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Data Science

Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind

MCR Data Science - Wed, 2020-11-18 10:32

 

light at the end of the tunnel photoThe GOOD news on the vaccine front over the past few weeks related to the progress of the pharmaceutical companies may be an indicator that we are seeing the light at the end of this dark COVID-19 tunnel. Although no vaccine is 100% effective (WHO, 2020), numbers like 90 – 95% efficacy should bring us hope that the rising hospitalization numbers and death tolls will eventually decrease. However, we still need to be diligent in wearing masks and social distancing now more than ever because it will take time to implement a plan to vaccinate over 300 million people.

This good vaccine news made me think about some visualizations I saw in the past that were created to show just how effective vaccines can be. Before COVID, the Wall Street Journal in 2015 published a series of visualizations that depict the impact of several vaccines. This type of visualization is called a heat map and shows, through a range of color squares, how cases of disease have decreased across time and especially after the point where vaccines have been introduced. I hope to see the COVID-19 visualization get added to this list soon so that we can watch our states slowly move from red to blue. Not only is a heat map a compelling image that tells a story, it is also interactive and you can mouse over the color squares to see the data behind the square and explore the numbers in your own state.

Does this peak your interest to see more interesting visualizations? Here is a galley of visualizations created in Tableau Public, a free visualization software. In addition, The New York Times has a great website called “What’s Going On in This Graph?” that is being used to teach students about statistics.

Want to learn more about creating visualizations? NNLM has some great additional resources you can explore. This recorded webinar, Data Visualization: Theory to Practice provides an overview of data visualization and an introduction to some tools to create visualizations. This webinar recording, What’s in a Data Story? Understanding the Basics of Data Storytelling focuses on how storytelling and data visualizations are connected.

Sometimes a picture really is worth a thousand words!!

Photo source: Pickpik

The post Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: Data Science

Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later

PSR Data Science - Tue, 2020-11-17 18:10

by John Borghi
Manager, Research and Instruction
Stanford University, Lane Medical Library

A little over a year ago, I boarded a plane to Washington DC to attend the 2019 meeting of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). At this point in my career, I had been working in academic libraries for over six years. For much of that time, I had worked in biomedical settings and focused my activities on research data. I teach classes on data management and data sharing, but I had come to AMIA because I wanted to learn more about clinical data, informatics, and health information technology.

Over the next few days, I attended sessions on ethics in biomedical informatics, the emergence of artificial intelligence in healthcare, and so many other interesting topics that I was constantly exhausted and in search of coffee. Because the conference was in D.C., I also learned a lot about data-related initiatives at federal agencies, especially the National Institutes of Health and National Library of Medicine.

So why am I writing about this now? As I sit down to write this, the 2020 AMIA meeting is occurring. But rather than being held in a conference center it is, like so many other meetings in the last year, entirely virtual. Shortly after I returned from the 2019 meeting, the first cases of the disease we now know as COVID-19 began to emerge. I can’t even begin to summarize or even characterize the year that followed. But topics related to how researchers and clinicians collect, analyze, and apply data to healthcare decisions now consume so many of our personal, professional, and political conversations and activities. Everything I learned at last year’s meeting resonates very differently in the time of COVID.

The session I was most eager to attend last year was about the data-related initiatives at the NIH. At the time, I had just contributed to my institution’s response to a request for comments on a draft data management and sharing policy and I was eager to hear more about what was happening and what was planned in the future. A year later, and the final policy has been announced and I’m glad to see that the suggestions made by my peers and I- both in the meeting and in our written comments- have been integrated into the new policy. But also, the necessity of biomedical and health science researchers making the products of their work available (and in a usable form) to one another could not be clearer than during a global pandemic.

Another standout session I attended at the AMIA meeting concerned the All of Us Research Program, an effort to gather genetic and health data from one million or more people living in the United States in order to accelerate medical breakthroughs. At the time, I was amazed at the sheer scale of the project and interested in how the data would be curated and made available to the research community. Now, when I check the project’s website, I see there are a series of efforts to leverage the dataset to study COVID antibodies, survey the pandemic’s effect on community health, and use the electronic health record to study patterns and learn about COVID-related symptoms. Rather than a redirection of the project, this represents its immediate application.

