National Network of Libraries of Medicine
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Hindi Japanese Korean Persian Portuguese Russian Spanish

SEA News

Subscribe to SEA News feed SEA News
News for Network Members in Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, U.S. Virgin Islands, Virginia and West Virginia
Updated: 3 hours 9 min ago

NNLM SEA Digest News – October 19, 2018

Fri, 2018-10-19 08:28

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Celebrating National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunity

Webinars October 22-26

Webinars October 29 – November 2

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Meet Rachel Johnson, CAE, Communications Services Division Chief Prince William County Public Library System Office of Community Engagement

Thu, 2018-10-18 11:17
Prince William County Public Library System

Prince William Library System Director Deborah Wright and Assistant Director Joslyn Bowling Dixon (center, left to right) receive a Certificate of Completion upon solidifying collaborative consumer health program plans for the year with partners from Virginia Commonwealth University and the Prince William County Health District

Rachel Johnson, CAE
Communications Services Division Chief
Prince William County Public Library System Office of Community Engagement
Prince William, VA

October is Health Literacy Month, a time to focus on your overall health and well-being, and get access to resources and information to help you do so. The Prince William Public Library System provides a valuable asset to our users on their journey to a healthier self. Not only does the Library offer resources in both digital and print, but we have recently begun to offer health and wellness programs to our patrons.

In addition to numerous databases, the library also provide access to the Health and Wellness Resource Center for our users. This digital resource offers carefully compiled and trusted medical reference materials for informational purposes. Our premium online resources provide our users access to health and medical journals, videos, and general interest publications.

Aside from our databases, we provide our library patrons access to many personal health and wellness improvement books, eBooks, and audio materials. Resources like Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics: A 10% Happier How-To Book by Daniel Harris is available in multiple formats. This guide to meditation debunks its misconceptions and provides a wealth of techniques. How to Be Well: The Six Keys to a Happy and Healthy Life by Frank Lipman helps patrons learn the habits and tactics to improve health and establish lifelong vitality.

Starting this month through November, we plan to offer a number of different health-focused programs throughout the library system including everything from Child & Me Yoga to Healthy Holiday Eating to a Community Health Open House. At the Community Health Open House, we intend to bring together representatives from local and regional agencies to answer questions our community members have related to health topics like heart attacks, strokes, and hypertension. We are excited about all of the upcoming programs we have scheduled throughout our library system and invite you to attend!

Bull Run Regional Library and Potomac Community Libraries are increasing their efforts to provide more resources as part of a greater Consumer Health initiative. This initiative includes partnerships with other health-related organizations in the county and throughout Virginia. This is a developing initiative that we will enhance our resources in the coming months for the public.

If you are in Prince William County, VA, we hope you visit the Public Library and take advantage of many of the health and wellness opportunities available!

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Funding Announcement: All of Us Community Engagement Project Award

Tue, 2018-10-16 13:13

The All of Us Research Program’s goal is to learn how differences between us might lead to different types of treatments. With a goal to have one million people participate in this study, researchers may use this information to improve the health for everyone. As part of a partnership with the All of Us Research Program, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NNLM SEA) is pleased to offer the All of Us Community Engagement Project Award.

Amount: Up to $10,000

Application Deadline: Sunday, November 11, 2018

The purpose of the SEA All of Us Community Engagement Award is to support libraries for projects that improve health information literacy, improve access to, awareness of, and skills to locate high quality biomedical and health information, and improve understanding and importance in participation of clinical trials, including the All of Us Research program.

Potential Project Ideas

  • Hosting a symposium or panel presentations at public libraries that serve underrepresented or diverse populations on understanding clinical trials, informed consent, and what it means to participate in research.
  • Incorporating NLM health and science information resources and the All of Us Research Program community resources into new or existing health programs within public libraries. See National Health Observances for some ideas.
  • Training programs that educate finding and evaluating consumer health information found on the Internet and incorporate the All of Us Research Program.
  • Placing web-accessible computers in locations where they can be used by under-represented and minority populations to locate health information, free clinics, community health centers, and information on clinical trials, like the All of Us Research Program.
  • Train-the-trainer projects that enhance the skills of library staff and other consumer health information intermediaries to train a target population on locating and evaluating health information, clinical trials and informed consent, or the All of Us Research Program.
  • Exhibiting at community health fairs or presenting at local meetings to promote health literacy, NLM products and services, and the importance of participating in medical research.
  • Other creative ideas that integrate health information outreach and the All of Us Research program are strongly encouraged.

