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RML Blogs

Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-02-02 20:00

The reason we have cancer and heart disease is the same reason you can’t get rid of the wear and tear on your tires on your car: as soon as you use them, you are wearing them away. You can’t make eternal tires, and it’s the same with the human body.                                                                                                         – S. Jay Olshansky, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions.

When the Words Suddenly Stopped by Vivian King l Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart by Phoebe Chi l Restart Your Heart by Aseem Desai

In Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart: A Personal Guide to Taking Control of Your Health While Living with Chronic Conditions, Dr. Phoebe Chi seeks to empower those with chronic diseases of all types, including heart disease and high blood pressure, in the self-management of their conditions. The internal medicine and public health physician does so with practical exercises and tools in each chapter to address symptoms, even throwing some poetry into the mix.

Restart Your Heart: The Playbook for Thriving with AFib by cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. Aseem Desai clears up some of the confusion surrounding atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can interfere with blood flow. In addition to providing knowledge about AFib, Desai discusses how to deal with the diagnosis from a mental and emotional perspective.

Finally, in When the Words Suddenly Stopped, former television broadcast journalist Vivian King describes her experience recovering from a stroke that took away her voice, sharing how determination bolstered by a reliance on faith, family and friends allowed her to recover.

Strengthening your heart knowledge can help strengthen your heart. We hope these books will provide you an opportunity to do both. Visit the NNLM Reading Club for discussion guides to these titles and other useful information.

The post Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) for Libraries Part 2: The Library Match Game

SEA News - Tue, 2021-02-02 13:38

We all hope that by the end of the summer 2021 the COVID-19 pandemic will mainly be behind us, and the large bandwidth that the pandemic has taken up over the past year can be used for pressing needs that may have taken a back seat. One of those needs is disaster planning. While there is a vaccine to assuage the impact of a pandemic, there is no antidote for the personal and economic devastation from events that disrupt the provision of core library services, such as an earthquake, hurricane, tornado, or civil unrest. It is essential for all libraries to resume planning for disasters, which includes knowing how to respond to a disaster, how to develop partnerships with local emergency planners, and how to find a backup library to mitigate the impact of a disaster.

On Wednesday, February 10 at 1 PM ET/10 AM PT,  join us for Part 2 of the Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) for Libraries series that provides attendees with the awareness and tools necessary to face disasters of any kind. Hosted by Dan Wilson from the University of Virginia, Part 2 will answer attendee questions that arose while writing their COOP, and match libraries from the northwest with similar libraries in the southeast who can potentially partner as a backup library. If you missed Part 1 or would like to review the information, a recording of the session is available at: https://youtu.be/xi8M1zeGXKs

These sessions are intended for members of the PNR & SEA regions: AK, AL, DC, GA, FL, ID, MD, MI, MT, NC, OR, PR, SC, TN, USVI, VA, WA, and WV. Participants from other regions are welcome to attend, however, we may be less likely to match you with a COOP partner.

After attending both sessions, participants are eligible for 4 MLA CE credits. This class is also eligible for Disaster Information Specialization continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association.

Part 2 Registration: https://nnlm.gov/ZuF

For questions, please contact Liz Waltman

The post Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) for Libraries Part 2: The Library Match Game first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: February 2, 2021

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-02-02 10:54

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

New Guide from the NNLM: Substance Use Disorders
The Network of National Library of Medicine’s Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Initiative aims raise awareness of National Library of Medicine’s Substance Use Disorders resources and the resources of partner organizations. ​As part of this initiative, Network of the National Library of Medicine staff launched a new guide to information on Substance Use Disorders. The guide links to free and reliable online resources for …read the blog to learn more about the guide

Self-Learning Source: AHA’s Interactive Cardiovascular Library
February is American Heart Month. It’s a good time to start taking steps to improve your health. (Remember those New Year’s resolutions?) Consider also taking some time this month to get better acquainted with heart health. The American Heart Association has an interactive cardiovascular library called “Watch, Learn and Live”. Through text, animation and graphics, viewers can learn about over 20 topics related to heart health…learn more about this interactive tool on the blog

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open”: Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data – its management, preservation, sharing, use and re-use, and more. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.” At four 30 minute “coffee chat” sessions on Monday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data. Each session is from 10:00 – 10:30 a.m. PT. Please register separately for each session

  • February 8: Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training
  • February 9: How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response
  • February 10: Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications
  • February 11: If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation: Join us for a 1-hour moderated panel discussion featuring the NNLM Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” sessions four guest speakers who will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more. February 12 from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

