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RML Blogs

Call for Requests to host National Library of Medicine exhibit, “Politics of Yellow Fever in Alexander Hamilton’s America”

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2019-08-20 06:18

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has a wonderful program of traveling exhibits that focus on history, literature, health issues and professions. They consist of banners but there is online content as well. The banners allow for programming and collaborating with organizations in your community such as a school, a health clinic, an academic institution, or community organization.

The NLM Exhibition Program has an opportunity to host one of their newer exhibits, “Politics of Yellow Fever in Alexander Hamilton’s America”.

NLM traveling exhibit "Politics of Yellow Fever"

This six-banner traveling exhibition explores how party politics shaped the response to the yellow fever epidemic in 1793 Philadelphia where Philadelphians confronted yellow fever in the absence of an effective cure or consensus about the origins of the disease.  Medical professionals, early political parties, and private citizens seized on the epidemic to advance their respective agendas. As a result, Philadelphia’s sick and dying received medical care informed as much by politics as by the best available science.  Politics of Yellow Fever tells the story of how Philadelphia’s sick, anxious residents responded to yellow fever using an uneasy blend of science and politics.

If you would like to host “Politics of Yellow Fever in Alexander Hamilton’s America”, please complete a Call for Requests Response Form and submit your completed form to: NLMCallForRequestsSubmissions@mail.nlm.nih.gov by September 23, 2019 at 8:59 p.m., PT.

For more information on Exhibitions Connect and Call for Requests, please visit the Exhibitions Connect web page.

Consider subscribing to the MAKING-EXHIBITION-CONNECTIONS  listserv for future official announcements.

Categories: RML Blogs

Favorite Experiences at the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians

NER News - Mon, 2019-08-19 17:09

This is the final blog post in a series authored by several individuals who received scholarships to attend the and the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians. In this installment, a scholarship recipient, Anne Marie Engelsen, the Science Reference Librarian at Fogler Library at the University of Maine, describes her favorite parts of the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians.  For more information about the New England Science Boot Camp presentations including videos please see the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians website.  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

I was lucky enough to get a scholarship to attend the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians for the second year in a row. Thank you to the Scholarship Committee and NNLM for the opportunity! This year was another success, and I was so glad to visit the University of New Hampshire’s gorgeous campus. Here are my 5 favorite parts of Science Boot Camp this year (in no particular order).

 

  1. Citizen Science

For the capstone talk Wednesday night, Malin Clyde (Community Volunteer State Specialist at the University of New Hampshire Extension) spoke about citizen science and her initiative, Nature Groupie, which lists citizen science volunteer opportunities in New England. We also learned about other citizen science initiatives like Zooniverse, a website that links people to small computer-based tasks for an active research project, Aurorasaurus, an app that lets people report active aurora borealis sightings around the world, and SciStarter, a larger scale list of active citizen science projects. For those who enjoy being outdoors and want to contribute to conservation or research projects, citizen science is a great opportunity! If you’d like more information about how you can link citizen science into the library, check out The Librarian’s Guide to Citizen Science from Arizona State University and SciStarter.

 

  1. Social Justice in Science

The second theme of Boot Camp (the others being Remote Sensing and Assistive Technologies) was my favorite by far. The first presenter was Sofia Lemons, a Lecturer in Computer Science from the College of Engineering & Physical Sciences, who explored the way bias is built into computing systems. When so much of our society and lives rely on computing systems, it’s important to remember that computers are not inherently without bias because computers are made by people, and no person is without bias. This is seen when researchers find that facial recognition is only accurate for white male users. The second presenter was Dr. Elena Long, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics. Dr. Long’s talk was equal parts workshop and call to action, highlighting the issue of deadnames in academic publications. Changing names on past publications is significant for trans academics because not doing it can out the academic as trans, which may result in discrimination. The choice becomes either outing themselves or losing some publications in a CV. In a nice change of pace, Dr. Long had the librarians workshop to discuss the barriers, systematic or otherwise, that might prohibit a name changing process from publishers. So what can we do? As librarians, we have a specific role that bisects the academic and publishing spheres and could help support this type of change. If we can connect, organize, and spread the message, we can create some ripples that can help combat the bad ripples that come from the issue itself.

 

  1. UNH Brewing Science Lab

One of the tours I went on Wednesday Morning was the Brewing Science Lab (complete with samples!!). UNH is the country’s only university that has a distribution license for the beer produced from its brewing science lab, rather than partnering with local breweries. The lab supports a Brewing Science minor and performs analytical testing for New Hampshire Breweries. While we were there, we got to see all of the equipment and science that goes into making beers and ciders, then taste some of the beers made by students! They had a gose that used an invasive seaweed for its salty kick and an IPA with a basil-y finish. It was interesting to see the (admittedly tiny) lab that created some tasty brews and see the passion that Cheryl Parker, Brewery Manager, had for the program and teaching students.

 

  1. Science Librarians

One of the main draws of Science Boot Camp for me is the community of science librarians that I get to see when I’m there. I was fortunate enough to have two fantastic mentors both years I attended Boot Camp- Sue O’Dell from Bowdoin College and Liz Fowler from the University of New Hampshire. Being from a fairly remote institution (UMaine is so far from anything), I love having this chance to spend time with librarians from around New England for some outside perspective and networking. The intentionally casual atmosphere of the conference allows for relationship building and general collegiality without too much of the pressure that other conferences have. I look forward to this part of the conference the most!

 

  1. Snacks

Conference snacks can be hit or miss, but my snack experience at Science Boot Camp has been overwhelmingly positive both years. This year, UNH catering provided homemade chocolate pudding (!!!), chocolate-covered strawberries (!!!), snack mix, and more delectable delicacies. I was pleasantly surprised, and I now want nothing less than scratch-made pudding at every conference I go to. Well done.

