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All of Us

Explore Inherited Diseases with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA All of Us - Wed, 2020-12-02 15:41

We inherit many things from the people who went before us – our physical characteristics, aspects of our personality and, sometimes, our health. December’s Reading Club selections discuss inherited diseases, focusing specifically on cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell disease, and cancer caused by the BRCA mutation.

In Resurrection Lily, Amy Byer Shainman discusses her experiences after learning that she inherited a BRCA gene mutation that put her at high risk of developing certain cancers. She struggles with preventively removing her breasts even when she does not have a breast cancer diagnosis. The late Mallory Smith tells how she faced the daily challenges of cystic fibrosis in a diary she left behind in hope of aiding others who live with the disease in Salt in My Soul: An Unfinished Life.  In A Sick Life: TLC ‘n Me: Stories from On and Off the Stage, singer Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins recounts her experiences as a member of the all-time best-selling American female music group and as a person with a particularly challenging form of sickle-cell disease.

Perhaps you know someone facing one of these illnesses or another inherited disease. Perhaps you would just like to know more about what it is like to deal with such illnesses. Either way, each of these books will provide you with a first-hand account.

To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Inherited Diseases page.

December Book Club Covers

Resurrection Lily by Amy Byer Shainman | Salt in my Soul by Mallory Smith | A Sick Life by Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins

The post Explore Inherited Diseases with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: All of Us

December’s NNLM Reading Club: Inherited Diseases

PNR All of Us - Tue, 2020-12-01 18:38

We inherit many things from the people who went before us – our physical characteristics, aspects of our personality and, sometimes, our health. December’s Reading Club selections discuss inherited diseases, focusing specifically on cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell disease, and cancer caused by the BRCA mutation.

Resurrection Lily by Amy Byer Shainman l Salt in My Soul by Mallory Smith l A Sick Life by Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Resurrection Lily, Amy Byer Shainman discusses her experiences after learning that she inherited a BRCA gene mutation that put her at high risk of developing certain cancers. She struggles with preventively removing her breasts even when she does not have a breast cancer diagnosis. The late Mallory Smith tells how she faced the daily challenges of cystic fibrosis in a diary she left behind in hope of aiding others who live with the disease in Salt in My Soul: An Unfinished Life.  In A Sick Life: TLC ‘n Me: Stories from On and Off the Stage, singer Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins recounts her experiences as a member of the all-time best-selling American female music group and as a person with a particularly challenging form of sickle-cell disease.

Perhaps you know someone facing one of these illnesses or another inherited disease. Perhaps you would just like to know more about what it is like to deal with such illnesses. Either way, each of these books will provide you with a first-hand account.

To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Inherited Diseases page.

The post December's NNLM Reading Club: Inherited Diseases first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: All of Us

Access Dr. Bill Sullivan’s Webinar 24/7!

BHIC All of Us - Tue, 2020-12-01 10:30

Did you miss Bill Sullivan discussing the hidden forces of genetics last week? Don’t worry! You can catch up on the November 17th webinar whenever is convenient for you here.

Dr. Bill Sullivan, professor of pharmacology and microbiology at the Indiana University School of Medicine, discussed his book Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs, and the Curious Forces That Make Us Who We Are.

 

The post Access Dr. Bill Sullivan's Webinar 24/7! first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.

Categories: All of Us

Call for Washington Artists: Seattle Traffic Box Community Connector

PNR All of Us - Wed, 2020-11-25 14:32

The All of Us Research Program is holding a call for artists’ designs to transform select traffic signal and utility cabinets in Seattle, Washington. The designs should be reflective of the program’s core values to promote diversity and inclusion in health research and represent the local community. Designs should reflect the project theme: A Healthy Future for All of Us and the diversity of the Seattle community.

 

The project aims to drive awareness and education about All of Us and boost enrollment in communities historically underrepresented in biomedical research. This project utilizes public art to celebrate community diversity and enhance the visual landscape. Artists designs will be printed on vinyl and installed on locally-maintained signal box cabinets in high-traffic areas. In addition, each traffic box will contain a prominently placed QR code that engages passersby in an augmented reality experience introducing the program’s values and goals.

Deadline: December 18, 2020 5:00pm Eastern Time

For more information and submission guidelines, click here.