When I proposed attending the 2019 AMIA meeting, I told my colleagues I wanted to explore another dimension of our profession- to understand more about how clinical data was actually being applied and used. Looking back now, at all of the notes I took during the meeting, I am struck by two things. The first is that the meeting feels like it occurred a lifetime ago. Everything surrounding my attendance at the meeting, from walking through a crowded airport to catch my flight to D.C. to presenting on what I saw to a room full of my colleagues upon my return, feels so remote now. But I am also struck by the immediacy of everything I learned at the meeting. Understanding and working to improve how clinical data is collected, analyzed, and applied are always absolutely vital pursuits. But the last year has shined a light on just how vital.

The post Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: NIH Issues New Policy for Data Management and Sharing

PNR Data Science - Fri, 2020-11-06 12:24

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has released its Final NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing which requires NIH-funded researchers to prospectively submit a plan outlining how scientific data will be managed and shared. This new policy will replace the 2003 NIH Data Sharing Policy.  NIH will continue to engage the community to support the change and implementation of this new Policy, which will take effect January 25, 2023.

For more information, please read an NIH Director’s statement by Dr. Francis Collins as well as an “Under the Poliscope” blog by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz:

NIH Director’s Statement

Under the Poliscope: NIH Releases New Policy for Data Management and Sharing

For questions, please contact: SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

The post DataFlash: NIH Issues New Policy for Data Management and Sharing first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: Data Science

Living on the Data Fringe: Through a Library Liaison Lens #1

MCR Data Science - Wed, 2020-10-28 15:40

Data can be scary! When we think about data, we often think about ‘big data’ or data science and how data scientists use programming skills to extract large datasets for analysis or use visualization software to display complex datasets. However, you don’t have to be a data scientist, a data librarian, or a health science librarian to be interested in data or use data in your daily life. I am proof of that concept. On a daily basis I need or use data in my librarian practice, my teaching, and/or my research. I contend that ALL librarians (academic librarians, school librarians, and public librarians) should consider how data integrates or impacts their own practice.

As the data coordinator for the MidContinental Region (MCR) in the Network of the National Library of Medicine, I like to think about a broader data vision. In addition to biomedical or clinical research data, data can be assessment data we collect in libraries, statistical data that our students need to find to support a paper argument, numerical or textual data collected and analyzed around a topic when conducting research. Helping students manipulate data can be one of the conduits for teaching digital literacy skills to students at a variety of levels. Data does not have to be ‘big’ data, it can be ‘small’ data or ‘thick’ data (more on this to come in future post). Starting small and learning about data as it impacts your daily work or life can be a great way to dip your toes into the data science world. Start by checking out the first level of the NNLM Data Roadmap (Data Demystified) to begin your data journey to scaffold up your knowledge and skills, and find data topics of interest that are relevant to YOUR OWN librarian context!

This is the first blog post in a blog series, Living on the Data Fringe: Through a Library Liaison Lens, that will appear on this MCR blog over the next few months to help you scaffold up with data and rethink using data in your practice. Two blogs each month will help take the scariness out of data, and provide a context to help you learn more about alternative data topics, understand the different levels of data usage and expertise, and try out some resources and tools. As librarians we can enhance our practice by learning more about data, and using data in our teaching/librarianship (using data to learn about our libraries), in our own research, and even help others find data for their research. Reach out with questions or suggestions for future data blog topics!

Stay tuned and Happy Halloween!
Photo Source: Needpix.com

The post Living on the Data Fringe: Through a Library Liaison Lens #1 first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: Data Science

NNLM’s Data Thesaurus Provides Key Tools for Data-Driven Exploration

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2020-10-22 14:57

Are you struggling to find a simple definition for key data terminologies? Wondering where to find resources and relevant literature regarding data vocabularies? Look no further! The Network of the National Library of Medicine’s Data Thesaurus provides key tools for data-driven exploration.

