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All of Us

LA’s Chinatown COVID-19 Relief Program – Southeast Asian Community Alliance (SEACA)

PSR Latitudes All of Us - Fri, 2021-04-16 14:22

by Sissy Trinh
Executive Director
Southeast Asian Community Alliance (SEACA)

While COVID-19 presented numerous challenges, one of the largest issues facing the public health sector was the lack of consistent messaging by government agencies and officials. Nowhere was this more acute than for members of the public who faced language and technology barriers. The lack of translated materials and non-web based public health strategies meant that residents with language and tech barriers were often relying on misinformed neighbors and outdated information.

The Southeast Asian Community Alliance (SEACA) stepped in to fill this void by partnering with NNLM PSR at UCLA. SEACA created a COVID relief/mutual aid program in March 2020 to distribute PPE, groceries, and public health information in Chinese, Vietnamese, Spanish, and English for the low-income residents of Chinatown Los Angeles. However, because SEACA was not a public health organization, finding accurate, accessible, and up-to-date public health information proved difficult, especially given how quickly the science was evolving along with conflicting public health orders. The NNLM PSR staff were able to provide crucial support by sourcing culturally and linguistically appropriate information based on the Chinatown community’s current needs and conditions. For example, public health directives such as “go grocery shopping once every two weeks” was impractical because so many Chinatown residents live in overcrowded housing or in Single Room Occupancy units and storing that much food was not possible. Instead, NNLM staff found and shared flyers on how large families and families with essential workers can protect themselves from COVID. This allowed SEACA to avoid acting as amateur epidemiologists/public health experts and instead to focus on its strengths – acting as a crucial lifeline to residents who had limited access to other sources of information.

As a result of this award, SEACA was able to successfully distribute culturally and linguistically relevant information about COVID-19, All of Us Research Program information, and supplies to Chinatown community members.

The post LA’s Chinatown COVID-19 Relief Program – Southeast Asian Community Alliance (SEACA) first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: All of Us

Start the Conversation on End-of-Life Care with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA All of Us - Wed, 2021-04-07 14:57

It’s difficult to talk about, even scary. Important things usually are.

And deciding what to do about that transition between life and death – how to make it more comfortable, what to do afterwards – is so very important, to our loved ones and ourselves. It involves issues not only of health, but of spirituality, compassion and trust.

Whether your focus of concern is on a family member or yourself, NNLM Reading Club suggests three books that may help with your understanding of end-of-life matters and those conversations you probably have been putting off.

 The Unwinding of the Miracle; Can't we talk about something more pleasant?; The Five Invitations.

The Unwinding of the Miracle by Julie Yip-Williams | Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast | The Five Invitations by Frank Ostaseski

In The Unwinding of the Miracle: A Memoir of Life, Death and Everything That Comes After, the late Julie Yip-Williams leaves behind a chronicle of a life filled with improbable outcomes since her childhood as a blind Vietnamese refugee who regained her sight at the hands of an American doctor. She faces her own terminal illness at age 37 with honesty.

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast brings her idiosyncratic humor to her experience as caretaker of aging, declining parents in the graphic memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? Finally, Zen Hospice Project co-founder Frank Ostaseski relates the lessons he has learned as a Buddhist teacher who has worked with more than a thousand dying patients in The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us about Living.

We encourage you to take a deep breath, read one of these books, and discuss it with people whose opinions you respect, especially those in your own family. It just might make you feel a whole lot better about the inevitable. Visit the NNLM Reading. Club: End of Life health topic to get started.

The post Start the Conversation on End-of-Life Care with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: All of Us

April NNLM Reading Club Selections: End of Life

MCR All of Us - Thu, 2021-04-01 12:41

It’s difficult to talk about, even scary. Important things usually are.

And deciding what to do about that transition between life and death – how to make it more comfortable, what to do afterwards – is so very important, to our loved ones and ourselves. It involves issues not only of health, but of spirituality, compassion and trust.

Whether your focus of concern is on a family member or yourself, NNLM Reading Club suggests three books that may help with your understanding of end-of-life matters and those conversations you probably have been putting off.

In The Unwinding of the Miracle: A Memoir of Life, Death and Everything That Comes After, the late Julie Yip-Williams leaves behind a chronicle of a life filled with improbable outcomes since her childhood as a blind Vietnamese refugee who regained her sight at the hands of an American doctor. She faces her own terminal illness at age 37 with honesty.

