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Data Science

Register Today! Finding Clinically Relevant Genetic Information

MCR Data Science - Fri, 2019-09-13 15:21

NNLM Resource Picks: Finding Clinically Relevant Genetic Information

Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2019
Time: 3:00pm, Eastern Standard Time

Register

Did you know genetic testing is available for over 2,000 rare and common conditions, and that over 500 laboratories conduct genetic testing? Clinicians using genetic diagnostics rely on variant classifications to arrive at a diagnosis, decide on interventions, and evaluate care. But how do you locate this information?

Peter Cooper, NCBI Staff Scientist, will join us live to introduce three resources for finding clinically relevant genetic information. In this session, he will:

  1. Explain the validity of clinical variation information in the ClinVar database.
  2. Locate information about a genetic condition related to a specific list of symptoms using MedGen.
  3. Locate tests for a clinical feature, gene or disease using the Genetic Testing Registry.

MLA CE credit is available for those who register and complete the evaluation form!

NNLM Resource Picks is a collaborative, bimonthly, webcast series featuring the National Library of Medicine resources to increase awareness of these resources as well as encourage their integration by libraries and other organizations to more fully serve their colleagues and communities. All sessions are recorded with closed captioning and archived. Click here for upcoming and past NNLM Resource Picks sessions.

Contact: Dana Abbey at dana.abbey@cuanschutz.edu.

Categories: Data Science

NNLM’s RD3 Website: RDM 101 Course Material Available for Non-Course Registrants

PNR Data Science - Thu, 2019-09-12 11:57

RD3 Website Intro

The NNLM’s research data management (RDM) course entitled, “RDM 101” kicked off this past Monday, September 9th, 2019 with a full class; interest in this particular RDM course was so high that it even gave rise to a course waitlist!

RDM 101 is an excellent and comprehensive course on RDM basics.  It covers topics that are relevant to the supporting RDM librarian, who needs to help anyone in research that needs a hand with managing and organizing data.  More specifically, it covers these key data science topics:

  • Data organization
    (i.e. data collection, data documentation like file naming etc., data types, metadata format and standards for metadata content like controlled vocabularies, and data management plan (DMPs) design);
  • Data storage and security
    (i.e. short-term backup and long-term storage options, encryption, password protection etc.);
  • Data access and sharing, and reuse
    (i.e. copyright and intellectual property issues, data use agreements, data sharing funder requirements, licenses for data usage etc.) and;
  • Data preservation
    (i.e. various data repositories – subject specific, general, and institutional – and data journals).

For the busy librarian who may not have the time commitment that is required and involved to participate in this RDM 101 course, or for the librarian who couldn’t get into the Moodle course, there is hope!!!  All of the RDM 101 course material except active links to the course readings and assignments/pretest/posttest material is up and running on the NNLM’s RD3 website.

The NNLM’s RD3 website is the answer to your data science questions.  It is an excellent and comprehensive website about data science and includes a page under “Training” for RDM training from the RDM 101 course.  It is organized by week and there are 5 weeks in total.

Something to look forward to in the next coming weeks is RDM 102’s course material will be posted on the NNLM’s RD3 website too!  Soooo, stay tuned!!!

Categories: Data Science

Upcoming Research Data Management Webinar: If You Share It, Will They Come? Quantifying and Characterizing Reuse of Biomedical Research Data

SEA Data Science - Wed, 2019-09-04 10:04

Date: Wednesday, October 2nd

Time: 2:00PM – 3:00PM ET

Presenter: Lisa Federer, PhD, MLIS is the Data Science and Open Science Librarian at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), focusing on developing efforts to support workforce development and enhance capacity in the biomedical research and library communities for data science and open science. Prior to joining NLM, Lisa spent five years as the Research Data Informationist at the National Institutes of Health Library, where she developed and ran the Library’s Data Services Program. She holds a PhD in information studies from the University of Maryland and an MLIS from the University of California-Los Angeles, as well as graduate certificates in data science and data visualization. Her research focuses on quantifying and characterizing biomedical data reuse and development of meaningful scholarly metrics for shared data.