The Data Thesaurus is a resource connecting and defining concepts, services, and tools relevant to librarians working in data-driven discovery. A definition, relevant literature, and web resources accompany each term along with links to related terms. Users can search or browse the 70 different terms.

Launched in 2013, the original data thesaurus has undergone updates and transformations. As the world of data evolves, so too does the thesaurus. In fact, over the past year, a group of dedicated librarians from across the country have come together to serve on the NNLM Data Thesaurus Advisory Group. Members of the Advisory Group are working on evaluating and updating the current thesaurus with new resources, terms, and definitions. As you explore the thesaurus, please share your feedback! Do you see missing terms? Broken links? General feedback? We’re open to hearing it all!

We hope the Data Thesaurus proves to be a useful resource for you and your stakeholders!

The post NNLM’s Data Thesaurus Provides Key Tools for Data-Driven Exploration first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: Library Carpentry Workshops (October ’20 – January ’21)

PNR Data Science - Mon, 2020-10-19 14:32

In partnership with The Carpentries, NNLM’s National Training Office (NTO) are thrilled to bring core lessons of Library Carpentry virtually to NNLM. Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their hands-on, approachable workshops empower people in a variety of roles to use software and data in their own work and support effective, efficient, reproducible practices.

The NNLM Training Office is pleased to announce a new opportunity for information professionals to build data skills through online Library Carpentry workshops, at no cost to participants. 5 workshops will be offered October 2020 through January 2021. Applications and more information available here. Questions can be directed to nto@utah.edu.

The post DataFlash: Library Carpentry Workshops (October '20 - January '21) first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: Data Science

Online Library Carpentry: Seats available November 3-6!

SEA Data Science - Fri, 2020-10-16 14:14

The University of Maryland, Baltimore is hosting an online Library Carpentry workshop from noon – 4 pm, November 3rd – 6th.

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their hands-on, approachable workshops empower people in a variety of roles to use software and data in their own work and support effective, efficient, reproducible practices.

This opportunity is FREE for SEA members, and eligible for 20 MLA CEs. Seats are limited.

Contact Kiri Burcat at kburcat@hshsl.umaryland.edu with questions and visit the workshop webpage for information and to register.

The post Online Library Carpentry: Seats available November 3-6! first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: Data Science

The Charts are Off: Approaches to Ethical Decision-Making in Data Visualization

SEA Data Science - Wed, 2020-10-14 10:47

Description: Many of us work in environments filled with “data-driven” decision-making and regular reporting of data to justify our budgets and planning. Data Visualization can be a powerful tool for telling our story and presenting the facts on the ground, but how can we make ethically informed decisions when visualizing our data? This talk will discuss different ethical frameworks and how they can inform the decisions we make in data visualization. We aim to go beyond discussion of avoiding misleading charts and into the ethical decision-making frameworks that inform how to present our data.

This is part of the Research Data Management Webinar Series.

Presenters:

Nicole Contaxis, MLIS is the Project Lead for the NYU Data Catalog at the NYU Health Sciences Library. Nicole develops the vision and strategy for the future of the NYU Data Catalog, including software development, curation, and partnerships with allied departments at the institutions. She leads NYU’s participation in the Data Discovery Collaboration, a national effort to improve institutional data discovery. Her areas of interest include data sharing, data ethics, and community engagement. Nicole is a former National Digital Stewardship Resident at the National Library of Medicine. She received her MLIS from UCLA and is currently working on her M.A. in Bioethics at NYU.

Fred LaPolla, MLS is a Research and Data Librarian and Lead of Data Education at NYU Health Sciences Library. He works with the library’s Data Services team and serves as liaison to the Departments of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Innovation (DGIMCI) and Radiology. Fred also teaches Rigor and Reproducibility and R Programming in the Grossman School of Medicine Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences. He is passionate about professional education and finding ways to facilitate learning around data collection, management, visualization and analysis. Fred holds a Masters of Library Science (MLS) from Queens College, CUNY.

When: October 22nd, 2020 | 11 AM PT/ 12 PM MT/ 1 PM CT/ 2 PM ET

Register: https://nnlm.gov/rdm-webinar-oct2020

The post The Charts are Off: Approaches to Ethical Decision-Making in Data Visualization first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: Data Science

Recordings for the NNLM PSR Subawards Webinar & Research Data Management (RDM) Webinar Series Now Available!