NLM’s History of Medicine Division: A Research Collection of Rare Medical Materials: The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) History of Medicine Division has one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of historical material related to health and disease. In this session you will learn how the History of Medicine Division approaches acquisition and conservation; discover hidden treasures in the collection and get to know how to access this vast resource. Most importantly, you will see how such collections remain relevant in a world concerned with data science, health care to diverse groups, and reacting to pandemics. February 24 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library: In this Caring for the Mind webinar, participants will learn how to effectively provide mental health information at their libraries. Participants will learn about the best electronic resources to consult as well as ways to improve their print collections. Best approaches for handling interactions with emotional patrons will also be discussed. March 16 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Launching and Leading the Librarian Reserve Corps: Developing an agile librarian network in response to COVID-19: This is a presentation on librarian visioning, leadership, management, and trial by fire. It provides a unique perspective on launching and leading an international network of librarian volunteers in a new role: emergency responders in the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn how Elaine Hicks lead an international team who ushered the Librarian Reserve Corps (LRC) into reality. Nearly a year later, the LRC continues to provide expertise and guidance on a myriad of scholarly communications issues concerning COVID-19 research. Elaine, Stacy Brody, and Sara Loree were awarded Library Journal’s 2021 Librarians of the Year in recognition of their important work. April 21 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated. 

Coverage to Care: How to Use Your Health Coverage: From Coverage to Care is hosting a partner webinar and will be joined by our HHS colleague to discuss the newly updated HealthFinder website! Join us to hear about ways to educate consumers about their health coverage and how to empower them to take action and make the most of their coverage.  February 4 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register 

STEM, Health, and Mental Health (National Girls’ Collaborative Project): How can STEM programming promote a healthier lifestyle? How does spending time in the great outdoors make you feel? Join a panel of speakers from the Alliance for a Healthier Generation and Gateway to the Great Outdoors as they share ways to connect physical and mental health to STEM learning. February 9 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

COVID-19 Vaccination Policies: What to consider? (Indiana State Library): Are you wondering what to consider in forming your library’s policy on COVID-19 vaccinations? This webinar addresses the legality of mandatory vaccine policies during a pandemic and examines the pros and cons of such policies to help you determine which type of COVID-19 vaccine policy to propose to your board. February 18 at 7:00 a.m. PT. Check the calendar for a link to register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*“Health Data Standards: A Common Language to Support Research and Health Care”, from the NLM Director’s blog

*COVID-19 Web Collecting: Reflections at One Year

*“Following COVID-19 Vaccines Across the United States”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*NIH Director: Collaboration Amid Chaos, and Biden’s First 100 Days (Track the Vax podcast)

*Watch as Vice President Kamala Harris receives her second dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine at the NIH Clinical Center

*Janssen Investigational COVID-19 Vaccine: Interim Analysis of Phase 3 Clinical Data Released

The February issue of NIH News in Health includes articles on lowering cancer risk, eating for a healthy heart, and the truth about the benefits of chocolate

AI Tools Provide Picture of Cervical Health

The Cancer Moonshot: A Midpoint Progress Update

Bold Predictions for Human Genomics by 2030, a new series about the bold predictions from the 2020 Strategic Vision, learn more about this 10 part series and register

Employment may slow memory decline for women

*Severe COVID-19 in pregnancy associated with preterm birth, other complications. NIH-funded study suggests mother-to-infant transmission appears to be rare

National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities celebrated 10 years as an NIH institute: A Year in Review and a Path Forward

FYI:

*COVID-19 Resources

Health Campaign: Mil Gracias for Not Smoking Indoors!
The Mil Gracias (a Thousand Thanks) for Not Smoking Indoors amid COVID-19! public health campaign from Salud America! at UT Health San Antonio helps people share gratitude for smokers who respect others’ air by reducing exposure to secondhand smoke indoors. Visit the Mil Gracias website to download English and Spanish fact sheets and news about the health impacts of secondhand smoke, the need for smoke-free multifamily housing and resources to help smokers quit if they are ready.

Publication: Understanding and Living with Glaucoma
This free, 40-page booklet, published by the Glaucoma Research Foundation, provides information on the different types of glaucoma, how to detect and treat glaucoma, tips on speaking and working with your eye doctor, and how to adjust your day-to-day activities to take good care of your eye health. English Booklet (PDF) Spanish Booklet (PDF)

Announcing Essential Graphic Medicine: An Annotated Bibliography
Funded by an ALA Carnegie-Whitney grant, which supports the preparation and publication of reading lists and other bibliographical aids, Alice Jaggers and Matthew Noe have been developing this tool since early 2018 as a way to aid library workers in the development of graphic medicine collections. Learn more and access the annotated bibliography on the Graphic Medicine website.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: February 2, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

SCR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 17:09

 

The following guest blog post is provided by NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network in collaboration with Sarah Lucero. We always love to share what libraries around our region are up to! Read below to learn about ABOS and Sarah’s experience at this year’s virtual conference.

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, one South Central Region scholarship recipient outlines her favorite moments, and what she took away from the ABOS conference.

Sarah Lucero, Programming and Outreach, Nicholas P. Sims Library (TX)

This was my first year to attend the ABOS conference. I learned about ABOS in early spring of 2020 and when I saw that a conference would be held in Dallas I immediately applied for the Carol Hole Award. I was delighted to find an organization that focuses on outreach!

