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All of Us

What Makes A Vaccine Successful?

BHIC All of Us - Mon, 2021-02-22 12:16

At the moment we’re all talking about vaccines like never before, but what makes a vaccine successful?

The ultimate indicator of a successful vaccination campaign—the percentage of people who are fully vaccinated against a condition, such as COVID-19—must be tracked by all communities. Read more on how states and localities can improve the data they share here.

The information is accessible in a variety of languages such as English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, French, Thai and Portuguese.

The post What Makes A Vaccine Successful? first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.
Categories: All of Us

Rare Disease Month

BHIC All of Us - Mon, 2021-02-22 12:10

Rare diseases are individually rare yet collectively common. In fact, 1 in 10 people in the USA are affected by a rare disease. There are only six days until Rare Disease Day and you can learn more about the day here.

To find out more information about rare diseases and their impact on so many of us, click here.

 

The post Rare Disease Month first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.
Categories: All of Us

Black History Month Webinar

BHIC All of Us - Mon, 2021-02-22 12:05

In recognition of Black History Month, join the All of Us Research Program in celebrating African-American researchers’ impact and contributions to the media and research fields on Friday February 26th at 12-1:30pm EST.

The event is open to anyone with a passion for discovery and innovation but is especially designed for African American emerging researchers and early career investigators.

The post Black History Month Webinar first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.
Categories: All of Us

February Citizen Science Event

PSR Latitudes All of Us - Fri, 2021-02-12 17:54

SciStarter has teamed up with the Network of the National Library of Medicine and the All of Us Research Program to host a webinar series in January, February, and March, called “Lend Citizen Science Project Scientists a Hand. Then, Discuss the Results!” This series is highlighting a different citizen science project each month, showing you how to get involved in the project, and creating a space for you to share your experiences and questions with the project scientists! February’s featured project is Eterna.

Eterna is an online puzzle game citizen scientists can play to help project scientists understand complex RNA molecules and develop new medical treatments for global diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, or even COVID-19. Players design and solve puzzles, and can compete in challenges specifically created to solve some of science’s most pressing questions. Puzzle solutions that receive the most votes in the game are actually built and tested in labs at Stanford, so that scientists can learn more about how RNA molecules work.

Eterna RNA molecule model

Since the game’s launch in 2011, Stanford has built and tested thousands of molecules designed by players. Additionally, 25 scientific papers on RNA structure and design have been published using data from Eterna, some of which citizen scientist Eterna players helped to write! Not only did Eterna help forge this revolutionary new role for non-experts in science, it also represented the very first use of the massive open laboratory’ model in a published biology paper. This model of experimental design and data collection, characterized by a huge number of people coming together to analyze science experiments, is an exciting possibility that could be used widely in the future to help strengthen the integrity of the scientific method. Beyond paving the way for new experimental methods, Eterna players have helped bioengineers learn new rules for RNA structure design, so that they can create increasingly accurate machine learning algorithms that perform well in experiments. Eterna’s gamers can help fight disease too. The OpenTB Challenge launched in 2018 recruited players to design a molecule that could be used to create a cost-effective diagnostic test for tuberculosis. More recently, Eterna has challenged players with an “Eterna-Corona Puzzle of the Day,” with the goal of better understanding the RNA biology of coronaviruses, RNA-based tests and treatments, and mRNA vaccines. Eterna is currently being used to help develop a refrigerator-stable COVID-19 vaccine that could be used all around the world.

The successes of crowdsourcing scientific data through Eterna’s massive open laboratory model really jibe with the All of Us program’s vision of diversity in research. People of all backgrounds should be involved in research so we can find solutions that work well for everyone around the world. Furthermore, the more minds we have working on important scientific questions, the faster we’ll be able to find the answers the world needs. Eterna’s developers are dedicated to making the game increasingly accessible to all kinds of people. Groundbreaking ideas can come from anyone, anywhere!

Join the Eterna webinar event live on Thursday, February 18 at 2:00 pm PST. For more information visit the event page at SciStarter.

 

Post by NNLM PSR intern Elisa Borgsdorf, edited by Amy Reyes

The post February Citizen Science Event first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: All of Us

NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network Member Survey

SEA All of Us - Wed, 2021-02-10 15:28

The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is inviting members to complete a survey about the All of Us Community Engagement Network (CEN). The purpose of the survey is to learn about your experiences participating in the CEN and how we can improve our services to support your organization to be a trusted health resource in your community.

The survey will take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Completing the survey is voluntary.