PSR Data Science - Mon, 2020-09-28 22:30

On September 22, 2020, NNLM PSR hosted a special funding webinar, NNLM PSR Subawards: Guidelines, Resources, and Answers! . This webinar welcomed awarded project liaisons to the 2020-2021 NNLM PSR subaward program, going over some key points in subaward guidelines, demonstrating the DRS data reporting system, providing an overview of some of the resources NNLM PSR offers for subawardees, and answering any questions subawardees have for NNLM staff. To view the webinar, visit the NNLM PSR YouTube playlist or click on the YouTube video player below.

On September 24, 2020, the NNLM Research Data Management (RDM) Webinar Series presented, Operationalizing the CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance in Research Data Management, with speaker, Stephanie R. Carroll, Assistant Professor and Associate Director of the Native Nations Institute at the University of Arizona. This webinar focuses on the CARE Principles and identifies practical tools for implementing the CARE Principles alongside the FAIR Principles in the context of the open science and open data environments. This webinar may be of interest to those working with Indigenous data or collections, as well as metadata librarians and those interested in open access policies and managing institutional repository. To view the webinar, visit the NNLM Research Data Management YouTube playlist, or play the video below.

The post Recordings for the NNLM PSR Subawards Webinar & Research Data Management (RDM) Webinar Series Now Available! first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: Data Science

Library Carpentry Workshop Information Session

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2020-09-24 13:30

Description: Learn about upcoming opportunities to participate in online Library Carpentry workshops in an informational session hosted by members of the Library Carpentry community, and The Carpentries Executive Director, Dr. Kari L. Jordan.

Do you want to…

– manipulate, transform, and analyze data?
– make data driven decisions?
– automate repetitive tasks?
– support open research and data scholarship?

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities to support these and other participant goals. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective and reproducible data and software practices.

This fall and winter, NNLM will host 5 online Library Carpentry workshops for participants from NNLM member institutions. The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. In addition to participating in Library Carpentry workshops, NNLM members will also have the opportunity to receive training to become instructors for Library Carpentry.

When: October 8, 2020 | 11 AM PT/12 PM MT/1 PM CT/2 PM ET

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/library-carpentry-workshop-information-session/27637

The post Library Carpentry Workshop Information Session first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: Data Science

Operationalizing the CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance in Research Data Management

SEA Data Science - Tue, 2020-09-22 14:52

Description: Extractive and unethical research practices led to the accumulation of Indigenous collections in vast national repositories that have missing, incomplete, and impoverished records and metadata. These problems of inequity continue in the ways Indigenous Peoples’ data is created, stored, accessed, and used. Indigenous Peoples insist on the urgent need to integrate Indigenous knowledges and approaches into data and collections practices and policies. The articulation of Indigenous Peoples’ rights and interests in data about their peoples, communities, cultures, and territories is directed towards reclaiming control of data, data ecosystems, and data narratives in the context of open data and open science. The people and purpose-oriented CARE Principles (Collective Benefit, Authority to Control, Responsibility, and Ethics) reflect the crucial role of data in advancing innovation, governance, and self-determination among Indigenous Peoples. The CARE Principles complement and extend the more data-centric approach of the FAIR Principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable). This webinar will focus on the CARE Principles and identify practical tools for implementing the CARE Principles alongside the FAIR Principles in the context of the open science and open data environments.

This is part of the Research Data Management Webinar Series.

Presenter: Stephanie Russo Carroll (Ahtna-Native Village of Kluti Kaah) is Assistant Research Professor, Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy (UC); Associate Director and Manager – Tribal Health Program, the Native Nations Institute (NNI) in the UC; Assistant Professor in the Public Health Policy and Management Program at the Community, Environment and Policy Department, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health (MEZCOPH); Assistant Professor, American Indian Studies Graduate Interdisciplinary Program; and Co-Director, Center for Indigenous Environmental Health Research, MEZCOHP at the University of Arizona (UA).