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast brings her idiosyncratic humor to her experience as caretaker of aging, declining parents in the graphic memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? Finally, Zen Hospice Project co-founder Frank Ostaseski relates the lessons he has learned as a Buddhist teacher who has worked with more than a thousand dying patients in The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us about Living.

We encourage you to take a deep breath, read one of these books, and discuss it with people whose opinions you respect, especially those in your own family. It just might make you feel a whole lot better about the inevitable. Visit the NNLM Reading. Club: End of Life health topic to get started.

The post April NNLM Reading Club Selections: End of Life first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: All of Us

Understanding End-of-Life Matters

PNR All of Us - Thu, 2021-04-01 11:07

It’s difficult to talk about, even scary. Important things usually are.

And deciding what to do about that transition between life and death – how to make it more comfortable, what to do afterwards – is so very important, to our loved ones and ourselves. It involves issues not only of health, but of spirituality, compassion and trust.

Whether your focus of concern is on a family member or yourself, this April the NNLM Reading Club suggests three books that may help with your understanding of end-of-life matters and those conversations you probably have been putting off.

The Unwinding of the Miracle by Julie Yip-Williams l Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast l The Five Invitations by Frank Ostaseski

In The Unwinding of the Miracle: A Memoir of Life, Death and Everything That Comes After, the late Julie Yip-Williams leaves behind a chronicle of a life filled with improbable outcomes since her childhood as a blind Vietnamese refugee who regained her sight at the hands of an American doctor. She faces her own terminal illness at age 37 with honesty.

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast brings her idiosyncratic humor to her experience as caretaker of aging, declining parents in the graphic memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? Finally, Zen Hospice Project co-founder Frank Ostaseski relates the lessons he has learned as a Buddhist teacher who has worked with more than a thousand dying patients in The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us about Living.

We encourage you to take a deep breath, read one of these books, and discuss it with people whose opinions you respect, especially those in your own family. It just might make you feel a whole lot better about the inevitable. Visit the NNLM Reading. Club: End of Life health topic to get started.

The post Understanding End-of-Life Matters first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: All of Us

Vaccines, Vaccinations, and NLM

BHIC All of Us - Mon, 2021-03-22 12:43

More than 25 million people in the U.S. have received both doses of the coronavirus vaccine.

Getting a spot in the COVID vaccine line will become one of the shared stories of this pandemic.

As a resident of Washington, DC, and someone who is over 65 years of age, Patti became eligible pretty early – January 11. At the time, DC released appointment slots through its public web site. Learn more about Patti’s story here.

 

The post Vaccines, Vaccinations, and NLM first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.
Categories: All of Us

Life Interrupted: Telling Breast Cancer Stories

BHIC All of Us - Mon, 2021-03-22 12:40

The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is proud to be partnering with Director Paula Mozen, to offer a series virtual film screenings and panel discussions featuring LIFE INTERRUPTED a documentary film featuring empowering stories of breast cancer survivors.

Join us LIVE for a Virtual Panel Discussion on one of the dates below to engage with breast cancer survivors and medical professionals from their own communities, learn about breast cancer, ask questions, and share your experience. The 64-minute documentary will be available to stream on demand a week prior to the dates below.

The next event is today and the information is below.

 

The post Life Interrupted: Telling Breast Cancer Stories first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.
Categories: All of Us

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey

MCR All of Us - Tue, 2021-03-16 15:43

In this post, Paula Mozen, Director of the documentary LIFE INTERRUPTED, shares  the story of her journey with this film about the experiences of three breast cancer survivors. Portions of the original post have been edited for clarity.

I was a documentary filmmaker long before I became a breast cancer survivor. When I was first diagnosed, I wanted to take care of my situation and move on. The last thing I wanted to do was to make a film about it, a project that I knew would take several years to fundraise and complete. As time passed and I gained perspective on my own situation, I realized I was NOT alone; there are hundreds of thousands of us out here. In the United States, 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2021, an estimated 330,000 new cases will be diagnosed.

Breast Cancer is indeed an epidemic. It can be found across all age, gender, socio-economic, ethnic, and geographic groups. It does not discriminate; however, as we know, access to quality healthcare can be very discriminatory.