SEA staff are available for consultations. Please email NNLM SEA to schedule an appointment.

Please visit the All of Us Community Engagement Project Award for details regarding the award, eligibility, and to access the application.

Categories: RML Blogs

Seeking News Following Hurricane Michael

Tue, 2018-10-16 12:45

Hurricane Florence swept across the southeastern United States and devastated the Gulf Coast. It is impossible for NNLM SEA to know which of our network members have suffered loss or damage based upon news reports.

Have you, your library or organization experienced ill effects from the storm?

Is there good news after the hurricane that you would like to share with our network members?

We would still like to hear from you! Please call our office at 410-706-2855, e-mail HSHSL-NLMsea@hshsl.umaryland.edu, or share in the comments section of this post.

Let us know; we want to hear from you!

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Medical Librarianship with Ruth Riley – LibraryVoicesSC Podcast Episode 64

Mon, 2018-10-15 12:36

Ruth RileyRuth A. Riley, MS, AHIP
Assistant Dean for Executive Affairs
Director of Library Services
School of Medicine Library
University of South Carolina – Columbia, SC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curtis R. Rogers, Ed.D. Communications Director South Carolina State Library – Columbia, SC

Dr. Curtis Rogers, Communications Director for the South Carolina State Library and producer of the LibraryVoicesSC podcast, discusses medical librarianship, the University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine Library, and more with Ruth Riley, Director of Library Services at the USC School of Medicine in Columbia, South Carolina.

Ruth has served as Director of the USC School of Medicine Library since 2000. She has worked in three other academic health sciences libraries including the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Library, the Alfred Taubman Medical Library at the University of Michigan, and the J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

Since 2012, Ruth has also served as the Assistant Dean for Executive Affairs at the USC School of Medicine. She is presently serving as Past-President of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries and has served as Chair of the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association and Chair of the Partnership Among South Carolina Academic Libraries.

Listen online at Podbean, Stitcher, or TuneIn Radio today!

The episode is also featured on the South Carolina State Library website: http://www.statelibrary.sc.gov/news/medical-librarianship-ruth-riley-libraryvoicessc-podcast-episode-64.

Links featured in this episode:

USC School of Medicine Library: https://uscmed.sc.libguides.com/
Medical Librarian’s Month: https://www.mlanet.org/page/national-medical-librarians-month
MedlinePlus: https://medlineplus.gov

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming GMR Webinar: Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities

Mon, 2018-10-15 11:29

Date/Time: October 24, 2018 1 PM CT/2 PM ET

Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities Through Virtual Community Health and Wellness Workshops

This session will provide attendees with background information about the Latino community both in the United States and in Minnesota. An overview of current demographics and health issues will be covered. The presenters will then describe how they designed, implemented, and evaluated the virtual health and wellness workshop series, covering mental health and wellness topics, targeting the Latino community in rural Minnesota towns.* The session will wrap up with considerations that other organizations can use when targeting outreach efforts to the Latino population within their local and hard-to-reach rural communities.

Register Here: https://nnlm.gov/class/addressing-latino-health-and-wellness-disparities-through-virtual-community-health-and

This session will be presented by Carla Kohler, Manager of Community Health Services and Dr. Benjamín Feigal, Director of Mental Health Services at CLUES (Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio).

*This workshop series was developed with funding support from the GMR

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Provisions for a Future Draft Data Management and Sharing Policy

Fri, 2018-10-12 15:45

On October 10, 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a Request for Information (RFI) in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts to solicit public input on proposed key provisions that could serve as the foundation for a future NIH policy for data management and sharing.  The feedback we obtain will help to inform the development of a draft NIH policy for data management and sharing, which is expected to be released for an additional public comment period upon its development.

Comments on the proposed key provisions will be accepted through December 10, 2018, and can be made electronically by visiting here.