Stephanie’s research explores the links between Indigenous governance, data, the environment, and community wellness. Her interdisciplinary lab group, the Collaboratory for Indigenous Data Governance Research, develops research, policy, and practice innovations for Indigenous data sovereignty. Indigenous data sovereignty draws on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that reaffirms the rights of Indigenous nations to control data about their peoples, lands, and resources. The lab’s research, teaching, and engagement seek to transform institutional governance and ethics for Indigenous control of Indigenous data, particularly within open science, open data, and big data contexts. The lab primarily collaborates with Indigenous Peoples and nations in the US Southwest and the Arctic, as well an international network of Indigenous data sovereignty and governance experts. Lab members also often partner with communities to which they belong, including Indigenous communities. (https://nni.arizona.edu/people/staff/stephanie-carroll-rainie(link is external))

When: September 24th, 2020 | 11 PT/12 MT/1 CT/2 ET

Register: https://nnlm.gov/rdm-webinar-sept2020

The post Operationalizing the CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance in Research Data Management first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: Library Carpentry Workshops with NNLM (Informational Session)

PNR Data Science - Fri, 2020-09-18 16:18

The NNLM Training Office is pleased to announce a new opportunity for information professionals to build data skills through online Library Carpentry workshops, at no cost to participants.

Library Carpentry<https://librarycarpentry.org/about/> focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective and reproducible data and software practices.

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. The instructors put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower participants and enable data-driven discovery. Those with some experience will also benefit, as the goal is to teach not only how to do analyses, but how to manage the process to make it as automated and reproducible as possible. To see some great examples of how you might use and apply these new skills, check out LibraryCarpentry.org. <https://librarycarpentry.org/audience/>

In addition to participating in Library Carpentry workshops, NNLM members will also have the opportunity to receive training to become instructors<https://librarycarpentry.org/get_involved/#Host> for Library Carpentry.

To learn more about these opportunities, we invite you to attend an informational session hosted by members of the Library Carpentry community, and The Carpentries Executive Director, Dr. Kari L. Jordan.

Join NTO Thursday, October 8, 2020 at 11AM Pacific / 12PM Mountain/ 1PM Central/ 2 PM Eastern.

Register here<https://nnlm.gov/class/library-carpentry-workshop-information-session/27637> for the session. Session recording will be distributed to all registrants.

Information on applications and workshop dates will be available soon.

Contact nto@utah.edu for more information.

The post DataFlash: Library Carpentry Workshops with NNLM (Informational Session) first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: Data Science

GMR Funding Opportunity – Data Internship Award

GMR Data Science - Thu, 2020-09-17 14:01

 

The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is committed to supporting access to biomedical and health information with the goal of making data discoverable, accessible, and citable. NNLM is committed to supporting NLM’s vision to increase access to biomedical and health information with the goal of making data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR). One outcome of this initiative is the NNLM RD3: Resources for Data-Driven Discovery website. This award looks to expand awareness of and build the professional competencies of students in the field of data science and research data management.

The purpose of the Library Data Internship Award is to build capacity in the library and information science community to support data-driven research and health. To do so, the GMR will provide funding to support health sciences libraries within the Greater Midwest Region to offer a student internship focused on data services. This internship should be designed to enable participating students to achieve basic level proficiency from one of the Performance Indicators outlined in the linked article, The Medical Library Association Data Services Competency: a framework for data science and open science skills development(link is external), and listed below:

  1. Applies principles of data literacy
  2. Establishes and advances data services
  3. Supports research data best practices across the data lifecycle
  4. Applies knowledge of research methods, research ethics and rigor, and open science practices
  5. Provides training and consultation for data-related topics

In addition, the internship should clearly identify how the work will support at least one of the Data Science Areas of Activity as outlined on the Opportunities for Building Capacity in the Library and Information Science Community to Support Data-Driven Research and Health webpage.(link is external) Applicants are encouraged to view Where OET & NNLM Can Build Capacity(link is external) to review possible project ideas.

Learn more and apply here!

 

Categories: Data Science