Description: Since the mid-2000s, new data sharing mandates have led to an increase in the amount of research data available for reuse. Reuse of data benefits the scientific community and the public by potentially speeding scientific discovery and increasing the return on investment of publicly funded research. However, despite the potential benefits of reuse and the increasing availability of data, research on the impact of data reuse is so far sparse. This talk will provide a deeper understanding of the impacts of shared biomedical research data by answering the question “what happens with datasets once they are shared?”

Specifically, this talk will demonstrate that data are often reused in very different contexts than for which they were originally collected, as well as explore how patterns of reuse differ between dataset types. This talk also considers patterns of data reuse over time and the topics of the most highly reused datasets to determine whether it is possible to predict which datasets will go on to be highly reused over time. Finally, career stage and geographic location of data reusers provide an understanding of who benefits from shared research data. These findings have implications for several stakeholders, including researchers who share data and those who reuse it, funders and institutions developing policies to reward and incentivize data sharing, and repositories and data curators who must make choices about which datasets to curate and preserve

Registration: Registration is free and can be accessed through the NNLM class instance.

For additional information, please contact Kiri Burcat.

Categories: Data Science

DataFlash: Stephen Few’s “The Data Loom” – A Book Review

PNR Data Science - Tue, 2019-08-27 16:26

Books with reading glasses

Stephen Few is no amateur when it comes to data analysis and data visualization; as the author of more than half a dozen books on data analysis and data visualization, this Pacific Northwest resident has become a trusted expert on the topic.

In Few’s newest book which was released this past May 2019 entitled “The Data Loom”, he does not disappoint his growing data fans.  In a time where dressing up data stories with cheap tricks (i.e. useless and misleading data visualizations to suit your own objectives) has become popular, Few reminds us of the importance of truthful data storytelling and truthful data presentations.  Few teaches us how to think critically and scientifically when it comes to thinking about our data and data presentation.  In fact, Few asserts that we don’t really live in the “Information Age” but more of the “Data Age” where data only is valuable to us after we make sense of it – i.e. through data sensemaking.

In Chapter 3 entitled “Think Scientifically”, Few reflects on the greater purpose of data sensemaking (63):

“Too often, data sensemaking focuses solely on collecting and reporting facts. However, facts are only useful if they lead to an understanding that enables decisions and actions that produce a better world.  Not every question involves causal relationships, but the most important questions do.”

Through being able to think critically and scientifically, we are in a better position to really understand and use data in a truthful and valuable way that will ultimately affect our ability to make good decisions.  Few’s knowledge of critical and scientific thinking comes shining through with many of his inspirational quotes and book references from great thinkers.  Masterfully, Stephen Few succinctly sums up a huge body of essential statistical, philosophical, and scientific works into a matter of 122 pages.  “The Data Loom” by Stephen Few is an amazingly concise work on thinking about data and a very worthwhile read!!!

Additional Reading by Stephen Few:

Show Me the Numbers

Information Dashboard Design: Displaying Data for At-a-Glance Monitoring

Categories: Data Science

NIH All of Us Research Program Plans Genome Sequencing and Genetic Counseling for Participants

PSR Data Science - Wed, 2019-08-21 18:03

The NIH All of Us Research Program has awarded $4.6 million in initial funding to Color, a health technology company in Burlingame, CA, to establish the program’s nationwide genetic counseling resource. With the goal of speeding up health research breakthroughs, All of Us plans to sequence the genomes of 1 million participants from diverse communities across the United States. Through this funding, Color’s network of genetic counselors will help participants understand what the genomic testing results mean for their health and their families. As one of the most ambitious research programs in history, the All of Us Research Program aims to create the largest and most diverse health research resource of its kind. Participants from all parts of the country share health information over time through surveys, electronic health records and more. Some participants also are invited to contribute blood and urine samples for analysis. Researchers will be able to use this data to learn more about how biology, behavior, and environment influence health and disease, which may lead to discoveries on how to further individualize health care in the future.

