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Data Science

Data Flash: New Year’s Data Resolutions

PNR Data Science - Mon, 2019-01-14 03:00

This Wednesday, the PNR and PSR (so, the whole west coast!) regions of the NNLM are joining forces to offer what promises to be a fantastic webinar, by data guru Margaret Henderson (who literally wrote the—or at least a—book on research data management for librarians).  She will talk about how to get data services started at your institution, after taking one of the many online (and in-person) courses on research data management (RDM) available these days.

But, what if your new year’s resolution is to actually TAKE one of the courses?  Where do you find the one that will work for you?  Or, what if you just want to know more about the RDM scene in general?  This post is for you!  Here are some ideas for finding the right offering for you…

–Get a sense of the issues in the field by reading generally; articles like “Libraries and the Research Data Management Landscape” from CLIR can set the stage (as can Margaret’s book!)

–Consider what your personal goals are, and assess what kind of course would best meet them… Or maybe you want to be networking? Or learning Python? Courses aren’t the thing for every person or goal!

–Look for LibGuides that collect and describe some of the options out there; here’s a good one from Columbia University

–Look at offerings from professional organizations; here is a fabulous list of resources from ACRL

–Look for news and even list-servs that discuss data (the ones from RDAP and IASSIST are good places to start), which will have posts on the latest courses available; or, perhaps, a webliography?

–Look beyond the US—Europe, Canada, Australia, and others have been doing RDM work for even longer than we have, and there are some sophisticated and accessible offerings! Take a look here and here and here

–Look at offerings within particular academic disciplines (not just explicitly health-related); check out this one from the American Society for Engineering Education!

And, watch this space! You may be aware that the NNLM has offered an intensive RDM 101 course (spring and fall 2018), and RDM 102 is about to begin.  The NLM’s director, Patti Brennan, is data savvy and data focused, so there are sure to be more offerings in the coming years!  I’ll leave you with this recent talk she did, the closing plenary for the Coalition for Networked Information, titled “NLM & NIH Partnership in Accelerating Discovery Through Data”.  Enjoy!

Categories: Data Science

Upcoming PNR Rendezvous and Midday at the Oasis webinar

PNR Data Science - Wed, 2019-01-09 14:07

We are excited to be collaborating with our sister region, Pacific Southwest Region, to combine our monthly webinars this month to provide a wonderful session we believe you will find informative and useful.

Session title: What to do After You Take a Data Course

Presenter: Margaret Henderson, Librarian at San Diego State University. Margaret has presented and written on many library topics over the years, and wrote the book, Data Management: A Practical Guide for Librarians (2016, Rowman & Littlefield).

Summary: There are many online and in-person courses available for librarians to learn about research data management, data analysis, and visualization, but after you have taken a course, how do you go about applying what you have learned? While it is possible to just start offering classes and consultations, your service will have a better chance of becoming relevant if you consider stakeholders and review your institutional environment. This lecture will give you some ideas to get started with data services at your institution.

When: Wednesday, January 16 from 1:00 – 2:00pm PT (please adjust to your time zone)

How to attend: Registration is required but the webinar is free.

The session will be recorded and posted soon after the live session.

We hope you can join us!

Categories: Data Science

New Organizational Developments for NLM Coming in 2019!

PSR Data Science - Sat, 2019-01-05 18:25

In her first blog post of 2019, NLM Director Dr. Patti Brennan had many exciting updates to share. First, as of January 1, NLM has a new organizational chart that anticipates the outcome of a first phase of reorganization that will be implemented over the coming year. This initial phase focuses on consolidating NLM staff and related programs into fewer divisions and offices to improve efficiency and our overall effectiveness. Details of these changes will continue to be worked on during the year, with regular updates on the progress and the implications for specific NLM programs and services.

Missing from the new organizational chart is the Specialized Information Services (SIS) Division, the place within NLM that addressed the health information needs of specific communities, including Native Americans, minority-serving institutions, and urban teens. Commitment to these and other populations traditionally underserved within health care have not wavered, but NLM is working to ensure both the sustainability of this notable work and its integration into the fabric of the new NLM. The new, streamlined organization will incorporate within other offerings the critical information resources and services SIS originally provided.

Second, the Office of High Performance Computing and Communications, situated within the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications since the early 1990s, has closed. This unit offered many innovations over the years, advancing health computing to the 21st century and launching one of NLM’s most incredible ventures, the Visible Human Project. NLM will continue to make the Visible Human data available, but staff from the Office will be incorporated into other branches of the Lister Hill Center.

