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Data Science

Librarians and Research Data Management Services: Branching Out Into Big Data

MCR Data Science - Tue, 2018-09-18 10:47

In the NNLM Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles course, we asked participants, as they progressed through the course, to consider the following questions: Do you think health sciences librarians should get involved with big data in healthcare? Where should librarians get involved, if you think they should? If you think they should not, explain why. You may also combine a “should/should not” approach if you would like to argue both sides. NNLM will feature responses from different participants over the coming weeks.

Written by: Rose Fredrick, Digital Repository Librarian, Health Sciences Library, Creighton University

Big data has a different nature than traditional research data. It is more immediate and ephemeral which creates large, eclectic datasets that are not easily categorized or managed with traditional data science tools.  It is changing the way research is done and the health sciences in particular are discovering new possibilities for studies by aggregating multiple sources of patient data, like wearable health trackers and electronic health records. These transformative studies also give health science librarians an opportunity to support data scientists by building upon existing research data management services.  The librarian’s role in research data management is well-established and this creates a natural launching point for librarians to expand into big data research services.

Many libraries already provide a full array of data services, such as advising on data management plans, metadata and organization, public access mandates, data security, and the preservation and archival of data sets.  Although big data has different needs when it comes to storage and analysis, many of the same services apply.  Librarians have expertise in the ethical implications of data privacy, publisher and funder requirements, and in curating, organizing and preserving data.  All of these skills and services can benefit big data researchers, but librarians do need to be aware of the challenges of big data.

While the knowledge base of librarianship and research data management can clearly be used advantageously for big data services, there can be barriers to librarians implementing these new services.  Perhaps the biggest barrier is training. Depending on the services being offered, at a minimum librarians will need to become familiar with the nature of big data and how that shapes the research process, the correct terminology, and what resources are available to researchers.  Furthermore, to offer the most robust services, librarians may need data science training or advanced technical training to assist with data processing. Not all institutions are prepared to train librarians so extensively nor will they experience enough demand to require a full-time data science librarian .

Librarians can offer more basic services without intensive data science and technical training, however.  A first step could be to become familiar with the terminology, issues, and processes of using big data and be ready to refer researchers with questions to useful resources.  Another option that requires a bit more investment is to offer instruction on crafting data management plans, understanding funder/publisher requirements for data, or choosing a data preservation platform.  Librarians with more time could offer one-on-one advisory sessions on the data management plan for their research projects.  Librarians without a data science background could also take advantage of training geared towards them, like the Data and Visualization Institute for Librarians or the Data Sciences in Libraries Project.

Additionally, as a digital repository librarian, I wanted to determine whether my library would be able to offer services for archiving big data.  Currently, our institutional repository would not be able to house such large sets of data, so while we can advise researchers on preparing for preservation and selecting a platform, we will not be able to archive the data sets in-house.  In the future, it may be possible to collaborate with our information technology department and create an archival system using Apache Hadoop . Some libraries with enough technical resources may already be able to take that step. In the meantime, I think libraries can offer counseling on choosing from the available platforms and perhaps offer data preparation advice based on their experience from archiving smaller sets of research data. In summary, health sciences librarians have relevant expertise and services to offer to big data research and they should consider what combination of services will be the best fit for their institutions.

Categories: Data Science

Big Data in Healthcare: Finding Your Niche

GMR Data Science - Mon, 2018-09-17 12:39

In the NNLM Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles course, we asked participants, as they progressed through the course, to consider the following questions: Do you think health sciences librarians should get involved with big data in healthcare? Where should librarians get involved, if you think they should? If you think they should not, explain why. You may also combine a “should/should not” approach if you would like to argue both sides. NNLM will feature responses from different participants over the coming weeks.

Written by: Brenda Fay, Library Specialist, Aurora Libraries – Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center

For librarians in health science libraries, big data in healthcare might be something of a stranger. Sure, we know that data is being collected about patients, but how do we librarians fit in? Depending on what type of library you work in, whether you’re a solo librarian, and perhaps even your comfort level learning new skills, knowledge and familiarity with data and data practices may or may not be something in your wheelhouse. I work in a large healthcare system within a team of fourteen librarians and library staff. Our institution has a research arm that is growing and growing, and yet none of us have really been involved in big data or data management practices at our institution. I don’t think that’s very unusual for a place that isn’t also an academic medical center. Can healthcare big data be overwhelming? Yes. Is big data in healthcare worth all the fuss? Yes.

