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Data Science

What Will 2020 Bring for NLM?

PSR Data Science - Tue, 2020-01-14 19:53

In a recent blog post, NLM director Dr. Patti Brennan highlighted some of NLM’s accomplishments in 2019. So, what’s on tap for 2020? First, as NLM prepares for major renovations to its Building 38, most of the staff, including Dr. Brennan, will move to other office space on the NIH campus for about two years. That will be enough time to implement a major redesign of the first floor of the 60-year-old, architecturally dramatic but not really fit-for-purpose workspace to make more efficient use of the space, add modern office layouts and meeting spaces, and modernize the HVAC systems. Also, NLM will continue to grow its Intramural Research Program (IRP), which focuses on computational biomedical and health sciences. Two new tenure-track investigators were hired this past year and one or two more are expected to be added in 2020. The IRP brings together two NLM divisions, the National Center for Biotechnology Information, specifically the Computational Biology Branch, and the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, which emphasize discovery based on molecular phenomena and clinical information. There will also be greater alignment of training efforts, including an expansion of the public-facing parts of training.

NLM will continue to make biomedical and health information literature available to the public, scientists, and clinicians, with a greater emphasis on public access and open science. The entire PubMed Central (PMC) repository of full-text literature is already freely available to the world, and with the increasing interest in open access to government-supported research findings, this repository is expected to grow. PMC will grow in new ways, too, such as enhancing the discoverability of data sets in support of published results made available with articles as supplementary material or in open repositories, and supporting greater transparency in scientific communication through the archiving of peer review documents. Many NLM resources will be moved to the cloud and continue to support efforts to make strides through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Science and Technology Research Infrastructure for Discovery, Experimentation, and Sustainability (STRIDES) Initiative to accelerate discovery by harnessing the power of commercial cloud computing. This will not only offer some logistical savings, it will also increase the discoverability of NLM’s resources.

NLM will play a bigger and more vital role in big science as it unfolds at NIH. Intramural researchers are expanding the application of deep learning technologies to clinical, biological, and image data. In collaboration with the NIH Office of Data Science Strategy, NLM will build and release new tools to help researchers leverage the FHIR standard to make clinical data more accessible for research, and to improve phenotype characterization. These initiatives will accelerate data sharing by advancing standard approaches to research data representation. And finally, NLM will advance its impact on and outreach to professional and lay communities around the country. The National Network of Libraries of Medicine has exciting plans to expand its training in research data management and to provide local health information education and support to help health care providers working with American Indian and Alaska Native populations address challenges such as mental health and HPV-related cancer.

Categories: Data Science

Online Course – Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Librarian Roles

MCR Data Science - Wed, 2020-01-08 15:49

Join us for the Big Data in Healthcare:  Exploring Emerging Roles course that will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. The 6-week course will be taught via Moodle and includes short readings, videos, and activities. We’ll start with an overview of data science and then learn about big data from a systems perspective, dig into how big data impacts patients and researchers, think about the role of librarians in supporting big data initiatives, and finish with an opportunity for you to develop an action plan based on course content. (6 MLA Continuing Education Credits)

Registration is limited to 50 participants. Register at: https://nnlm.gov/class/big-data-healthcare-exploring-emerging-roles/15911

Class Date: Feb 3, 2020 to Mar 17, 2020

 Instructor(s):

Kirsten Burcat, MLIS, Data & Evaluation Coordinator
Derek Johnson, Health Professionals Outreach Specialist
Donna Harp Ziegenfuss, MS, EdD, Data Science Coordinator

Contact:

Derek Johnson

Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: Library Carpentry Workshops

PNR Data Science - Tue, 2019-12-17 15:02

The NNLM Training Office (NTO) and Southeastern Atlantic Region (SEA) are pleased to host Library Carpentry workshops this spring and provide professional development funds to support travel to these exciting opportunities.

In this two-day interactive, hands-on workshop you will learn core software and data skills, with lessons including:

Participants may apply to attend the workshop series in either:

  • Baltimore, Maryland – March 19-20, 2020 or
  • Salt Lake City, Utah – March 26-27, 2020

To broaden access to this exciting training, we invite applications to cover the costs of travel and attendance, up to $1,500 for Baltimore, and $1,200 for Salt Lake City. Travel costs will be reimbursed after travel occurs.

For more information, please apply here.

Categories: Data Science

Applications Open for Library Carpentry Workshops in Baltimore and Salt Lake City!