The third arm of the reorganization integrates the creative design and development services of the Audiovisual Programs Development Branch, also from the Lister Hill Center, into NLM’s Office of Communications and Public Liaison. This realignment will help incorporate advanced media and visualization techniques into NLM’s robust communication programs to better inform the public of the many information services and research advances.

Finally, NLM is renaming its Office of Health Information Programs Development the Office of Strategic Initiatives (OSI). OSI will play a key role in advancing NLM efforts in data and open science, program evaluation, and the strategic plan implementation.

Along with these changes there will be assessment of staff skills and evaluation of interests to best align those skills and interests with NLM’s evolving needs. NLM is committed to retaining its federal staff as functions are realigned, and will do its best to ensure matching of the talented staff with work they enjoy and the Library needs.

Categories: Data Science

Start the New Year with New Knowledge! Upcoming Training Opportunities from NNLM

MAR Data Science - Thu, 2019-01-03 14:45

Looking for professional development opportunities? The National Network of Libraries of Medicine provides opportunities for library staff, health professionals, educators and others to learn about new health information resources and programs. All of our classes are free, and many are eligible for continuing education credit from the Medical Library Association. Even if you will not be able to attend a live webinar, you can still register to receive a notification when the recording is available on the NNLM YouTube Channel. Check out some of our January 2019 offerings and register today!

From Movies to Meals: Senior Services and Spaces at Your Local Library – January 9, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Libraries often are the de facto senior centers of our growing – and aging – communities. The Marion Public Library embraces this role through program design, community feedback, and strategic partnerships. In addition to “traditional” library programming, this webinar hosted by GMR will describe how the library works to meet the nutritional and social needs of seniors through twice-weekly congregate meals as well as a monthly mobile food pantry visit.

Connecting Graphic Medicine to Your Community with Programming – January 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join NER with guest presenters Alice Stokes and Tori Rossetti as they give short presentations on the graphic medicine programs they’ve run at their institutions and take attendees’ questions. Learn about starting and running a graphic medicine book club, incorporating participatory art to engage your audience, best practices and lessons learned.

MeSH Changes and PubMed Searching – January 11, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – Every year, the Medical Subject Headings are updated. How does this affect your PubMed searches? What happens when a term gets changed, or added, or removed; or moved to a different part of the MeSH hierarchy? How do you accommodate vocabulary changes over time in your comprehensive searches? How do you check your saved searches and alerts? Join NTO for this webinar to learn the answers to these questions.

PubMed and Beyond: Clinical Resources from the National Library of Medicine – January 14, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by MAR, this presentation will introduce free bedside information resources for the busy clinician. Resources presented will include Clinical Queries in PubMed/MEDLINE and free drug, patient education, and point-of-care resources.

What to do after You Take a Data Course – January 15, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – There are many online and in-person courses available for librarians to learn about research data management, data analysis, and visualization, but after you have taken a course, how do you go about applying what you have learned? While it is possible to just start offering classes and consultations, your service will have a better chance of becoming relevant if you consider stakeholders and review your institutional environment. This lecture by Margaret Henderson and hosted by PSR will give you some ideas to get started with data services at your institution.

More Than a Bandage: Health Information Resources for K-12 Health Professionals – January 15, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by MAR, this course will introduce free health information resources for K-12 health professionals provided by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Participants will learn about consumer health sites covering general health, drug information, and environmental health, with an emphasis on MedlinePlus.

The Pieces of Systematic Review with Margaret Foster Webinar Series – Third Thursday of every month from January-May 2019, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Systematic reviews are well-documented as contributing to evidence-based healthcare by, in part, revealing gaps in the literature or illustrating the effectiveness of health interventions. They are common practice, but they can often be fraught with issues in how they’re conducted. There is a constant need for education and discussion. In each live session of this SCR webinar series, Margaret Foster draws from her expertise to discuss issues, provide examples, and demonstrate the steps of her Pieces process, as described in her book, Assembling the Pieces of Systematic Review: A Guide for Librarians. This second run of the original series will provide more practical examples for conducting each step of a systematic review as well as look at other types of reviews.

STEAM Programming for Adults – January 22, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Adult STEAM programming recognizes that adult life-long learners also benefit from an increased interest and knowledge of STEAM topics which can empower to them to think creatively and to design and engineer solutions to real world problems. With this goal in mind the Catawba County Library has established a series of community driven STEAM programs for Adults. During this hour long session, SEA and guest presenter will share the inspiration for Adult Steam programs, how to get started, find community partners, funding ideas, and program evaluation. Participants will also learn how to transform popular DIY craft programs into Adult STEAM programs.