The post Call for Washington Artists: Seattle Traffic Box Community Connector first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: All of Us

National Family Health History Day

PSR Latitudes All of Us - Tue, 2020-11-24 13:55

Happy family having Thanksgiving dinner at homeThanksgiving is coming up in the United States, and with it, time for conversations and catching up with loved ones and family. Though we may be “zooming” one another instead of sharing our meals at the same table this year, it is still a wonderful opportunity to share family memories, special stories and history. That is why Thanksgiving Day is also National Family Health History Day. These conversations can be difficult, but there are some great resources available to help.

  • My Family Health Portrait – This is a resource from the Surgeon General to help you document your own family health history online. Similar to programs that let you share your cultural heritage, this assists you in tracking your health heritage. This can help you identify if you might be at higher risk for certain conditions. You can use this document to start a conversation with your doctor and with other family members.
  • Does It Run In The Family? Toolkit – This toolkit, made up of two books from Genetic Alliance, is available in English, Spanish and Tagalog. Book 1 can help guide you in having health history conversations with your family, including suggested activities and conversation starters. Book 2 helps you learn more about genes, genetics and how they might influence your own health outcomes.
  • Family Health Resources from NNLM – The NNLM Reading Club has created a page full of resources about family health, heritable conditions, genetics and more. There are also several recommended titles for book club kits. If you would like to learn more about the NNLM Reading Club program you can reach out to the PSR All of Us Community Engagement Librarian, Amy, at abreyes@library.ucla.edu.

If having a family health history conversation leads to questions about conditions you would like more information on, a great place to start is with Medline Plus Genetics. On Medline Plus Genetics you can search for genetic information by the name of a condition or by a particular gene. Of course it is advised to share all of your health history and any questions you might have with you personal healthcare provider.

The post National Family Health History Day first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: All of Us

Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections

MCR All of Us - Thu, 2020-11-19 13:22

Two libraries in the Salt Lake City area hired library staff with special connections to diverse communities as part of a project funded this year by the NNLM MidContinental Region.

These “community wellness liaisons,” aided members of their communities in accessing library services and programs, with a special emphasis on health-related information. They were hired to work for nearly a year at the main branch of the Salt Lake City Public Library and at the West Valley branch of the Salt Lake County Library.

Five individuals were selected with the input of the Community Faces of Utah (CFU) collaborative. CFU members include Calvary Baptist Church representing African Americans in Salt Lake City, the National Tongan American Society representing Pacific Islanders and Native Hawaiians, the Hispanic Health Care Task Force representing Spanish-speaking populations, the Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake representing indigenous Americans, and Best of Africa representing African refugees and immigrants. CFU also includes the Community Collaboration and Engagement Team at the University of Utah’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCET) which coordinated the project, and the Utah Department of Health.

Each liaison was a member one of the CFU communities. They worked for 20 hours a week for one of the two libraries, splitting their time between the library and community outreach. One liaison also spent part of their time at the Glendale branch of the City Library. In addition to working with library staff, the liaisons coordinated closely with leaders from their respective CFU organizations.

All liaisons received training in health-information skills from NNLM and completed level 1 of the Consumer Health Information Specialist training.

The liaisons worked with their libraries to conduct public programs and participated in virtual community outreach activities after the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closure of the libraries. Examples of programs and activities included a Kwanzaa celebration, discussions on trauma and mental wellness, in-library displays on health, and library resource lists on health topics of highest interest to each community.

 They and the CFU community leaders also conducted trainings for staff on such topics as diversity, inclusion and allyship. This helped to create a two-way conversation between communities and library.

The project initially arose from a discussion at a CFU meeting in which the community leaders discussed their perceptions that individuals from diverse communities did not feel welcome in local libraries, in part because of the lack of diversity among library staff. As a result, many individuals from diverse communities around the Salt Lake Valley did not use their local libraries and were unaware of library services and programs that could meet their needs.

Based on this discussion, CFU designed a research study that included community engagement sessions, similar to focus groups, which were conducted with each of the CFU communities. Each CFU community leader co-facilitated the session in their community along with a CCET staff member.

The participants in the engagement sessions suggested ideas for addressing the problem, such as having library staff from similar backgrounds as community members and making health information more accessible by bringing library resources and programs directly into the communities. The discussions involving community group members, library leaders and the researchers led to the pilot project that hired the CWLs.