 

 

Anne Marie Engelsen

Science Reference Librarian

Fogler Library | University of Maine

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more information about science librarianship, other upcoming events, or scholarships or funding please visit the NNLM Data Driven Discovery Website and the  NNLM NER website, or contact anyone in the NNLM NER office.

Categories: RML Blogs

Bringing Healthy Ideas to Life: NNLM PNR All of Us Community Engagement Awards!

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2019-08-19 15:01

 

Do you have a great idea to advance health literacy and advance health equity in your community? Bring your great idea to life by applying for one of the NNLM PNR All of Us Community Engagement Awards! We’re delighted to offer 3 Community Engagement Awards, each up to $100,000. Please note: award applications for any amount up to $100,000 will be considered.

The goals of the Community Outreach Awards are to foster awareness of the NIH All of Us Research Program and promote health literacy and health equity through:

  • improving consumer access to quality, evidence-based health information
  • providing programs, education and outreach focused on addressing community health needs
  • addressing digital health literacy skills development
  • increasing the understanding and importance of participation in clinical trials, including the All of Us Research Program

Creative approaches to meeting the health literacy needs through community engagement are encouraged.  Consider focusing on any topics that support the aims of NIH All of Us Research Program, such as how biology, environment or lifestyle influence health.

The period of performance for these awards is: May 1, 2019 – April 30, 2020. Please note: awarded projects may request an extension through December 2020 to complete activities.

Priority for awards will be given to public libraries, or to organizations with an established public library partner carrying a significant role in the project.

Eligible applicants must be from institutions that are members of the NNLM PNR; if you don’t have a membership, membership is free and open to institutions interested in improving equitable access to health information.  To apply for membership, submit an online membership application.  NNLM PNR members who have not previously received NNLM funding or have only received funding once before are encouraged to apply.

Interested in applying? Please note the following deadlines:

  • Letter of Intent providing a brief description of the proposed project, must be submitted no later than Wednesday, September 11, 2019. Please send your Letter of Intent to: nnlm@uw.edu and include Community Engagement Award in the subject line.
  • Submission deadline for your completed application is Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 3:00 Pacific Time (late submissions will not be accepted). Please send your completed application to nnlm@uw.edu and include Community Engagement Award in the subject line.

For more information about this award and for tips on writing your proposal check out our Proposal Writing Toolkit. There you’ll find helpful suggestions for how to include All of Us awareness in your project proposal, guidelines for submitting a letter of intent and step by step tutorials on how to complete your project application.

Questions? Please drop us a line: nnlm@uw.edu. We welcome all questions and input. We look forward to funding your good ideas!

Categories: RML Blogs

Reaching Around the World: Grantees’ Big Summer

NER News - Mon, 2019-08-19 09:45

Brittany Netherton and Brenda Lormil two NNLM NER grantees had big summers presenting the work they’re doing at events in San Diego and Sweden!

Brittany from the Darien Library had the opportunity present on graphic novels in the library at the San Diego Comic-Con and her work with Graphic Medicine.

From Brittany:

“On Thursday, July 18 I delivered a lightning round presentation during San Diego Comic-Con’s Comic Conference for Educators and Librarians. The audience included librarians and educators from across North America. My presentation defined Graphic Medicine broadly, and then I spoke about Darien Library’s intentional Graphic Medicine collection development and marketing over the past year. As I was discussing the importance of other libraries creating similar collections, and sharing different resources they could use to get started, I saw people throughout the room snapping pictures of the slides and taking notes. I ended my presentation with an announcement of our NNLM NER grant, which drew excited applause from the audience. After the presentation, an NNLM representative from the San Diego area introduced herself to me, and said that Graphic Medicine is something they’re working on right now, and that she was happy to see me presenting on it.

A few weeks after the presentation, I received a text message from one of the librarians who helped plan the conference. He wanted me to know that in their recap of the event, one of the event organizers said that my Graphic Medicine presentation was particularly well-received and had attendees talking. They see Graphic Medicine as an area they want to intentionally highlight next year, and asked if I might be interested in joining the planning committee.”

 

Brenda and partners from Northeastern University School Health Academy (NEUSHA) took HAMA and NEUSHA’s great work developing a model for supporting a quality continuing nursing education (CNE) program that addresses culturally competent services, advocating for health and safety needs of students and strengthening global health for Haitian American students and their families.  HAMA and NEUSHA presented the CNE program they created to participants at the 2019 School Nurses International Conference in Stockholm, Sweden on July 25.  Read the full abstract of the project that Brenda presented on.

 

Congratulations to Brittany and Brenda on their great accomplishments this summer!  NNLM NER is proud to support the work they’re doing in their communities and look forward to reporting on more of the great work of our grantees soon.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-08-16 13:04

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Member Highlights: Upstate Health Sciences Library, Syracuse, NY – learn more about this youth-focused education program that pairs medical librarians and healthcare professionals with middle school students, to improve health literacy and inspire the pursuit of health-related careers.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote National Immunization Awareness and Talk to Your Doctor Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

In the Region – This summer, Michael Balkenhol attended the ALA annual conference in Washington, D.C. where he had the opportunity to catch up with a few of our Members, and attended some interesting sessions that will inspire future NNLM programs! Read about more of our recent activities to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in NY, NJ, PA and DE. – MARquee News Highlights

Kindling Health Topics through Kindles – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

New on YouTube: Resources for Community Health Workers, June 26, 2019

NLM/NIH News

Engaging Users to Support the Modernization of ClinicalTrials.gov – NLM aims to make ClinicalTrials.gov an even more valuable resource with a renewed commitment to engage with and serve the people who rely on it. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

The Amazing Brain: Shining a Spotlight on Individual Neurons – Here you get a close-up look at pyramidal neurons located in the hippocampus, a region of the mammalian brain involved in memory. – NIH Director’s Blog

Leaders of NIH’s All of Us Research Program Recap Progress and Next Steps – In the first major publication to come from the All of Us Research Program, consortium leaders highlight the program’s efforts to advance precision medicine and its early success in building a diverse participant community.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using. The current issue recently highlighted updates to PubMed Labs that improved search filters, and a new milestone for PubMed – the 30 millionth journal citation!