                                                                     MSU photo by Kelly Gorham

Holding these truths together plus having the inside track to my own experience, I decided to make the film I wish I could have seen when I was diagnosed – both times. I wanted LIFE INTERRUPTED to put a face to the statistics and tell meaningful stories in order to inspire change.

Breast cancer patients are often asked to make their own choices in terms of treatments available. The moment the diagnosis is received, each person must gather information and make life-altering decisions under extreme emotional duress, all in a relatively short period of time. While individual circumstances are unique, hearing about the personal journeys from articulate women who have traveled this road before is invaluable for navigating treatments and keeping hope alive. Knowledge is power; the successful prevention and treatment of breast cancer depends on this.

Persistence is a common theme for indie filmmakers and breast cancer survivors alike. Just when you think you are finished, there is usually another mountain to climb.

From Berkeley to Berlin to Beirut and back to Bozeman, MY LIFE INTERRUPTED was screened, was reviewed, and won several awards at festivals. After these events, I wanted to connect directly with audiences who cared about the themes and issues the film covered, including healthcare advocates, providers, and survivors. My hope was to provide empowerment for survivors to be self-advocates  and to share with family members, advocates and healthcare providers what it truly means to survive breast cancer.

I learned about the All of Us Research Program (http://joinallofus.org/nlm) and partnership with NNLM through Julie Sherwood, the Partnership & Community Engagement Manager for the Wichita Public Library. After a series of emails, a partnership was formed that would involve collaborations with NNLM staff from throughout the organization, including Brittney Thomas, Brian Leaf, Linda Loi, Darlene Kaskie, Michele Spatz, George Strawley, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Richard McLean, Helen Spielbauer, Rachel Maller, Holly Stevenson, Laura Bartlett, and Frost Keaton.

Beginning March 3rd through April 15th, NNLM and I look forward to presenting the LIFE INTERRUPTED Virtual Screening Series which includes live interactive panel discussions in partnership with The Black Women’s Health Imperative, The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS), Asian Health Coalition, Henry Ford Health System, Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library.

During the panel discussions, hear from medical or research professionals who specialize in breast cancer, breast cancer survivors, and advocates who represent populations historically underrepresented in medical research. Panelists will share their experiences and knowledge on diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, living with breast cancer, advancing treatments and cures for breast cancer, and advocating for precision medicine and diversity of medical research through programs like All of Us.

It has been an absolute honor and pleasure to work with the entire team so far, a group of talented, motivated and detail-oriented individuals who are dedicated to creating the best possible audience user experience. Everyone is focused on making each event engaging, interactive, relevant and accessible. To work with a team like this is – well – a filmmaker’s dream come true; we are all on the same page, doing the right thing for the right reasons, all to empower patients and share meaningful stories.

Thank you to Paula Mozen for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post. We look forward to seeing the great things that come from this project.

Below are all the upcoming free virtual screenings and LIVE Q&A panel discussions. For more information or to attend any of these upcoming events, visit watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted.

Free Virtual Screenings start March 16 and continue through April 15.

LIVE Q&A Panel Discussions

Monday, March 22 at 2 pm MT presented by ACCESS: Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services

Wednesday, March 31 at 4 pm MT presented by the Asian Health Coalition

Friday, April 2 at 2 pm MT presented by Henry Ford Health System

Monday, April 15 at 2 pm MT presented by Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library

 

For more information on the film LIFE INTERRUPTED and to sign up for the free screening, click here: https://watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted. .

Remember to follow the NNLM MCR on Twitter.

The post Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: All of Us

NNLM Reading Club Presents… Resurrection Lily

MCR All of Us - Mon, 2021-03-08 10:15

Join NNLM and our All of Us community partners on March 11, 2021, 3-4 pm ET for a live event with Amy Byer Shainman, author of Resurrection Lily: The BRCA Gene, Hereditary Cancer & Lifesaving Whispers from the Grandmother I Never Knew.

Shainman and Ellen Matloff, a certified genetic counselor, will discuss and answer your questions about hereditary cancer syndromes.

To attend the event, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJBzdgCTn2E.

