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Data Science

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History

MAR Data Science - Mon, 2017-09-11 10:22

Join the National Library of Medicine, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) through a grant to Virginia Tech, for this exciting opportunity! On January 29-30, 2018, NLM will host Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History, bringing together scholars from various fields of medical history whose innovative research shows promise through the use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities.

Viral Networks will combine a face-to-face workshop with structured virtual-editing activities to produce and advance the innovative scholarship of the participants, and to help build the larger community of scholars who are pushing the envelope at the intersection of medical history and the digital humanities during this time of expanding digital resources and data-driven research. The focus on networks connects new computational tools for analyzing large-scale interactions between people, organizations, and ideas with the established emphasis of humanities scholarship on meaning, value, and significance over time and across cultures. Workshop participants will include twelve contributing scholars, who each will produce a chapter of original research in the planned open-access scholarly publication; consulting scholars who are experts in network analysis; and an advisory board which will coordinate stages of collaborative writing, peer review, collective editing, the final publication, as well as the preservation of data. After December 1, 2017, more information about the workshop will be available on the workshop Google site. Participation in Viral Networks will be free to scholars who apply and are accepted as participants.

Members of the public are invited to attend the keynote address by Theresa MacPhail, PhD, Assistant Professor Science and Technology Studies at Stevens Institute of Technology, and author of The Viral Network: A Pathography of the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic (Cornell University Press, 2014). Dr. MacPhail will speak on “The Evolution of Viral Networks: H1N1, Ebola, and Zika” describing the culture of public health, the production of scientific knowledge, networks of expertise, information sharing, and everyday experiences of epidemiologists, microbiologists, biomedical scientists, and medical practitioners.

Dr. MacPhail’s address will take place on Monday, January 29, in the Balcony B Auditorium of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Natcher Conference Center, located on the Bethesda, Maryland, campus of NIH, and it will be part of the NLM History of Medicine Division’s 2018 lecture series, which promotes awareness and use of NLM and other historical collections for research, education, and public service in biomedicine, the social sciences, and the humanities. As with all lectures in this series, Dr. MacPhail’s lecture will be free and open to the public.

To help us ensure adequate space, and the overall success of the program, we ask individuals who are interested in attending Dr. McPhail’s lecture to indicate their interest on the workshop Google site, when the sign-up form is available later this year.

Additionally, Dr. MacPhail’s lecture will be live-streamed globally and subsequently archived by NIH VideoCasting.

NLMʼs support of Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History is part of its ongoing partnership with the NEH, and follows specifically on its cooperative involvement in several previous NEH-fundedinitiatives, namely the April 2016 workshop Images and Texts in Medical History: An Introduction to Methods, Tools, and Data from the Digital Humanities, which explored emerging approaches to the analysis of texts and images in the field of medical history; the April 2013 symposium Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities, which explored the intersection of digital humanities and biomedicine, and the October 2013 symposium An Epidemiology of Information: New Methods for Interpreting Disease and Data, which explored new methods for large-scale data analysis of epidemic disease.

About the partner institutions:

The National Endowment for the Humanities is an executive-branch, independent grant-making agency of the United States of America dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities and in those social sciences that use humanistic methods. NEH accomplishes this mission by providing grants for high-quality humanities projects to cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, universities, public television and radio stations, and to individual scholars.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, is the world’s largest medical library with more than 17 million items in its collection. A leader in information innovation, it is the developer of electronic information services used by scientists, health professionals and the public around the world. NLM makes its information services known and available with the help of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, which consists of 5,600 member institutions, including eight Regional Medical Libraries. NLM conducts and supports research that applies computer and information science to meet the information needs of clinicians, public health administrators, biomedical researchers and consumers.

Dedicated to its motto, Ut Prosim (That I May Serve), Virginia Tech takes a hands-on, engaging approach to education, preparing scholars to be leaders in their fields and communities. As the commonwealth’s most comprehensive university and its leading research institution, Virginia Tech offers 225 undergraduate and graduate degree programs to more than 31,000 students and manages a research portfolio of $496 million. The university fulfills its land-grant mission of transforming knowledge to practice through technological leadership and by fueling economic growth and job creation locally, regionally, and across Virginia.

Categories: Data Science

SEAside Webinar: An Introduction to Data Visualization – September 25, 2017 1 PM ET

SEA Data Science - Wed, 2017-08-30 08:14

Date/Time: Monday, September 25, 2017, 1:00 – 2:30 PM ET

Presenter: Tony Nguyen, Technology and Communications Coordinator, NNLM SEA Region, University of Maryland, Baltimore

Presentation Summary: Are you interested in learning about data visualization? This webinar will provide an introduction to data visualization, concepts on visually represented data, design techniques, and different tools to which you can use to help develop your data visualizations.