ABOS did not disappoint! I chose to attend multiple sessions that concentrated on children and senior citizens outreach; which is the primary focus of my position and my community programming.

I particularly enjoyed seeing how other Outreach Services were revamping and modifying how to do outreach in a new way; and discussing with fellow attendees what has and has not worked for us.

Overall, I learned there is a huge community of like-minded people who are just as passionate about serving our local communities as I am. I eagerly await next year’s conference.

Thank you to Sarah for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post.

To learn more about ABOS, please click here.

To learn more about The Carol Combs Hole Conference Attendance Award, click here.

Check out the Nicholas P. Sims Library in Waxahachie, TX here.

 

Remember to like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on Blogadillo.
Categories: RML Blogs

More News and Announcements

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2021-02-01 17:09

NLM announces Outside Inside: Immigration, Migration, and Health Care in the United States, a new online exhibition

Outside/Inside primarily features items from the NLM historical collections and explores the history of ideas about immigrant health and immigrants’ and migrants’ experiences with U.S. health care since the late 1800s.

NLM Musings from the Mezzanine: Nursing and Libraries – Powerful Forces in Motion

NLM joins the Nation in celebrating Black History Month. Libraries play an important role in ensuring equity of access to information.

New MEDLINE Website and Policy Updates

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) launched a new MEDLINE website that provides a consolidated location for information regarding MEDLINE policies, history, statistics, and the MEDLINE journal selection and review processes.

NLM Launches a New Online Exhibition – Making a World of Difference: Stories About Global Health

This new online exhibition recognizes the 50th anniversary of The Darkening Day, an NLM exhibition on the health aspects of environmental pollution, which opened at the library in 1970.

New NIH COVID-19 Website

NIH announced a new NIH Spanish COVID-19 site featuring information on testing, treatments, vaccines and clinical trials, The site also highlights NIH COVID-19 resources about addiction, mental health, prevention and more.

DOCLINE Customer Service Transition

On February 12th, NNLM transitioned support from the National DOCLINE Coordination Office (NDCO) to NLM. Instead of contacting the NDCO for customer service assistance Network Members will need to contact the NLM Support Center by filling out a Write to the Help Desk ticket.

NIH News in Health

Check out the February 2021 issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue, topics include lowering your cancer risk, chocolate health claims, dementia, DASH food plan, NIH COVID-19 research, and much more!

The post More News and Announcements first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Identifying and Combating Health Misinformation Webinar Series 2021

MCR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 16:05

Understanding Vaccine Hesitancy and Social Media’s Role in Spreading Vaccine Misinformation

 Vaccine hesitancy has been a longstanding issue, even before the coronavirus pandemic. The growth of vaccine hesitancy in recent years is most commonly attributed to the anti-vaccine movement. Social media is often at the heart of this conversation as a tool used to spread vaccine opposed information and to connect vaccine-hesitant people with each other. This webinar aims to give an overview of understanding vaccine hesitancy, both around childhood vaccines and the COVID-19 vaccine, and how social media has facilitated this movement.

Learning objectives:
1. Understand why someone is vaccine-hesitant or “anti-vaccine”
2. Understand how social media (e.g., Twitter, FB, etc.) has influenced the growth of vaccine hesitancy
3. Identify the next steps going forward to solve the issue.

Speaker:
Kolina Koltai studies how groups’ use of sociotechnical systems affects decision making and information behavior. She researches information-seeking behaviors, trust assessment of information (and misinformation), and decision making with a focus on when people dissent from the scientific mainstream (e.g., vaccine dissent). She specifically focuses on how social networking sites and digital communities interact with information behavior practices around health and science. Koltai received her Ph.D. in Information Studies from the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin and is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for an Informed Public at The University of Washington.

Class Date:

Region/Office: National, MCR
Mar 1, 2021
11:00 MT/ 12:00 CT

Continuing Education Credits: 1

Register here

Vaccine Webinar Graphic

The post Identifying and Combating Health Misinformation Webinar Series 2021 first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Love Data Week 2021

MCR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 15:38

Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM (led by the RDM Working Group) is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”

At four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions on Monday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data.

Registration for “coffee chats” here: https://nnlm.gov/classes/love-data-week-spotlight-open

Registration for panel discussion here: https://nnlm.gov/class/love-data-week-spotlight-open-panel-presentation/30152

Love Data Week Graphic

The post Love Data Week 2021 first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

BLOSSOM: Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness

MCR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 15:34

A free virtual symposium for library staff focused on their health and wellness. This three-day virtual symposium will bring together experts on morale in libraries, invisible services in libraries, vocational awe, burnout, and self-care. The symposium will provide library staff at all levels, including management, with key takeaways to help improve the health and wellness of library staff. This event is open to library science students and all library staff regardless of employment status.

Save the Date! March 24, 25, 26, 2021. Enter your email address here to be notified when the website is up, and registration is available.