Participants will be eligible to enter a random drawing for one of ten $25 Target gift cards. Only one person from each NNLM member organization is eligible to win a gift card.

Select here to access the survey: NNLM CEN Survey

Or, copy and paste the following URL: https://nnlm.gov/ZbW

Please respond to the survey by February 26, 2021.

If you have any questions about the survey, please contact Asih Asikin-Garmager at asih-asikin@uiowa.edu.

The post NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network Member Survey first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: All of Us

Strengthen Your Heart Health Knowledge with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA All of Us - Tue, 2021-02-09 15:05

The reason we have cancer and heart disease is the same reason you can’t get rid of the wear and tear on your tires on your car: as soon as you use them, you are wearing them away. You can’t make eternal tires, and it’s the same with the human body.

– S. Jay Olshansky, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions.

NNLM Reading Club February Selections

When the Words Suddenly Stopped by Vivian L. King | Being Empowered for a Health Heart by Dr. Phoebe Chi | Restart Your Heart by Dr. Aseem Desai

 

In Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart: A Personal Guide to Taking Control of Your Health While Living with Chronic Conditions, Dr. Phoebe Chi seeks to empower those with chronic diseases of all types, including heart disease and high blood pressure, in the self-management of their conditions. The internal medicine and public health physician does so with practical exercises and tools in each chapter to address symptoms, even throwing some poetry into the mix.

Restart Your Heart: The Playbook for Thriving with AFib by cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. Aseem Desai clears up some of the confusion surrounding atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can interfere with blood flow. In addition to providing knowledge about AFib, Desai discusses how to deal with the diagnosis from a mental and emotional perspective.

Finally, in When the Words Suddenly Stopped, former television broadcast journalist Vivian King describes her experience recovering from a stroke that took away her voice, sharing how determination bolstered by a reliance on faith, family and friends allowed her to recover.

Strengthening your heart knowledge can help strengthen your heart. We hope these books will provide you an opportunity to do both. Visit the NNLM Reading Club for discussion guides to these titles and other useful information.

The post Strengthen Your Heart Health Knowledge with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: All of Us

Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition

PNR All of Us - Thu, 2021-02-04 20:05

By Guest Contributor Karen Yother, Community Library Network, Idaho

Anyone who has worked with teens will tell you that they are quite the unique audience. What is trendy one day is out of favor the next. They eagerly develop their own personalities and interests, continually seeking ways to express their ideas in a variety of formats. But today’s teens also are under an intense amount of pressure at home, at school, from friends, the community and – unlike their earlier counterparts — in the virtual world.

Project Rationale/Description/Goals

More than 19,600 teens live in our Northern Idaho Community Library Network service area: approximately 34% of our total population. Yet, similar to most communities, needed programs and services to teens are poorly funded. The Alliance for Excellent Education reports that teens (ages 12-18) receive the least financial support, lagging far behind what is invested in children (birth-11 years) and new adults (ages 19 and up).

Conversations with our community partners working with teens center around Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and ways to help teens overcome traumatic experiences. The more ACEs a child experiences, the more likely he or she will suffer poor academic achievement, substance abuse, and toxic stress. According to the Child Mind Institute, nearly one in three teens meet the criteria for an anxiety disorder by the age of 18. Given that mental health is a topic not frequently discussed, teens often suffer in silence. That needn’t happen as there are a variety of approaches to help teens who have experienced ACEs, including meditation, exercise, and spending time outdoors. To help allay the anxiety suffered by many teens, we developed Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition, with a focus on mindfulness, physical activity, and nutrition.

Our Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project was funded by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region. Our project goal was to provide health literacy programming along with technology access, exploration, and training to teens in the Community Library Network service area. We planned to use a mobile discovery bike and van to reach young members whose communities lack the facilities and infrastructure to offer wellness programming by using tech-discovery options.

Through this wellness initiative, teens would gain first-hand experience with various mindfulness techniques, access technology to find quality health resources, and discover how their local library is available to assist their wellness exploration, practices and learning.

Regrettably, onset of the COVID pandemic required us to forego the majority of our programming for the time being. Following is a report of what we planned to accomplish … and what we still hope to achieve, once conditions allow.

Project Plans

Our project focuses on teens ages 11-18 and their health literacy needs, specifically providing them access to quality health information and community resources to help reduce stress and anxiety. We identified teens’ health and wellness because teens increasingly use our library for respite and safe harbor. Our project embraces one of the core tenets of precision medicine, a focus of the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network and aimed to equip teens with access to quality health information and resources, as well as to empower them to make the best choices for themselves. According to the Precision Medicine Initiative, precision medicine is “an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person.” While we are not medical professionals, we recognize the individuality of teens in our community and the need to offer a variety of programs and resources to meet their unique and varying needs.