The post NNLM Reading Club Presents… Resurrection Lily first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: All of Us

Join us on March 11th for Resurrection Lily

PNR All of Us - Sun, 2021-03-07 20:00

Please join us this Thursday as Amy Byer Shainman, also known as the BRCA Responder, talks about her book, Resurrection Lily: The BRCA Gene, Hereditary Cancer & Lifesaving Whispers from the Grandmother I Never Knew with Certified Genetic Counselor Ellen Matloff.

In this powerful program, these two genetic cancer experts will share their knowledge and answer your questions.

Mar. 11, 2021

   11:00 a.m. Alaska | 12:00 p.m. PT | 1:00 p.m. MT 

Join the live stream on YouTube 

https://youtu.be/PJBzdgCTn2E

The post Join us on March 11th for Resurrection Lily first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: All of Us

Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit

GMR All of Us - Fri, 2021-03-05 10:02

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries. The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family friendly activities, and all the instructions and materials needed (audio file guides are available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese).

The free kits are available to the first 400 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf. Applications for the kits will be open until they are all gone/April 30th, 2021. If you are a member of NNLM you can apply for a kit by clicking here. Otherwise, it is easy and free to sign your organization up.

Test the Waters Flyer

The post Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit first appeared on Midwest Matters.
Categories: All of Us

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey

SCR All of Us - Wed, 2021-03-03 19:37

This week’s guest blog post comes from Paula Mozen, Director of the film LIFE INTERRUPTED. In this post, Paula shares a bit of her story and her journey with this film about the trials of breast cancer survivors. Please note that portions of the original post have been edited for clarity.

I was a documentary filmmaker long before I became a breast cancer survivor. When I was first diagnosed, I wanted to take care of my situation and move on. The last thing I wanted to do was to make a film about it, a project that I knew would take several years to fundraise and complete. As time passed and I gained perspective on my own situation, I realized I was NOT alone; there are hundreds of thousands of us out here. In the United States, 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2021, an estimated 330,000 new cases will be diagnosed. 

Breast Cancer is indeed an epidemic. It can be found across all age, gender, socio-economic, ethnic, and geographic groups. It does not discriminate; however, as we know, access to quality healthcare can be very discriminatory.

MSU photo by Kelly Gorham

Holding these truths together plus having the inside track to my own experience, I decided to make the film I wish I could have seen when I was diagnosed – both times. I wanted LIFE INTERRUPTED to put a face to the statistics and tell meaningful stories in order to inspire change. 

Breast cancer patients are often asked to make their own choices in terms of treatments available. The moment the diagnosis is received, each person must gather information and make life-altering decisions under extreme emotional duress, all in a relatively short period of time. While individual circumstances are unique, hearing about the personal journeys from articulate women who have traveled this road before is invaluable for navigating treatments and keeping hope alive. Knowledge is power; the successful prevention and treatment of breast cancer depends on this. 

Persistence is a common theme for indie filmmakers and breast cancer survivors alike. Just when you think you are finished, there is usually another mountain to climb.

From Berkeley to Berlin to Beirut and back to Bozeman, MY LIFE INTERRUPTED was screened, was reviewed, and won several awards at festivals. After these events, I wanted to connect directly with audiences who cared about the themes and issues the film covered, including Healthcare Advocates, Providers, and survivors. My hope was to provide empowerment for survivors to be self-advocates  and to share with family members, advocates and healthcare providers what it truly means to survive breast cancer.

I learned about the All of Us Research Program and partnership with NNLM through Julie Sherwood, the Partnership & Community Engagement Manager for the Wichita Public Library. After a series of emails, a partnership was formed that would involve collaborations with NNLM staff from throughout the organization, including Brittany Thomas, Brian Leaf, Linda Loi, Darlene Kaskie, Michelle Spatz, George Strawley, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Richard McLean, Helen Spielbauer, Rachel Maller, Holly Stevenson, Laura Bartlett, and Frost Keaton. 

Beginning March 3rd through April 15th, NNLM and I look forward to presenting the LIFE INTERRUPTED Virtual Screening Series which includes live interactive panel discussions in partnership with The Black Women’s Health Imperative, The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS), Asian Health Coalition, Henry Ford Health System, Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library.

During the panel discussions, hear from medical or research professionals who specialize in breast cancer, breast cancer survivors, and advocates who represent populations historically underrepresented in medical research. Panelists will share their experiences and knowledge on diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, living with breast cancer, advancing treatments and cures for breast cancer, and advocating for precision medicine and diversity of medical research through programs like All of Us.