Project organizers shared the results from the engagement sessions with a sixth group consisting of city and county librarians and library administrators. In a culminating workshop, CFU community leaders and representatives from the two library systems reviewed the research findings and developed a plan for the pilot project.

Funding for the project came from the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network, which helps public libraries in supporting the health information needs of their users by providing training to library staff, funding and other resources to support health programming and activities, and connections to medical libraries and other NNLM members in their area.

The CEN is part of the All of Us Research Program, which has a mission to accelerate health research and medical breakthroughs, enabling individualized prevention, treatment and care for all of us. The program aims to build one of the largest, most diverse datasets of its kind for health research, with one million or more volunteers nationwide who sill sign up to share their information over time.

The project wraps up in November. You can read more details about the three-part project in the reports for the project’s first stage and second stage.

The post Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: All of Us

Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later

PSR Latitudes All of Us - Tue, 2020-11-17 18:10

by John Borghi
Manager, Research and Instruction
Stanford University, Lane Medical Library

A little over a year ago, I boarded a plane to Washington DC to attend the 2019 meeting of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). At this point in my career, I had been working in academic libraries for over six years. For much of that time, I had worked in biomedical settings and focused my activities on research data. I teach classes on data management and data sharing, but I had come to AMIA because I wanted to learn more about clinical data, informatics, and health information technology.

Over the next few days, I attended sessions on ethics in biomedical informatics, the emergence of artificial intelligence in healthcare, and so many other interesting topics that I was constantly exhausted and in search of coffee. Because the conference was in D.C., I also learned a lot about data-related initiatives at federal agencies, especially the National Institutes of Health and National Library of Medicine.

So why am I writing about this now? As I sit down to write this, the 2020 AMIA meeting is occurring. But rather than being held in a conference center it is, like so many other meetings in the last year, entirely virtual. Shortly after I returned from the 2019 meeting, the first cases of the disease we now know as COVID-19 began to emerge. I can’t even begin to summarize or even characterize the year that followed. But topics related to how researchers and clinicians collect, analyze, and apply data to healthcare decisions now consume so many of our personal, professional, and political conversations and activities. Everything I learned at last year’s meeting resonates very differently in the time of COVID.

The session I was most eager to attend last year was about the data-related initiatives at the NIH. At the time, I had just contributed to my institution’s response to a request for comments on a draft data management and sharing policy and I was eager to hear more about what was happening and what was planned in the future. A year later, and the final policy has been announced and I’m glad to see that the suggestions made by my peers and I- both in the meeting and in our written comments- have been integrated into the new policy. But also, the necessity of biomedical and health science researchers making the products of their work available (and in a usable form) to one another could not be clearer than during a global pandemic.

Another standout session I attended at the AMIA meeting concerned the All of Us Research Program, an effort to gather genetic and health data from one million or more people living in the United States in order to accelerate medical breakthroughs. At the time, I was amazed at the sheer scale of the project and interested in how the data would be curated and made available to the research community. Now, when I check the project’s website, I see there are a series of efforts to leverage the dataset to study COVID antibodies, survey the pandemic’s effect on community health, and use the electronic health record to study patterns and learn about COVID-related symptoms. Rather than a redirection of the project, this represents its immediate application.

When I proposed attending the 2019 AMIA meeting, I told my colleagues I wanted to explore another dimension of our profession- to understand more about how clinical data was actually being applied and used. Looking back now, at all of the notes I took during the meeting, I am struck by two things. The first is that the meeting feels like it occurred a lifetime ago. Everything surrounding my attendance at the meeting, from walking through a crowded airport to catch my flight to D.C. to presenting on what I saw to a room full of my colleagues upon my return, feels so remote now. But I am also struck by the immediacy of everything I learned at the meeting. Understanding and working to improve how clinical data is collected, analyzed, and applied are always absolutely vital pursuits. But the last year has shined a light on just how vital.

The post Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: All of Us

Call for Applications – GMR Funding Now Available!

GMR All of Us - Wed, 2020-11-04 12:49

The GMR is excited to announce two new funding opportunities! The application deadline is November 30, 2020.