The Wellness Open House is one program we designed to offer through Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition. Health, wellness, alternative medicine, and other practitioners were invited to participate, share information, and provide demonstrations as appropriate. All of Us materials would be distributed to all attendees in an effort to raise awareness of the All of Us Research Project. While the Wellness Open House was designed with teens in mind, the event was also open to their family members and the general public. COVID-19 put our Open House on hold, but plans are in place to offer this event later this year.

Many families within our District’s 1,100 square miles lack access to technology and quality health resources, especially in our rural areas. Four of our library communities — Athol, Harrison, Pinehurst and Spirit Lake — are towns with fewer than 2,500 people. These small towns lack the resources and infrastructure to expose teens and families to the countless educational, cultural and entertainment opportunities available through today’s technology. This lack of technology access coupled with work and school schedules, shelter and transportation difficulties, add to the stress of daily life for many teens, contributing to increased anxiety. All of these factors are obstacles to success.

We planned to use Pop-Up Library Book Bikes, equipped with hotspots, tablets, virtual and augmented reality equipment to bring programming to neighborhoods, parks and targeted community locations.  Engaging programs such as meditation, yoga, Zumba, healthful cooking, and paint & sip will be scheduled once it is safe again to do so. Teens will receive access to new technologies and learn about health resources for their personal health literacy toolkits.

During our planning sessions, the Youth Services (YS) team discussed the project’s programs, community partnerships, timelines and branding needs. We wanted to create a brand that empowered teens and opened them up to a world of possibilities. The team selected “I Am” as the theme to empower teens to think of all the positive characteristics to define themselves: bold, strong, empowered, loved, fearless, creative. Once the project’s logo was completed, using Community Library Network funds, we created materials for distribution at community events to engage teens, including stickers, magnets, and stress balls.

We built a project website, I am ME, which provides quality health resources for teens. Topics include mental health, self-care, relaxation, food, be your best self, along with hotlines, helplines, and text lines.

We purchased six (6) sandwich boards to use as ‘talk back’ boards. Drawing from the Public Library Association Project Outcomes evaluation tools, we selected three questions for teen response at each program’s conclusion:

  1. Did you learn something helpful?
  2. Are you more aware of health-related resources and services provided by the library?
  3. What did you like most about the program?

Using this method, teens will write their responses on Post-it notes and place them under each question, giving them an opportunity to respond honestly and anonymously.

COVID-19

We held a few initial programs and were just about to fully launch our Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project when the pandemic hit and everything shut down. Staff attempted to re-invent programs to meet community health requirements but were unable to do so in a safe, engaging way. Throughout the pandemic, it has been heartbreaking for staff to see teens stressed and distanced from both their friends and routines, knowing there is nothing we can do. Pre-COVID-19, the library was a safe place for teens to come and hang out, chat with friends and staff, and attend quality programs. Being closed has heightened teens need for a safe place and not being able to provide it was a significant blow to the staff as well as the community.

Recently our local schools began offering mental health and suicide prevention programs to the 3rd-5th grade students. Because of its “I Am” initiative through the Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project, the library is poised to provide support and resources to the schools for these students. Being able to support and embed ourselves in the community again to provide kids and teens with tools for their well-being toolbelt is gratifying.

Our “Why”

The Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project’s “I Am” initiative is important because one year ago, three teens in our community committed suicide. We are not naïve to think that this project, once fully launched, will save every teen who struggles with mental health, self-esteem, family issues, food insecurity, bullying, trauma – the list of ACEs goes on and on. Rather, we want the library, through this project, to be part of the solution, the place teens will think of to:

  • provide the tools and resources to help them make the best decisions possible.
  • learn to take a deep breath before they lash out.
  • understand the connection between a balanced diet and their overall health.
  • understand the importance of a good night’s sleep.
  • learn ways to gather their thoughts, use positive internal messaging, find ways to manage stress, and develop skills to have a healthy school/work life balance.

Will our teens always make the ‘right’ decision? No. But having the proper tools gets them one step closer and that is something we can all support.

The Community Library Network’s mission, “We empower discovery” encompasses nearly every aspect of what we do. This project aligns closely with what we aim to accomplish every day – to better the lives of our members through empowerment. While we did not get to complete the entire year of our project’s plans, we consider this project one of our stars. Our early efforts were well-received by teens; community members expressed their appreciation; partners have signed on to support it post-pandemic; and staff frequently share new ideas and plans for upcoming virtual and in-person programs.