NIH News in Health: read the August 2019 issue of NIH News in Health, featuring, “Period Problems: Fibroids, Endometriosis, and Other Issue,” and, “Bulging Veins: What to Do About Varicose Veins.” Other topics include psoriatic arthritis, walking for better health, and urologic diseases.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

August 2019

Understanding the Opioid Crisis: Where do I begin? – August 20, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – An estimated 1.9 million people in the U.S. have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder. This class with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) will help you to understand what addiction and opioids are, and where you can find authoritative information to understand this complex epidemic. The National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health provide resources for both the general public and health professionals to learn about opioid abuse and overdose prevention and treatment options.

Feeding the Whole Child: Full minds and full bellies, all free at the library – August 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – What does it take to get your library or non-profit involved in the Federal Summer Food Service Program and other food insecurity efforts? What are some strategies to help ensure the success of your program, and how can you get your community engaged? Get answers to these and more questions of your own in this informative and interactive session with the Greater Midwest Region (GMR).

Unconscious Bias: Perceptions of Self & Others – August 21, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Our lived experiences are the tools we use to interpret the world around us. Join this webinar with the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and take some time to notice how you perceive yourself and others. This is the second installment in a series of webinars about diversity, equity, and inclusion for health sciences librarians.

Inclusive Graphic Medicine: Communication, Collections and Community – August 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – The emerging field of graphic medicine provides opportunities for health sciences librarian involvement at many levels. Collection development, health literacy, medical education, and promotion of resources for patient-provider communication are some of the relevant areas where librarians participate in the use of comics in healthcare and medical education. In this webinar with the MidContintental Region (MCR), three panelists will discuss their experiences with graphic medicine.

Libraries Connecting Communities to Vaccine Information & Resources – August 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – With vaccines being in the headlines recently, it is likely many of your library patrons are wondering if they, their children, or family members are up to date with immunizations. This webinar with the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) will provide practical information, resources, and tools for public library staff to help empower and inform their communities around vaccines. The presentation will also equip libraries to help their patrons speak with their pharmacist and other members of the care team about vaccines as well as additional health information needs.

Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-being of LGBTQ+ Populations – August 22, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – LGBTQ+ individuals face many barriers in accessing healthcare, including discrimination, lack of access, misunderstanding, and fear. As a consequence, many LGBTQ+ individuals do not regularly access appropriate and timely care. The more informed healthcare professionals are, LGBTQ+ patients and clients will become more comfortable in an environment that is often alienating, disrespectful, and traumatic. This class with the New England Region (NER) will discuss cultural competency, health information needs, and information resources for working with LGBTQ+ patrons.

Are You Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources for Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe – August 28, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the New England Region (NER), get ready for September and National Preparedness Month with this webinar that highlights NLM disaster health information and other emergency preparedness resources for community educators, families, friends and caregivers. This class will also include resources for special populations and those with special needs.

NNLM Delivery – August 28, 2:30-3:15 PM ET – The Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) is upgrading MARDelivery, our free document delivery service that has been offered to NNLM Members in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware for over a decade. Not only have we upgraded to a fresh look and feel for existing MARDelivery users, but this free service will soon be extended to Members across the entire National Network of Libraries of Medicine! Join us for this brief information session about our new-and-improved document delivery platform, NNLM Delivery.

September 2019

Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship – September 4, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information. In this one-hour webinar with the NNLM Training Office (NTO) and NLM Office of Engagement and Training (OET), librarians will reflect on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support.

Biomedical & Health Research Data Management for Librarians – September 9-November 15, 2019 – This collaborative online course offered by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to data issues and policies in support of developing and implementing or enhancing research data management training and services at your institution. The course topics include an overview of data management, choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset, addressing privacy and security issues with data, and creating data management plans. Participants are eligible for up to 32 MLA CE, dependent upon the number of modules completed.

“Seeing” your Search: Visualization Techniques for Exploring PubMed Search Results – September 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – In this webinar with the Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA) presenters will use visualization methods to explore the aggregate qualities of PubMed results. Techniques such as Venn diagrams and line charts can yield important insights into a search by giving us an overview of our results at a glance. You will also see how using these techniques in an interactive way can help guide the process of refining a search strategy.

Getting Started with Information Outreach in Your Community: An Introduction – September 12, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR), this class will provide a background in cultural competence and outreach skills for librarians making outreach efforts to underserved, underrepresented minority populations in their community. The goal of this course is to offer concrete ideas that will enable librarians to initiate outreach programs with these populations. Topics include locating community demographics, the importance of developing relationships, the basics of building and developing community-based partnerships, recognition and acceptance of cultural differences, and the importance of cultural competency.

A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals – September 17, 18, 20 & 24, 2019 – Sponsored by the National Library of Medicine, this webinar for librarians and other information professionals will preview the new, modern PubMed with updated features including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You’ll also learn about features that are still under development, and find out how to give NLM your feedback on the new system. The new PubMed, currently available at PubMed Labs for testing, will be the default PubMed system in early 2020.

ECRI Guidelines Trust – September 18, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Medical librarians are one of the largest user groups of the ECRI Guidelines Trust. So why not take advantage of all the Trust has to offer in terms of evidence-based clinical practice guideline content? Join this webinar with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) to hear directly from the creators of the Trust and learn how this guideline repository can facilitate your searches for up-to-date clinical practice guidelines. They will take you on a tour of their site’s content and capabilities, and share latest search features and enhancements developed with a librarian audience in mind.