To further engage stakeholders, NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the proposed key provisions on November 7, 2018, from 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. ET. Details about the webinar, including how to register can be found by clicking here.

For a perspective on the importance of obtaining robust stakeholder feedback on this topic, please see the latest Under the Poliscope by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz.

Questions about the proposed provisions may be sent to the NIH Office of Science Policy at SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar Announcement: Help Us Combat the World’s Most Dangerous Animal with an App!

Fri, 2018-10-12 14:15

Title: Help Us Combat the World’s Most Dangerous Animal with an App!

Guest Speaker: Dorian Janney, GLOBE Mission Mosquito Campaign Coordinator and Lead for NASA Satellite Collaborations, GFSC/NASA/ADNET

Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Time: 10am CT / 9am MT

Description: Mosquitoes are the world’s most dangerous animal, and there is something we can all do to reduce the threat of mosquito-transmitted disease in our communities. Join us to find out why mosquitoes are so dangerous and to learn how NASA Earth-observing satellite data is being used in an effort to predict, monitor, and respond to vector-borne disease around the world.

In this presentation, participants will be introduced to a Citizen Science effort and the newest GLOBE field measurement campaign, GLOBE Mission Mosquito! This program connects with citizen scientists of all ages to monitor changes in the frequency, range, and distribution of potential disease vector mosquitoes by reporting observations using the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper app. Participants are encouraged to download the free app here before the webinar.

Speaker Bio: Dorian Janney works at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. She is the Education and Outreach Specialist for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission as well as the GLOBE Mission Mosquito Campaign Coordinator and Lead for NASA Satellite Collaborations. She is a GLOBE Program Master Trainer, and enjoys going outside with people of all ages to assist them in learning more about this fantastic planet we all live on! She was a classroom teacher for over thirty years, and served as the head of the science department at a middle school which focused on Aerospace Technology and Astronomy.  Feel free to contact her at dorian.w.janney@nasa.gov.

For more information: https://nnlm.gov/scr/professional-development/connections. No registration is required for this class.

To Join the Meeting

  1. Go to https://nih.webex.com.
  2. Enter the session number: 625 372 995​​ and password: webinar
  3. Please provide your name and email address.
  4. You may have to download and install a web add-on or run a temporary application depending on the browser you use.
  5. Select your audio connection preference:
    *Call using computer – Adjust settings and test the connection
    *Call from WebEx – Enter your direct phone number and press 1 when prompted
    *Call in – Call: 1-650-479-3208 (US/Canada toll number)
    Enter access code: 625 372 995​​ #
    Enter the Attendee ID on your screen and press #
  6. If you are using a mobile device, your access code is: webinar

For live captioning, please use http://livewrite-ncc.appspot.com/attend?event=cit001

For any technical issues, please call: 817-735-2223.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Meet Dr. Cynthia Baur, Director, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park

Fri, 2018-10-12 10:32

 Cynthia Bauer and Student Team

Dr. Cynthia Baur (center) and the Center for Health Literacy student team at
the spring 2018 Health Literacy Huddle, UMD School of Public Health

Interview by Mary Ann Williams, MSLS
Research, Education & Outreach Librarian
School of Dentistry Librarian
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Health Sciences & Human Services Library

“Librarians and libraries are essential to developing health literate societies.”

 1) Please tell us about the Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy and what you strive to accomplish there.

 I am the Director of the Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park. We aim to educate people about limited health literacy and how and why it affects healthcare and public health outcomes. We research many different aspects of limited health literacy and look for practical solutions at different levels from increasing individual knowledge and health-promoting actions to healthcare system performance that puts patients and caregivers at the center of care processes. We also work on guidelines and policies that can influence how people find, communicate about, and use health information and services.

2) What inspired you to pursue the work you do today?

My personal experiences as a new mother 23 years ago inspired me to work on health communication and health literacy issues. I was overwhelmed and confused by the information I was getting from the healthcare system, and I thought it would be a worthy purpose to try to make all types of health information and services easier to understand and use. I expected it would be a short-term project and then I would move on and work on other problems! Obviously, I didn’t know or anticipate the many obstacles – educational, cultural, institutional, financial, political, and more – to clearly communicating about health.