Setting COVID-19 aside, issues facing teens today can feel overwhelming and insurmountable. The spotlight the pandemic shone on teen health was a stark reminder of why what we do is so important. While we did not have the opportunity to host every aspect of our projects’ programs or events that we wanted to in 2020, we’ve chosen to persevere and forge ahead into 2021 with renewed vigor and excitement to reach the teens in our community and ensure access to quality health resources and programs in whatever format possible.

Note: If you would like more information about the Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project, you may reach Karen Yother at: kareny@communitylibrary.net

The post Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: All of Us

NNLM Reading Club February Selections Focuses on Heart Health

MCR All of Us - Wed, 2021-02-03 13:07

 

The reason we have cancer and heart disease is the same reason you can’t get rid of the wear and tear on your tires on your car: as soon as you use them, you are wearing them away. You can’t make eternal tires, and it’s the same with the human body.

– S. Jay Olshansky, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions.

In Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart: A Personal Guide to Taking Control of Your Health While Living with Chronic Conditions, Dr. Phoebe Chi seeks to empower those with chronic diseases of all types, including heart disease and high blood pressure, in the self-management of their conditions. The internal medicine and public health physician does so with practical exercises and tools in each chapter to address symptoms, even throwing some poetry into the mix.

Restart Your Heart: The Playbook for Thriving with AFib by cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. Aseem Desai clears up some of the confusion surrounding atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can interfere with blood flow. In addition to providing knowledge about AFib, Desai discusses how to deal with the diagnosis from a mental and emotional perspective.

Finally, in When the Words Suddenly Stopped, former television broadcast journalist Vivian King describes her experience recovering from a stroke that took away her voice, sharing how determination bolstered by a reliance on faith, family and friends allowed her to recover.

Strengthening your heart knowledge can help strengthen your heart. We hope these books will provide you an opportunity to do both. Visit the NNLM Reading Club for discussion guides to these titles and other useful information.

The post NNLM Reading Club February Selections Focuses on Heart Health first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: All of Us

Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club

PNR All of Us - Tue, 2021-02-02 20:00

The reason we have cancer and heart disease is the same reason you can’t get rid of the wear and tear on your tires on your car: as soon as you use them, you are wearing them away. You can’t make eternal tires, and it’s the same with the human body.                                                                                                         – S. Jay Olshansky, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions.

When the Words Suddenly Stopped by Vivian King l Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart by Phoebe Chi l Restart Your Heart by Aseem Desai

In Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart: A Personal Guide to Taking Control of Your Health While Living with Chronic Conditions, Dr. Phoebe Chi seeks to empower those with chronic diseases of all types, including heart disease and high blood pressure, in the self-management of their conditions. The internal medicine and public health physician does so with practical exercises and tools in each chapter to address symptoms, even throwing some poetry into the mix.

Restart Your Heart: The Playbook for Thriving with AFib by cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. Aseem Desai clears up some of the confusion surrounding atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can interfere with blood flow. In addition to providing knowledge about AFib, Desai discusses how to deal with the diagnosis from a mental and emotional perspective.

Finally, in When the Words Suddenly Stopped, former television broadcast journalist Vivian King describes her experience recovering from a stroke that took away her voice, sharing how determination bolstered by a reliance on faith, family and friends allowed her to recover.

Strengthening your heart knowledge can help strengthen your heart. We hope these books will provide you an opportunity to do both. Visit the NNLM Reading Club for discussion guides to these titles and other useful information.

The post Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: All of Us

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

SCR All of Us - Mon, 2021-02-01 17:09

 

The following guest blog post is provided by NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network in collaboration with Sarah Lucero. We always love to share what libraries around our region are up to! Read below to learn about ABOS and Sarah’s experience at this year’s virtual conference.

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, one South Central Region scholarship recipient outlines her favorite moments, and what she took away from the ABOS conference.

Sarah Lucero, Programming and Outreach, Nicholas P. Sims Library (TX)

This was my first year to attend the ABOS conference. I learned about ABOS in early spring of 2020 and when I saw that a conference would be held in Dallas I immediately applied for the Carol Hole Award. I was delighted to find an organization that focuses on outreach!

ABOS did not disappoint! I chose to attend multiple sessions that concentrated on children and senior citizens outreach; which is the primary focus of my position and my community programming.