Over time, the program anticipates providing several kinds of information to participants, including: information on ancestry and traits, drug-gene interactions (pharmacogenomics) and genetic findings connected with high risk of certain diseases. Genomic results from All of Us, although produced at a high quality in specially certified labs, should be confirmed by a health care provider before a participant makes any changes to their care. The pharmacogenomic information may help participants work with their health care teams more effectively to make choices about certain prescription drugs. Genetic findings tied to 59 genes associated with risk of specific diseases, like breast cancer or heart disease, for which there are established medical guidelines for treatment or prevention will also be returned to participants. To ensure that the program uses the most current knowledge in the fast-moving field of clinical genetics, All of Us is following guidance from professional organizations such as the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium.

As health-related information is made available, all participants will have access to genetic counseling services from Color. A small percentage of people will have DNA results, such as a variation in the breast cancer gene BRCA1, that may be important for treatment or screening. This information can also be valuable to their immediate family members who may share the same genetic variant. For All of Us, that could amount to tens of thousands of participants out of its eventual 1 million. Color will deliver the results to these participants in genetic counseling sessions, highlighting any important findings they may want to discuss with a health care provider.

Color will offer educational materials and telecounseling in multiple languages, as well as access to in-house licensed clinical pharmacists who can help participants have more effective conversations with their health care providers. Genetic counselors will also be able to help connect participants to health care providers who can address their particular health risks. To help guide its genetic counseling services, Color’s steering committee is led by Amy Sturm, M.S., CGC, LGC, president of the National Society of Genetic Counselors. It also includes leadership of the American Board of Genetic Counseling. The steering committee will help ensure that Color delivers top-quality genetic counseling and serves as a platform for training future generations of genetic counselors. Color has built software and digital tools that remove traditional barriers to genetic counseling and clinical genetic testing. It has conducted more than 15,000 genetic counseling sessions to help people across the country understand their DNA information. For an overview of the outputs that Color will provide, watch this 90-second YouTube video featuring Eric Dishman, Director of the NIH All of Us Research Program.

Categories: Data Science

AAHSL/PNR-NNLM Research Data Professional Development Award

GMR Data Science - Fri, 2019-07-26 09:04

A new professional development opportunity has been released for individual at AAHSL institutions that are interested in building their professional capacity to support research data knowledge! The 2019-2020 AAHSL/PNR-NNLM Research Data Professional Development Award program provides those selected with an opportunity to attend or experience a professional development activity related to research data knowledge and receive up to $2,000.00 in support of that activity (travel, hotel, registration, per diem).

All applications must be submitted by September 1, 2019. Applicants will receive notice of their award by mid-October. Travel and required documentation must be completed prior to April 30, 2020

Application form: http://bit.ly/AAHSL-Data

Categories: Data Science

Florence Nightingale and the Data Visualization Society

SEA Data Science - Wed, 2019-07-24 14:33

Written By: Kiri Burcat, Data & Evaluation Coordinator, NNLM SEA

Here at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, the Health Sciences and Human Services Library is physically connected to the School of Nursing. The building’s façade is engraved with the last names of some of the nursing profession’s pioneers: Dorothea Dix; Clara Barton; Mary Eliza Mahoney; Florence Nightingale. I see them every day as I walk between my car and the library.


University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Nursing, from nursingonpoint.com

Florence Nightingale is famous for her accomplishments in professionalizing nursing roles during the Victorian Era. She organized care for soldiers during the Crimean war, advocated for sanitary conditions in battlefield hospitals, and established a nursing school at St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Still today, new nurses take the Nightingale Pledge at their pinning ceremonies and the Florence Nightingale Medal is awarded internationally to nurses of the highest distinction.

But I learned about her from a data visualization course.

A prolific writer, Nightingale effectively used charts and infographics to communicate medical information. One of her best-known visualizations, called the coxcomb, illustrates the fact that far more soldiers were dying from preventable contagious diseases than from battle wounds:


Florence Nightingale, from Wikimedia commons. The first part of the description reads: “The areas of blue, red, and black wedges are each measured from the centre as a common vertex. The blue wedges measured from the centre of the circle represent area for area the deaths from Preventable or Mitigatable Zymotic diseases, the red wedges measured from the centre the deaths from wounds, and the black wedges measure from the centre the deaths from all other causes.

For this, she’s also lauded as one of the pioneers of data visualization.