3) If you only had one Health Literacy tool to use, what would it be?

My pick is the CDC Clear Communication Index because I was one of the co-creators while working at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. My colleague Dr. Christine Prue (a Terp alum) and I identified the need for science-based criteria about how to clearly communicate public health information and recommendations. She and I led a team to develop and test the Index. It has proved to be a remarkably flexible tool for improving the presentation of many types of information, not only health.

4) What role(s) can you see libraries/librarians (medical or public) taking to support health literacy initiatives?

 I think librarians and libraries are essential to developing health literate societies. We included libraries as key partners in the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (2010) because they are information hubs for all types of communities: urban, rural, large or small. Librarians are passionate about getting reliable information in people’s hands, and we need more people committed to finding and using the highest quality information in decision-making. I use the public library in my neighborhood, and I am impressed by the many ways libraries now make information available to a wide range of users. I’m also impressed that librarians are embracing their role as health information providers and can get a Consumer Health Information Specialization from the Medical Library Association.

 

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

New Website Design for Tox Town

Thu, 2018-10-11 13:48

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce a new design for the Tox Town website, which provides consumer-level information on everyday locations and situations where toxic chemical exposure might occur.

The new design, informed by extensive user research has:

  • Enhanced search optimization
  • Improved readability

New Tox Town features reflecting consumers’ frequently asked questions include:

Due to low usage, the website no longer contains Spanish language materials.

Categories: RML Blogs

Funding Opportunity: ALA Midwinter Travel Awards Available

Wed, 2018-10-10 08:38

ALA Seattle

As part of a partnership with the All of Us Research Program, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NNLM SEA) is pleased to offer up to 15 Professional Development Awards for library staff to attend ALA Midwinter. Library Awardees can apply for up to $3000 for registration and travel costs.

  • Eligibility – Any library in AL, DC, FL, GA, MD, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN, USVI, VA, and WV may apply.
  • Awards will be made on a cost-reimbursement basis to the individual attendee’s library. (i.e. a library must pay for an employee to attend and NNLM SEA will reimburse that library after the conference).
  • Libraries may choose to use the $3,000 to send more than one person, but NNLM SEA will not reimburse expenses beyond $3000 to a single organization.
  • Libraries must be a member of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. You may search to see if an organization is a member in the Membership directory. If not, membership is free and easy to sign up for. Only one award will be given per library.
  • If an individual is not a member of ALA, this award cannot pay for membership. Please budget for the non-member rate.
  • In addition to the full conference, each individual using award money must register for and attend the preconference “Implicit Bias, Health Disparities and Health Literacy” – See details below*
  • Any individual that receives any funds to attend ALA midwinter will be required to fill out a short evaluation. Awardee institutions will also be asked to contribute to SEA Currents, the NNLM SEA Newsletter about the conference.
  • Applications are due October 31, 2018. Decisions will be made on a first come, first served basis. Please note Early Bird Registration for ALA Midwinter is October 24, 2018.

*More about the ALA Midwinter Preconference:

Implicit Bias, Health Disparities and Health Literacy: Intersections in Health Equity – Friday, January 25, 2019, 9:00 AM-Noon – The purpose of this preconference is to raise awareness of implicit bias’s connection to health equity and to deepen understanding of health literacy as a tool to address health equity within vulnerable communities. The format will include presentations, facilitated table conversations, and self-reflection. Participants will explore how libraries can deepen their work in health literacy to ensure a lasting impact for improving the health of their community. Organizers will provide a packet of useful resources to support health literacy in the library including tools to identify their local communities’ health needs. This preconference is sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region, the Public Library Association, and the ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services.

Ticket pricing for Preconference: ALA Member: $40/50/$60 – Other Member: $40/$50/$60 – Non-Member: $40/$50/$60

Please feel free to share this with any library you think might be interested.