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2019-12-05 14:40

The NNLM Training Office (NTO) and Southeastern Atlantic Region (SEA) are pleased to host Library Carpentry workshops this spring and provide professional development funds to support travel to these exciting opportunities.

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective and reproducible data and software practices.

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. The instructors put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower researchers and enable data-driven discovery. Even those with some experience will benefit, as the goal is to teach not only how to do analyses, but how to manage the process to make it as automated and reproducible as possible. Biomedical and health sciences librarians and LIS students are encouraged to participate.

In this two-day interactive, hands-on workshop you will learn core software and data skills, with lessons including:

Participants may apply to attend the workshop series in either:

  • Baltimore, Maryland – March 19-20, 2020 or
  • Salt Lake City, Utah – March 26-27, 2020

To broaden access to this exciting training, we invite applications to cover the costs of travel and attendance, up to $1,500 for Baltimore, and $1,200 for Salt Lake City. Travel costs will be reimbursed after travel occurs.

Eligibility:

Your organization must be a NNLM Network Member. If your organization is not a Network Member, they can join for free!

You must be able to commit to traveling for the workshop dates:

  • University of Maryland, Baltimore – March 19-20, 2020
  • University of Utah, Salt Lake City – March 26-27, 2020

You must be able to bring a laptop computer.

All participants must be prepared to observe The Carpentries Code of Conduct in workshops.

Applications to participate and receive funding are due Friday, January 10, 2020. Notice of acceptance to the Library Carpentry Workshop will be announced on or before January 31, 2020.

See full details and apply via the online application: https://nnlm.gov/nto-sea/funding/library-carpentry-professional-development-award.

For questions, please contact the NTO at nto@utah.edu or NNLM SEA at HSHSL-NLMsea@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: Applications Open for RDM 102 (Spring 2020)

PNR Data Science - Thu, 2019-12-05 13:35

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020) Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity and include practice in using Jupyter Notebooks. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and data storytelling.

The program spans 9 weeks from February 24 – April 24, including 5 modules of asynchronous content, a catch-up week, and a synchronous online session during the week of April 20. The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. Under the guidance of a project instructor, participants will complete a Final Project to demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data science services at their institution. Expect to spend about 6 hours each week on coursework and the project.

Applications are due January 10, 2020.

Additional details, including application link, are available at https://wp.me/p8Qzkf-2LX.

For questions and concerns, please contact the NTO at nto@utah.edu

Categories: Data Science

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020)

SEA Data Science - Wed, 2019-12-04 11:14
Course Description

Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity. It will also include practice in using Jupyter Notebooks through an open-source browser-based application (JupyterHub) that allows users to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations, and narrative text.

The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and data storytelling.

To have a successful experience in this course, we recommend that you are familiar with the concepts covered in RDM 101 and statistical concepts addressed in these videos:

Components
The program spans 9 weeks from February 24 – April 24, including 5 modules of asynchronous content, a catch-up week, and a synchronous online session during the week of April 20. The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. Under the guidance of a project instructor, participants will complete a Final Project to demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data science services at their institution. Expect to spend about 6 hours each week on coursework and the project.

Instructors

  • Shirley Zhao, MSLIS, MS, Assistant Librarian (Clinical), Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, The University of Utah
  • Leah Honor, MLIS, Education & Clinical Services Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Tess Grynoch, MLIS, Research Data & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Nancy Shin, MLIS, NNLM PNR Research and Data Coordinator, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington
  • Vicky Steeves, MLIS, Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, Division of Libraries & Center for Data Science, New York University

CE Credits
Participants who complete all modules, the Final Project, and the course evaluation will receive 36 hours of Medical Library Association Continuing Education credit. No partial CE credit is granted.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in the program.

Important Dates
  • Application deadline: January 10, 2020
  • Notifications begin: January 21, 2020
  • Course: February 24 – April 24, 2020
Applications

Who can apply?
Applications are open to health science information professionals working in libraries located in the US. Applicants must have previous training or experience in research data management through the RDM 101 course or attest to the objectives listed here. Enrollment is limited to 40 participants.

How to apply
Complete the online application form by January 10, 2020. The application will gather the following information:

  • Name, email address, phone number, state, place of employment, current job title.
  • Did you complete RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians? (It is not required for RDM 102).
  • Please briefly describe your knowledge or experience in research data management and/or data science.
  • Why do you want to take this course?

Questions?
Contact NTO.