Cooking Classes without a Kitchen – September 24, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Cooking programs are a great way to provide nutritional and health information to patrons, as well as celebrate cuisines from different cultures. They’re also a lot of fun and very interactive opportunities where patrons can learn from each other. However, not every library is fortunate enough to have a kitchen programming space. This webinar with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) will explore some ideas for how a library without a kitchen can still provide great food programs for their patrons.

New classes on-demand! Looking for more self-paced learning opportunities? Check out MedlinePlus for Public Librarians. This aysnchronous, hands-on, narrated tutorial explains why MedlinePlus should be the first choice for public librarians when answering health information questions.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well-Drawn, exhibition and lecture – Visit the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System for the exhibition “Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well-Drawn,” an exploration of presenting personal illness narratives and health information through comics. The exhibition is free and open to the public during normal library hours from August 19 to September 30. To complement the exhibit, Dr. Jay Hosler will give a lecture on the art and science of science comics on August 27 at 11:30am (refreshments provided).

HSRProj Back to School Webinar: How to Search, Communicate, and Disseminate Your Research – August 21, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by AcademyHealth through the HSRProj program, this introductory seminar explores effective search, communication, and dissemination strategies and provides an overview of resources publicly available through the National Library of Medicine for public health and health services and policy researchers to use in their work.

Troubleshooting Systematic Reviews: Refining the Search – September 5, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – How do you refine a systematic review search to make sure you are capturing articles that meet your eligibility criteria? How do you troubleshoot a search that is failing to retrieve known articles significant to your topic? How do you revise searches based on researcher feedback? How do you compare strategies for capturing additional articles? Join Margaret Foster and Sarah Jewell for the second of two webinars that address these and other troublesome questions that librarians interested in consulting on systematic reviews will want to answer. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

AJPH Call for Proposals: Special Issue about Health Misinformation on Social Media – The American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, intends to publish a special issue focusing on research that can help us better understand and address the proliferation of health misinformation on social media. If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send an extended proposal to Ms. Anna Gaysynsky, Assistant Guest Editor, at Anna.Gaysynsky@nih.gov by 11:59 PM ET on Friday, August 30.

OpenCon 2019 in Philadelphia, PA – Join Temple University on November 1 for OpenCon Philly, a free one-day series of panels and interactive workshops for idea exchange and learning around open access, open education, and open data. Connect with regional colleagues and find future collaborators as you share success stories, learn from each other’s failures, and discuss challenges in your work towards making research, educational materials, data, and government information more equitable and accessible to all. This event is free and open to all. RSVP to stay in the loop and be notified of the call for presentations! A registration form will be forthcoming closer to the event.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – August 16, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-08-16 10:54

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars August 20 

Webinars August 21

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Training Office Announces New MedlinePlus Training

PSR News - Thu, 2019-08-15 20:22

The NNLM Training Office recently announced a new online, on demand, training opportunity: MedlinePlus for Public Librarians.

MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health web resource for the public on all things health and medical related. Need information on a disease or condition? A drug, herb or supplement? A medical or diagnostic test? A healthy recipe? Health information in another language? MedlinePlus has you and your library patrons covered. Produced by the National Library of Medicine and written for the general public, MedlinePlus offers trusted, current and ad-free health information, anytime, anywhere, for free.

The MedlinePlus for Public Librarians class is a free, one-hour interactive tutorial that helps you deep-mine the depth and breadth of information found on this key resource so you can provide your patrons with solid health and medical information. The class is eligible for the Medical Library Association’s Consumer Health Information Specialization and approved for one (1) continuing education credit. Upon completing the tutorial, you may print a certificate of completion. And, because this tutorial is on demand, it’s available 24/7 – just like MedlinePlus!

Please note the following content disclaimer for the course issued by the NNLM Training Office (NTO): “MedlinePlus is always updating! Some content may have changed since the publication of this tutorial. Subscribe to the MyMedlinePlus Weekly Newsletter to stay informed, or contact the NTO with questions.”

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

AAHSL and NLM Announce 2019/2020 Leadership Fellows and Mentors

SEA News - Thu, 2019-08-15 14:04

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries and the National Library of Medicine (https://www.nlm.nih.gov) are pleased to announce the members of the 2019/2020 class of the NLM/AAHSL Leadership Fellows Program. The jointly sponsored program matches fellows and mentors in a one year leadership development program.  Since the program began in 2002, 54 percent of fellow graduates have assumed director positions.

The NLM/AAHSL Leadership Fellows Program prepares emerging leaders for director positions in academic health sciences libraries. The program provides a combination of in-person and virtual learning experiences for fellows and offers the opportunity to work collaboratively with the cohort of participants. Fellows are paired with mentors who are academic health sciences library directors. Mentors work closely with their fellows throughout the year, and host their fellow’s visit to their library.

The candidate pool for fellows and demand for the program remain strong. Selection is competitive and recognition of a substantial record of leadership accomplishment and potential for a director position. The cohort includes five fellows and their mentors, who will begin their work together at the November AAHSL meeting in Boston.

Information about the program is available at:

https://aahsl.memberclicks.net/leadership-fellows-program


2019/2020 Fellows and Mentors:

Marisa L. Conte, MLIS, AHIP, Assistant Director, Research and Informatics, Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Mentor:  Kelly R. Gonzalez, MSIS, MBA, Assistant Vice President for Library Services, Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Emily Jill Glenn, MSLS, Associate Director, Education & Research Services, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE.

Mentor:  Anne K. Seymour, MSIS, Director, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University & Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Emily J. Hurst, MSLS, AHIP, Deputy Director and Head of Research and Education, VCU Libraries, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.

Mentor:  Rose L. Bland, MA, MPA, AHIP, Director, Shimberg Health Sciences Library, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

Gail M. Kouame, MLIS, Assistant Director for Research & Education Services, Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library, Augusta University, Augusta, GA.