Please contact Tony Nguyen, Executive Director, with questions regarding this opportunity via e-mail or call 410-706-2855.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

MLA Research Training Institute: 2019 Call for Applications

Wed, 2018-10-10 07:20
Apply for the 2019 Research Training Institute

Applications are open through December 1, 2018, for the 2018 cohort of MLA Research Training Institute for Health Sciences Librarians (RTI) research fellows. Please follow links to the application instructions and the online application form. The institute is a weeklong residential workshop held in Chicago, July 15–19, 2019, with follow-up activities and support, mentoring, and membership in an ongoing research community. Read more in the MLA News article. For questions regarding the institute, application process, or scholarships, please contact Project Director Susan Lessick, AHIP, FMLA.

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming Webinar: Using Recovery Coaches in Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Tue, 2018-10-09 16:08

Date/Time: October 18, 2018 1-2 PM ET

PresentersRichard Kenny, CADC Recovery Coach, UMassMemorial Medical Center and Rob Ryan, LADC Recovery Coach, UMassMemorial Medical Center

Abstract: A Recovery Coach is a person who helps remove the personal and environmental obstacles to recovery, links the newly recovering person to the recovering community and serves as a personal guide and mentor in the management of personal and family recovery. In this webinar you will learn what motivational interviewing is and how it aids in the change process and communicates acceptance. Rich and Rob will present an overview of the Recovery Coaching program at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. They will also share the data they have collected from their program about the use of recovery coaching in the treatment of substance use disorder.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the UMass Memorial Medical Center’s Recovering Coaching program as a method to treat substance use disorder.
  • Learn what motivational interviewing is and how to use motivational interviewing in goal-centered, and client-centered situations.
  • Understand the data that has been collected about the success of the Recovery Coaching program at the UMass Memorial Medical Center.

Register at: https://nnlm.gov/class/using-recovery-coaches-substance-use-disorder-treatment/8878

 

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Meet Mary Ann Williams and Lauren Wheeler

Tue, 2018-10-09 15:13
Willams and Wheeler

Mary Ann Williams (L) and Lauren Wheeler (R) conducting a workshop

Mary Ann Williams
Research, Education & Outreach Librarian
School of Dentistry Librarian
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Health Sciences & Human Services Library

Lauren Wheeler
Information Services Librarian
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Health Sciences & Human Services Library </p?

Health literacy is becoming a vital issue at both the societal and medical professional level. The Health Sciences and Human Services Library at the University of Maryland, Baltimore offers a Communicating with Patients workshop to help those in medical professions learn effective ways to communicate with their patients. The workshop begins by raising the participants’ awareness of the low health literacy rates in the United States as well as in Baltimore. Confronted with the realization of these rates, health professionals immediately see the need to improve their verbal and written communication with their patients.

Defining health literacy at the beginning of the workshop has been a great strategy to engage participants. We explain that health literacy is the ability to read, understand, and act on health information. The emphasis of this definition is placed on the ability of the patient to deal with the information the healthcare provider is giving them. However, it is the responsibility of the healthcare professional to provide health information that is understandable to the patient.

During the workshop, we highlight several areas where clear health communication is lacking within the healthcare setting. These areas include the language used on prescription container labels, maps, schedules and instructions posted in healthcare setting, as well as the use of unfamiliar phrases, symbols and abbreviations. Many of these things have a high literacy demand and are discouraging to patients. Our workshop brings awareness to these areas then gives suggestions for clearer communication.

While most health-related materials are written at a high school reading level, the average adult reads at a middle school level. This statistic is often shocking to the workshop participants. It helps them see the importance of health literacy. To combat the differences between health materials and average reading levels, the workshop presents simple changes the health professional can use when presenting information to the patient. We talk about using short sentences and bullet points to help focus readers. We also suggest against using polysyllabic words whenever possible. These longer medical terms can often be substituted with a shorter, easier to understand, term. For example, using blood infection instead of septicemia. One approach that often surprises our workshop participants is to use sans-serif fonts like Ariel instead of fonts with serifs, like Times New Roman. We also suggest clear ways to convey numerical concepts. These strategies include rounding decimals to the nearest whole number and using familiar analogies. Telling a patient to eat a serving of meat about the size of their palm paints a much different, and easier to understand, picture than just saying to eat a single serving of meat. Participants seem interested that such a simple change can make a difference in how a patient understands information.