On July 15th, the Data Visualization Society introduced their new online publication, Nightingale, named in her honor. The Society, itself a new community, was formed “to collect and establish best practices, fostering a community that supports members as they grow and develop data visualization skills” and Nightingale will publish stories covering data viz techniques, design processes, and applications in a variety of fields.

Interested in experimenting with data visualization while earning CE credits?

Tune in to the August installment of the NNLM Research Data Management Webinar Series:  What’s in a Data Story? Understanding the Basics of Data Storytelling and keep an eye on the training calendar for an instance of Cool Creative Communications: Dazzling Data Visualization later this fall.

Categories: Data Science

Registration Open: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians!

GMR Data Science - Fri, 2019-07-19 17:10

Course Title: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians

An asynchronous online National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Moodle course that will take place from September 9 – November 8, 2019. Enrollment will be limited to the first 100 who register!

Description: The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. There are eight self-paced modules and students may customize their experience by completing the modules of most interest and use to them.

The course topics include:

  • An overview of research data management
  • Choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset
  • Addressing privacy and security issues with data, and
  • Creating data management plans

CE Credits

Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be eligible to claim up to 32 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association (MLA). Credit will be dependent on the number of modules completed. To receive credit, components must be submitted by November 8.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in this course.

For more information and to Register for this course go to the Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians course page

Questions about the course?
Please contact nto@utah.edu

Categories: Data Science

Data Flash: New RDM Moodle Course for Librarians!!!

PNR Data Science - Fri, 2019-07-19 16:51

An Upcoming Online Course Opportunity for Librarians Interested in Research Data Management! There is no application deadline as enrollment will be limited to the first 100 who register!

 Course Title: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians

An asynchronous online National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Moodle course that will take place from September 9 – November 8, 2019.

Description: The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. There are eight self-paced modules and students may customize their experience by completing the modules of most interest and use to them.

The course topics include:

  • An overview of research data management
  • Choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset
  • Addressing privacy and security issues with data, and
  • Creating data management plans

CE Credits

Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be eligible to claim up to 32 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association (MLA). Credit will be dependent on the number of modules completed. To receive credit, components must be submitted by November 8.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in this course.

For more information and to Register for this course go to the Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians course page

Questions about the course?
Please contact nto@utah.edu

 

Categories: Data Science

Upcoming Beyond the SEA Webinar: Improving Your Spreadsheets Using Art Principles

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2019-07-18 14:20

Date: Tuesday, August 6th, 2019

Time: 2:00PM – 3:00PM ET

Presenter: Jonah Calinawan, an accountant turned artist. Jonah holds a Bachelor of Mathematics from the University of Waterloo, Canada, and an MFA from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco.

Description: One day at work, Jonah realized he was composing his spreadsheets as if they were photographs. That moment was a springboard for Jonah’s signature presentation on Improving Spreadsheets Using Art Principles.

In this webinar, Jonah will share simple ideas and guidelines for presenting and formatting spreadsheets (and Tableau dashboards) for maximum impact and understandability. To make this presentation as tailored as possible to your needs, Jonah is looking for examples that he could use during the webinar. If you are willing, please send a redacted spreadsheet or Tableau dashboard snapshot that you normally would circulate to your users and audiences to jonahcalinawan@gmail.com.

Registration: Registration is free and can be accessed through the NNLM class instance.

For additional information, please contact Kiri Burcat.

Categories: Data Science

Midwest Data Librarian Symposium Call for Proposals

GMR Data Science - Mon, 2019-07-15 14:54

Midwest Data Librarian Symposium (MDLS) invites session proposals for its 5th symposium taking place at University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL) on September 30 – October 1, 2019.

MDLS is a low-cost, 2-day, hands-on, unconference style event for Midwesterners who support research data management and research data services (RDS) at their institutions. The greater data community, not limited to data librarians, is invited to present interactive sessions at this year’s event. Presenters from all disciplines and regions are encouraged to apply.

Proposals are due on July 31, 2019.

Full details and the application form can be found on the MDLS website.

Questions?  Contact us at mwdatalibsym@gmail.com

Follow us on Twitter: @MW_DataLibSym

Categories: Data Science

Register for the July MCR Monthly Webinar, Data Management Education Needs: Identifying Signposts for Graduate Student Researchers

MCR Data Science - Thu, 2019-06-20 12:54

Register for the NNLM MCR’s free monthly webinar on Wednesday, July 17 at 2 -3 pm MT!