Save the date announcement

The post BLOSSOM: Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

MLA Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate

MCR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 15:26

Research Data Management on Demand LogoMLA recently announced the Data Services Specialization (DSS) certificate that librarians can earn to demonstrate their attainment of the relevant knowledge and skills necessary to provide data services.

Designed for health sciences librarians and information professionals and built upon the MLA Data Services Competency, the Basic certification requires the completion of 4 4-credit free Network of the National Library of Medicine courses. These courses cover 5 skill areas and are available on demand. An additional three credits in the five skill areas are required and several NNLM courses are listed on the NNLM Data Services Specialization page.

Registration for the NNLM courses is open. You can find more information about the DSS certificate, including cost, requirements, and skills on the MLA website.

The post MLA Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

DOCLINE Support Transitioning to NLM Support Center

MCR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 15:20

Starting February 12th, Network Members will contact the NLM Support Center for DOCLINE customer service assistance. When support is needed, complete a Help Desk ticket: https://support.nlm.nih.gov/support/create-case/.

The post DOCLINE Support Transitioning to NLM Support Center first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

SEA News - Mon, 2021-02-01 15:09

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, 3 Southeastern/Atlantic Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

——–

Nicole Klein, Community Engagement Librarian at Cobb County Public Library System (GA)

Nicole Klein sitting with her two dogsI’m still fairly new to working exclusively in Outreach—I’ve been in my current position just shy of a year—so this was my first time attending an ABOS conference. I was blown away by how interactive the folks attending the ABOS conference made it for themselves. The virtual format definitely made for a “make what you will out of it” experience this year and I was impressed to see how available and engaged attendees made themselves. As my supervisor has said, the folks that work in Outreach reach are a different breed of librarian and that was very evident to me, and wholly appreciated; it felt like discovering my people. We are looking at procuring a book bike at our library system and Ian Gosse’s presentation, “The Paperback Rider: The Five-Year Evolution of a Book Bike Service” was INVALUABLE.

Marlan Brinkley, Library Director of the McDowell County Public Library System (NC)

Photo of Marlan BrinkleyI had a great time attending the ABOS Conference this year.  Normally traveling costs prevent me from going to events like these, so I was glad for the opportunity to attend digitally. Recorded sessions were especially helpful, particularly when I wanted to attend two or more sessions all occurring at the same time. The videos have also been a great resource for when I needed to replay them and catch a product or vendor name I missed the first time.

One of my favorite sessions was Outreach Start Up provided by Beth Brown from the Muskingum County Library System. I was looking forward to it because my library system was finally at a point where we dedicate programs and services toward outreach. While we had successfully done some outreach in the community, I was wanting to hear from someone who created an outreach department practically from scratch. What worked well? What didn’t? We’re a small rural library system, so I was hoping to hear outreach tips that could be scalable to us. Fortunately, Ms. Brown provided great advice and a general outline of what we should consider as we grow our outreach department.

Here are the items I felt were particularly noteworthy:

  • The value of information gathering. What services are being offered where? Where are the gaps? What are our community partners (ex. Friends groups) doing?
  • Tip: imagine the policies you’re starting with are a blueprint- they’ll be adjusted to suit the needs of your community.
  • As we consider what policies we should implement, look at policies from other libraries as inspiration.
  • The ABOS listserv is a dependable resource for advice (which we already knew!).
  • We were introduced to Bed Bug Bags as a resource. I had no idea this was even a thing.
  • The value of keeping communication open between the homebound delivery recipients. I especially admired their efforts by writing letters to their patrons during Covid-19 closures.
  • As we look for opportunities to establish connections in the community, include public events such as festivals, parades, farmer’s markets. Bring a collection that matches the theme (ex. cooking, farming, and produce books for the farmer’s market).
  • Consider rebranding some services. Ex. was “homebound”, now called “house call.”
  • Finally, be an active member of the community by joining local groups and organizations.

Heather Ogilvie, Outreach Librarian, Bay County Public Library (FL)

Photo of Heather OgilvieABOS 2020 Virtual Conference: Outdoing Outreach was AWESOME. ABOS as an organization is a dynamic work group, and a brain trust, but most of all, ABOS is a community where everyone belongs.

[At the orientation] I found at the last minute, that, while I had been using the super-cool Whova App for days to learn about workshops, agendas, attendees, and contests, I didn’t know how to get into the actual conference! Turns out I was not alone. We were all wandering around in cyberspace. But within moments everyone began to appear in the ZOOM conference room.

Throughout the day, there were bookmobile videos from other libraries, showcasing their work. That was super interesting. Most bookmobiles on display are currently operating on curbside pickup only. The larger bookmobiles are staying home now, and the vans, cars, and bicycles are on the move.

All the sponsors made personal presentations. Ordinarily, I feel uncomfortable among the vendors… but in this environment, we were discussing products, services, and innovations, rather than what I could purchase. It was just interesting and not stressful!