Are You Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources for Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe – January 23, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join MAR for this class that covers NLM disaster health information and other emergency preparedness resources for community educators, families, friends and caregivers. Resources for special populations and those with special needs are highlighted.

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – January 23, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? Join MAR for this class that will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. In addition to MLA credit, this course has been approved by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing for 1 CECH for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES).

Transgender Health: Research and Resources – January 29, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by MAR, this session will discuss barriers that people who are transgender may face in their communities. The primary barriers discussed by guest speakers will include those that affect access to healthcare and re-entry to the community following incarceration. The guest speakers will also provide information about online and print resources that librarians, public health professionals or others interested in improving the health of transgender individuals in their communities can turn to for information.

DOCLINE 6.0 Update – January 30, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join NNLM for an update on DOCLINE 6.0! Meet Erin D. Latta from the National DOCLINE Coordination Office.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes.

Categories: Data Science

Data Flash: Some Reading About Library Responses To Research Mandates

PNR Data Science - Fri, 2018-12-21 04:47

Self-promotion–we all are called upon to do it at some time or another.  And my time has arrived!  This post is to let you know that if you’re interested in reading about research mandates, from funders, institutions and publishers, there’s a new book chapter that’s just been come out, by me and Virginia Commonwealth University’s Research Data Librarian Nina Exner.   The title is “Responding to Change: Reinventing Librarian Identities in the Age of Research Mandates” and it appears in the volume Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome (Advances in Library Administration and Organization, Volume 39).  You can see that it is fascinating reading, at least for my cat Dorothy!

Seriously, we didn’t really know until we started what a big topic this would turn out to be.  From the abstract, you’ll see that we: “(1) outline the changing scholarly ecosystem; (2) summarize major terms and concepts to understand the process of producing research outputs; (3) discuss the perspectives of the major players in the research enterprise; (4) present some of the challenges that research mandates and the changing research environment have brought to libraries; and finally (5) review ways in which libraries have successfully addressed them.” Phew!

Of course, by nature of this quickly moving environment, some of what we offer has shifted in the year since we wrote it, but we hope there are still many helpful suggestions!  There are two figures in particular that lay out some ideas for librarian involvement in the research enterprise.

Also, if you are OK with not having the publisher’s beautified version, the final manuscript version is available in open access form through the University of Washington’s ResearchWorks Archive.

While not light holiday reading, it may fit the bill if you make a new year’s resolution about enhancing your current awareness activities!  Either way, we welcome feedback– please feel free to contact me at glusker@uw.edu with any comments, suggestions, etc.

Happy New Year!

Categories: Data Science

FORCE11 and UCLA Library Partner to Host 2019 FSCI Summer Institute on Open Research August 5-9!

PSR Data Science - Thu, 2018-11-29 14:53

FORCE11 has announced that the third annual FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI) will take place at UCLA from August 5 to 9, 2019. With this move, FORCE11 begins a long-term collaboration with the UCLA Library to plan and present FSCI, and improve understanding and engagement with the fast-changing world of research communication on campuses everywhere. FSCI started in 2017 as a partnership between FORCE11 and the University of California at San Diego. Now setting down roots in Los Angeles, FSCI is a week-long summer school in open research for researchers, librarians, publishers, university administrators, funders, students and post-docs that incorporates intensive coursework, seminars, group activities, lectures and hands-on training. Participants learn from leading experts, have the chance to discuss the latest trends and to gain expertise in new technologies. FSCI is transdisciplinary and relevant across the sciences, social sciences and humanities.

“Working together with the academic community to explore frontiers in research communications is key to changing practices,” said Ginny Steel, UCLA Norman and Armena Powell University Librarian. “The UCLA Library has been actively involved in efforts to enhance and expand scholarly discourse through openness, and the summer institute will be a valuable forum for us to consider the opportunities and challenges in concert with the international research community. We look forward to welcoming everyone in August.”

FSCI courses explore changing practice in data-sharing, authorship, peer review, research assessment, publishing and more. There are courses for those who know very little about current trends and technologies and courses for those ready to pursue advanced topics. FSCI covers scholarly communication from a variety of disciplinary, regional and international perspectives. Course information and registration will be available in the spring. To stay updated on details as they emerge, sign up to receive email updates, join the Facebook page, follow @force11rescomm on Twitter, or visit FSCI2019@UCLA online.

Categories: Data Science

Apply by January 4 for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians!