During the session, we encourage active participation by asking participants to share their experiences, or how they might use what we have discussed. An example of engaging the participants is used when explaining how clear health communication is done in active voice instead of passive voice; we ask participants to translate an example paragraph into active voice. Sometimes this is a strange concept to participants because they are used to writing for academic journals, which typically require the use of passive voice.

Another way participation is encouraged during the workshop is by giving participants a few sentences that could be improved in several ways. We ask them to change these sentences to make them clearer, using the strategies talked about in the workshop. If any of the points are missed as participants discuss their changes, we go back and talk about them.

To reinforce the points which were covered, we provide a lengthier sample of text with the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level score and percentage of passive sentences. They work in Microsoft Word to lower both of these numbers. Oftentimes, there is a “lightbulb moment” where the workshop participants realize that translating medical text is more difficult than they originally thought. Using this exercise makes the lecture more relatable and participants can quantifiably see how the changes they make to a passage affect health literacy.

The Communicating with Patients workshop is very popular. Health providers often see the need to communicate clearly with patients, they just need a little instruction on how to achieve this. From the follow-up survey, we believe workshop participants are happy with the strategies taught in the workshop and, from their comments, hope they are using a few of them in their everyday practice.

Categories: RML Blogs

Get Ready: Hurricane Michael Takes Aim at 300-Mile Gulf Coast

Tue, 2018-10-09 08:27

Hurricane Michael Takes Aim at 300-Mile Gulf Coast

Hurricane Michael is threatening more than 300 miles of the Gulf Coast, prompting emergency declarations in more than 100 counties from Mobile, Alabama through the Florida Panhandle and into the state’s Big Bend region. Residents are encourage to make preparations ahead of potential landfall. It is impossible for us to know the extent to which our Network Members will be impacted by this hurricane.

NOTE for DOCLINE Members: If your library will be closed due to the hurricane, please set your library “out of office” to temporarily deactivate lending in DOCLINE. If your library has never set your “out of office” before, please visit the NNLM DOCLINE website to learn how. Doing so will prevent requests from routing to your library during times of extended absence or special circumstances.

We encourage you to visit the following pages from the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). You can embed the content from both of these pages on your own Website by accessing the Health and Human Services (HHS) Content Syndication Storefront. When we update any of these pages, your pages will be automatically updated as well.

Hurricane Michael

DIMRC

MedlinePlus

Federal Agency Resources

Agencies and Organizations

Social Media

Crowdsource Resources

Finally, visit the NNLM SEA Page of Disaster Information Resources for Alerts and Feeds, State and National Specific Resources, Multilingual and Evacuation Resources, and more!

Although we are not sure what the full impact of this hurricane will have in our region, please reach out to the NNLM SEA and NDCO if we can be of assistance. We will continue to update this article with more information as the hurricane progresses to the gulf coast. Please keep us up-to-date regarding the status of your library/institution but more importantly let us know you are safe and well.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Meet Brittni Ballard: Gaming for Health Literacy – It’s a thing!

Fri, 2018-10-05 11:45


Brittni Ballard, Future MLIS
MLIS student
University of Maryland, College Park

University of Maryland’s HackHealth is a 12-week after-school health literacy program for Prince George’s County middle schoolers co-founded by Dr. Beth St. Jean and Dr. Mega Subramaniam.

This program featured a specially-designed digital health literacy skills pre-assessment worksheet to be re-administered at the program’s end to gauge student growth. However, participants so openly disliked the assessment, it was not offered again. Realizing the assessment needed to be less test-like, Beth shared the dilemma with her graduate students and word spread through mutual acquaintance to Master of Library and Information Science student Brittni Ballard.

Brittni’s interest in game-based learning, including gamification and serious games, combined with passions for adolescent / young adult education and emerging technologies, presented a mutually beneficial collaboration through Independent Study this past summer: Brittni could pursue her interest in game-based learning and future HackHealth participants could benefit from a more positive program introduction.

As a result, a learning platform with three distinct learning objects was created. These objects are a survey which shares students’ scores on multiple choice questions only upon completion, a discussion forum with modern interactivity features, and a visual novel video game which shares students’ performance history upon completion.