Why should health science librarians get involved with big data in healthcare? With the ever-growing interest and use of data all around us, data isn’t going away anytime soon. Librarians are great at continually staying on top of trends and changes in our field, and I truly believe that health science librarians will become more and more involved, in one way or another, with data initiatives at their institutions. It’s better to be in front of the curve and helping guide the conversation, than trying to catch up when the ship has sailed. Learning about big data will keep librarians relevant. If we look at skills librarians already have, like organization and classification, taxonomies and metadata, those could immediately be leveraged into increasing the quality of research data management practices at our institutions by working with researchers on their data management plans, which many need to include on grant and funding applications. We should also get involved because there are so many free training opportunities available to us from MLA, NLM, and others. If MLA and NLM/NNLM think big data is worth supporting on such a large scale, I am onboard, too.

How might health science librarians get involved with big data in healthcare? This is much trickier and depends a lot on the situation you find yourself in. You might not be able to start any of these activities today or even next year, but knowing how other health science librarians work with big data in their institutions can inspire you to find a way where you are. Reference questions might lead you to big data. If you’ve ever been asked to find data, Kevin Read and his NYU librarian colleagues have created a data catalog (NYU Health Sciences Library, n.d.) for those looking for data sets to use, or for researchers to publish their own data. Assisting on systematic reviews or publications might lead you to big data. A 2018 study looked at Google Trends, an online source for accessing trends in Google’s search data, and laypeople’s searches for asthma (Mavragani, A, K, & KP., 2018). It had some methodological issues that a librarian would have likely pointed out right away. Building relationships with library users might lead you to big data. Librarians at NU Health Sciences Library had conversation with basic and clinical researchers at their institution to learn more about their data needs. These conversations allowed them to tailor library services to fill a gap in “community’s data issues including, but not limited to, the challenges they face when collecting, organizing, and sharing their research” (Read, Surkis, Larson, McCrillis, & Nicholson, 2015).

I firmly believe that working with big data in healthcare will raise the profile of health science librarians and the libraries they work in.

Bibliography

Mavragani, A., A, S., K, S., & KP., T. (2018). Integrating smart health in the US health care system: Infodemiology study of asthma monitoring in the Google era. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance, e24.

NYU Health Sciences Library. (n.d.). Data catalog. Retrieved August 29, 2018, from https://datacatalog.med.nyu.edu/

Read, K. B., Surkis, A., Larson, C., McCrillis, A. G., & Nicholson, J. X. (2015). Starting the data conversation: informing data services at an academic health sciences library. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 131-135.

Categories: Data Science

Upcoming Training for Health Sciences Library Staff

MAR Data Science - Wed, 2018-09-12 11:00

Did you know that you can get free training from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine right from your desktop? Nearly every day, there is a new webinar from NNLM or the National Library of Medicine. Other classes are available through Moodle. Since webinars are available nationally, make sure to take note of time zones. Some upcoming classes that may be of interest to health sciences library staff include:

  • Clinical Information, Librarians and the NLM: From Health Data Standards to Better Health – This interactive webinar series focuses on the roles and products of the National Library of Medicine related to applied medical informatics, particularly as applied to electronic health records systems and clinical research. Sessions are held weekly on Thursdays through October 4, from 12:00-12:40 PM ET.
  • PubMed for Librarians – PubMed for Librarians is made up of six 90-minute segments. These six segments will be presented via WebEx and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend. Register for the next live session (part 4) coming up on September 19 from 2:00-3:30 PM ET, or watch a recording.
  • Accessible Library Customer Service – September 19, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Gain knowledge and tools to provide accessible customer service in your library by joining us for this one-hour webinar! This presentation will give an overview of disability including appropriate terminology, creating an accessible environment, and evaluating current practices for way-finding, emergency preparedness, and web resources. Other topics include budgeting for accessibility, accessible employment, specific service needs, potential partner organizations, and a plethora of tips and resources for future use.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – September 26, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – This presentation will help you learn how to navigate the site and understand the nuances and limitations of information available on ClinicalTrials.gov.
  • NNLM Research Data Management Webinar Series – The NNLM Research Data Management (RDM) webinar series is a collaborative, bimonthly series intended to increase awareness of RDM topics and resources. The series aims to support RDM within the library to better serve librarians and their institutional communities. The next webinar in this series, Planning, Developing, and Evaluating R Curriculum at the NIH Library, is coming up on October 12 from 2:00-3:00 PM ET.
  • LinkOut for LibrariesNovember 1, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – LinkOut for Libraries provides journal access to PubMed users. Join us for an informational webinar to learn more about this service from the National Library of Medicine. Erin Latta, from the National DOCLINE Coordination Office, will lead this webinar.