Upon completion of the SEAside Webinar, each participant will receive 1.5 contract hours of continuing education credit award by the Medical Library Association. Participants will receive a code to which they will enter in medlib-ed.

Pre-Register: Pre-registration is strongly recommended, but not required. Visit our registration page to sign up!

To Join the Webinar:
•    Date: Monday, September 25, 2017
•    Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM ET
•    WebEx: https://nih.webex.com
•    Session number: 622 740 720
•    Session password: DataViz

To Join the Training Session
——————————————————-
1.    Go to https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=t1df98d79c6180fc076bd1c40d0e58ff8
2.    Enter your name and email address.
3.    Enter the session password: DataViz
4.    Click “Join Now”.
5.    Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link
https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=tff6c366d303adfc4caa92409d47c6f80

To Join the Session by Phone Only
——————————————————-
To receive a call back, provide your phone number when you join the training session, or call the number below and enter the access code.
•    Call-in toll number (US/Canada):1-650-479-3208
•    Global call-in numbers: https://nih.webex.com/nih/globalcallin.php?serviceType=TC&ED=591275762&tollFree=0
•    Access code: 622 740 720

To add this session to your calendar program (for example Microsoft Outlook), click this link:
https://nih.webex.com/nih/k2/j.php?MTID=taad5f20e5e3b000f561e1da78840565e

Technical Briefs – Important Information Prior to the Use of WebEx:

Contact: For additional information or questions, please contact Tony at ttnguyen@hshsl.umaryland.edu(link sends e-mail).

This webinar is co-sponsored by the DC Area Health Sciences Library Association (DCAHSL).

Categories: Data Science

Ongoing: Search for Libraries to Participate in RDM Pilot

MAR Data Science - Tue, 2017-08-15 09:55

The search continues! If you are interested in launching research data management services at your library, please consider participating in this pilot project.

NNLM MAR has funded a pilot to provide training, tools and strategies for medical libraries seeking to develop research data management services. This program provides a holistic approach to developing data services that focuses on building the required knowledge base, understanding and connecting with researchers, promoting effective outreach strategies, and integrating with the broader institutional data community. The program consists of online training modules for librarians, and three components to assist in implementing services:

  • A data interview template with guidance for effective outreach and engagement with researchers
  • A teaching toolkit consisting of slides, script, and evaluation materials to be used for teaching researchers at the pilot institution
  • Strategies and promotional materials for developing a data class series

We are seeking 5 libraries from the MAR region (DE/NJ/NY/PA) to participate in this pilot. This would involve ongoing support from the project PIs (Kevin Read and Alisa Surkis, NYU Health Sciences Library) throughout the course of the program, including regularly scheduled webinars with all the pilot sites to discuss strategies and challenges.

If your library is interested in participating in this pilot project, please contact Kevin Read or Alisa Surkis.

Categories: Data Science

“Calling BS in the Age of Big Data”, next PNR Rendezvous

PNR Data Science - Wed, 2017-08-09 10:16

Our digital worlds are inundated with misinformation, data manipulations and outright lies. In this webinar session, we will look at common pitfalls specifically around information visualization. Our presenter, Jevin West, will have us examine different ways that information can be misrepresented with figures and graphs. “Calling BS in the Age of Big Data” will build upon several lectures given in the Calling BS class at the University of Washington. 

Presenter: Jevin West Assistant Professor, Information School, University of Washington. He is one of the chief architects of the new Data Science curricula for undergraduate and graduate programs. Jevin co-founded and directs the DataLab with general themes in Data for Social Good, Data Curation, Computational Social Science, InfoVis and Science of Science. Together with Carl Bergstrom, he developed the industry-standard Eigenfactor metrics, used around the world to evaluate the quality of scholarly journals. He now develops computer vision techniques for mining scientific figures, recommendation algorithms for navigating the literature, and education data mining techniques for predicting student attrition. He asks questions about the origins of scientific disciplines, the biases within science that drive these disciplines, and the impact the current publication system has on the health of science.

When: Wednesday, August 16, 1:00pm PT, Noon Alaska, 2:00pm MT

How to Connect: 

Categories: Data Science

Persistent Identifiers

PNR Data Science - Wed, 2017-08-09 05:00

Have your researchers or other patrons ever asked you how to create a “permanent,” persistent, or long-lasting  link to a webpage, data set, article, file, dissertation, or even a physical object? While there are several online options, two tools/services used by the University of Washington Libraries are listed below.