It has been an absolute honor and pleasure to work with the entire team so far, a group of talented, motivated and detail-oriented individuals who are dedicated to creating the best possible audience user experience. Everyone is focused on making each event engaging, interactive, relevant and accessible. To work with a team like this is – well – a filmmaker’s dream come true; we are all on the same page, doing the right thing for the right reasons, all to empower patients and share meaningful stories. 

Thank you to Paula Mozen for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post! We look forward to seeing the great things that come from this project.

For more information or to attend any of these upcoming free events, visit watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted

For more Information on the film LIFE INTERRUPTED, click here: www.lifeinterruptedfilm.com

Remember to like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

The post Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey first appeared on Blogadillo.
Categories: All of Us

Fortify Your Knowledge Diet with the NNLM Reading Club!

SEA All of Us - Wed, 2021-03-03 14:44

The NNLM Reading Club in March examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good or better for us.

 The Future of Nutrition by Dr. T. Colin Campbell, How to Eat by Mark Bittman and David Katz, and Resetting the Table by Robert Paarlberg

The Future of Nutrition by Dr. T. Colin Campbell | How to Eat by Mark Bittman and David Katz | Resetting the Table by Robert Paarlberg

Dr. T. Colin Campbell, whose previous books include best-seller The China Study, covers the nutrition industry and its impact on both our health and the practice of science with The Future of Nutrition. In How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered, Mark Bittman and David Katz, M.D., use a Q&A format address to dispense advice on topics such as dietary patterns and lifestyle; specific diets like the Mediterranean diet, intermittent fasting and the keto diet; and various foods such as grains, meat, dairy and alcohol. Finally, Robert Paarlberg, an associate at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, contradicts some of the conventional wisdom surrounding things like organic foods and those neighborhoods and communities known as food deserts. He looks for solutions to food problems that can make sense for farmers and consumers alike in Resetting the Table: Straight Talk about the Food We Grow and Eat.

No matter what fare typically gets you through your day, we invite you to fortify your knowledge diet with these Reading Club selections. Visit nnlm.gov/all-of-us/nnlm-reading-club/nutrition to see our menu. Enjoy!

The post Fortify Your Knowledge Diet with the NNLM Reading Club! first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: All of Us

Free: Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit!

PNR All of Us - Wed, 2021-03-03 13:47

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries. The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family friendly activities, and all the instructions and materials needed (audio file guides are available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese).

The free kits are available to the first 500 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf. Applications for the kits will be open until they are all gone/April 30th, 2021. If you are a member of NNLM you can apply for a kit by clicking here. Otherwise, it is easy and free to sign your organization up.

To learn more about the Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit, click here.

Questions? Email us at lib-nnlmallofus@uiowa.edu

The post Free: Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit! first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: All of Us

Fortify Your Knowledge

PNR All of Us - Tue, 2021-03-02 20:00

The NNLM Reading Club in March examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good or better for us.

The Future of Nutrition by T. Colin Campbell l How to Eat by Mark Bittman & David L. Katz l Resetting the Table by Robert Paarlberg

T. Colin Campbell, whose previous books include best-seller The China Study, covers the nutrition industry and its impact on both our health and the practice of science with The Future of Nutrition. In How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered, Mark Bittman and David Katz, M.D., use a Q&A format to dispense advice on topics such as dietary patterns and lifestyle; specific diets like the Mediterranean diet, intermittent fasting and the keto diet; and various foods such as grains, meat, dairy and alcohol. Finally, Robert Paarlberg, an associate at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, contradicts some of the conventional wisdom surrounding things like organic foods and those neighborhoods and communities known as food deserts. He looks for solutions to food problems that can make sense for farmers and consumers alike in Resetting the Table: Straight Talk about the Food We Grow and Eat.

No matter what fare typically gets you through your day, we invite you to fortify your knowledge diet with these Reading Club selections. Enjoy!

The post Fortify Your Knowledge first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: All of Us

New Citizen Science Exploration Kit from NNLM

SEA All of Us - Mon, 2021-03-01 12:56

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries.

The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family-friendly activities to learn about water as it affects personal and environmental health. All instructions and needed materials are included, with audio file guides available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese. The free kits are available to the first 500 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf.