Mentor:  Rick L. Fought, EdD, MLIS, AHIP, Associate Professor and Director, Health Sciences Library, University Of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN

Erika L. Sevetson, MS, Director of Academic Engagement for Health, Biomedical and Physical Sciences,  Brown University Library, Providence, RI.

Mentor:  Debra Rand, MS, AHIP, Associate Dean for Library Services, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and Corporate Director of Libraries for Northwell Health, Hempstead, NY.

Categories: RML Blogs

MARDelivery is Getting an Upgrade!

MAR News - Thu, 2019-08-15 12:25

The Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) is upgrading MARDelivery, our free document delivery service that has been offered to NNLM Members in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware for over a decade. Not only have we upgraded to a fresh look and feel for existing MARDelivery users, but this free service will soon be extended to Members across the entire National Network of Libraries of Medicine!

Join us for a brief information session on Wednesday, August 28 at 2:30 PM ET to learn about our new-and-improved document delivery platform, NNLM Delivery. All active MARDelivery users are strongly encouraged to attend this session, to learn how it will impact existing accounts and stored files.

This webinar will provide:

  • A brief overview of NNLM Delivery, including its purpose and requirements for use
  • A demonstration of how to use the product for document delivery and retrieval
  • Information for existing MARDelivery users on transitioning to the new NNLM Delivery platform

If you are interested in NNLM Delivery but cannot attend the live webinar, you can still register to receive a notification when the recording is available on the NNLM YouTube channel.

Categories: RML Blogs

Kindling Health Topics through Kindles

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2019-08-15 11:14

Today’s guest post is from one of the NNLM PNR Mini Outreach awardees. Pam Thompson, Branch Manager of the Calispel Valley Library, in Cusick, Washington, reports about their project where Kindles were purchased and loaded with books and information on relevant health topics to their community.

Our Mini Outreach award was entitled; Health Topics on Kindles. We purchased three Kindles, with pre-loaded titles each one featuring a different topic.  Fruits and Vegetables and Alzheimer’s disease and titles from the NNLM Book Club were the three subjects we chose.

To get the word out about the availability of these Kindles, we planned two programs, one on site at the library and one off site. We also had articles in the paper and a feature on our web page and Facebook. The library displayed flyers at all of the branches, as well as the local post offices, hospital and medical clinic.

On May 1, 2019 we had our onsite library program. Health Day at the Library was staffed by two library staff members and a staff member from the SNAP – Ed, a nutrition awareness service. We had several stations set up for patrons to circulate. A Virtual Reality machine on loan from the State Library was loaded with a program on the human body and was put in use by the participants. The SNAP-ED staff brought healthy snacks and also led people in chair yoga exercises. Our 3D machine was on display, demonstrating its use. We also had a digital microscope hooked up to a laptop and people could experiment with this. We handed out book bags and brochures and exhibited the use of the Kindles. One benefit of the program was a new collaboration with SNAP-ED and we were able to continue our partnership in a later program we had in the spring. We had over 20 visitors which is about 10 percent of the town’s population.

The second program, on May 7th was a visit to the local food bank. Our partner was the Senior Citizen Specialist from our local Rural Resources agency. We had tables set up outside the building of the food bank and had our program a half hour before the food bank officially opened. This was in order that people could peruse the information and talk to us without the distraction of trying to get their food supplies at the same time. Book bags, brochures and information about health coverage was handed out, the Kindles were exhibited, and I talked about the program, the grant, and resources available through our library. Our partner had a great deal of information about health programs and resources available through Rural Resources. Literally every person that visited the food bank that day also visited out table.

The Rural Resources specialist and I made plans to continue this outreach program several times a year. Moreover, we collaborated on a program that is taking place this summer at the library, a Tai JI Quan class for balance, targeting senior citizens and those who have problems with mobility.

My recommendations for anyone who would be interested in having health topics available on Kindles is to be sure you are in an area where there is interest in having E-readers. Also to consider is how to display the Kindles. This means not only the packaging, but also where you are going to house them in the library. Since the Kindles are expensive, it is not something that can be far from the watchful eye of a staff member.

One idea is to make an empty dummy of the Kindle, with bright colors and shelve it along with other books on the subject. When patrons bring up the dummy, we would then be able to procure the actual Kindle for check out. So far our circulation of the Kindles has only reached eleven check outs, but we expect that to increase as we move the devices for circulation among our other branches and experiment with displaying it with the books as previously described.

Overall the Health Topics on Kindles grant has been a great experience. It has made opportunities available to have health programs in the library and off site. It has brought us valuable partners in the community with common goals and has furthered one of our district’s missions, to promote health communities. With a little bit of tweaking, the use of the Kindles will gain traction and I’m grateful to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for making this project possible.

Categories: RML Blogs

Member Highlights: Upstate Health Sciences Library, Syracuse, NY

MAR News - Wed, 2019-08-14 08:00

NNLM MAR is pleased to share successes of health outreach projects and activities in our region. Learn what your amazing colleagues are doing to increase access to quality health information for the communities they serve.

Inspire Upstate

The Clinical Outreach team at Upstate Medical University, Health Sciences Library sought to expand their community programming to include youth-focused education. The team contacted existing partner PEACE, Inc. PEACE is Onondaga County’s federally designated Community Action Agency. The team has a successful programming history with PEACE, including: PEACE staff education days, a health expert speaker series focused on health concerns, and adult health literacy education sessions. When it came time to select community partners, the success of popular ongoing education programs with PEACE made them an ideal choice. In February of 2018 PEACE leaders met with the Upstate team to discuss population specific needs, concerns, and aspirations. With the feedback from PEACE, the team developed a three-day summer program for Syracuse City School District with the purpose of increasing their knowledge of hospital-based professions, and developing their interest in pursuing a healthcare career. They call this program Inspire Upstate.

