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Data Science

Living on the Data Fringes: Open Science Goes Beyond Open Data

MCR Data Science - Fri, 2021-03-26 09:56

open science umbrellaReflecting on the immense amount of data openly and freely available online, especially on COVID-19, I wanted to write a blog post about the value and opportunities available to researchers related to open data. But as I began to write I thought about the other aspects of ‘openeness’ and realized there is so much more to write about than just open data. A recent blog post published by the SEA region of NNLM during love data week, 23 things about open data, completely covers the open data piece and I have nothing to add there. In addition, you may want to check out the very comprehensive list of COVID-19 open-access data and computational resources compiled by the Office of Data Science Strategy.

However, I think there are other aspects of open science at a broader level that could use some additional explanation and examples. The Carpentries, a non-profit organization, provides open and free coding and data science training opportunities through three programs, Data Carpentry, Software Carpentry, and Library Carpentry. Their lessons are all available online for self-directed learning or you can participate in training opportunities near you. Open Science can also entail open and participatory data collection through citizen science research activities like SciStarter. Open science initiatives and scientists often rely on open-source software and tools such as Zotero for collaborating on citation collection, Open Refine, Phyton, and R studio for data collection and manipulation, as well as many other visualization and data applications so that data can be easily shared and manipulated. Open Science also entails open collaboration for doing research that integrates tools for storing and sharing open science projects through the full research cycle such as the Open Science Framework (OSF). Open repositories can provide an infrastructure and space for collecting, archiving and preserving open data and provide identifiers for data collections when the research is finally published. And last but not least, is the emerging number of opportunities for publishing open research such as journals and books. Although many publishers require the author to pay publications fees for making research open to other researchers, there are many quality and open research examples available.

Even as I have been research open science and open scholarship I have found some open textbooks about open science I would like to recommend such as the Open Data Handbook, Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science, Issues in Open Research Data, and international perspectives in the Social Dynamics of Open Data. The Foster Open Science website in the EU offers some interesting paths into open science based on what you are interested in doing So to get started, jump into the open culture at any of these different open points to learn more about open data, how to find and manipulate open data, and how to share and publish in open formats.

Open Sicence Umbrella Image: Flicker

The post Living on the Data Fringes: Open Science Goes Beyond Open Data first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: Data Science

Infographics: Tips, Tools, and Resources

SEA Data Science - Mon, 2021-03-22 11:04

Written By: Kiri Burcat, Data & Evaluation Coordinator, NNLM SEA

Advocacy and communication are a part of many librarians’ jobs. Infographics are a popular way to present information visually, and can help to communicate your point more clearly, more persuasively, and more memorably. Very few of us, however, have formal art or design training.  Fortunately, for health information and outreach professionals, there are already many infographics on popular topics.

Here are a few reliable resources for health and wellness infographics*:

The American Heart Association has a collection of infographics focused on healthy living. Two favorites: choosing seasonal produce and staying cool during warm weather workouts.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has infographics for many different public health issues. You can look for them on any CDC topic page, but here are a few selections:

The National Institutes of Health maintains a Flickr account with photos, scientific illustrations, and an album of infographics.

If you still want to make your own from scratch, there are several available tools. Venngage, Canva, and Piktochart are popular and approachable options. Whichever program you choose, a few foundational design tips can build your confidence and help your infographics look more polished:

Learn about the rule of thirds. Use grids and guides to place elements for visual interest and compositional balance.

Use hex codes or RBG values to precisely match colors and draw inspiration from existing palettes. Adobe Color is one tool that you can use to choose color schemes. It includes an accessibility tool, which identifies potential color conflicts and simulates how your palette will look to individuals with different types of color blindness. Here, I uploaded a picture of the NNLM Data Roadmap graphic, and the program created a color palette. The hex codes are provided under the swatches so I can match them in my design program:

Screenshot of the color match tool in Adobe Color.

In some programs, you can fill a shape element with a photo to get a more custom look for your photos or elements. For presentations, I’ll sometimes do this with my photo and a circle element:

Square photo of Kiri Burcat                             Round photo of Kiri Burcat.

Explore possibilities beyond your software’s default photos, fonts, and icons. High-quality visual elements go a long way toward elevating your infographics, and usage rights and access can be affordable. With proper attribution, some free sources include: Unsplash (for photos), Google Fonts, and The Noun Project (for icons).

For more visual information topics from the NNLM, check out archived webinars on:

Or our on-demand class about data visualization: Cool Creative Communications: Dazzling Data Visualization

*Note and comply with attribution and usage guidelines

The post Infographics: Tips, Tools, and Resources first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: Data Science

Online Library Carpentry Workshop Opportunity: March 25th – 26th

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2021-03-04 11:53

The NNLM SEA is pleased to host an online Library Carpentry workshop on March 25th – 26th 2021.