 

All of Us Awareness and Virtual Engagement Award
This award enables NNLM member organizations within the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) to develop and offer programs to improve public access to health information and provide awareness of All of Us to communities. The award also supports professional capacity around precision medicine and All of Us to better understand and support community outreach of the program and to better serve the community health information needs. Up to $49,999 is available per Award. Project timeline: January 1, 2021 – April 30, 2021. Learn more and apply.

 

Quick Response COVID-19 Health Information Outreach Award
This award enables organizations to develop and offer programs, including pilot projects, that will impact health literacy and health information needs related to the COVID-19 / SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic in the Greater Midwest Region. This award will provide funds for organizations to offer health information and related programming within their community. Up to $49,999 is available per Award. Project timeline: January 1, 2021 – April 30, 2021. Learn more and apply.

The post Call for Applications - GMR Funding Now Available! first appeared on Midwest Matters.

Categories: All of Us

NNLM Reading Club Looks Beneath the Surface

PNR All of Us - Tue, 2020-11-03 20:00

Your health is the product of three factors: lifestyle, environment and genetics. In November, NNLM Reading Club is taking a closer look at human genetics.

Featured are three books that translate the complexities of genetics into understandable terms. Pulitzer Prize-winner Siddhartha Mukherjee traces the history of genetics from its beginnings in the 19th-century experiments of Gregor Mendel and intertwines it with the story of his own family in The Gene: An Intimate History.  Adam Rutherford looks at the wealth of information our DNA contains – including the history of our species – in A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Human Story Retold through Our Genes. Finally, in Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs, and the Curious Forces That Make Us Who We Are, Indiana University School of Medicine Professor Bill Sullivan describes how genetics, epigenetics, microbiology and psychology combine to affect our personalities and actions.

Sullivan will be the guest speaker for a Nov. 17 online author talk as part of the NNLM Reading Club Presents… Series. Join us at 2 p.m. ET at https://youtu.be/1l2CGOsYL04.

To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Human Genetics page.

The post NNLM Reading Club Looks Beneath the Surface first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: All of Us

Take a Closer Look at Genetics with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA All of Us - Tue, 2020-11-03 11:47

Your health is the product of three factors: lifestyle, environment and genetics. In November, NNLM Reading Club is taking a closer look at human genetics.

Featured are three books that translate the complexities of genetics into understandable terms. Pulitzer Prize-winner Siddhartha Mukherjee traces the history of genetics from its beginnings in the 19th-century experiments of Gregor Mendel and intertwines it with the story of his own family in The Gene: An Intimate History.  Adam Rutherford looks at the wealth of information our DNA contains – including the history of our species – in A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Human Story Retold through Our Genes. Finally, in Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs, and the Curious Forces That Make Us Who We Are, Indiana University School of Medicine Professor Bill Sullivan describes how genetics, epigenetics, microbiology and psychology combine to affect our personalities and actions.

Sullivan will be the guest speaker for a Nov. 17 online author talk as part of the NNLM Reading Club Presents… Series. Join us at 2 p.m. ET at https://youtu.be/1l2CGOsYL04.

To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Human Genetics page.

NNLM Reading Club November Selections

A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived by Adam Rutherford | The Gene by Siddhartha Mukherjee | Pleased To Meet Me by Bill Sullivan

The post Take a Closer Look at Genetics with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: All of Us

Welcome Amy Reyes, Community Engagement Librarian!

PSR Latitudes All of Us - Fri, 2020-10-30 15:29

Headshot of Amy Reyes, woman with brown hair wearing floral top and blue cardiganWelcome to Amy Reyes, the newest team member with the Pacific Southwest Region, our new All of Us Community Engagement Librarian.

Amy comes to the NNLM with almost a decade of experience in public libraries, as well as work in school and academic library settings. She is a consumer health information specialist (CHIS) and passionate about STEM education, science literacy, health literacy and health equity. In her most recent position she developed after school STEM programs, intergenerational programs and was part of the team that built and launched a new maker space.

Outside of work Amy is pursuing the same life long learning she hopes to inspire in others. Currently, she is working towards a second bachelors degree in biology with an emphasis in biomedical science. She is also active as an advocate for mental health and diversity. She is certified in Mental Health First Aid and ASIST suicide prevention. Amy also serves on the Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice Task Force of the Public Library Association. She is also active in the Medical Library Association and American Public Health Association.