Inspire Upstate Clinical Outreach Team and participantsInspire Upstate Goals: The first Inspire Upstate camp was held in July 2018, and again in July 2019. It is a three-day summer program for Syracuse City School District middle-school aged youth. This unique camp combines health literacy education; hands on sessions with clinical and academic teams; and tours of hospital spaces. Inspire Upstate has four goals:

  1. Locate and identify quality health information on the internet
  2. Increase knowledge of hospital-based professions
  3. Inspire the next generation of Syracuse residents to pursue a hospital career
  4. Begin a positive relationship and gain familiarity with different people you may encounter at the hospital

Health Literacy: The cornerstone of the program is daily health literacy education provided by Medical Librarians. Librarians followed the National Health Education Standards for 6-8th graders when creating the learning outcomes for their section of the program. In the first session, Librarians focus on what separates quality health literature from questionable health information. The next day, youth are encouraged to select a health topic interesting to them, and find quality health literature on their topic. They create ‘zines to share information on their topic with friends and family on the last day of the program. One remarkable youth indicated her interest in puberty on her intake survey. She pursued the topic and completed her ‘zine on pads and tampons. It was a big hit with many of the others!

Inspire Upstate participant learning CPRHands on experience: Inspire Upstate is filled with movement and interactive activities. Youth put on clean suits for a tour of the Upstate Stroke Center, they are shaken by a mucus-loosening respiratory vest, they sing “Baby Shark” while learning about compression timing in CPR, and use stethoscopes to listen to each other’s heartbeat.

Healthcare Connection: The last goal of Inspire Upstate is to give the youth a sense of familiarity with how the hospital works, and who they may encounter on their next hospital visit. The camp accomplishes that goal by featuring Upstate healthcare providers, and other hospital workers each day. Upstate staff discuss what they do on a day to day basis, why they picked the field, and what education they needed for their role. In the past two sessions, presentations were done by Physical Therapists, Music Therapists, Respirational Therapists, Art Therapist, Nurses, Doctors, Environmental Service staff, Security Officers, and Admissions Professionals. Every camp ends with an Upstate student panel so that youth can ask questions, and get a better understanding of healthcare education.

Did it work? Inspire Upstate met the four goals it set out to accomplish! Youth are able to separate quality from questionable health literature after three days of Librarian-led discussion. Success was also determined by survey instruments completed throughout the program. Surveys showed participants could identify a greater number of healthcare professions at the close of camp, each adding an average of 2-3 to their original list. Doctors, Nurses, and Janitorial staff were the three types of professions youth were most familiar with before the camp. After camp, surveys included Librarians, Respiratory Therapist, Physical Therapists and even Phlebotomists! One in three participants switched their perspective and became interested in a future career in healthcare after meeting with clinical and academic staff. Those who knew they were interested in a healthcare career before camp began expressing more specific ideas about what type of job they would pursue. The written responses to open ended survey questions also gave the team insight into what makes the program work. “When I heard ‘summer camp’ I thought of woods, cabins, and spending the night. This was WAY better,” one student reflected. Other youth indicated that they were surprised they had so much fun, and expected that the program was going to be boring. Plans have begun for expanding the program from one to three camps in summer 2020.

Inspire Upstate participants in mesh gowns and hair caps

Want to learn more about Inspire Upstate? Read about it in a featured article on the library’s website, “Inspire Upstate, a health professions camp, spotlights health careers, education for city youth,” or contact Olivia Tsistinas, Clinical Outreach Coordinator, via email: tsistijo@upstate.edu or telephone: (315) 464-7200.

Categories: RML Blogs

August NIH News in Health newsletter now online

MCR News - Tue, 2019-08-13 16:41

Check out the August 2019 edition of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. Download a PDF version for printing.

Period Problemsillustration of a woman talking with her doctor.

Fibroids, Endometriosis, and Other Issues

Getting your period is a fact of life for most women. But every woman’s period is different. How do you know if yours is causing problems that it shouldn’t?

Bulging Veins

What to Do About Varicose Veins

Do you have bluish-purple or red veins popping out on your legs or face? Varicose veins aren’t just a cosmetic issue. If they aren’t treated, they can also cause health problems.

Health Capusules

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Webinar on September 4: Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship

PSR News - Tue, 2019-08-13 13:52

A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information. Bioinformatics research advances in such areas as gene therapy, personalized medicine, drug discovery, the inherited basis of complex diseases influenced by multiple gene/environmental interactions, and the identification of the molecular targets for environmental mutagens and carcinogens have wide ranging implications for the medical and consumer health sectors (Rein, 2006). Register for this one-hour webinar on Wednesday, September 4, 11:00AM – 12:00PM PDT, presented by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and the National Center for Biotechnology Information to hear reflections on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support.

Facilitator:

Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine.

Guest Speakers:

Kumru E. Kastro, MS, MI is the Liaison Librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, and first-year Engineering at Drexel University. Kumru is responsible for building library collections and teaching information and research skills to faculty and students.

Elliott Smith, MLIS is the Emerging Technologies & Bioinformatics Librarian at UC Berkeley, where he currently supports the students and faculty of the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Integrative Biology. He received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Master of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University.

Jean-Paul Courneya, MS, is a bioinformationist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Health Sciences and Human Services Library. JP is the information resource specialist for biotechnology, bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, next-gen sequencing, molecular and cell biology bench research, and data management for research.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM Webinar: Are You Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources for Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe

MCR News - Tue, 2019-08-13 12:49

When: Wednesday, August 28, 2-3pm eastern (1-2pm central/noon-1pm mountain/11am-noon pacific)

Description:

Get ready for September and National Preparedness Month with NLM disaster health information and other emergency preparedness resources for community educators, families, friends and caregivers. Resources for special populations and those with special needs are highlighted.