In addition to scheduled courses, NNLM has a number of “on-demand” self-paced classes via Moodle, such as:

Most webinars are recorded, so you are encouraged to register for a session of interest, even if you cannot make the live webinar. To register for classes, you just need to create an account.

You can find additional opportunities on our training schedule.

The best way to find out about upcoming trainings, NLM updates and other information from the Network is to subscribe to MAR Weekly Postings, which come out on Fridays.

Categories: Data Science

Apply Today! Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians

SEA Data Science - Tue, 2018-09-11 12:03

Health sciences librarians are invited to apply for the online course, Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, offered by the NNLM Training Office (NTO). The course is a free, 7-week online class with engaging lessons,  practical activities and a final project. The course runs October 15 – December 14, 2018.

The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to data issues and policies in support of developing and implementing or enhancing research data management training and services at your institution. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. Course topics include an overview of data management, choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset, addressing privacy and security issues with data, and creating data management plans.

Applications are due September 20, 2018.

Additional details and the online application are available here.

For questions, please contact the NNLM Training Office

Categories: Data Science

Did you miss the first round of MAR funding? Apply now for $19,000

MAR Data Science - Thu, 2018-08-30 13:00

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, a health information outreach program funded by the National Library of Medicine, has funding for two grants of $19,000. Libraries, community-based organizations, schools, health care providers, and other organizations that provide health programming or services within PA, NY, NJ or DE are eligible to apply. Applications are due October 5, 2018, and award funds must be spent by April 30, 2019.

Applications for funding less than $15,000 will not be considered at this time.

Projects can fall under one of these categories:

  • Clinical and Public Health Outreach Award: Projects that enhance clinicians’ and public health workers’ abilities to find and use biomedical and health information in practice and for patient education.
  • Outreach to Consumers Award: Projects that improve health information literacy and increase the ability for patients, family members, students and members of the general public to find and use health information.
  • Health Sciences Library Project Award: Projects that support health sciences librarians as conduits of information management, access, and delivery within their institution and/or outreach community.
  • Health Literacy Project Award: Projects that promote a culture of health literacy within the organization.

Potential applicants are encouraged to review the above RFPs and watch a one hour recorded webinar on writing applications for NNLM MAR funding. Additional questions may be sent to nnlmmar@pitt.edu.

Stay tuned: Another round of funding opportunities will be announced soon to encourage proposals from public libraries or involving public library partnerships!

Categories: Data Science

Data Flash: Hospital or academic or data-interested librarian? 2 opportunities for data-related training, free!

PNR Data Science - Mon, 2018-08-27 08:30

Whether you’re in a hospital or academic or research center or other data-related setting, take a look at these two amazing training opportunities—there’s something for everyone!  And they’re free!

1) “Clinical Information, Librarians and the NLM: From Health Data Standards to Better Health

When we did our regional data needs assessment last year, many of you who are hospital librarians said that you wanted to be able to “speak IT”; in other words, to know more about data standards such as UMLS, SNOMED CT, and more.

Well, here’s your chance!  This interactive webinar series consists of five 30-minute Thursday sessions (each at 9 AM Pacific Time).   It “focuses on the roles and products of the National Library of Medicine related to applied medical informatics, particularly as applied to electronic health records systems and clinical research. The series is specially designed for health sciences librarians and other health information specialists seeking to serve more active roles in their health IT team and better support researchers”.  You’ll learn about not only UMLS and SNOMED CT, but also RxNorm, LOINC, Common Data Elements and the Value Set Authority Center.

Want to dazzle your IT team?  Take this class!

2) Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians

If research data management is more your focus, perhaps for those of you in academic or research center settings, this training could be for you.   It can be tough to “pick up” the skills needed to be a support for researchers, and so an intensive guided course with amazing teachers and assigned mentors is a wonderful chance to immerse yourself and kick start your involvement.

“Health sciences librarians are invited to apply for the online course, “Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians”, offered by the NNLM Training Office (NTO). The course is a free, 7-week online class with engaging lessons,  practical activities and a final project. The course runs October 15 – December 14, 2018.  The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to data issues and policies in support of developing and implementing or enhancing research data management training and services at your institution. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. Course topics include an overview of data management, choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset, addressing privacy and security issues with data, and creating data management plans.”

Applications are due September 20, 2018.  Note that a letter of commitment from your library is part of the application!