This was my Ice Breaker for day one: I am currently teaching a class called Conversations that Matter: Tough Topics With Total Strangers. I think we can strengthen community resilience by increasing critical thinking and expanding our ability to find common ground.

I had discussion on this topic throughout the conference. So many libraries are interested in community conversations, deliberative dialogue, and other techniques, and were eager to learn how to get started.

Some of Heather’s favorite presentations included:

  • A session about a library that provides programming through outdoor activities.
  • A rural library’s work with connecting with patrons with dementia.
  • The Paperback Rider, a session about a book bike, and the librarian that provides services by riding the bike out into the community with giveaways and craft ideas.
  • Libraries Without Borders talking about their Wash and Learn initiative that reimagines what a library can by bringing popup library programming to laundromats.
The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Self-Learning Source: AHA’s Interactive Cardiovascular Library

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2021-02-01 12:56

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Significant contributors to heart disease include high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and high cholesterol.

February is American Heart Month. It’s a good time to start taking steps to improve your health. (Remember those New Year’s resolutions?) Consider also taking some time this month to get better acquainted with heart health.

The American Heart Association has an interactive cardiovascular library called “Watch, Learn and Live”. Through text, animation and graphics, viewers can learn about over 20 topics related to heart health. What’s nice about the interactive library is that plain text is used with the graphics while more detailed information is included on the left side-bar. The information is short segments and is easy to review as needed.

Some of the topics included:

  • blood pressure
  • cholesterol
  • stent
  • heart attack
  • hemorrhagic stroke
  • cardiac catheterization

Keep in mind, this is not meant to be a substitute for a doctor or professional advice or treatment. Schedule a time for a health check-up and talk to your doctor about cholesterol, blood pressure, and your heart health risks. In fact, let your doctor know that you are using this educational resource to learn more about your health.

The post Self-Learning Source: AHA’s Interactive Cardiovascular Library first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

GMR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 11:48

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, three Greater Midwest Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

 

Diane Bruson HeadshotDiane Brunson, Bookmobile Librarian, Bath County Memorial Library (KY)

The “Out-Doing Outreach” ABOS 2020 annual conference was held virtually this year, and the ABOS board did a fantastic job pulling together an online conference that saw over 1,000 people in attendance. I would personally like to thank the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) for sponsoring the award that allowed me to participate in this year’s conference.

So what did I learn at ABOS? Where do I begin?

I drive the bookmobile in a rural community in Eastern Kentucky. I’ve been interested in learning how to provide health information to my patrons and while we were closed to the public earlier this year, I took the opportunity to earn my Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) Level 1. I attended the NNLM and All of Us presentation and learned about the All of Us research program. I’ve installed the All of Us app on my phone and am hoping to promote this research program within my community. I’ve been exploring NNLM’s website for programming ideas that could be done virtually, via packet pickup from the library, or by bookmobile delivery service to patron’s homes in 2021 as my library does not expect to have in-house programming until 2022 at the earliest.

I attended several sessions that talked about working with elderly patrons, and the concept of Reminiscence kits. One of the neatest reminiscence ideas I came away with was turning pictures into 12 to 14 piece puzzles. What a great way to use items from our genealogy room and perhaps hear stories about our town! I may not be able to have in person programming right now, but I could create puzzle kits to drop off at the senior living facilities. The memories and stories all these activities elicit can build connections between people and help reduce depression while building self-esteem.

Ari Lazarus, from the FTC, did a presentation about fraud avoidance. He talked about all the resources available on the FTC’s website. I never knew the FTC has so much information available to libraries, even programming ideas.

I have lots of notes from the sessions I attended, but one of the greatest sources of information was the community chats. Anyone could post a question and within minutes receive dozens of replies. I serve a growing Amish community and asked for suggestions to expand the bookmobile’s collection of materials that other Amish serving communities find popular. I now have a page of authors, titles, and series I didn’t know about before.

I came away from the 2020 ABOS conference almost overwhelmed from the sheer amount of information I gathered. While we will have to wait and see what 2021 holds, I look forward to connecting with the ABOS family at the 2021 annual conference. See you in St. Louis! Or maybe virtually! However it takes place, I know I want to participate.

 

Anne Rhodes HeadshotAnne Rhodes, Outreach Librarian, Mansfield/Richland County Public Library (OH)

Initially, I was hoping to attend the 2020 ABOS conference in person in Dallas. I considered how wonderful it would be to be in a place with hundreds of other people who loved and understood the challenges and rewards of the Outreach department. Like many libraries, our Outreach department is very small and very few library staff members even know what we do. It seemed like a dream come true to be surrounded by rooms full of my peers. Then Covid 19 hit and I knew that our library administration wouldn’t approve the travel during such an uncertain time.