PSR Data Science - Wed, 2018-11-28 19:45

Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate as students or mentors in RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians, a rigorous NNLM online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians. The librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity will be threaded throughout the course, which will also include practice in using Jupyter notebooks through an open-source browser-based application (jupyterhub) that allows users to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations, and narrative text. The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions.

Applicants must have previous training or experience in research data management through the RDM 101 course or attest to these learning objectives. Applications are open to health science information professionals working in libraries located in the US; or with permission of the instructors, persons living outside the US with LIS training and wishing to obtain a position in a US based library. A letter of institutional support is required. Enrollment is limited to 40.

The online asynchronous component of the program is six weeks, running from February 20 – April 5, including a catch-up week, and then followed by a synchronous online session during the week of April 8. Participants can expect to spend about six hours each week on coursework and the project. There is no charge for participating in the program. MLA CE credit will be awarded (TBD). Mentors will assume the role of a researcher with a dataset seeking data services support. They will work with groups of 4-5 mentees. Mentors will be compensated $1,000 for their time and required to submit a W-9 and a contract with the University of Utah. For more details and knowledge requirements, consult the course description link at the beginning of this message. To apply, submit the online application form, and upload PDFs of a current CV and letter of institutional support by January 4, 2019. For questions, contact Shirley Zhao, RDM Project Lead and Training Development Specialist.

Categories: Data Science

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians

NTO Data Science - Wed, 2018-11-28 10:28

 

Course Description

Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate as students or mentors in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity. It will also include practice in using Jupyter notebooks through an open-source browser-based application (jupyterhub) that allows users to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations, and narrative text.

The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and leadership.

Components
The online asynchronous component of the program is 6 weeks from February 20 – April 5, including a catch-up week, and then followed by a synchronous online session during the week of April 8. The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. There will be optional weekly office hours. Under the guidance of a mentor, participants will complete a Final Project to demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data science services at their institution. Expect to spend about 6 hours each week on coursework and the project.

Mentors will assume the role of a researcher with a dataset seeking data services support. They will work with groups of 4-5 mentees. Before the course, mentors will select a dataset and scope research questions to form the basis for mentee projects. During the course, mentors will participate in class discussions, sharing expertise as needed, and meet with mentees (individually or as a group) to provide guidance in the completion of the project. For example, during the data visualization module, mentors may provide guidance in using software, choosing appropriate chart types, etc. At the end of the course, mentors must be available for a synchronous online session during the week of April 8 where mentees will present their findings, and will provide written project feedback to each mentee.

Instructors

  • Shirley Zhao, MSLIS, MS, Data Science Librarian, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
  • Leah Honor, MLIS, Education & Clinical Services Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Tess Grynoch, MLIS, Research Data & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Margaret Henderson, MLIS, Health Sciences Librarian, San Diego State University

Important Dates

  • Application deadline: January 4, 2019
  • Notifications begin: January 14, 2019
  • Course: February 20 – April 12, 2019
For Student Applications

Applicants must have previous training or experience in research data management through the RDM 101 course or attest to the learning objectives listed here. Applications are open to health science information professionals working in libraries located in the US; or with permission of the instructors, persons living outside the US with LIS training and wishing to obtain a position in a US based library. A letter of institutional support is required (see application instructions below). Enrollment is limited to 40.

CE Credits
Students who complete all modules, the Final Project, and the course evaluation will receive MLA CE credit (exact number of hours to be determined). No partial CE credit is granted.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in the program.

Application Instructions
Please fill out the online application form, and upload PDFs of your current CV and your letter of institutional support by January 4, 2019: https://redcap.iths.org/surveys/?s=7LER8MMRCJ

The letter of institutional support must be from your supervisor and address time for participation in this online course. If you are not currently employed, you may seek a letter from 1) a previous employer who can speak to your qualifications, accomplishments, and commitment or 2) your Regional Medical Library.

For Mentor Applications

We are seeking 8 experienced data librarians (not necessarily in health sciences) to participate in this program as mentors to support students completing individual projects, which are designed to apply skills acquired each week. Mentors should be familiar or have experience with the topics of the course. Ideally, mentors will also have experience using Jupyter notebooks, Open Refine, GitHub, and basic programming in Python or R.

Deliverables

  1. Dataset and potential research questions
  2. Log of mentor/mentee interactions
  3. Written feedback to each mentee
  4. Summary report of experience as mentor, including suggestions for course.

Compensation
Mentors will be compensated $1000 for their time and required to submit a W-9 and a contract with the University of Utah.