Categories: Data Science

NIH to Host Informational Webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

GMR Data Science - Tue, 2019-12-03 16:02

NIH will be hosting an informational public webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance on Monday, December 16, 2019, from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET. The purpose of this webinar is to provide information on the draft policy and answer any clarifying questions about the public comment process. Public comments will NOT be accepted via the webinar but must instead be sent through the link provided below.

Instructions for Accessing Webinar:

  • To view the webinar presentation, please click here
  • To call-in to the webinar:
    • U.S. and Canadian participants can dial: 866-844-9416 and enter passcode: 4009108
  • For international participants, please refer to the table of toll-free numbers found here.

PLEASE NOTE THAT WHILE YOU WILL ABLE TO VIEW THE WEBINAR THROUGH WEBEX, YOU MUST USE THE SPECIFIED PHONE LINE TO BE CONNECTED TO THE AUDIO.  YOU WILL BE UNABLE TO CALL-IN VIA YOUR COMPUTER.

Participants may also send questions in advance of the webinar to SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

 

Comments on the draft policy and draft supplemental guidance can be made electronically here through Friday, January 10, 2020

Categories: Data Science

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020)

NTO Data Science - Mon, 2019-12-02 17:09
Course Description

Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity. It will also include practice in using Jupyter Notebooks through an open-source browser-based application (JupyterHub) that allows users to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations, and narrative text.

The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and data storytelling.

To have a successful experience in this course, we recommend that you are familiar with the concepts covered in RDM 101 and statistical concepts addressed in these videos:

Components
The program spans 9 weeks from February 24 – April 24, including 5 modules of asynchronous content, a catch-up week, and a synchronous online session during the week of April 20. The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. Under the guidance of a project instructor, participants will complete a Final Project to demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data science services at their institution. Expect to spend about 6 hours each week on coursework and the project.

Instructors

  • Shirley Zhao, MSLIS, MS, Assistant Librarian (Clinical), Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, The University of Utah
  • Leah Honor, MLIS, Education & Clinical Services Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Tess Grynoch, MLIS, Research Data & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Nancy Shin, MLIS, NNLM PNR Research and Data Coordinator, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington
  • Vicky Steeves, MLIS, Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, Division of Libraries & Center for Data Science, New York University

CE Credits
Participants who complete all modules, the Final Project, and the course evaluation will receive 36 hours of Medical Library Association Continuing Education credit. No partial CE credit is granted.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in the program.

Important Dates
  • Application deadline: January 10, 2020
  • Notifications begin: January 21, 2020
  • Course: February 24 – April 24, 2020
Applications

Who can apply?
Applications are open to health science information professionals working in libraries located in the US. Applicants must have previous training or experience in research data management through the RDM 101 course or attest to the objectives listed here. Enrollment is limited to 40 participants.

How to apply
Complete the online application form by January 10, 2020. The application will gather the following information:

  • Name, email address, phone number, state, place of employment, current job title.
  • Did you complete RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians? (It is not required for RDM 102).
  • Please briefly describe your knowledge or experience in research data management and/or data science.
  • Why do you want to take this course?

Questions?
Contact NTO.

Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: NIH Requests Public Comment on a Draft Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

PNR Data Science - Fri, 2019-11-08 15:08

On November 6th, 2019, NIH released a Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and supplemental draft guidance for public comment. The purpose of this draft policy and supplemental draft guidance is to promote effective and efficient data management and sharing that furthers NIH’s commitment to making the results and accomplishments of the research it funds and conducts available to the public. Complete information about the draft Policy and draft supplemental guidance can be found on the NIH OSP website.

Stakeholder feedback is essential to ensure that any future policy maximizes responsible data sharing, minimizes burden on researchers, and protects the privacy of research participants.  Stakeholders are invited to comment on any aspect of the draft policy, the supplemental draft guidance, or any other considerations relevant to NIH’s data management and sharing policy efforts that NIH should consider.

To facilitate commenting, NIH has established a web portal that can be accessed here. To ensure consideration, comments must be received no later than January 10, 2020.

For additional details about NIH’s thinking on this issue, please see Dr. Carrie Wolinetz’ latest Under the Poliscope blog:

NIH’s DRAFT Data Management and Sharing Policy: We Need to Hear From You!

NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the draft policy in the near future. Please stay tuned for details.

Questions may be sent to SciencePolicy@mail.nih.gov.