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective, and reproducible data and software practices.

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. The instructors put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower researchers and enable data-driven discovery. Biomedical and health sciences librarians and LIS students are encouraged to participate.

In this interactive, hands-on workshop you will learn core software and data skills, with lessons including:

Logistics:

  • This workshop will be held via Zoom, from 9 am – 5:00 pm ET each day.
  • Participants must have access to a computer (no tablets or Chromebooks) with Windows, Mac, or Linux operating system and an internet connection that can support a Zoom video meeting.
  • Participants must agree to follow theCarpentries Code of Conduct.
  • Participants will be responsible for downloading some files and software before the workshop. Setup instructions will be provided.

To apply, please complete the NNLM SEA Library Carpentry application.

There are 20 seats available. They will generally be awarded on a first-come-first serve basis, but applicants from organizations in the Southeastern Atlantic region of the NNLM will be prioritized.

Notice of acceptance to the workshop will be announced on Monday, March 15th.

Questions? Contact Kiri Burcat at kburcat@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

The post Online Library Carpentry Workshop Opportunity: March 25th – 26th first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: MLA’s New Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate

PNR Data Science - Tue, 2021-03-02 11:06

Last January, MLA announced the Data Services Specialization (DSS) certificate that librarians can earn to demonstrate their attainment of the relevant knowledge and skills necessary to provide data services.

Best geared for health sciences librarians and information professionals and built upon the MLA Data Services Competency, the Basic Certification requires the completion of four 4-credit free Network of the National Library of Medicine courses. These courses cover 5 skill areas (i.e. principles of data literacy; data services; research data best practices across the data lifecycle, open science practices, and training and consultation on data-related topics) and are available on demand. An additional three credits in the five skill areas are required and several NNLM courses are listed on the NNLM Data Services Specialization page.

Registration for the NNLM courses is open and free.  MLA DSS certification costs for MLA members is $55 and for MLA nonmembers is $75. You can find more information about the DSS certificate, including cost, requirements, and skills on the MLA website.

The post DataFlash: MLA’s New Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: Data Science

Love Data Week 2021: 23 Things About Open Data

SEA Data Science - Mon, 2021-02-08 15:38

This year, the NNLM is celebrating Love Data Week with a speaker series and panel discussion with four data practitioners. If you’d like to dive a little deeper into the world of open data, these 23 Things are a starting point for learning more.

  1. Learn the “why, what, and how” of open data with the Open Data Handbook.
  2. Browse a list of hundreds of different data file formats and then learn the best ones to use for open, accessible data.
  3. Learn about data sharing and publishing with NNLM’s Research Data Management On-Demand module.
  4. Catch up on the NNLM Research Data Management webinar series with our YouTube playlist.
  5. Access and learn about the New York Times’s COVID-19 data.
  6. Search for local government datasets on data.gov.
  7. Explore the Google Dataset Search.
  8. Explore health-related open datasets made available through Kaggle, including the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset Challenge (CORD-19) medical literature text-mining dataset.
  9. Filter, visualize and export datasets from National Library of Medicine resources from Data Discovery at NLM.
  10. Compare the open data efforts of 30 different national governments with the Open Data Barometer, a report from the World Wide Web foundation.
  11. Visualize “the issues that will shape the future of New York City” with this interactive civic data exhibit.
  12. See how All In: Data for Community Health is working to improve community health outcomes through data-sharing partnerships to identify needs and inform policy.
  13. Check out the Civic Switchboard project to see how library workers can get involved in civic data initiatives.
  14. Analyze Census data in Microsoft Excel with a tutorial from Census Academy.
  15. Make a map using QGIS – a free GIS (Geographic Information System) program – with step-by-step exercises from the Community Health Maps program.
  16. Build data analysis, visualization, and programming skills with the self-guided lessons from The Carpentries. Start with Library Carpentry for lessons tailored specifically for librarians.
  17. Foster a “data culture” within your organization with engaging learning activities from the Data Culture Project.
  18. Build community data literacy with Data 101 workshop toolkit from the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center, and attend our Tuesday, Feb 9th “coffee chat” to hear more from WPRDC project director Bob Gradeck.
  19. Make research data and code more findable with these 10 quick tips and come to the Monday, Feb 8th “coffee chat” to hear more from article co-author Ibraheem Ali, PhD.
  20. Support open, equitable, and inclusive scholarly communications with this guide from the Association of College and Research Libraries and come to the Wednesday, Feb 10th “coffee chat” to hear more from co-author Yasmeen Shorish.
  21. Learn about common data elements for clinical data collection and management with this presentation from the National Library of Medicine, and then learn how to use the NIH Common Data Element (CDE) repository.
  22. Familiarize yourself with upcoming expansions to NIH policies on data management and data sharing for NIH-funded researchers.
  23. Join the conversation: get involved with a community of data practitioners through the Research Data Access and Preservation (RDAP) Association or learn about the work of the Academic Data Science Alliance.