Amy is very excited to be joining the PSR team at UCLA and to be part of the NLM/NNLM team. She looks forward to diving into exciting new and established regional projects, as well as helping to promote NNLM and the All of Us research program on a national level.

The post Welcome Amy Reyes, Community Engagement Librarian! first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: All of Us

NNLM SEA Digest News – October 30, 2020

SEA All of Us - Fri, 2020-10-30 10:57

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars November 10 – November 16

Webinars November 17 – November 20

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – October 30, 2020 first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: All of Us

NIH to assess and expand COVID-19 testing for underserved communities

BHIC All of Us - Tue, 2020-10-27 10:45

“It is critical that all Americans have access to rapid, accurate testing for COVID-19, especially underserved and vulnerable populations who are bearing the brunt of this disease. RADx-UP will help us better understand and alleviate the barriers to testing for those most vulnerable and reduce the burden of this disease on all Americans” – NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins. NIH RADx-UP is investing $234M to improve testing for underserved & vulnerable populations.

Learn more about this exciting initiative here.

The post NIH to assess and expand COVID-19 testing for underserved communities first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.

Categories: All of Us

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Pleased to Meet Me

BHIC All of Us - Tue, 2020-10-27 10:39

On November 17th at 2pm ET join Dr. Bill Sullivan, author of Pleased to Meet Me, as he describes the hidden forces of genetics that shape personality and behavior.  Dr. Bill Sullivan is a professor of pharmacology and microbiology at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

You can tune in here.

The post NNLM Reading Club Presents...Pleased to Meet Me first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.

Categories: All of Us

Host an NNLM Virtual Reading Club Discussion at your Library!

SEA All of Us - Thu, 2020-10-22 11:24

You may already know about the NNLM Reading Club, a selection of “ready-to-use” book titles along with free and downloadable materials designed to help libraries support the health information needs in their communities. Due to COVID-19, All of Us Community Engagement funded in-person activities are suspended until further notice. This includes shipping the NNLM Reading Club kits.

As an alternative, SEA is offering awards (up to $300) for member libraries to purchase 8-10 e-books and e-audio book formats of titles available from the NNLM Reading Club!

Libraries can host a virtual book discussion and make titles available to borrow in a digital format. We also recommend that all awardees include and/or link to All of Us downloadable materials for users to access during your library’s virtual book club discussion. Libraries can purchase physical books and audio books if your library offers a safe method for patrons to borrow books (ex. curb side pick up or contactless delivery).

Award recipients will need to host at least one virtual discussion event by March 30th, 2021, fill out the Reading Club survey, and share the event on the Virtual Programs page.  This award will be available until funds are exhausted.

For more information visit the NNLM SEA Book Club website.

The post Host an NNLM Virtual Reading Club Discussion at your Library! first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: All of Us

All of Us Research Program Issues Funding Opportunity for New Engagement Partners

SEA All of Us - Tue, 2020-10-06 13:41

The All of Us Research Program has issued a new funding opportunity seeking the collaboration of national, state, and local engagement partners to recruit and engage participants in the landmark NIH program.

All of Us, a historic effort to accelerate research and improve health, launched nationally in 2018 to create one of the most comprehensive and diverse biomedical data resources of its kind. To date, more than 358,000 participants have enrolled in the program. This latest funding opportunity illustrates the program’s commitment to partnering with organizations that are influential in their respective communities, especially those organizations that work with diverse communities. Through these partnerships, All of Us aims to create bi-directional and co-equal relationships that engage communities that have historically been underrepresented in biomedical research.

The program anticipates funding at least six awards in FY 2021 through this latest funding opportunity, each with a total project period of five years. Applications are due on November 23, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. of the applicant’s local time. 

All of Us encourages eligible applicants with experience working with and engaging underrepresented communities to apply for this funding. All of Us considers the following populations underrepresented in research: racial and ethnic minority groups; children and seniors; sexual and gender minorities; people living with disabilities; people with barriers in access to care; people who have low income or low educational attainment; and rural residents.

For full details regarding this opportunity, please see the funding announcement.