I particularly enjoyed seeing how other Outreach Services were revamping and modifying how to do outreach in a new way; and discussing with fellow attendees what has and has not worked for us.

Overall, I learned there is a huge community of like-minded people who are just as passionate about serving our local communities as I am. I eagerly await next year’s conference.

Thank you to Sarah for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post.

To learn more about ABOS, please click here.

To learn more about The Carol Combs Hole Conference Attendance Award, click here.

Check out the Nicholas P. Sims Library in Waxahachie, TX here.

 

Remember to like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on Blogadillo.
Categories: All of Us

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

SEA All of Us - Mon, 2021-02-01 15:09

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, 3 Southeastern/Atlantic Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

——–

Nicole Klein, Community Engagement Librarian at Cobb County Public Library System (GA)

Nicole Klein sitting with her two dogsI’m still fairly new to working exclusively in Outreach—I’ve been in my current position just shy of a year—so this was my first time attending an ABOS conference. I was blown away by how interactive the folks attending the ABOS conference made it for themselves. The virtual format definitely made for a “make what you will out of it” experience this year and I was impressed to see how available and engaged attendees made themselves. As my supervisor has said, the folks that work in Outreach reach are a different breed of librarian and that was very evident to me, and wholly appreciated; it felt like discovering my people. We are looking at procuring a book bike at our library system and Ian Gosse’s presentation, “The Paperback Rider: The Five-Year Evolution of a Book Bike Service” was INVALUABLE.

Marlan Brinkley, Library Director of the McDowell County Public Library System (NC)

Photo of Marlan BrinkleyI had a great time attending the ABOS Conference this year.  Normally traveling costs prevent me from going to events like these, so I was glad for the opportunity to attend digitally. Recorded sessions were especially helpful, particularly when I wanted to attend two or more sessions all occurring at the same time. The videos have also been a great resource for when I needed to replay them and catch a product or vendor name I missed the first time.

One of my favorite sessions was Outreach Start Up provided by Beth Brown from the Muskingum County Library System. I was looking forward to it because my library system was finally at a point where we dedicate programs and services toward outreach. While we had successfully done some outreach in the community, I was wanting to hear from someone who created an outreach department practically from scratch. What worked well? What didn’t? We’re a small rural library system, so I was hoping to hear outreach tips that could be scalable to us. Fortunately, Ms. Brown provided great advice and a general outline of what we should consider as we grow our outreach department.

Here are the items I felt were particularly noteworthy:

  • The value of information gathering. What services are being offered where? Where are the gaps? What are our community partners (ex. Friends groups) doing?
  • Tip: imagine the policies you’re starting with are a blueprint- they’ll be adjusted to suit the needs of your community.
  • As we consider what policies we should implement, look at policies from other libraries as inspiration.
  • The ABOS listserv is a dependable resource for advice (which we already knew!).
  • We were introduced to Bed Bug Bags as a resource. I had no idea this was even a thing.
  • The value of keeping communication open between the homebound delivery recipients. I especially admired their efforts by writing letters to their patrons during Covid-19 closures.
  • As we look for opportunities to establish connections in the community, include public events such as festivals, parades, farmer’s markets. Bring a collection that matches the theme (ex. cooking, farming, and produce books for the farmer’s market).
  • Consider rebranding some services. Ex. was “homebound”, now called “house call.”
  • Finally, be an active member of the community by joining local groups and organizations.

Heather Ogilvie, Outreach Librarian, Bay County Public Library (FL)

Photo of Heather OgilvieABOS 2020 Virtual Conference: Outdoing Outreach was AWESOME. ABOS as an organization is a dynamic work group, and a brain trust, but most of all, ABOS is a community where everyone belongs.

[At the orientation] I found at the last minute, that, while I had been using the super-cool Whova App for days to learn about workshops, agendas, attendees, and contests, I didn’t know how to get into the actual conference! Turns out I was not alone. We were all wandering around in cyberspace. But within moments everyone began to appear in the ZOOM conference room.

Throughout the day, there were bookmobile videos from other libraries, showcasing their work. That was super interesting. Most bookmobiles on display are currently operating on curbside pickup only. The larger bookmobiles are staying home now, and the vans, cars, and bicycles are on the move.

All the sponsors made personal presentations. Ordinarily, I feel uncomfortable among the vendors… but in this environment, we were discussing products, services, and innovations, rather than what I could purchase. It was just interesting and not stressful!