Continuing Education Credits: 1 (including Consumer Health and Disaster Information Specializations)

Objectives:
Participants will be able to:

  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness information for consumers/public
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness for special populations
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness for those with disabilities
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness mobile Apps for consumers/public

For full details and to register: https://nnlm.gov/class/are-you-ready-essential-disaster-health-information-resources-keeping-your-loved-ones-safe-2

For questions, please contact Sarah Levin-Lederer (sarah.levinlederer@umassmed.edu)

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming Webinar: Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship

SEA News - Tue, 2019-08-13 10:32

Date: Sep 4, 2019, 2:00PM – 3:00PM ET

Continuing Education: 1 CE from the Medical Library Association

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/reflections-bioinformatics-librarianship/16768

Description: A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information.  Bioinformatics research advances in such areas as gene therapy, personalized medicine, drug discovery, the inherited basis of complex diseases influenced by multiple gene/environmental interactions, and the identification of the molecular targets for environmental mutagens and carcinogens have wide ranging implications for the medical and consumer health sectors (Rein, 2006). In this one-hour Webinar, librarians reflect on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support. Dr. Bonnie Maidak of the National Center for Biotechnology Information facilitates.

Facilitator:

Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine.

Guest Speakers:

Kumru E. Kastro, MS, MI is the Liaison Librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, and first-year Engineering at Drexel University. Kumru is responsible for building library collections and teaching information and research skills to faculty and students.

Elliott Smith, MLIS is the Emerging Technologies & Bioinformatics Librarian at UC Berkeley, where he is currently supports the students and faculty of the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Integrative Biology. He received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Master of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University. When he’s not thinking about science he rereads Jane Austen.

Jean-Paul (JP) Courneya, MS , is a bioinformationist at the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library. JP is the information resource specialist for biotechnology, bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, next-gen sequencing, molecular and cell biology bench research, and data management for research.

For More Information: contact the NNLM Training Office, nto@utah.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar: Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship

MCR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 20:49

Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship
Date: Sep 4, 2019, 1:00PM – 2:00PM CT
Location: WebEx
Continuing Education: 1 CE from the Medical Library Association
Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/reflections-bioinformatics-librarianship/16768

A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information.  Bioinformatics research advances in such areas as gene therapy, personalized medicine, drug discovery, the inherited basis of complex diseases influenced by multiple gene/environmental interactions, and the identification of the molecular targets for environmental mutagens and carcinogens have wide ranging implications for the medical and consumer health sectors (Rein, 2006). In this one-hour Webinar, librarians reflect on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support. Dr. Bonnie Maidak of the National Center for Biotechnology Information facilitates.

Facilitator:

Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine.

Guest Speakers:

Kumru E. Kastro, MS, MI is the Liaison Librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, and first-year Engineering at Drexel University. Kumru is responsible for building library collections and teaching information and research skills to faculty and students.

Elliott Smith, MLIS is the Emerging Technologies & Bioinformatics Librarian at UC Berkeley, where he is currently supports the students and faculty of the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Integrative Biology. He received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Master of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University. When he’s not thinking about science he rereads Jane Austen.

Jean-Paul (JP) Courneya, MS , is a bioinformationist at the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library. JP is the information resource specialist for biotechnology, bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, next-gen sequencing, molecular and cell biology bench research, and data management for research.

 For more information contact the NNLM Training Office, nto@utah.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Webinars: New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals

MCR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 20:43

Get ready for a new PubMed!

In this webinar for librarians and other information professionals, you will preview the new and modern PubMed with updated features including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You will also learn about features that are still under development and find out how to give us your feedback on the new system. The new PubMed, currently available at PubMed Labs for testing, will be the default PubMed system in early 2020.

This webinar will be repeated for several sessions so that we can answer your questions. Please sign up for only ONE session.

Date and time: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm EDT

Register for your preferred session at: https://nnlm.gov/classes/new-pubmed-highlights-information-professionals

 

Need a quick tour of Labs? See also the NCBI Minute “A new PubMed is on its way!”

Date and time: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 at 11:00 am – 11:45 am EDT

To register, go to: https://bit.ly/2Tbk3gk.

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Webinar, “New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals”

PSR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 19:51

Get ready for a new PubMed!

Register for this webinar on Tuesday, September 17, 8:00 – 9:00am PDT, designed for librarians and other information professionals, to see a preview of the new and modern PubMed with updated features, including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You will also learn about features that are still under development and find out how to give feedback on the new system. The new PubMed, currently available at PubMed Labs for testing, will be the default PubMed system in early 2020. This webinar will be repeated for several sessions so that all questions are answered. You only need to sign up for one session.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Musings of an Aspiring Science Librarian By Amanda Doughty

NER News - Mon, 2019-08-12 17:38

This is the third blog post in a series authored by several individuals who received scholarships to attend the and the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians. In this installment, a scholarship recipient, Amanda Doughty, a library student describes the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians.  For more information about upcoming research data management classes, webinars and events please visit the NNLM Data Driven Discovery Website and the  NNLM NER website.

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Musings of an Aspiring Science Librarian

By Amanda Doughty

          The 11th Annual Science Boot Camp for Librarians initially seemed like a chance to learn some new information, network a bit and enjoy the beautiful host campus of the University of New Hampshire. The fact that I also was honored to receive a scholarship to attend was an unexpected bonus! I never would have imagined though, the value and immense amount of knowledge, insight and connections I would gain from those few days in Durham, NH.