When I got the news that the conference would be virtual, I had high hopes, but thought it might be lame. We’ve all sat through those webinars where the technology isn’t great, the speaker kind of drones on and it’s really difficult to engage. Why would I want to endure four days of that? Plus, we all know that some of the best moments come from those “hallway” conversations where we all talk about horror stories, fun programs that are working in our community and the special joy that comes from those personal interactions with the public. We’re Outreach people, by our very definition we love the interactions! What’s a conference without the personal touch?

Somehow, the organizers of “Out-Doing Outreach” managed to bring the personal experience to a virtual venue. Right from the start, presenters reached out to me with individual messages that made me feel part of the conversation and the sponsors were engaging and seemed like they were talking directly to me. It was nice to be able to sit at my desk and travel to the various booths. If I wasn’t interested, it was easy to click away and not feel rude.

It was even easier to engage. It can be intimidating to approach a group of people who all seem to know each other, but with this format you could virtually butt in and it wasn’t awkward. The “communities” were wonderful and it was enlightening and fun to toggle back and forth between topics and see what others were saying. It was also easy to contribute and get your thoughts together in writing rather than trying to speak in front of a group.

The sessions I attended were insightful and engaging. From the ins and outs of bookmobiles, pop up programming and ways to keep track of our community impact, I was furiously taking notes and generating ideas that might work for my library. I learned about software programs that are worth the investment, how to implement a “couch to 5K” and got tips and tricks for attracting more people to our events. There were several times that I literally teared up hearing about the impact that Outreach programs are having around the world.

Another bonus was that I had access to programs that were scheduled during the same time slot. Often it’s very difficult to choose which program to attend at a given time. Sometimes I attend one session and then find out later that another one I had been thinking about was great. There is no FOMO in the virtual format!

It is such a bonus to be able to log in at my leisure and watch other presentations or even rewatch something that I found especially useful. Typically when I leave a conference, I’ve heard so many ideas and concepts that they are all jumbled up in my head. Now I can revisit the presentation and really absorb the content.

Despite the fact that we were “In” Doing Outreach rather than “out,” my conference experience was spectacular. The planning and work involved to make something like this happen was evident and the attention to detail was top notch. I sincerely appreciate the time that the organizers and presenters invested in making this an outstanding event. It couldn’t be easy or fun to be presenting to a screen rather than an audience.

I am truly hoping that the 2021 conference will be an in person event, but if it’s not, I have the utmost confidence that it will be informative, engaging and fun. I’ll miss the personal interactions but won’t miss the long lines for the bathroom.

 

Marcia Siehr HeadshotMarcia Siehr, Head of Outreach Services, Kenosha Public Library (WI)

2020 was my second chance to attend the ABOS National Conference, and once again, I was surprised and grateful for all the knowledge and contacts this conference allowed me to gain.

I am relatively new in my role as Head of Outreach Services at Kenosha Public Library, and even though I had a long career in social services before becoming a librarian, there are still so many community programs and organizations that I was not aware were available to my patrons.  Connecting with other professionals that strictly focus on Outreach is so valuable.

I’m really pleased to report that this year’s breakout sessions were terrific.  The subject matters and presenters were widely diverse, but I personally learned the most from the NNML breakout session.  Health literacy is a hot topic in the library world, and the NNML is truly an invaluable resource to an Outreach librarian.  I have plans, big plans, for 2021!  I would really like to offer the NNML Health Book Club to our patrons as a way to expand our offerings for health literacy. Additionally, I want to figure out how to launch an All of Us Kenosha County campaign and look at promoting additional citizen science activities for all ages using NNML SciStarter.

My deep gratitude to NNML for the scholarship opportunity offered to ABOS members.  I can honestly say that I did not understand the wealth of information your organization can offer to public librarians and outreach librarians such as myself.  I look forward to keeping up to date with everything NNML has to offer in the future!

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on Midwest Matters.
Categories: RML Blogs

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

MAR News - Mon, 2021-02-01 10:00

In October 2020, the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to COVID-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, two Middle Atlantic Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

Claire Williams, Marketing Coordinator, Huntingdon County Library (PA) Picture of Claire Williams

Claire Williams, Marketing Coordinator

I absolutely loved my first ABOS conference! While the format was new and different than anything I’ve experienced before, it was amazing to meet and talk to library staff from all over the world and hear about their experiences.

This was my first outreach-centric conference, and it was wonderful to hear about all the things people are doing. Our outreach department is still fairly new, and it was nice to get a sense of where we are relative to other libraries. Getting confirmation that the services we’re offering or developing are similar to what’s working in other rural areas, and that the struggles we’re facing are also faced by other libraries, was really energizing in a year that’s been discouraging.

I especially loved Chris Garnsworthy’s presentation, and the work they’re doing with seniors and those with dementia. It produced a lot of ideas for things we might be able to launch with our senior centers and residential facilities when we’re able to visit them again, once COVID restrictions are lifted and it’s safe to gather with them again.

Learning all the ways that libraries are pivoting in the face of COVID, and that we’re all really struggling through it together, was also encouraging. We’ve worked to develop ways to reach those we previously visited, but with the ever-changing landscape, it’s been difficult. Hearing what’s working, what isn’t and figuring out where we can fit those things into our community gave us a renewed sense of what we do.