This was my Ice Breaker for day one: I am currently teaching a class called Conversations that Matter: Tough Topics With Total Strangers. I think we can strengthen community resilience by increasing critical thinking and expanding our ability to find common ground.

I had discussion on this topic throughout the conference. So many libraries are interested in community conversations, deliberative dialogue, and other techniques, and were eager to learn how to get started.

Some of Heather’s favorite presentations included:

  • A session about a library that provides programming through outdoor activities.
  • A rural library’s work with connecting with patrons with dementia.
  • The Paperback Rider, a session about a book bike, and the librarian that provides services by riding the bike out into the community with giveaways and craft ideas.
  • Libraries Without Borders talking about their Wash and Learn initiative that reimagines what a library can by bringing popup library programming to laundromats.
The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: All of Us

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

MAR All of Us - Mon, 2021-02-01 10:00

In October 2020, the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to COVID-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, two Middle Atlantic Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

Claire Williams, Marketing Coordinator, Huntingdon County Library (PA) Picture of Claire Williams

Claire Williams, Marketing Coordinator

I absolutely loved my first ABOS conference! While the format was new and different than anything I’ve experienced before, it was amazing to meet and talk to library staff from all over the world and hear about their experiences.

This was my first outreach-centric conference, and it was wonderful to hear about all the things people are doing. Our outreach department is still fairly new, and it was nice to get a sense of where we are relative to other libraries. Getting confirmation that the services we’re offering or developing are similar to what’s working in other rural areas, and that the struggles we’re facing are also faced by other libraries, was really energizing in a year that’s been discouraging.

I especially loved Chris Garnsworthy’s presentation, and the work they’re doing with seniors and those with dementia. It produced a lot of ideas for things we might be able to launch with our senior centers and residential facilities when we’re able to visit them again, once COVID restrictions are lifted and it’s safe to gather with them again.

Learning all the ways that libraries are pivoting in the face of COVID, and that we’re all really struggling through it together, was also encouraging. We’ve worked to develop ways to reach those we previously visited, but with the ever-changing landscape, it’s been difficult. Hearing what’s working, what isn’t and figuring out where we can fit those things into our community gave us a renewed sense of what we do.

I also really appreciated that the conference was able to address COVID so thoroughly, since it really has shaped this entire year for our outreach work, and will likely continue to shape it into 2021. The tips I learned, as well as the network of others that I got a chance to meet, will be invaluable going forward.

Sincere thanks to NNLM for this opportunity. I never would have learned about all these amazing resources and people without you!

Bridget O’Donnell, Reference and Adult Services Librarian, Poughkeepsie Public Library District (NY) Picture of Bridget O'Donnell

Bridget O’Donnell, Reference and Adult Services Librarian

As a recipient of the 2020 NNLM All of Us Health Outreach Award and a first-time attendee to an Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) Conference, I’m honored to have been invited to participate in the 15th-Anniversary Virtual Conference, “Out-Doing Outreach.” Despite an unexpected shift for the planning committee from an in-person conference to a virtual event and technological difficulties that could have happened even on a normal day (like synchronizing sessions from my laptop for the video and smart phone for audio), a high-volume of attendees and I were given access to a wealth of ‘evidenced-based’ knowledge and viable information in a welcoming and educational panel of open discussions.

How we got here…The assistant director and my supervisor initially brought this opportunity to my attention for two reasons. One, in 2018 I earned the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certification and continue to take NNLM/MLA webinars in order to update health-related resources and programs at our library. And two, the original launch date for the Roaming Rover Library, our new book mobile, was slated for the 2nd Annual Poughkeepsie Book Festival in April but had been set back due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, Rover had only been out a few times [the last week of September] so attending the conference [in October] would be a proactive step that could help facilitate Rover’s induction into the community.

Picture of Rover Roaming Library

When Rover first went out we had limited technology and no books available for checkout, but we were welcomed by the Dutchess County Tourism & Parks departments, the local farmer’s market, the Family Partnership health & family service organization and the Fresh Market store. While on site, English and Spanish-speaking library staff handed out fliers, bookmarks and swag and answered questions about the library. At one event community members were signed up for library cards. To help promote the 2020 Census, trained staff answered questions, tablets were connected to Rover’s Wi-Fi so visitors could submit their Census while at the book mobile and fliers were distributed with instructions to complete the census at home. Activity bags were handed out at a family movie night and a socially distanced Halloween event in one of the area’s recreational parks.