         I should preface this by stating that I am not (officially) a librarian. I just completed my 1st year as an MLIS student at Simmons University. Truth be told, I think I may have been the only library student attending boot camp this year! However, from the moment I walked on campus and joined the Ocean Engineering Lab tour with other boot campers, I felt a sense of belonging. In fact, that is one of many things that I quickly realized about this profession: Science Librarians are INCLUSIVE. Making others feel safe and comfortable, both in a library or information setting, and in daily living, is at the heart of these librarians and what they do. And this was echoed again and again starting with when I arrived to check-in, my name badge had a space for preferred pronouns. When the first session began, the Librarians Code of Conduct was reviewed. This code included laying out of expected behaviors by attendees, bystander intervention, the reporting process and support information. Additionally, those on the planning committee with blue “Code of Conduct” pins were always open and available to discuss concerns or incidents one might have witnessed or experienced. The topics on Social Justice also echoed the Science Librarians’ obligation and responsibility for inclusion on all fronts. Sofia Lemons demonstrated that social justice is critical in promoting equity, empowering those who have been historically excluded, and dismantling and replacing systems of privilege and oppression. Sofia also specified the means in which artificial intelligence and computers can, in fact, be biased and what one can do to combat this. One of the resources discussed was the Algorithmic Justice League (www.ajlunited.org), which aims to advocate for a world with more inclusive and ethical AI. As Science Librarians, Sofia encouraged all of us to start making changes in our own lives, personally and professionally, and to push for accountability when social justice is lost. Creating and enforcing codes of conduct (such as the one outlined at Boot Camp) are helpful tools for fostering inclusion and change.

         Science Librarians are also immensely SUPPORTIVE. The quantity and variety of patrons in which those in the profession assist is incredible! From students to scholars to communities and more. I was hopeful that this Boot Camp would help pinpoint and shed more light on the everyday tasks of a Science Librarian, but what I quickly learned is that this list would probably be too long to even measure! During the Remote Sensing session, Michael Palace defined remote sensing as the act of looking at things without touching them. Some examples of this would be drones (AKA unpersonned aerial systems) or satellites. With the amount of information created from one of these remote sensing tools, the data flow can be overwhelming. The scientists have a goal for the use of this information, and the science librarian can assist with data storage and sharing (creative commons), as well as DOI (Digital Object Identification). Librarians also aid in finding data sources and help with metadata for the project. In this same Remote Sensing session, Philip Browne and Barry Rock described their trickle-down concept in which data is collected and analyzed using science, which is peer-reviewed to produce information, which is shared with the public (cue the Science Librarian!) to ensure survival, ultimately leading to a sustainable human civilization in a natural world. In addition, this session gave me a bunch of interesting, inspiring and free tools and websites for future use, such as Google Earth Pro (https://www.google.com/earth/versions/#earth-pro), Journeys In Film (https://journeysinfilm.org/), the Wayback Machine (https://archive.org/web/) and the Trillion Trees campaign (https://www.trilliontreecampaign.org/).

         One of my favorite parts of the boot camp was the second Social Justice session presented by Elena Long. This session was very hands on and proved to me another characteristic of science librarians: They are INGENIOUS! The very definition of such a person is to be clever, original, and inventive, and that is exactly what was challenged of us. Elena was needing our help addressing the publication name change dilemma. As it stands now, there is no great answer to update a person’s name once something has been published. There is no way to easily change an author’s published name without referencing a past one. The issue is particularly challenging for transgender people who have transitioned, because linking to a previous name may leave that person at risk for exclusion by others. As a group, we did come up with some ideas. The first of which involves using ORCID (www.orcid.org) to publish everything in the future, in which case the author is assigned a unique number and not a name at all. The second really involves establishing a culture change – connecting, organizing and advocating for change. The hope is if we, as science librarians, can be accepting and inclusive of everyone, this will have a ripple effect and impact others around us. When that day comes, the publication name change will not even be an issue!

         At the end of my few days of the Boot Camp, I was exhausted mentally and emotionally from all I had learned and everyone I met in such a short period of time. Now that I have had the chance to reflect on my experience, I am even more inspired to become an inclusive, supportive, and ingenious Science Librarian myself! I am so thankful to have had this opportunity and look forward to becoming a part of this amazing community.

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For more about data science or other upcoming events, please visit the NNLM Data Driven Discovery Website and the  NNLM NER website, or contact anyone in the NNLM NER office.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

New NNLM PSR Office Manager: Keisha Williams!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-08-12 16:14

Hello Everyone! I’m Keisha Williams, the new Office Manager for the NNLM PSR. I’ll be coordinating the office workflow for the region.

Keisha Williams

My background is in the fast-paced travel healthcare industry where I worked in the housing capacity as a team lead and in credentialing as a specialist. In my housing role I oversaw the daily functions of the housing specialist team, ensuring that our travel healthcare professionals had housing established in various and often remote locations all over the country. We serviced all of their travel and housing needs so the only concern for the travelers was to pack a suitcase, travel and arrive at work without the daunting tasks of relocating. After working in housing for several years, I moved into the credentialing side of travel healthcare. I worked very closely with the travel healthcare professionals to ensure all the facility and state credential requirements were met prior to their start.

More recently I worked within the entertainment industry for a talent agency in the contract administration department. I performed client data management and contract administration ensuring that buyers were meeting their contractual obligations to the clients. Working in this capacity I participated in several volunteer outreach opportunities and realized I wanted to do work that was more in service to the public and meaningful to me personally, as healthcare education very much is.

I’m very excited for my new role as Office Manager with NNLM Pacific Southwest Region. As I am new to the UC system my main focuses are to master the various systems, learn the UCLA policies and procedures, support the training and outreach team, and take care of the office’s accounting and operational needs. Additional fun tidbits about me include a BA in Cinema and Television Arts. I love the art of storytelling, visually and written. I’m currently all in to The Handmaids Tale; that’s my must-watch TV! My creative outlet is writing. I’m a mom to two daughters whom I adore. I’m originally from San Diego so authentic Mexican food is my vice and fills my soul with comfort.

I look forward to working with you all and learning even more about the NNLM and how I can support the organization. Please feel free to reach out and give me a shout!

Ciao for now!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

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