Together, these three learning objects introduce information literacy broadly while comprehensively approaching health literacy development through reinforcement and assessment of students’ functional, communicative or interactive, and critical health knowledge and skills.

For additional information on the learning platform’s development or to learn more about game-based learning, visit this behind-the-scenes site, also developed by Brittni. Alternatively, skip the context and dive right into the game where the real fun awaits! Download the Windows or Mac version, .zip files shared via Google Drive you must extract, and when alerted to an unknown developer of the app “HealthHack_Demo,” click “Run Anyway.”

Learn on, game long, and prosper.

October is Health Literacy Month and National Medical Librarians Month! This month we will feature profiles of health literacy advocates and medical librarians in the NNLM SEA region. There’s still time to participate. If you have a story you’d like to share, please visit this post to learn how.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – October 5, 2018

Fri, 2018-10-05 06:35

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Celebrating National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Asynchronous Moodle LMS Course

Webinars October 8-12

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar Announcement: In the Shoes of a Fellow: The National Library of Medicine’s Associate Fellowship Program – October 17, 2018

Thu, 2018-10-04 11:33

Fellowship Program

Date/Time: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 1:00 PM PT/ 4:00 PM ET

Presenter: Shannon Sheridan, MLIS, NLM Associate Fellow

Summary: Having a solid foundation of experience is essential for early-career librarians. For those interested in the health sciences, it may seem difficult at times to find opportunities to grow as a leader and a librarian. The National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program is a one-year postgraduate training fellowship at the NLM in Bethesda, Maryland, with an optional second year component. The program is designed to provide a broad foundation in health sciences information services, and to prepare librarians for future leadership roles in health sciences libraries and in health services research. In this webinar, a current Associate Fellow will discuss the organization of the program, her experiences as an Associate Fellow, and some of the projects she and other fellows worked on.

Upon completion of the presentation, each participant will receive 1.0 contact hour of continuing education credit award by the Medical Library Association. Participants will receive a code to which they will enter in medlib-ed.

Registration is encouraged. For questions, please contact Carolyn Martin.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Meet Kelsey Grabeel and Learn How a Health Information Center in an Academic Medical Center Improves Health Literacy for Patients

Thu, 2018-10-04 09:03


Kelsey Grabeel, MSIS, AHIP
Assistant Director of the Health Information Center
Assistant Professor
University of Tennessee Medical Center
Health Information Center
Preston Medical Library

“One of the biggest misconceptions about health literacy is that only those with a lower education level will have low health literacy.”

1) What inspired you to pursue the work you do today?

Early on as the Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) at Preston Medical Library, I became involved in health literacy projects. Our library has a Consumer and Patient Health Information Service that I participated in and I worked on a Health Literacy Fact Sheet as well. Our health literacy projects grew out of our desire to affect more patients while they were in the hospital and to include our nurses and other staff in a more integrated way. As a GRA, I had an interest in assisting health consumers and when the library moved to a location inside the hospital, they gained a librarian position focused on consumer health/health literacy. It seemed like a great fit and once I became a librarian, I worked on a couple of health literacy research projects. What really caught my interest was being a member of the Patient Education Committee. I was shocked by the complicated language used in some of the titles for the patient education our hospital distributed. I really wanted to make a difference and found purposeful work editing patient education materials to make them easy to understand.

2) Can you share a health literacy success story from personal experience?

A health literacy success story for me would be when the Patient Education Committee made the Health Information Center (HIC) part of the custom patient education review workflow. Our nurses, staff, physicians, etc write custom patient education in house. The Patient Education Committee added the HIC so that we could review the in house resources for literacy and plain language principles. Once we were added to the workflow, I was able to edit patient education materials and make suggestions to lower the reading grade level and make materials easy-to-read, written in plain language. So far, I have reviewed and edited about 70 pieces of custom patient education.

3) Please tell us about the Health Information Center and what you strive to accomplish there.

At the HIC, I strive to make it a place patients can come to relax and learn. They can come to find easy-to-read health information and read about health conditions. I try to have cookbooks for patients and the community as well as caregiving books. We really want people to know about our health information service that provides free health information from reliable resources. We also have computers patients can use to check email or do their own research.