Application Instructions
Please fill out the online application form, and upload a PDF of your current CV by January 4, 2019: https://redcap.iths.org/surveys/?s=ACPRDF48KX

Questions?

Please contact NTO or Shirley Zhao, RDM Project Lead and Training Development Specialist.

Categories: Data Science

Data Flash: Wikidata, RDM and Librarians

PNR Data Science - Mon, 2018-11-26 03:22

You’ve heard of Wikipedia, but are you familiar with Wikidata? What about WikiCite?

If you are interested to hear more, join us as we host Wikidata expert and librarian Katie Mika, from the University of Colorado Boulder!  In this hour-long webinar, she will “introduce the WikiCite initiative (to build a database of open citations to support free and computational access to bibliographic metadata) and will identify simple, high impact ways for librarians to get involved. As experts in the intersection of bibliographic metadata, information discovery, and interdisciplinary research, librarians are a tremendous resource for this community.”

To register for the session (which will be recorded, and a link sent out to registrants), visit https://nnlm.gov/class/wikidata .  You might also want to check out the link on that page to the NNLM’s Research Data Management Webinar Series, with several recorded sessions already available.

Please send any questions to Ann Glusker, email: glusker (AT) uw.edu.  We look forward to learning along with you on Dec. 7!

P.S.  If you want some fascinating extra reading before the webinar, check out this article by Katie Mika, “Wikidata and BHL” [Biodiversity Heritage Library]

Categories: Data Science

Today (November 15th) is National Rural Health Day

SCR Data Science - Thu, 2018-11-15 18:29

National Rural Health Day exists to promote awareness of the unique healthcare needs in rural areas of America. 60 million people, or 1 in every 5 Americans, currently live in rural areas of the United States. Receiving medical care is not always easy for those living in these areas due to a potential shortage of providers.

In Arkansas, 44% of the population live in rural (or non-metropolitan) areas. This means there’s roughly 9.5 physicians for every 10,000 people living in rural areas. In Louisiana, there are 9 physicians to every 10,000 rural residents. For the other three states:

  •         New Mexico: 12.5 physicians per 10,000 rural residents
  •         Texas: 8 physicians per 10,000 rural residents
  •         Oklahoma: 10.3 physicians per 10,000 rural residents

This contrasts from metropolitan areas in Texas, for instance, where the average is 25.7 physicians for every 10,000 people.

A few strategies being used to bring more healthcare into these areas include virtual doctor visits, incentives for doctors, and affiliation with larger healthcare networks. Rural Health Information Hub provides several resources for those interested in learning about public health in rural areas. Knowing about the resources around your area could possibly save a life in times of emergency.

map of health shortages

Like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Sources:

https://medlineplus.gov/ruralhealthconcerns.html
https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/topics/agricultural-health-and-safety

Categories: Data Science

Upcoming Webinar: Proposed Provisions for a Draft NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy

SEA Data Science - Tue, 2018-11-06 14:37

Date: Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Time: 11:30 AM – 1 PM ET

Registration: Details about the webinar, including how to register can be found by clicking here.

Description: On October 10, 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a Request for Information (RFI) in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts to solicit public input on proposed key provisions that could serve as the foundation for a future NIH policy for data management and sharing. The feedback obtained will help to inform the development of a draft NIH policy for data management and sharing, which is expected to be released for an additional public comment period upon its development.  To further engage stakeholders, NIH will be hosting a webinar on the proposed key provisions on November 7, 2018, from 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. ET.

Comments on the proposed key provisions will be accepted through December 10, 2018, and can be made electronically by visiting the National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Policy.

For a perspective on the importance of obtaining robust stakeholder feedback on this topic, please see the latest Under the Poliscope by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz.

Categories: Data Science

Data Flash: RIP PubMed Health

PNR Data Science - Sun, 2018-10-28 17:20

This is not exactly a data post, but, the loss of a trusted source for clinical effectiveness research will have its effects on the dataverse.  PubMed Health is being discontinued as of this coming Wednesday.  As any of my colleagues can tell you, I’m taking the loss of PubMed Health hard– I loved showing it to people at various conferences, and using it myself– I found it a wonderful mid-point between MedlinePlus.gov and PubMed.gov, and it also had some great methodology resources and a glossary.  All of its content will be findable in other ways though!

In thinking about how to proceed in future with finding clinical effectiveness research searching, I did some exploring and gathered my findings into a poster I presented recently at the Washington State Public Health Association conference.  Below, in list form, is the poster content–feel free to contact me at glusker (AT) uw.edu if you have any questions! And please send any suggestions for additions to these lists!