Presenter: Dr. Judy Pasek, STEM Liaison Librarian with the University of Wyoming Libraries, will present on research conducted at the Universities of Wyoming and Northern Colorado about the data management needs of graduate students.

Register for this webinar

About the Session: Effectively managing research data is a skill set that graduate students need to acquire along their pathway to becoming competent researchers. Librarians can help guide learning by establishing instructional signposts for relevant data management concepts, including data sharing practices. To be effective, librarian guides need to be familiar with the knowledge and skill gaps of the novice researchers. Surveys were conducted at two medium-sized universities to assess perceived importance and knowledge of 12 research data management competencies, with a goal of informing education planning. Graduate students provided insight into sources of learning about research data management. Study results set the foundation for identifying approaches to research data management education

When: Jul 17, 2019   from 1 – 2PM (Pacific)  | 2 – 3PM (Mountain) | 3 – 4PM (Central) | 4-5 PM (Eastern)

Categories: Data Science

Call For Participants: Data Thesaurus Advisory Board

SEA Data Science - Thu, 2019-06-20 10:06

The Research Data Management Workgroup of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine is actively recruiting Data Thesaurus Advisory Board members to be part of a committee that reviews terms, adds new terms, and suggest connections between terms.

If you are interested in being part of the Data Thesaurus Advisory Board send you name to Mary Piorun at mary.piorun@umassmed.edu by July 1st with a brief description (less than 300 words) explaining your interest.

To learn more about about the Data Thesaurus and other resources for data-driven discovery at NNLM, visit nnlm.gov/data.

 

Categories: Data Science

NNLM Recruiting Data Thesaurus Advisory Board Members

GMR Data Science - Tue, 2019-06-18 16:19

The Research Data Management Workgroup of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine is recruiting Advisory Board members to be part of a committee that reviews terms, adds new terms, and suggest connections between terms. If you are interested in being part of the Data Thesaurus Advisory Board send your name to Mary Piorun (select hyperlink to find Mary’s e-mail address) by July 1st with a brief description (less than 300 words) explaining your interest.

Categories: Data Science

Data Flash: Introducing the NNLM PNR’s Research & Data Engagement Award!

PNR Data Science - Thu, 2019-06-06 18:18

Growing plants.

The NNLM PNR is happy to announce the Research & Data Engagement Award.  The primary purpose of the Research & Data Engagement Award is to support projects and build partnerships that demonstrate engagement in research data services through the sharing of expertise and resources.

Eligible applicants must be from institutions that are members of the NNLM PNR; if you don’t have a membership, membership is free and open to institutions interested in improving equitable access to health information.  To apply for membership, submit an online membership application.  Encouraged to apply are applicants who have not previously received NNLM funding or have only received funding once before.

Some ideas of potential projects range from an interdisciplinary collaboration to implement clinical data management services to developing knowledge and skills of librarians, students, researchers, clinicians, or public health workforce about best practices for organizing, managing, visualizing, and sharing data.  Up to two awards valued at up to $19,000 will be awarded this year for the funding period beginning May 1st, 2019 and ending April 30th, 2020.

For those interested in this exciting award, applicants should inform NNLM PNR of their intent to apply by submitting a Letter of Intent, including the type of award and a brief description of the proposed project, by Thursday, July 11th, 2019 to nnlm@uw.edu. Potential applicants should also submit their completed applications by Wednesday, August 7th, 2019 as an email attachment to nnlm@uw.edu.  For more information about this award and for tips on writing your proposal check out our NNLM PNR Funding Opportunities page and our Proposal Writing Toolkit respectively.

Good luck and we look forward to your exciting applications!!!

Categories: Data Science

New NNLM PSR Education and Outreach Librarian: Zoe Pettway Unno!

PSR Data Science - Thu, 2019-05-30 18:46

Greetings! I am excited to have joined the NNLM PSR RML as an Education and Outreach Librarian. I look forward to working with network members and health professionals through training that promotes electronic access to health information from the NLM.