The post All of Us Research Program Issues Funding Opportunity for New Engagement Partners first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: All of Us

NNLM Reading Club Explores Diversity in Medicine in October

PNR All of Us - Wed, 2020-09-30 11:24

“For I know that diversity is important, not based just on gender, or your race or ethnicity, but your unique experiences, your perspectives and solutions that you bring to the table. … Don’t shy away from your experiences, your challenges, your joys. Yes, they are wonderfully complicated, but they shape who you are.”  ~Valerie Montgomery Rice, MD, President and Dean of Morehouse School of Medicine [1]

 About 13 percent of the U.S. population identify as Black or African American, but only 5 percent of active physicians do. Eighteen percent of people list themselves as Hispanic or Latino while the representation among doctors is less than 6 percent. [2] [3] In order to talk about diversity and equity in health care, we must also discuss diversity and equity in the medical profession.

For the month of October, the NNLM Reading Club recommends three memoirs that explore the personal experiences of physicians of color.

Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon by Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, MD l Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflection on Race and Medicine by Damon Tweedy, MD l The Beauty in Breaking: A Memoir by Michele Harper, MD

Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon by Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, MD, traces the author’s journey from child in a Mexican village to migrant farmworker in California to brain surgeon and researcher. Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflection on Race and Medicine by Damon Tweedy, MD, looks at how both Black doctors and patients must navigate the difficult and often contradictory terrain of race and medicine. Finally, The Beauty in Breaking: A Memoir by Michele Harper, MD, recounts the experiences of an African American emergency room doctor amid personal struggles that include her history with an abusive father and racial conflict faced in the ER ward.

To learn more about these books and their authors and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources, visit NNLM Reading Club’s Racism and Health: Diversity in Medicine. 

[1] Rappleye, E. (2018, June 4). Eight inspiring quotes from 2018 medical school graduation speeches. Retrieved September 28, 2020, from Becker’s Hospital Review.

[2] U.S. Census Bureau. ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates. Retrieved September 28, 2020, from United States Census Bureau.

[3] Association of American Medical Colleges. Diversity in Medicine: Facts and Figures 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2020, from AAMC.

 

 

The post NNLM Reading Club Explores Diversity in Medicine in October first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: All of Us

Carrie Ann Inaba’s Battle with Sjögren’s syndrome

BHIC All of Us - Tue, 2020-09-29 16:09

Carrie Ann Inaba doesn’t let Sjögren’s syndrome stand in her way. Find out how the “Dancing with the Stars” judge doesn’t let her autoimmune disease get the best of her here.

Outside of her on-camera career, Inaba is a self-described warrior for those with Sjögren’s syndrome, a difficult and often painful autoimmune disease she has herself. As an Awareness Ambassador for the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation, she spreads hope and comfort to others with the condition. In this exclusive interview, she describes how meditation, yoga, and a sense of community have helped her thrive despite her diagnosis.

The post Carrie Ann Inaba's Battle with Sjögren's syndrome first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.

Categories: All of Us

“We Live for the We: the Political Power of Black Motherhood” Livestream

BHIC All of Us - Tue, 2020-09-29 16:06
Last week authors Dani McClain and Andrea Collier discussed  McClain’s book, We Live for the We: the Political Power of Black Motherhood. “A longtime reporter on race, reproductive health, and politics, Dani McClain is also the mother of a little girl. Like all first-time mothers, she has countless questions about raising her child—and her questions take on political significance as she examines what it means to introduce her daughter to our unjust, even hostile, society, according to a statement by her publisher Bold Type Books. “Black mothering is an inherently political act. Black women are more likely to die during pregnancy or childbirth than women of any other race; black mothers must stand before television cameras reminding the world that their slain children were human beings. In We Live for the We, McClain explores how to build a strong, supportive community for her daughter that includes often-ignored values and perspectives, and how to ensure her daughter lives with dignity and joy. She learns how to parent boldly in uncertain times, how to root herself in her faith and cope with the anxieties that sometimes threaten to consume her. “McClain spoke with mothers on the frontlines of movements for social, political, and cultural change who are grappling with the same questions. Following a child’s development from infancy to adolescence, We Live for the We shares lessons about the need for community, the challenges of navigating segregated schools, and how to talk honestly about sex and consent. “Warm, wise, and urgent, We Live for the We will become a handbook for parents and a guide to help us imagine the society we build for the next generation,” the statement concludes. The livestream was recorded on Facebook and you can watch it here.

The post "We Live for the We: the Political Power of Black Motherhood" Livestream first appeared on Bringing Health Information to the Community.

Categories: All of Us

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