Perma.cc is a free, online tool built by Harvard’s Library Innovation Lab and supported by libraries and institutions across the country. It allows users to create a link to online content, such as a webpage, that will always be accessible, regardless of what happens to the original source. No more link rot! For more information on how Perm.cc works, visit their User Guide. A free account will allow users to preserve up to 10 records per month; however, to preserve unlimited records, libraries must be a member of an archiving organization sponsored by a registrar. For more details on how to become a registrar, visit Perma.cc for Libraries.

EZID (easy-eye-dee) is a subscription based online service provided by the California Digital Library (CDL). It allows users to create and manage unique and persistent identifiers for anything from text to data to physical objects.  For a demonstration of how EZID works, a list of their annual subscription fees, or a list of current CDL clients, visit Learn About EZID.

Categories: Data Science

New National Academy of Science Study Launch “Toward an Open Science Enterprise”

MCR Data Science - Thu, 2017-08-03 12:37

The NAS recently launched a study on how to move “toward an open science enterprise.” This is to support the acceleration of scientific progress through the creation of important tools to give wide access to scientific research results and supporting data. The NAS Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI) ad hoc committee will lead this 1.5 year study that explores broadening access to scientific research results data.

Read the full story here.

jb

 

Categories: Data Science

Open Science Framework (OSF)

PNR Data Science - Wed, 2017-08-02 17:46


Looking for a place for your researchers to collaborate on projects and publications? Open Science Framework’s free online tool provides open source project management support for researchers across the entire research lifecycle. Created by the Center for Open Science in Charlottesville, VA, OSF is a collaboration tool, workflow system, and flexible repository all in one. Designed to work with many of the research tools researchers already use, it allows users to “automate version control, get persistent identifiers for projects and materials, preregister their research, and connect favorite third party services directly to the OSF.”

If your institution isn’t currently an OSF affiliate, you can learn more about the simple steps your library can take to access this free scholarly web tool. If it is an OSF affiliate, login by clicking on the “Login through Your Institution” link here.

Image: © Center for Open Science

Categories: Data Science

Connect with NIH Data Science Community – Join Data Science SIG

MCR Data Science - Fri, 2017-07-28 09:21

The NIH is inviting researchers, clinicians, educators (including librarians), patients, and the public to join the NIH Data Sciences Special Interest Group. The main goals of the group are to aid in disseminating new information, resources and activities; provide a place where the community can discuss and facilitate collaboration; and a place to share data and findings toward the common goal of improving the quality of life for all.

Learn more about the SIG and how to join

Categories: Data Science

NNLM SEA Digest News – July 28, 2017

SEA Data Science - Fri, 2017-07-28 08:01

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.

Top Item of Interest

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities

Please note that our class registration system requires obtaining a free NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NNLM Training Office. All sessions listed below are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all. Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.

Asynchronous Online Course – Moodle

Webinars July 31-August 4

Webinars August 7 – 11

In addition to the webinars listed, the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office provides webinars for subscribers to the Digital Library. You can attend a Quick Starter Course or attend a Drop-In Session.

YouTube Recordings Available

Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities. Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms referenced. Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

BD2K News

Data Management

Precision Medicine

Substance Use Disorder

Funding Opportunities

Miscellaneous News

For the latest news, stories, and reminders follow NNLM SEA:

Categories: Data Science

Clinical Use of Wearable Technology

PNR Data Science - Wed, 2017-07-26 05:00

While privacy concerns, accuracy of data collected, and FDA approval are all concerns in wearable technology, interest in clinical use of the devices has already begun. Some devices in use include:

Compact electrocardiogram monitor. According to the American Heart Association, cardiovascular disease and stroke are the two cause of death in American adults. Cardiovascular monitoring is vital to diagnosis and treatment of heart disease, and remote patient monitoring assists with this effort.

Wristband to monitor epileptic seizures. A device which can detect seizures in patients who have epilepsy can be used to record the time of the seizures, which will be useful to the healthcare provider, and also to reach an emergency contact to alert them a seizure has occurred. Activity monitored includes heart rate, oxygenation, and electrodermal activity.

Patch to detect sleep apnea. Usually, tests for sleep apnea involve a sleep study, or spending a night in the lab. Easier for the patient is a patch they wear instead. The patch monitors nasal pressure, blood oxygen saturation, pulse, respiration, sleep time and body position. Healthcare providers can use this data to diagnose, treat and determine the severity of the sleep apnea.