Applications for the kits will be open until April 30th, 2021. If you are a member of NNLM you can apply for a kit by visiting https://nnlm.gov/all-of-us/resources/citizen-science-health/ttw. Otherwise, it is easy and free for your organization to join the network.

Cartoon raindrop announcing the NNLM and Cornerstones of Sciences Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit

The post New Citizen Science Exploration Kit from NNLM first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: All of Us

Member Highlights: Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association

MAR All of Us - Mon, 2021-03-01 09:00

NNLM MAR is pleased to share successes of health outreach projects and activities in our region. Learn what your amazing colleagues are doing to increase access to quality health information for the communities they serve.

Thanks to generous funding from the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program, Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association partnered to deliver an incredible 24-hour virtual Black Health and Healing Summit, implementing what one of our presenters accurately described as “24 hours of Black excellence.” This live summit reached 3,921 people of all ages across the country and beyond with a roster of speakers that was nothing short of extraordinary. The event featured top experts in the fields of medicine and science, as well as notable entertainers, musicians and athletes. Presenters delved into a plethora of health and wellness issues faced by the Black community. This event was inspired by the need to promote health and healing as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to disproportionately affect Black communities across the nation.

Dr. Kizzmekia S. Corbett, PhD. and Dr. M. Joycelyn Elders, MD were two of the event’s esteemed speakers. Dr. Corbett is one of the leading scientists at the forefront of coronavirus vaccine development. She passionately shared about her work leading up to the COVID-19 vaccine in the context of medical mistrust and historical abuses and answered many audience questions about the vaccine. One participant during Dr. Corbett’s session shared in the chat that, “Information was very helpful. I’m leaning closer to taking the vaccine.” Dr. Elders, another public health hero who is the first African American and second female US Surgeon General, shared her insights on raising Black children during these especially trying times. Her husband, Coach Elders, also made a surprise appearance to close her session with a powerful poem. While we might think of virtual platforms as being less intimate, one thing that made this summit so special and different was the intimacy of hearing from presenter’s family members, seeing the inside of their homes, and being able to communicate with other audience members in real time via the chat.

The summit also stood out for its focus on fun and entertainment. As the World Health Organization (WHO) defines it and as Kelsa Bartley, the Chair of the African American Medical Librarians Alliance Caucus, recognized in her summit closing, health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease. This summit was relevant and informative, but it also demonstrated that health is a holistic experience that cannot be compartmentalized from all aspects of who we are. Health includes connecting with others, listening to music, finding balance, seeking joy, having fun, embracing your and the world’s beauty, and even taking the revolutionary act of resting. One way that we demonstrated this holistic approach to health was a panel discussion with beatboxing legend Doug E. Fresh, who was joined by hip-hop pioneer and Queens Public Library’s Hip Hop Coordinator, DJ Ralph McDaniels, and Dr. Olajide Williams, Chief of Staff of the Department of Neurology at Columbia University. They let us join them for a laid back but extremely insightful conversation, called “Friday Night Live: Building Health Equity Through the Transformative Power of Music”. Immediately after that session, we heard from actress, rapper, singer, songwriter, comedian, DJ, poet, and activist Amanda Seales. Amanda, who earned a masters degree in African-American studies with a concentration in Hip Hop from Columbia University, allowed us to bear witness to her candid conversation with Columbia University professor and Program Director, Dr. Chris Emdin. They discussed everything from Hip Hop culture to personal mental health struggles and their strategies to prevent and overcome them.

While there were too many incredible presentations to describe them all here, we warmly welcome you to view the session replays that are available at https://blackhealth.queenslibrary.org for the next 11 months, thanks to Virtual Experience Design Agency, our production and platform partner. We also thank NewYork-Presbyterian, City’s First Readers and Queens Public Library for supplemental funds to support this event.

Written by: Tamara Michel, Kim McNeil Capers, Janet Umenta, Zakia Ringgold, Cliff Ross, Amanda Beekharry, Yves Etheart, John Pham, Denise Clark, Lisi de Bourbon and Ewa Kern Jedrychowska.

Special Acknowledgements: Shauntee Burns-Simpson, Nichelle M. Hayes, Elisa Garcia, Syntychia Kendrick-Samuel, Tamela Chambers

The post Member Highlights: Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: All of Us