4) In your opinion, what is the biggest misconception about health literacy out there?

I think one of the biggest misconceptions about health literacy is that only those with a lower education will have low health literacy. Health literacy affects people of all education levels and I think that’s important to remember. Patients will most likely prefer the educational resource that is easier to read than one that is full of medical jargon.

5) What advice would you give someone who wants to follow your career path?

I would advise librarians or IS students to look for other health literacy librarians in the professional literature, at Chapter meetings, MLA CAPHIS, and contacting NNLM for suggestions. MLA offers CHIS certification that is valuable. NNLM provides free classes and resources for improving consumer health, as well. Attending health literacy conferences and signing up for listservs are a great step for those who are already doing consumer health and want to take their careers to the next level. I also would advise making connections in your own institution. You never know who might be interested and it’s important to engage the people in your own institution and get them excited about health literacy. By finding a faculty member equally passionate about health literacy, we were able to add a health literacy rotation to a 4th year medical student clerkship.

HIC Chalkboard by Jennifer Luhrs

       HIC Chalkboard by Jennifer Luhrs

Traveling Health Information Center

          Traveling Health Information Center     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October is Health Literacy Month and National Medical Librarians Month! This month we will feature profiles of health literacy advocates and medical librarians in the NNLM SEA region. There’s still time to participate. If you have a story you’d like to share, please visit this post to learn how.

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar Announcement: Game On! Motivate and Engage Your Staff with Gaming Strategies

Wed, 2018-10-03 16:03

Title: Game On! Motivate and Engage Your Staff with Gaming Strategies

Guest Speaker: Andrew See, Head of User Services and Experience, and Bridget Rowan, Training Coordinator for User Services and Experience, Northern Arizona University Cline Library

Date: Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Time: 11 am ET / 10 am CT / 9 am MT

Description: In this program, presenters will provide an overview of why your institution should be intentional in creating an immersive and engaging training and development program, and how to go about hiring the right person to lead it.

Attendees will learn how to create engaging staff workshops, integrate gaming into a learning management system, and use specific tools including badges and ready-made free online platforms. Using meaningful game elements attendees will leave inspired to increase staff engagement at their own institutions.

Became a game mechanic and learn how you can transform your training, development, and team building to promote and sustain a truly motivated staff.

Speaker Bio: Andrew See is Head of User Services and Experience at the Northern Arizona University Cline Library; a department which includes 8 classified staff, 2 faculty librarians, and approximately 19 student employees. Andrew chairs two User Experience groups in the library providing UX oversight to both the website and physical building.  He is currently serving as chair of the LLAMA Systems and Services: Management Practices Committee.  Andrew is a national presenter and published author on using technology in management practices.  He received his MLIS from the University of Arizona School of Information Resources and Library Science.  Contact him at Andrew.See@nau.edu.

Bridget Rowan is the Training Coordinator for User Services and Experience at the Northern Arizona University Cline Library where she trains both student employees and full time staff. When Bridget’s not immersed in the world of library training, you can find her working on the Cline Library website or managing 3D printing in the MakerLab. She earned her Master’s of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University. Contact her at Bridget.Rowan@nau.edu.

For more information: https://nnlm.gov/scr/professional-development/connections. No registration is required for this class.

To Join the Meeting

  1. Go to https://nih.webex.com.
  2. Enter the session number: 296 593 189​ and password: webinar
  3. Please provide your name and email address.
  4. You may have to download and install a web add-on or run a temporary application depending on the browser you use.
  5. Select your audio connection preference:
    *Call using computer – Adjust settings and test the connection
    *Call from WebEx – Enter your direct phone number and press 1 when prompted
    *Call in – Call: 1-650-479-3208 (US/Canada toll number)
    Enter access code: 296 593 189​ #
    Enter the Attendee ID on your screen and press #
  6. If you are using a mobile device, your access code is: webinar

For live captioning, please use http://livewrite-ncc.appspot.com/attend?event=cit001

For any technical issues, please call: 817-735-2223.

Categories: RML Blogs

Pages