues to be a successful example of how responsive librarianship can work in a pediatric hospital environment, providing a valuable benefit to the patients in the facility. For more information, please visit the RLL website (https://www.usf.edu/arts-sciences/departments/information/research/library-science.aspx)

Categories: RML Blogs

Join the RD3 Content Advisory Board

Tue, 2020-06-23 10:31
The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) Resources for Data Driven Discovery (RD3) web portal fosters learning and collaboration in data science and data management.

The Research Data Management Workgroup of the NNLM is recruiting Advisory Board members to be part of a committee that reviews and suggests resources for the RD3 web portal. If you are interested in being part of the RD3 Content Advisory Board send your name to Mary Piorun at mary.piorun@umassmed.edu by July 1st with a brief narrative (less than 300 words) explaining your interest.

Meetings will be monthly until all current resources have been reviewed, and quarterly thereafter.

Categories: RML Blogs

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