I also really appreciated that the conference was able to address COVID so thoroughly, since it really has shaped this entire year for our outreach work, and will likely continue to shape it into 2021. The tips I learned, as well as the network of others that I got a chance to meet, will be invaluable going forward.

Sincere thanks to NNLM for this opportunity. I never would have learned about all these amazing resources and people without you!

Bridget O’Donnell, Reference and Adult Services Librarian, Poughkeepsie Public Library District (NY) Picture of Bridget O'Donnell

Bridget O’Donnell, Reference and Adult Services Librarian

As a recipient of the 2020 NNLM All of Us Health Outreach Award and a first-time attendee to an Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) Conference, I’m honored to have been invited to participate in the 15th-Anniversary Virtual Conference, “Out-Doing Outreach.” Despite an unexpected shift for the planning committee from an in-person conference to a virtual event and technological difficulties that could have happened even on a normal day (like synchronizing sessions from my laptop for the video and smart phone for audio), a high-volume of attendees and I were given access to a wealth of ‘evidenced-based’ knowledge and viable information in a welcoming and educational panel of open discussions.

How we got here…The assistant director and my supervisor initially brought this opportunity to my attention for two reasons. One, in 2018 I earned the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certification and continue to take NNLM/MLA webinars in order to update health-related resources and programs at our library. And two, the original launch date for the Roaming Rover Library, our new book mobile, was slated for the 2nd Annual Poughkeepsie Book Festival in April but had been set back due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, Rover had only been out a few times [the last week of September] so attending the conference [in October] would be a proactive step that could help facilitate Rover’s induction into the community.

Picture of Rover Roaming Library

When Rover first went out we had limited technology and no books available for checkout, but we were welcomed by the Dutchess County Tourism & Parks departments, the local farmer’s market, the Family Partnership health & family service organization and the Fresh Market store. While on site, English and Spanish-speaking library staff handed out fliers, bookmarks and swag and answered questions about the library. At one event community members were signed up for library cards. To help promote the 2020 Census, trained staff answered questions, tablets were connected to Rover’s Wi-Fi so visitors could submit their Census while at the book mobile and fliers were distributed with instructions to complete the census at home. Activity bags were handed out at a family movie night and a socially distanced Halloween event in one of the area’s recreational parks.

As we continue to introduce Rover to those with limited access, I believe our focus isn’t just to provide the library’s [health, self-help, fiction…and children’s] books and DVDs to the public but to listen to their interests and acknowledge their needs, an idea I heard often at ABOS. I’ve seen numerous times in the past where the public library is one place people trust and gravitate towards during crisis; Rover is the vehicle, literally, the library can use to meet people where they’re at and help more people in the community adjust to a new normal as safely as possible.

Benefits of attending ABOS and what’s next… With our fiscal year coming to an end, this is the perfect time to think ahead and focus on 2021, whatever it might bring. While reviewing notes from sessions I attended and presentation materials available in the WHOVA app, I’ll be looking for: areas to grow professionally; creative mobile solutions to common problems; suggestions for more obscure [local] venues and collaborations; and new healthy programs and services I can help coordinate and disseminate to the public that might surprise and educate them.

Thank you NNLM for realizing another valuable partnership with ABOS, and thank you to the ABOS planning committee for re-organizing the conference into a successful virtual event. It really was a pleasure meeting the ABOS Community and being a part of something that can help improve the quality of life and well-being for so many people.

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

MCR News - Fri, 2021-01-29 15:47

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, two MidContinental Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

 

Photo of Nancy Kishpaugh

Nancy Kishpaugh, Senior Services Coordinator, Independence Public Library (KS)

 

What did the ABOS conference mean to me? The ABOS conference was a gem that provided an opportunity for gathering to exchange information and learn from one another in a time of social distancing. I have attended many in-person conferences in the past and I found the virtual conference to be very effective, as well as cost saving.

The Whova app made it possible for me to attend as many sessions as I wanted by recording sessions, which I could replay later. I was able to exchange ideas with librarians across the country on topics of like interest and it was easier to find them than at an in-person conference. Speakers were excellent and handouts were available for all sessions. It was so much easier to find the sessions I wanted through the app and to switch to another one if I wanted.

I particularly enjoyed the NNLM All of Us: Opportunities to Engage with Your Community Around Health Information session. As a community center, a library is ideally suited to provide health information to many of the people who need it most: seniors and underrepresented populations. It is difficult to know who to trust when searching for information online and being able to guide people to reliable information is important. Providing health information patrons can rely on, obtaining speakers on health information topics, and engaging our patrons in the All of Us Research Program will be a rewarding challenge.

I am a senior and began my journey towards health information literacy and engagement by joining the All of Us Research Program. What better way to promote and reassure library patrons of the value of participation in this valuable nationwide project? By becoming part of All of Us, I hope to be able to educate and engage my library patrons as well.