Interested in downloading this list? Visit: https://nnlm.gov/Zbr

The post Love Data Week 2021: 23 Things About Open Data first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: Data Science

Upcoming NNLM Class Beginning February 15th: Big Data in Healthcare

SEA Data Science - Mon, 2021-02-08 10:19

Description: This course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area.

Dates: This class will be taught in Moodle February 15, 2021 – March 26, 2021.

Course Expectations: To complete this course for 6 hours of MLA contact hours, participants are expected to:

  • Spend approximately 1 hour completing the work within each module.
  • Commit to complete all activities and articulate your views within each module.
  • Complete course requirements by the deadline established in each module.
  • Provide course feedback on the Online Course Evaluation Form

Objectives: Students who successfully complete the course will:

  • Explain the role big data plays in clinical patient outcomes.
  • Explain current/potential roles in which librarians are supporting big data initiatives
  • Illustrate the fundamentals of big data from a systems perspective
  • Articulate their views/options on the role health sciences sector librarians is in supporting big data initiatives

This is a Medical Library Association approved course that will earn students 6 contact hours.

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/big-data-healthcare-exploring-emerging-roles/28994

The post Upcoming NNLM Class Beginning February 15th: Big Data in Healthcare first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: Data Science

Love Data Week with NNLM

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2021-02-04 13:10

Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”

At four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions on Monday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data.

——–

Monday, Feb 8th

Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training
Ibraheem Ali, Sciences Data Librarian, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday, Feb 9th

How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response
Bob Gradeck, Project Director, Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center

Wednesday, Feb 10th

Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications
Yasmeen Shorish, Associate Professor & Head of Scholarly Communications, James Madison University Libraries

Thursday, Feb 11th

If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused
Lisa Federer, Data Science and Open Science Librarian at the National Library of Medicine

Friday, Feb 12th

Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation
Our panelists will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more

The post Love Data Week with NNLM first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th)

PNR Data Science - Thu, 2021-02-04 11:06

See the source image

Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”

At four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions fromMonday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data.

Monday, Feb 8th

Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training

Ibraheem Ali, Sciences Data Librarian, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday, Feb 9th

How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response

Bob Gradeck, Project Director, Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center

Wednesday, Feb 10th

Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications

Yasmeen Shorish, Associate Professor & Head of Scholarly Communications, James Madison University Libraries

Thursday, Feb 11th

If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused

Lisa Federer, Data Science and Open Science Librarian at the National Library of Medicine

Friday, Feb 12th

Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation

Our panelists will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more.

The post DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th) first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: Data Science

Living on the Data Fringes: Making Sense of Competencies

MCR Data Science - Wed, 2021-01-27 17:19

Organizations are striving to become data driven as they realize that data is becoming a mission critical topic. Finding, wrangling, analyzing, and managing data can require advanced computation skill sets. However, not everyone wants to be a data scientist, data analyst, or what the EDC Oceans of Data Institute calls a ‘data practitioner’. All members in an organization, no matter what their job, should have an appreciation of the scope of data, an awareness of how data is used in the organization, as well as, some basic data literacy skills. Striving to become data savvy should not be limited to those with science jobs who work with data on a daily basis. It is a competency that is also found in areas such as business, the social sciences, and even the humanities. We all need to understand how data is integrated into our lives. It would be helpful for someone diagnosed with a serious disease and researching at a public library to know how to interpret statistics about treatment and care options. Students in k-12 and up to the college level need to know how to find and interpret data as they conduct research in their classes. Humanities researchers might need to know how to do text mining to analyze a text corpus. But how do we know if we are data literate or competent in data skills? One way is to look at data competency models and find areas that you can relate to your daily work situation. What do you already know and/or do already? What competency areas do you need or want to learn more about?

Competence wordcloudLet’s start with the definition of a competency. A competency is a collection of knowledge, skills and behaviors that together demonstrate effective work performance in a particular area. It is a visible application of knowledge and behaviors. For example there may be managerial/leadership competencies, technical competencies, or functional competencies related to particular disciplines or job tasks. A competency does not equal a skill (although both are action-oriented). A skill may be one of the components of a competency, or several skills may be part of one competency. This competency concept is also important in k-12 and higher education where it is called competency-based education (CBE).

Now, thinking about data competencies, I believe the best approach to using competencies is to look at a variety of competency models or frameworks to better understand the expectations for knowledge, skills and behaviors related to your work position or desired job.  Many of the published competency models overlap, and you may be surprised to learn that your professional organization may have already established some data competencies for your role or position. Different competency models or frameworks might also overlap, so try looking outside of your specific area for more general competency areas such as research, communication, and collaboration. Use the competencies you find to guide personalized data professional development. What competency areas are you comfortable with? Which ones do you need to learn more about? You can combine the competency components that best fit your particular work situation, and use that as guide a build a professional development plan. The competencies can be a way to focus your learning and reflect on how to level up your data knowledge and skills.