Wearable technology in the future of healthcare can have a role in preventive healthcare, determining problems at an early stage and lowering hospitalization rates and healthcare costs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Data Science

ERuDIte – Educational Resource Discovery Index/BD2K Training Coordinating Center

MCR Data Science - Thu, 2017-07-20 10:27

ERuDIte is the educational resource discovery index that supports biomedical researchers, a service of the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (TCC) Web Portal. ERuDIte functions to:

  1. Identify, store and synthesize large volumes of relevant educational resources in a scalable fashion
  2. Maintain a schema that aligns with other resource collection initiatives to promote data sharing
  3. Serve high-quality, up-to-date educational content to the biomedical community (and research community at large) that not only teaches Data Science concepts but also supports the practical application of such concepts into specific analysis tasks
  4. Aid learners in navigating the vast number of resources pertaining to Data Science through semi-automatic tagging and prerequisite identification
  5. Provide an individualized learning path through recommendations tailored to learners’ interests, experience, and progress over time

Learn more about ERuDIte

 

Categories: Data Science

Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science – key to data quality and utility?

MCR Data Science - Fri, 2017-07-14 10:25

The NIH Citizen Science Working Group, made up of several dozen NIH staff, investigates and shares best practices related to citizen science and crowdsourcing, and engages with other agencies and groups promoting citizen science in other fields. One of the primary purposes of the group is to explore how to incorporate citizen science into biomedical research while maintaining NIH’s high level of scientific and ethical standards.

Read more about the group on the DataScience@NIH Blog

The concept of Citizen Science is to take a collaborative approach to research that involves the public who are not only research subjects or advisors, but directly act as collaborators and partners. They are using similar concepts found in crowdsourcing they defined as:

1. voluntary involvement or contributions solicited from unknown individuals (aka “the crowd”), be they experts or not;
2. opening a line of scientific inquiry to a group of experts (typically achieved through prizes and challenges).

If you or someone you know would like to get involved, consider joining the newly established (2016) Citizen Science Association and get started today. jb

 

Categories: Data Science

Interesting Read: The Power of Provenance and importance of FAIR

MCR Data Science - Tue, 2017-07-11 13:08

Dina Mikdadi’s, Data Scientist at Booz Allen Hamilton, has written a nice article on “The Power of Provenance” on the DataScience@NIH blog. Mikdadi makes  comparisons with the Federal Depository Library’s early efforts using “open framework” concepts making US federal publications freely accessible to US libraries (and the public) to the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Re-usable) data principles, making data more widely accessible.  jb

 

Categories: Data Science

Three July webinars coming up

PNR Data Science - Mon, 2017-07-03 04:08

We have 3 upcoming webinars in the month of July highlighting funded projects, learning about data services, and featuring the NLM resource- PubMed Health. We hope you can join us for the live sessions but they will be recorded.

PNR Partners

Considering future projects for your library? Unsure what to do? Come join us on July 12th to hear two NNLM PNR members speak about their wonderful work in the region who received PNR funding. Two librarians will present about how they brought an Association of College and Research Libraries data management workshop to eastern Washington. And, interested in the use of comics in health and medicine? We will also hear about the Comics in Medicine conference held at Seattle Public Library. Learn more about this PNR Partners session on our webpage.

When: Wednesday July 12 1:00pm PT, Noon Alaska, 2:00pm MT

How to connect (no registration required):

  • Go to current PNR Partners session
  • Enter your name and email address.
  • Enter the session password: partners
  • Click “Join Now”
  • Follow the instructions that appear on your screen

For more complete information go to the PNR Partners webpage

PNR Rendezvous

At our monthly webinar, PNR Rendezvous, we will be hearing from three librarians who will share their experiences developing and providing unique data services in academic medical settings for a Rendez-vous with Data!

When: Wednesday July 19 at 1:00pm PT, Noon Alaska, 2:00pm MT

How to connect (no registration required):

  • Go to current PNR Rendezvous session
  • Enter your name and email address
  • Enter the session password: pacific
  • Click “Join Now”
  • Follow the instructions that appear on your screen

For more complete information go to the PNR Rendezvous webpage

NNLM Resource Picks

NLM’s Hilda Bastian will present “Understanding systematic reviews and more at PubMed Health”. PubMed Health is a clinical effectiveness resource. It brings together systematic reviews of the effects of health care with information and information support tools to help consumers and clinicians find and use reliable evidence. It also now incorporates methodological resources about clinical effectiveness research. This webinar will provide an overview of PubMed Health’s features, discussing recent and coming developments. This particular session qualifies for both the Consumer Health Information Specialization and the Disaster Information Specialization offered by the Medical Library Association.