Check Out These Ways to Find Research on Clinical Effectiveness:

  • PubMed.gov has filters for systematic reviews and guidelines
  • Who cares? Seek out the organizations that care about the topic (Kids? American Academy of Pediatrics!)
  • If you or your local health sciences library have databases, check them out—for example, nursing database CINAHL has great content
  • NLM’s “Bookshelf” is becoming a good resource for guidelines https://is.gd/NLMBookshelf
  • The National Guidelines Clearinghouse will soon be re-released by ECRI and they have said it will be open access!
  • ClinicalTrials.gov records often link to related publications
  • For public health—try www.thecommunityguide.org and NICHSR OneSearch (a federated search of four public health databases)

Ramp Up Your Google Search Skills! 

  • Try this string, created by P.F. Anderson for a recent Twitter chat: guidelines|white-paper|standards|report|protocol| procedure|policy filetype:pdf (site:org OR site:gov) [fill in the condition])
  • Try GoogleScholar (scholar.google.com)

Search for Content from Reliable Guideline/Content Contributors (the Ones PubMed Health used):

  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US) (AHRQ)
  • Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH)
  • Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD)
  • Cochrane
  • Department of Veterans Affairs’ Evidence-based Synthesis Program from the Veterans Health Administration R&D (VA ESP)
  • German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG)
  • Knowledge Centre for the Health Services at The Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH)
  • National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines program (NICE)
  • National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment Programme (NIHR HTA)
  • Oregon Health and Science University’s Drug Effectiveness Review Project (DERP)
  • Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU)
  • The TRIP database (TRIP)
  • World Health Organization (WHO)

AND IF ALL ELSE FAILS, ASK A LIBRARIAN!

Categories: Data Science

Health Sciences Librarians of Illinois Annual Conference – Rivers of Data, Streams of Knowledge

GMR Data Science - Tue, 2018-10-23 10:18

The Health Sciences Librarians of Illinois received a GMR Professional Development award for 3 CE courses at the annual conference, held September 26-28 at the Cliffbreakers Riverside Hotel and Conference Center in Rockford, Illinois.

Attendees learned how to plan and develop working relationships in Building Partnerships with Faculty, Clinicians, and Other Stakeholders, with Gwen Wilson, the Health Informatics Coordinator/Librarian at Washburn University in Topeka, KS. Erin Foster, Data Services Librarian at the Indiana University School of Medicine provided information on Data Management in the Wild. A trio from the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, including Peg Burnette, Assistant Professor and Biomedical Sciences Librarian, Erin Kerby, Veterinary Medicine Librarian and Amanda Avery, a student at the iSchool inspired us to create or improve Your Online Professional Identity – Using Professional Profile Systems to Your Best Advantage.

Erin Foster addresses Data Management learning objectives 

Erin Foster addresses Data Management learning objectives

Gwen Wilson overviewing the course

Gwen Wilson overviewing the courseCourse evaluations were very positive and many learners had immediate plans to make use of what they learned. HSLI is grateful to GMR for the professional development funding, which helped our small organization provide excellent continuing education for members.

Amanda Avery, Erin Kerby, Peg Burnette, being introduced by Ramune Kubilius

Amanda Avery, Erin Kerby, Peg Burnette, being introduced by Ramune Kubilius

Categories: Data Science

NIH Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Provisions for a Future Draft Data Management and Sharing Policy

SEA Data Science - Fri, 2018-10-12 15:45

On October 10, 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a Request for Information (RFI) in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts to solicit public input on proposed key provisions that could serve as the foundation for a future NIH policy for data management and sharing.  The feedback we obtain will help to inform the development of a draft NIH policy for data management and sharing, which is expected to be released for an additional public comment period upon its development.

Comments on the proposed key provisions will be accepted through December 10, 2018, and can be made electronically by visiting here.

To further engage stakeholders, NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the proposed key provisions on November 7, 2018, from 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. ET. Details about the webinar, including how to register can be found by clicking here.

For a perspective on the importance of obtaining robust stakeholder feedback on this topic, please see the latest Under the Poliscope by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz.

Questions about the proposed provisions may be sent to the NIH Office of Science Policy at SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

Categories: Data Science

New Joint NSF/NLM Funding Announcement: Generalizable Data Science Methods for Biomedical Research

PSR Data Science - Thu, 2018-10-11 15:33

Significant advances in technology, coupled with decreasing costs associated with data collection and storage, have resulted in unprecedented access to vast amounts of health- and disease-related data. The National Library of Medicine and the Division of Mathematical Sciences in the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (DMS) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) recognize the need to support research to develop innovative and transformative mathematical and statistical approaches to address important data-driven biomedical and health challenges. The goal of this interagency program is the development of generalizable frameworks combining first principles, science-driven models of structural, spatial and temporal behaviors with innovative analytic, mathematical, computational, and statistical approaches that can portray a fuller, more nuanced picture of a person’s health or the underlying processes.