As we continue to introduce Rover to those with limited access, I believe our focus isn’t just to provide the library’s [health, self-help, fiction…and children’s] books and DVDs to the public but to listen to their interests and acknowledge their needs, an idea I heard often at ABOS. I’ve seen numerous times in the past where the public library is one place people trust and gravitate towards during crisis; Rover is the vehicle, literally, the library can use to meet people where they’re at and help more people in the community adjust to a new normal as safely as possible.

Benefits of attending ABOS and what’s next… With our fiscal year coming to an end, this is the perfect time to think ahead and focus on 2021, whatever it might bring. While reviewing notes from sessions I attended and presentation materials available in the WHOVA app, I’ll be looking for: areas to grow professionally; creative mobile solutions to common problems; suggestions for more obscure [local] venues and collaborations; and new healthy programs and services I can help coordinate and disseminate to the public that might surprise and educate them.

Thank you NNLM for realizing another valuable partnership with ABOS, and thank you to the ABOS planning committee for re-organizing the conference into a successful virtual event. It really was a pleasure meeting the ABOS Community and being a part of something that can help improve the quality of life and well-being for so many people.

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: All of Us

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

PSR Latitudes All of Us - Fri, 2021-01-29 14:48

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, 3 Pacific Southwest Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

Katie Ball, Special Projects Associate, Sacramento Public Library (CA)

woman smiling at the camera

Katie Ball

In my position at the Sacramento Public Library, I work in the Community Engagement Department, overseeing our Health Literacy and veteran related programming. In looking at all of the presentations at this year’s ABOS Conference, I was pleased to see so many offerings related to the work that I do. I appreciated the inclusion of workshops focused on serving the aging population. One of my current project centers around brain health and dementia education, and the workshops Tales and Travel Memories and Lifelong Learning for Older Adults and Those with Disabilities, Remember When: Reminiscence Groups with Older Adults, and Friends in Rural Places: Dementia-Friendly Community Initiative were particularly helpful. I have been eager to start a Memory Café program in our system, and the information from the Tales and Travel and the Reminiscence Groups workshops provided great outlines for potential activities that would appeal to caregivers and those who are living with dementia. The workshop, Roll Call! How Libraries Can Serve the Veterans Who Served Our Country, was helpful in brainstorming how to connect with veterans in the community, how to utilize volunteers for veteran related programming, and how to work with veteran focused organizations in my area. I look forward to using the information learned to grow programs for our veteran patrons.

This was my first ABOS Conference experience and I hope it won’t be my last. For the first virtual version of this conference, I thought it was well-executed, manageable, and engaging. I gathered many resources, including contacts at other libraries, helpful websites, and ideas for how to improve our programming. Being new to the library field, I appreciated the opportunity to immerse myself in this arena and learn from others who have created successful community programs in their systems.

Jennifer Siron, Senior Librarian of Engagement and Outreach at the Los Angeles Public Library (CA)

woman wearing eyeglasses smiling at camera

Jennifer Siron

The 2020 Virtual ABOS conference was my first time attending any ABOS conference. I found it to be well planned and executed, and I am so grateful to have been selected for the Carol Hole award so I could attend this year. The workshops were informational and very inspiring. As we are navigating through these uncertain times, it was comforting to hear we are not alone, and many systems are working hard toward continuing library service to our communities.

Sharon Coronado, Coordinating Librarian, Adult Services, County of San Luis Obispo (CA)

The 2020 ABOS Conference “Out-Doing Outreach” was In-credible! Since NLM sponsored my attendance, this award freed up opportunities for other staff to attend. All of us were ABOS conference first-timers. There were nine outreach staff from our library system who attended the conference. Everyone was excited to attend and came away with new ideas for outreach. Attendance also introduced staff to ABOS and they are now part of the listserv information sharing community.

Our library was awarded a CA State Library “Bringing the Library to You” grant. This grant award will help us to outfit a mobile library to visit senior care facilities. The Adult Services Department will schedule lobby stops to senior care facilities where we will bring resources to seniors to browse and checkout. Senior health care and telehealth resources will be a vital component to complement our outreach services. One major takeaway from the session NNLM & All of Us: Opportunities to Engage with Your Community Around Health Information was the community collaboration piece. The suggestions of local agencies to partner with will help to expand these efforts to serve seniors where they are. The impact this will have will be twofold: Adult Services librarians will become aware of vital resources to share with our communities when performing outreach throughout the county; and our library system will contribute to the All of Us project goal to help speed up medical research.

We hope to implement the NNLM Health Kiosks program into our branches in the future, and we plan to participate in the NNLM Reading Club. We will include our county public health department in bringing a holistic health experience in 2021 and beyond, including hyper local resources and book discussions in line with the National Health Observances calendar.