When: Wednesday July 26 at Noon PT, 11:00am Alaska, 1:00pm MT

Registration required

Categories: Data Science

REDCap

PNR Data Science - Thu, 2017-06-22 16:58

REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure web application for building and managing online surveys and databases.  Originally created in 2004 by a small group of researchers at Vanderbilt University who needed a HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant data collection tool, it has evolved into a free, consortium-based secure web application specifically geared to support online and offline data capture for research studies and operations. With over 2000 partner sites across the globe, REDCap is capable of collecting any type of data for any purpose. Each partner site maintains its own installation of REDCap and the only cost involved in supporting it is funding for local IT support and server space.

In the Pacific Northwest Region, several universities are partners, including University of Washington, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Pacific Northwest University of the Health Sciences, University of Western States, the National University of Natural Medicine, Oregon College of Oriental Medicine, Pacific University, University of Idaho, Montana State University, and University of Alaska – Fairbanks.

To learn more about this software tool, view the REDCap consortia site’s REDCap Overview video and search for your local collaborators.  You can also sign up for a free 1-week trial account and explore its many features online.  If you completed the PNR’s Data Needs Assessment back in April and May of this year, you are already a REDCap end user! Our data collection tool was created using the UW Institute of Translational Health Sciences REDCap access.  And if you attended MLA, watch Kevin Read’s and Fred LaPolla’s presentation, “REDCap and Trade: Negotiating a Library Role in Clinical Research Data Management” for an account of their experience providing researchers with REDCap training.

Categories: Data Science

DataScience@NIH News: Patti Brennan Promotes 10 Advances in Data Science

MCR Data Science - Thu, 2017-06-22 13:49
The 2015 report from the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director regarding the future of the National Library of Medicine recommended that “NLM should be the intellectual and programmatic epicenter for data science at NIH and stimulate its advancement throughout biomedical research and application.” Read summaries about NLM’s efforts from the past two years and learn about their plans for the future. 

jb

Categories: Data Science

Moodle Class Announcement: Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles

MAR Data Science - Thu, 2017-06-22 12:19

Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles is designed to help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes, and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. Course content comes from information shared by the presenters at the March 7, 2016 NNLM Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes Forum, top selections from the NNLM MCR Data Curation/Management Journal Club and NNLM PSR Data Curation/Management Journal Club’s articles, NINR’s Nursing Research Boot Camp, recommended readings from previous cohorts, and Big Data University’s Big Data Fundamentals online course. This course will be primarily held via the Moodle platform with optional WebEx discussions.

July 24 – September 24, 2017
Details and Registration

The class size for this course is limited to 25 students. We will begin a waitlist if there are more interested in participating.

Please contact John Bramble or Tony Nguyen with questions.

Categories: Data Science

NIH Data Commons Webinar: Tomorrow – Friday 6/23 12-2PM ET

MCR Data Science - Thu, 2017-06-22 10:32

The NIH Common Fund and the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) program cordially invite you to view an informational webinar for the NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase Research Opportunity Announcement RM-17-026 on Friday, June 23, 2017 from 12-2 PM US EDT.

The purpose of the announcement is to invite applications from applicants who have an interest in performing high impact, cutting-edge scientific and computing activities necessary to establish an NIH Data Commons. The goal of the NIH Data Commons is to accelerate new biomedical discoveries by providing a cloud-based platform where investigators can store, share, access, and compute on digital objects (data, software, etc.) generated from biomedical research and perform novel scientific research including hypothesis generation, discovery, and validation. Applicants are encouraged to develop innovative approaches to one or more key computational, data, analytical and scientific capabilities of the Data Commons. These key capabilities are described in detail in the announcement.
Please join the webinar from your computer, tablet, or smartphone here.

Join by phone:
1-877-668-4493 Call-in toll-free number (US/Canada)
1-650-479-3208 Call-in toll number (US/Canada)

Meeting number (access code): 625 237 220
Password: ABJ2mrn2

Potential applicants are encouraged to send emails ahead of the webinar to: commonspilot@od.nih.gov. Please indicate that it is a “Webinar Question” in the subject line.

jb

 

Categories: Data Science

Moodle Course Offering Now Open – (Registration is limited) Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles

MCR Data Science - Thu, 2017-06-22 10:22

The National Network of Librarians of Medicine (NNLM) invites you to participate in Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles. This course will be primarily held via the Moodle platform with optional WebEx discussions. This course is designed to help health sciences librarians understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area.