Specific information concerning application submission and review process is through the National Science Foundation via solicitation NSF-19-500. Applicants may opt to submit proposals via Grants.gov or via the NSF FastLane system. For applications that are being considered for potential funding by NLM, the PDs/PIs will be required to submit their applications in an NIH-approved format. Anyone invited to submit to NIH will receive further information on submission procedures. Applicants will not be allowed to increase the proposed total budget or change the scientific content of the application in the submission to the NIH. The results of the first level scientific review will be presented to NLM Board of Regents for the second level of review. NLM will make final funding determinations and issue Notices of Awards to successful applicants. NLM and DMS anticipate making 8 to 10 awards, totaling up to $4 million, in fiscal year 2019. It is expected that each award will be between $200,000 to $300,000 (total costs) per year with durations of up to three years. The application submission window deadline is in early January, 2019.

Collaborative efforts that bring together researchers from the biomedical/health and the mathematical/statistical sciences communities are a requirement for this program and must be convincingly demonstrated in the proposal. While the research may be motivated by a specific application or dataset, the development of methods that are generalizable and broadly applicable is preferred and encouraged. Proposals should clearly discuss how the intended new collaborations will address a biomedical challenge and describe the use of publicly-available biomedical datasets to validate the proposed models and methodology. Applicants are expected to list specific datasets that will be used in the proposed research and demonstrate that they have access to these datasets. The Data Management Plan should describe plans to make the data available to researchers if these data are not in the public domain. Some of the important application areas currently supported by the National Library of Medicine include the following:

  • Finding biomarkers that support effective treatment through the integration of genetic and Electronic Health Records (EHR) data;
  • Understanding epigenetic effects on human health;
  • Extracting and analyzing information from EHR data;
  • Understanding the interactions of genotype and phenotype in humans by linking human sensor data with genomic data using dbGaP;
  • Protecting confidentiality of personal health information; and
  • Mining of heterogeneous data sets (e.g. clinical and environmental).

Inquiries should be directed to Jane Ye, PhD at the National Library of Medicine, (301) 594-4882.

Categories: Data Science

ICYMI Webinar Recap for September 2018: Using US Census Bureau Data

SCR Data Science - Tue, 2018-10-09 10:07

The In Case You Missed It (ICYMI) Webinar Recap series will provide a summary of our monthly SCR CONNECTions webinars. We’ll go over highlights from our guest speakers’ presentations and give some additional thoughts about the connections our attendees could be making from the presented topics!

Our September guest speaker, Susana Privett, Data Dissemination Specialist with the US Census Bureau, is no stranger to online webinar presentations. A large part of her duties include giving online and in-person trainings and workshops on data and the census bureau’s online tools. And it’s a good thing, because September was one of our highest attended webinars yet!

For those not aware, all of the data collected from the US census, performed every 10 years, is posted online and available for access from census.gov. The website was recently revamped to be more user friendly and provide more opportunities for learning about census data, including additional training, news, infographics, and stories about data.

Susana demonstrated many of the features of the census website, such as QuickFacts to compare geographical data and American Factfinder, a data search tool that locates tables of population data. She also explained how census data is collected and categorized, with a breakdown of the geographic area types and an overview of census tracts and blocks. “They’re really like Russian nesting dolls,” she said, with a combination of legal and statistical geography.

Data and assessment are increasingly important topics in an era of big data and with the growth of digital data collection. Certainly anyone applying for grant funding knows the importance of data in showing evidence of need and potential for impact! The census bureau provides one possible source of data that can be utilized, and it’s freely available for anyone to use.

Susana just scratched the surface of what data the census bureau has to offer, and we hope to offer another session from her in the future for those looking to enhance their census data searching skills. Be on the lookout for that future session, and catch up with her webinar in the meantime:

Don’t forget to mark your calendars for our next SCR CONNECTions webinar, Game On! Motivate and Engage Your Staff with Gaming Strategies, scheduled for Wednesday, October 10th at 10am CT / 9am MT!