My library training and experience has included exposure to public, special, and academic libraries. I started my library career in the healthcare sector as a medical librarian and then the manager of Library Services and Physician Education at Kaiser Permanente South Bay Medical Center; followed by roles as Science Librarian at California State University, Fullerton, and Science and Engineering Librarian and Head, Science and Engineering Library, at USC. You’ll find more information about my background via my ORCID iD.

As an Education and Outreach Librarian my focus areas will include outreach to health professionals and research data management education. In addition, I will work with my PSR RML colleagues on other education areas, exhibits, and evaluation activities in the region.

I want to learn about your interests and encourage you to reach out to me with your emerging information needs. Feel free to send communications to my email address!

Smiling woman in front of animated library facade

Zoe Pettway Unno, Education and Outreach Librarian

Categories: Data Science

Intersections of Informatics and Librarianship: Tisha Mentnech Reports from the AMIA Informatics Summit

MCR Data Science - Thu, 2019-05-30 09:38

I was Tisha fortunate to be a part of the inaugural cohort RDM 101 Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Science Librarians in Spring 2018 . That experience continued my learning about RDM practices in librarianship. One aspect that particularly stuck with me are the multitude of roles for librarians to be involved with data. The announcement for the funding came at an opportune time. I had recently been accepted to teach a workshop on reproducibility at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) Informatics Summit in San Francisco in March. Initially, I was only going to attend the workshop because of the cost of the full conference but the call for funding provided me with the ability to attend and focus on their data science track.

I wanted to attend the data science track of AMIA Informatics Summit because I was also going to be a student in the RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians cohort focusing on data science practices for librarians. I knew this introduction would be a chance to see the intersections of librarianship and informatics as it relates to data science.  The workshop I taught, “Innovative Tools for Research Reproducibility and Data Sharing” was a kickstart to my learning at the conference. Questions that I was getting during the workshop about some of the information included things about ontologies, metadata, and repositories, much of which was a part of the RDM 101 course. Seeing the informaticists looking for discipline specific information on these needs began to lay the groundwork of connections between the 2 fields and demonstrated the similarities that informaticists and librarians.

The sessions that stood out to me were ones on open data and data science. One session that I took the most away from was: “Patients, Populations and Data Science.” The different talks within the session that were stand outs for my connection of information professionals were: “On the Role of Question Summarization and Information Source Restriction in Consumer Health Question Answering”,  “Extracting Biomedical Terms from Postpartum Depression Online Health Communities”, and “Modeling Depression Symptoms from Social Network Data through Multiple Instance Learning.” Each of these sections highlighted something about using open data or known data mining and data ethics. For me, one aspect of data librarianship that is most important is data literacy and ethics. Many people that were a part of the corpus of the data collected for these were not made aware that the data would be used in these ways, which brings up the question of using public data and how informed are the users creating the data. I think that as someone who teaches data literacy, this opened my eyes to things that need to be reinforced in the communities we support. This also brought up more ethical data questions that I have for research overall. I will not go into too much detail but this session opened my eyes and piqued my interest more in why having a data librarian involved in the IRB process is an avenue that I personally want to explore.

Overall, I was expecting to learn more about the intersections of informatics and librarianship. The Summit gave me more an overview of how the two disciplines could benefit each other. There are similarities in the theory of both library science and informatics. Data librarians could definitely benefit from partnering with the informatics departments if they are interested in taking their skills more technical. A symbiotic benefit for informaticists and librarians is with ontology, metadata, thesauri, and/or index development. One thing that I noticed and that was mentioned in the opening keynote from Greg Simon, President, Biden Cancer Initiative, is that there are so many home grown solutions to problems that are capitalized on and not enough creation with our peers.  This really hit home to me and is something that I am still thinking about today.

I am truly grateful for the experience that the NTO funding provided me. Learning about the ways in which librarians can support data outside of a traditional library role is something that I think needs to be discussed in more library and information programs and throughout library careers. There is not a one size fits all for librarians and the settings they work and exploring the intersections of librarians and informaticists helped remind me of that.

Tisha Mentnech (Tee-sha Mint-Nitch) she | they Research Librarian for Life Sciences and Research Impact Research Engagement North Carolina State University Libraries

tisha_mentnech@ncsu.edu

Categories: Data Science