Dates: July 24 – September 24, 2017

Register: To register for this class, please visit: https://nnlm.gov/class/big-data-healthcare-exploring-emerging-roles/7610

The class size for this course is limited to 25 students. We will begin a waitlist if there are more interested in participating.

Course instructors for the summer session are John Bramble, Mid-Continental Region, Derek Johnson, Greater Midwest Region, Elaina Vitale, Mid-Atlantic Region, and Tony Nguyen, Southeastern/Atlantic Region.

Please contact John or Tony with questions.

Description: The Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. Course content comes from information shared by the presenters at the March 7, 2016 NNLM Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes Forum, top selections from the NNLM MCR Data Curation/Management Journal Club and NNLM PSR Data Curation/Management Journal Club’s articles, NINR’s Nursing Research Boot Camp, recommended readings from previous cohorts, and Big Data University’s Big Data Fundamentals online course.

Participants will have the opportunity to share what they learned with the instructor from each section of the course content either through WebEx discussions or Moodle Discussions within each Module. These submissions can be used to help support the student’s views expressed in the final essay assignment.

Objectives: Students who successfully complete the course will:

  • Explain the role big data plays in clinical patient outcomes.
  • Explain current/potential roles in which librarians are supporting big data initiatives
  • Illustrate the fundamentals of big data from a systems perspective
  • Articulate their views/options on the role health sciences sector librarians is in supporting big data initiatives

NOTE: Participants will articulate their views on why health sciences librarians should or should not become involved in supporting big data initiatives by sharing a 500-800 word essay. Students are encouraged to be brave and bold in their views so as to elicit discussions about the roles librarians should play in this emerging field. Participants are encouraged to allow their views to be published on a NNLM online blog/newsletter as part of a dialog with the wider health sciences librarian community engaging in this topic. Your course instructors will reach out to you following the completion of the course.

On top of information gained, being a part of the big data in clinical care dialog, and earning 9 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association, students may earn an IBM Open Badge program from the Big Data University.

This is a semi-self-paced course (“semi” meaning there are completion deadlines). While offered primarily asynchronously, your course instructors plan to offer opportunities in which participants can join a WebEx discussion to discuss some of the content.

Course Expectations: To complete this course for nine hours of MLA contact hours, participants are expected to:

  • Spend 1-2 hours completed the work within each module.
  • Commit to complete all activities and articulate your views within each module.
  • Complete course requirements by the deadline established in each module.
  • Coordinate with a course instructor to publish your observations/final assignments on a NNLM blog/newsletter
  • Provide course feedback on the Online Course Evaluation Form

Grading: Grades for this course is simply a pass/fail grading system. When your submission meets the assignment’s expectations, you will receive full credit for the contact hours for that Module. For submissions that are unclear or incomplete, you may be requested for more information until your instructor approves.

  • For discussion posts, your activity will be marked as complete after you’ve submitted a discussion AND your instructor assigns a point to mark as complete
  • If you participate in WebEx Journal Club Discussions (when available), your instructor will assign points in the Discussions for that module.
  • Students have the option to accept fewer contact hours. However, you will need to inform your course instructors ahead of time.
Categories: Data Science

Pilot Program for Developing Research Data Management Services

MAR Data Science - Wed, 2017-06-21 16:44

Interested in launching research data management services at your library but don’t know how to get started? NNLM MAR has funded a pilot to provide training, tools and strategies for medical libraries seeking to develop research data management services. This program provides a holistic approach to developing data services that focuses on building the required knowledge base, understanding and connecting with researchers, promoting effective outreach strategies, and integrating with the broader institutional data community. The program consists of online training modules for librarians, and three components to assist in implementing services:

  • A data interview template with guidance for effective outreach and engagement with researchers
  • A teaching toolkit consisting of slides, script, and evaluation materials to be used for teaching researchers at the pilot institution
  • Strategies and promotional materials for developing a data class series

We are seeking 5 libraries from the MAR region (DE/NJ/NY/PA) to participate in this pilot. This would involve ongoing support from the project PIs (Kevin Read and Alisa Surkis, NYU Health Sciences Library) throughout the course of the program, including regularly scheduled webinars with all the pilot sites to discuss strategies and challenges.

If your library is interested in participating in this pilot project, please contact Kevin Read or Alisa Surkis.

Categories: Data Science

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