Like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Categories: Data Science

Clem McDonald, MD, Named as First NLM Chief Health Data Standards Officer

PSR Data Science - Wed, 2018-10-03 19:41
Dr. Clem McDonald

Clem McDonald, MD

NLM Director Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, has announced the appointment of Clem McDonald, MD, to the newly created position of Chief Health Data Standards Officer for the National Library of Medicine. His appointment will be effective November 1, 2018. The new position demonstrates NLM’s strong and enduring commitment to health data standards. The Chief Health Data Standards Officer’s responsibilities will involve integrating standards efforts across the Library, including the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) interoperability standard, Common Data Elements, and the vocabularies specific to clinical care (e.g., RxNORM, LOINC, SNOMED). The chief will also develop partnerships with industry, academia, and other federal agencies to advance the use of health data standards in clinical practice, public health, and observational data, including sensors.

For the last 12 years, Dr. McDonald served as Director of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications (LHNCBC) and Scientific Director of its intramural research program. His research focuses on clinical informatics; tools based on HL7’s FHIR to facilitate the use of electronic health records and research bases; the analysis of large clinical databases; the promotion, development, enhancement, and adoption of clinical messaging and vocabulary standards; and text de-identification. Prior to coming to NLM, Dr. McDonald served as the Regenstrief Professor of Medical Informatics at the Indiana University School of Medicine and the Director of the Regenstrief Institute for Health Care, a privately endowed research institute working to integrate research discovery, technological advances, and systems improvement into the practice of medicine. Dr. McDonald developed the Regenstrief Medical Record, one of the first electronic health record systems, and introduced the use of randomized trials to study health information systems. With NLM support, he and his colleagues developed the first Health Information Exchange, now loaded with 6 billion results from hospitals across Indiana. He also initiated the Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC) database observations for laboratory tests, clinical measurements, and clinical reports, and he was one of the founders of the Health Level 7 (HL7) message standards, used in hospitals today.

Effective November 1, Milton Corn, MD, Deputy Director of NLM for Research and Education, will also assume the responsibilities of Acting Scientific Director, LHNCBC. Olivier Bodenreider, MD, PhD, Chief of the Cognitive Science Branch at LHNCBC and a Principal Investigator in NLM’s Intramural Research Program, has been selected to become Acting Director, LHNCBC. Jerry Sheehan, NLM Deputy Director, will provide executive oversight and guidance.

Categories: Data Science

NLM Funds Study to Forecast Long-Term Costs of Data

PSR Data Science - Wed, 2018-10-03 19:39

The National Library of Medicine has teamed up with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) to conduct a study on forecasting the long-term costs for preserving, archiving, and promoting access to biomedical data. The study is being conducted as part of the NLM’s efforts to develop a sustainable data ecosystem, as outlined in both the NLM Strategic Plan and the NIH Strategic Plan for Data Science. Such an ecosystem is possible because the products and processes of research are now digital by default, and increasingly sophisticated and powerful computation can now be brought to data, rendering meaning that had previously been hidden. Across the biomedical sciences, decisions must be made about where in this ecosystem to invest limited resources to maximize the value of the data for scientific progress; strategies are needed to address question such as: What is the future value of research data? For how long must a dataset be preserved before it should be reviewed for long-term archiving? And what are the resources necessary to support long-term data storage?

For this study, NASEM will appoint an ad hoc committee to develop a framework for forecasting these costs and estimating potential benefits to research. The committee will examine and evaluate:

  • Economic factors to be considered when examining the life-cycle cost for data sets (e.g., data acquisition, preservation, and dissemination);
  • Cost consequences for various practices in accessioning and de-accessioning data sets;
  • Economic factors to be considered in designating data sets as high value;
  • Assumptions built in to the data collection and/or modeling processes;
  • Anticipated technological disruptors and future developments in data science in a 5- to 10-year horizon; and
  • Critical factors for successful adoption of data forecasting approaches by research and program management staff.

The committee will provide a consensus report and two case studies illustrating the framework’s application to different biomedical contexts relevant to NLM’s data resources. Relevant life-cycle costs will be delineated, as will any assumptions underlying the models. To the extent practicable, NASEM will identify strategies to communicate results and gain acceptance of the applicability of these models. As highlighted in a recent blog post, NASEM will host a two-day public workshop in late June 2019 to generate ideas and approaches for the committee to consider. Further details on the workshop and public participation will be made available in the coming months.

NLM is supporting NASEM’s efforts to solicit names of committee members, as well as topics for the committee to consider. Suggestions should be sent to Michelle Schwalbe, Director of NASEM’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics, or Elizabeth Kittrie, NLM Senior Planning and Evaluation Officer.

Categories: Data Science