Additional valuable information from All of Us presentations was the exposure to UBR or Underrepresented in Biomedical Research populations. These are the communities that libraries strive to serve, and we are now able to spotlight health programs specific to this demographic with a more clear understanding of resources available and challenges that these communities face. We are excited to get started in bringing resources that lead to the overall wellbeing of our communities. Thank you, NLM!

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: All of Us

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman & Ellen Matloff, CGC

BHIC All of Us - Mon, 2021-01-25 13:17

Please join us as Amy Byer Shainman, also known as the BRCA Responder, discusses her book, Resurrection Lily: The BRCA Gene, Hereditary Cancer & Lifesaving Whispers from the Grandmother I Never Knew: A Memoir. Ms. Shainman is a patient advocate who provides support and education surrounding BRCA and other hereditary cancer syndromes. She is also the executive producer of the award-winning documentary Pink & Blue: Colors of Hereditary Cancer. She is a BRCA-1 gene mutation carrier and a “previvor,” the term for a survivor of a cancer predisposition. Amy Byer Shainman will be joined by Ellen Matloff, Certified Genetic Counselor, and President and CEO of My Gene Counsel, a digital health company that provides scalable, updated genetic counseling solutions. In this powerful program, these two genetic cancer experts will share their story, their knowledge and answer your questions.

Click here to join us for the event on March 11th from 3-4pm EST.

The post NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman & Ellen Matloff, CGC first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.
Categories: All of Us

A Resilient New Year!

NER All of Us - Fri, 2021-01-08 08:34

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! first appeared on NER Update.

Categories: All of Us

A Resilient New Year! NNLM Reading Club

GMR All of Us - Thu, 2021-01-07 12:27

 

A Resilient New Year!

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

January Reading Club Titles

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! NNLM Reading Club first appeared on Midwest Matters.

Categories: All of Us

A Resilient New Year!

SEA All of Us - Thu, 2021-01-07 11:33

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

NNLM Reading Club selections for January 2021

Resilient by Dr. Rick Hanson | The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook by Dr. Anneliese A. Singh | The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health by Dr. Rheeda Walker

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: All of Us

A Resilient New Year!

PNR All of Us - Wed, 2021-01-06 20:00

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

Resilient by Dr. Rick Hanson I The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook by Dr. Anneliese A. Singh I The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health by Dr. Rheeda Walker

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: All of Us

Denver Artists Wanted

MCR All of Us - Fri, 2020-12-04 17:28

The All of Us Research Program is looking for Denver-area artists to transform utility boxes into themed works of art.

The public art project aims to drive awareness for the program. Designs should reflect the project theme –  “A Healthy Future for All of Us” – and the diversity of the Denver community.

Final designs will also include a QR code and connected augmented reality experience. Each of the selected artists/artist teams will be awarded a $1,000 honorarium for their design and the unlimited, licensed use of that design for program purposes.

Deadline for submissions is Dec. 18. Click this link to read the art call and submission guidelines. 

The post Denver Artists Wanted first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: All of Us

Explore Inherited Diseases with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA All of Us - Wed, 2020-12-02 15:41

We inherit many things from the people who went before us – our physical characteristics, aspects of our personality and, sometimes, our health. December’s Reading Club selections discuss inherited diseases, focusing specifically on cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell disease, and cancer caused by the BRCA mutation.

In Resurrection Lily, Amy Byer Shainman discusses her experiences after learning that she inherited a BRCA gene mutation that put her at high risk of developing certain cancers. She struggles with preventively removing her breasts even when she does not have a breast cancer diagnosis. The late Mallory Smith tells how she faced the daily challenges of cystic fibrosis in a diary she left behind in hope of aiding others who live with the disease in Salt in My Soul: An Unfinished Life.  In A Sick Life: TLC ‘n Me: Stories from On and Off the Stage, singer Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins recounts her experiences as a member of the all-time best-selling American female music group and as a person with a particularly challenging form of sickle-cell disease.

Perhaps you know someone facing one of these illnesses or another inherited disease. Perhaps you would just like to know more about what it is like to deal with such illnesses. Either way, each of these books will provide you with a first-hand account.

To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Inherited Diseases page.

December Book Club Covers

Resurrection Lily by Amy Byer Shainman | Salt in my Soul by Mallory Smith | A Sick Life by Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins

The post Explore Inherited Diseases with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: All of Us

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