Additional details and the online application are available here, and for questions, please contact the NNLM’s National Teaching Office at  nto@utah.edu .

Of course, we here in the Regional Medical Library are also standing by and always happy to help!

Categories: Data Science

Applications Open: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians – Applications Due Sep 20, 2018

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2018-08-23 13:08

Course Description
Health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online biomedical and health research data management training course, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. Familiarity with the research lifecycle is recommended but not required.

The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to data issues and policies in support of developing and implementing or enhancing research data management training and services at your institution. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data management, choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset, addressing privacy and security issues with data, and creating data management plans.

Course Components
The online asynchronous component of the program is 7 weeks from October 15 – December 14 with a week off for the Thanksgiving holiday. There will also be a week for catch-up.  The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. There will be optional weekly office hours. Expect to spend up to 4-5 hours each week on coursework. Participants will complete a Final Project Plan/Proposal, demonstrating improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data management services at their institution.

CE Credits
Participants who complete all modules, the Final Project Plan, and the course evaluation will receive MLA CE credit (exact number of hours to be determined). No partial CE credit is granted.

Instructor
The instructor is Tisha Mentnech, MSLIS, Research Librarian from the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah.

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.
  • Applications from libraries currently looking to develop or enhance research data management training and services are encouraged.
  • A letter of institutional support is required. See application instructions below.
  • Enrollment is limited to 40 participants.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in the program.

Important Dates

  • Application deadline: September 20, 2018
  • Notifications begin: October 1, 2018
  • Online Course: October 15 – December 14, 2018

Application Details

  • Name and Contact Information
  • Current Role/Title
  • Place of Employment
  • Briefly describe your current experience or interest in research data management.
  • Briefly describe the current status of research data management services at your library, including any barriers to implementation.
  • This training will have been worthwhile for you and your institution if…

Application Instructions
Please fill out the online Application Form, and upload a PDF of your current CV and your letter of institutional support. The letter of institutional support must be from your supervisor and address:

  1. time for participation in the online course;
  2. the library’s commitment to or plans for adding or enhancing research data management services.

Please submit your application via the online form by September 20, 2018:
https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4521556/Biomedical-Health-RDM-Training-Participant-Application-Fall-2018

Questions? Contact NTO at nto@utah.edu.

Categories: Data Science

Applications Open: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians

NTO Data Science - Thu, 2018-08-23 12:04

Updated 29 Aug 2018

Course Description
Health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online biomedical and health research data management training course, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. Familiarity with the research lifecycle is recommended but not required.

The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to data issues and policies in support of developing and implementing or enhancing research data management training and services at your institution. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data management, choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset, addressing privacy and security issues with data, and creating data management plans.

Course Components
The online asynchronous component of the program is 7 weeks from October 15 – December 14 with a week off for the Thanksgiving holiday. There will also be a week for catch-up.  The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. There will be optional weekly office hours. Expect to spend up to 4-5 hours each week on coursework. Participants will complete a Final Project Plan/Proposal, demonstrating improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data management services at their institution.

CE Credits
Participants who complete all modules, the Final Project Plan, and the course evaluation will receive MLA CE credit (exact number of hours to be determined). No partial CE credit is granted.

Instructor
The instructor is Tisha Mentnech, MSLIS, Research Librarian from the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah.

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.
  • Applications from libraries currently looking to develop or enhance research data management training and services are encouraged.
  • A letter of support is required. See application instructions below.
  • Enrollment is limited to 40 participants.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in the program.

Important Dates

  • Application deadline: September 20, 2018
  • Notifications begin: October 1, 2018
  • Online Course: October 15 – December 14, 2018

Application Details

  • Name and Contact Information
  • Current Role/Title
  • Place of Employment
  • Briefly describe your current experience or interest in research data management.
  • Briefly describe the current status of research data management services at your library, including any barriers to implementation.
  • This training will have been worthwhile for you and your institution if…

Application Instructions
Please fill out the online Application Form, and upload a PDF of your current CV and your letter of institutional support. The letter of institutional support must be from your supervisor and address:

  1. time for participation in the online course;
  2. the library’s commitment to or plans for adding or enhancing research data management services.
    If you are not currently employed, you may seek a letter from 1) a previous employer who can speak to your qualifications, accomplishments, and commitment OR 2) your Regional Medical Library.

Please submit your application via the online form by September 20, 2018:
https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4521556/Biomedical-Health-RDM-Training-Participant-Application-Fall-2018

Questions? Contact NTO at nto@utah.edu.

Categories: Data Science

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