Here are a few models to review and reflect on and find focus areas for your professional development:

So enjoy reflecting on your librarian role and how you can expand your competencies! It will help you articulate your strengths and skills and make a better case for your impact on the library and community.

Image: Gerd Altmann from Pixabay 

The post Living on the Data Fringes: Making Sense of Competencies first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: Data Science

MLA Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate

PSR Data Science - Sun, 2021-01-24 21:07

Research Data Management On-Demand and Network of the National Library of Medicine logoMLA recently announced the Data Services Specialization (DSS) certificate that librarians can earn to demonstrate their attainment of the relevant knowledge and skills necessary to provide data services.

Designed for health sciences librarians and information professionals and built upon the MLA Data Services Competency, the Basic certification requires the completion of 4 4-credit free Network of the National Library of Medicine courses. These courses cover 5 skill areas and are available on demand. An additional three credits in the five skill areas are required and several NNLM courses are listed on the NNLM Data Services Specialization page.

Registration for the NNLM courses is open. You can find more information about the DSS certificate, including cost, requirements, and skills on the MLA website.

The post MLA Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: Data Science

More News & Announcements

PSR Data Science - Sun, 2021-01-10 18:11

New NNLM Substance Use Disorders Resource Guide!

The Network of National Library of Medicine (NNLM) recently launched the Substance Use Disorders Resource Guide to raise awareness of NLM’s Substance Use Disorders resources and the resources of partner organizations through partnerships with SUD related organizations. Check it out!

Reminder: Pillbox will be retired January 29th

Today, National of Library of Medicine’s Pillbox program will be retired. This includes the Pillbox drug identification and search websites as well as production of the Pillbox dataset, image library, and application programming interfaces (APIs).

For assistance in identifying pills, consider services such as:

  • Your pharmacist can provide personalized assistance with your specific medications,
  • FDA Center for Drug Evaluation & Research (CDER) Division of Drug Information (DDI) staff can identify drugs for you based on physical appearance (color, shape, size, etc.) and markings. E-mail DDI your drug description.
  • Poison Control Center staff provide confidential, free pill identification 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Centers can also be reached by phone at 1-800-222-1222. In case of an emergency, call 911.

Recording of the “Identifying the Gaps: the Status of Data Management Education in Doctoral Nursing Programs now Available!

On January 19, NNLM hosted the “Identifying the Gaps: the Status of Data Management in Doctoral Nursing Programs” webinar as part of the Emerging Trends & Topics webinar series. Guest speakers, Abigail Goben and Rebecca Raszewski from University of Illinois Chicago, discuss increase in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs that has resulted in many new students and faculty who need data management education, resources, and support.

Love Data Week 2021

Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM (led by the RDM Working Group) is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”

At four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions on Monday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data.

Registrations for the “coffee chats” and the panel discussion are now available!

BLOSSOM: Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness

On March 24-26, 2021, NNLM hosts a virtual symposium that will bring together experts on morale in libraries, invisible services in libraries, vocational awe, burnout, and self-care. The symposium will provide library staff at all levels, including management, with key takeaways to help improve the health and wellness of library staff. This event is open to library science students and all library staff regardless of employment status. PSR Associate Director, Nisha Mody, will be one of the speakers.

Provide your email address to be notified when the website is up, and registration is available.

NLM Launches a New Online Exhibition – Fifty Years Ago: The Darkening Day

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) announces Fifty Years Ago: The Darkening Day, a new online exhibition recognizing the 50th anniversary of The Darkening Day, an NLM exhibition on the health aspects of environmental pollution, which opened at the library in 1970 and was subsequently reviewed in the September 29, 1970, issue of the NIH Record, page 11.

MedlinePlus Connect: 10 Years of Linking Electronic Health Records to Consumer Health Information

NLM is celebrating the 10th anniversary of MedlinePlus Connect, a free service that links electronic health records (EHRs), patient portals, and other health IT systems to relevant, authoritative, and up-to-date health information from NLM’s MedlinePlus health information resource and other NIH websites.

Important Changes to NCBI Accounts Coming in 2021

NCBI will be transitioning to federated account credentials. NCBI-managed credentials are the username and password you set at NCBI–these will be going away. Federated account credentials are those set through eRA Commons, Google, or a university or institutional point of access. After June 1, 2021, you will no longer be able to use NCBI-managed credentials to login to NCBI.

NIH News in Health

Check out the January 2021 issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue, topics include tips to reduce stress, staying safe from sepsis, postpartum depression, combatting COVID-19, and much more!

The post More News & Announcements first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: Data Science