Categories: Data Science

NIH Requests Public Comment on a Draft Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2019-11-07 10:23

Yesterday, NIH released a Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and supplemental draft guidance for public comment. The purpose of this draft policy and supplemental draft guidance is to promote effective and efficient data management and sharing that furthers NIH’s commitment to making the results and accomplishments of the research it funds and conducts available to the public. Complete information about the draft Policy and draft supplemental guidance can be found on the NIH OSP website.

Stakeholder feedback is essential to ensure that any future policy maximizes responsible data sharing, minimizes burden on researchers, and protects the privacy of research participants.  Stakeholders are invited to comment on any aspect of the draft policy, the supplemental draft guidance, or any other considerations relevant to NIH’s data management and sharing policy efforts that NIH should consider.

To facilitate commenting, NIH has established a web portal that can be accessed here. To ensure consideration, comments must be received no later than January 10, 2020.

For additional details about NIH’s thinking on this issue, please see Dr. Carrie Wolinetz’ latest Under the Poliscope blog:

NIH’s DRAFT Data Management and Sharing Policy: We Need to Hear From You!

NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the draft policy in the near future. Please stay tuned for details.

Questions may be sent to SciencePolicy@mail.nih.gov.

Categories: Data Science

UC Libraries and IT@UC Partner to Bring Renowned NLM Data Scientist to Campus

GMR Data Science - Tue, 2019-11-05 16:18

By Melissa Previtera and Don Jason

On September 17th and 18th, Dr. Lisa Federer, Data and Open Science Librarian for the National Library of Medicine (NLM), visited the University of Cincinnati as part of the Data and Computational Science Series (DCS2).

During her visit, Dr. Federer shared her expertise in the field of biomedical research data and data visualization through a lecture, a hands-on workshop, and meetings with various data and informatics leaders.

Dr. Federer’s lecture “If You Share it, Will They Come? Quantifying and Characterizing Reuse of Biomedical Research Data” encouraged individuals to think about how they are not only sharing and reusing data but how patterns of reuse can influence curation and preservation. She presented her talk in the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Profession’s Stanley J. Lucas, MD Board Room. Dr. Federer hosted a luncheon at the same venue. During the luncheon, she answered questions about her lecture and had in-depth conversations with UC faculty and researchers.

Lisa Federer engaged with participant learning

After the luncheon, Dr. Federer taught a hands-on workshop titled “Endless Forms Most Beautiful: Creating Customized Data Visualization with ggplot2 in R.” The workshop was held in the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library’s Dr. Stanley B. Troup Learning Space. The workshop addressed the importance of clear communication, effective visualizations, and accessibility for colorblind individuals. Dr. Richard Johansen, Data Visualization Specialist, and Mark Chalmers, Science Librarian, served as teaching assistants for the workshop.

During Dr. Federer’s time in Cincinnati, she served as the keynote speaker for the Cincinnati Area Health Sciences Library Association’s (CAHSLA) annual meeting and served as a guest speaker at the UC Libraries Faculty Meeting. She presented a talk titled “Beyond the Data Management Plan: Expanding Roles for Librarians” to both audiences. This talk gave a synopsis of emerging data science competencies for the library workforce. The talk provided a roadmap of trainings, webinars and classes librarians could complete in order to gain these professional skills.

Dr. Federer’s visit was a huge success – bringing together attendees from a variety of academic disciplines and research interests. The DCS2 planning committee hopes Dr. Federer’s visit starts conversations, expands professional networks and is the catalyst for future collaborations.

Don Jason, Health Informationist, served as site coordinator for Dr. Federer’s visit. He received logistical support from Melissa Previtera, HSL/ Winkler Center Term Librarian, Assami Semde, HSL Circulation Desk Coordinator, and Lori Harris, Interim Director of the Health Sciences Library.

The DCS2 planning committee would like to thank Dr. Federer for sharing her extensive knowledge and skills with the UC community. The committee would also like to thank UC Libraries’ Research & Data Services, the UC Digital Scholarship Center, and the UC Institute for Interdisciplinary Data Science, for meeting with Dr. Federer during her visit. Finally, we would like to extend our sincerest gratitude to the Office of the Provost for funding the DCS2.

The DCS2 is a collaboration between UC Libraries and IT@UC. The series provides the UC research community with innovative workshops and distinguished speakers on advanced research data topics. Please visit the DCS2 Website to register for upcoming lectures and training sessions.
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The NNLM is grateful for the outreach and engagement work of our NNLM members. If you have a program or project to share, please email us at gmr-lib@uiowa.edu.

Categories: Data Science