 

Photo of Tami Hurst

Tami Hurst, Outreach Assistant, Olathe Public Library (KS)

 

This was my first time attending the ABOS conference. I have been a member of ABOS for a few years now, but have not been able to attend due to our library’s low travel budget. Although I would have preferred an in-person conference, the virtual option made it affordable for us to attend and I feel like it allowed others to participate who may not have been able to.  My co-worker and I presented twice during the conference. Our first topic was on how to do Tales and Travel Memories programs for people living with dementia. Our second topic was on using reminiscence groups with older adults. Both workshops were very well attended.  It was a learning process for us to figure out the technology aspect of presenting from afar.  Not being able to see the participants was strange too. The conference was very informative for us. I really liked the WHOVA app platform. I especially liked the chat rooms where I was able to visit with others who also work with seniors and talk about more specific issues and ideas relating to services and programming for older adults. I’ve already talked via email with some of these folks since the conference. One of the things I’ve loved about being a part of ABOS is how the members are so generous and kind and willing to share ideas and resources. It’s a very supportive environment. The folks at ABOS are extremely creative and dedicated to serving their patrons. I’ve learned so much from them! Another thing I liked about the conference was that all of the presentations were recorded so I could go back and re-watch ones that interested me or see ones that I had to miss. We got some great information and resources for future programming on Consumer Fraud from Ari Lazarus from the FTC. He shared a Powerpoint presentation that we plan to use in the future when we can do programming again. I got some great ideas from Sally Inglett from Meternally. We use the old Bi-Folkal kits a lot in our programming, so I was excited to learn that they are being updated.  I learned more about Alzheimer’s and dementia from Johanna Schultz and Shannon Nosbich in their presentation about creating dementia friendly communities. The presentation motivated me to work toward increasing awareness of dementia in our community in general and in our library system in particular. Overall, the conference was informative and motivating.  I’m grateful that I was able to attend and I look forward to attending next year in St. Louis.

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference

PSR Newsletter - Fri, 2021-01-29 14:48

In October 2020, NNLM financially supported 20 library staff across the country to attend the 15th annual Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services (ABOS) conference. Originally slated for Dallas, TX, the conference was retooled as a virtual event due to Covid-19. Most attendees agreed that there were actually benefits to the online format. NNLM All of Us presented at the conference and continues to work with ABOS on health outreach initiatives. Here, 3 Pacific Southwest Region scholarship recipients outline favorite moments, and what they took away from the ABOS conference.

Katie Ball, Special Projects Associate, Sacramento Public Library (CA)

woman smiling at the camera

Katie Ball

In my position at the Sacramento Public Library, I work in the Community Engagement Department, overseeing our Health Literacy and veteran related programming. In looking at all of the presentations at this year’s ABOS Conference, I was pleased to see so many offerings related to the work that I do. I appreciated the inclusion of workshops focused on serving the aging population. One of my current project centers around brain health and dementia education, and the workshops Tales and Travel Memories and Lifelong Learning for Older Adults and Those with Disabilities, Remember When: Reminiscence Groups with Older Adults, and Friends in Rural Places: Dementia-Friendly Community Initiative were particularly helpful. I have been eager to start a Memory Café program in our system, and the information from the Tales and Travel and the Reminiscence Groups workshops provided great outlines for potential activities that would appeal to caregivers and those who are living with dementia. The workshop, Roll Call! How Libraries Can Serve the Veterans Who Served Our Country, was helpful in brainstorming how to connect with veterans in the community, how to utilize volunteers for veteran related programming, and how to work with veteran focused organizations in my area. I look forward to using the information learned to grow programs for our veteran patrons.

This was my first ABOS Conference experience and I hope it won’t be my last. For the first virtual version of this conference, I thought it was well-executed, manageable, and engaging. I gathered many resources, including contacts at other libraries, helpful websites, and ideas for how to improve our programming. Being new to the library field, I appreciated the opportunity to immerse myself in this arena and learn from others who have created successful community programs in their systems.

Jennifer Siron, Senior Librarian of Engagement and Outreach at the Los Angeles Public Library (CA)

woman wearing eyeglasses smiling at camera

Jennifer Siron

The 2020 Virtual ABOS conference was my first time attending any ABOS conference. I found it to be well planned and executed, and I am so grateful to have been selected for the Carol Hole award so I could attend this year. The workshops were informational and very inspiring. As we are navigating through these uncertain times, it was comforting to hear we are not alone, and many systems are working hard toward continuing library service to our communities.

Sharon Coronado, Coordinating Librarian, Adult Services, County of San Luis Obispo (CA)

The 2020 ABOS Conference “Out-Doing Outreach” was In-credible! Since NLM sponsored my attendance, this award freed up opportunities for other staff to attend. All of us were ABOS conference first-timers. There were nine outreach staff from our library system who attended the conference. Everyone was excited to attend and came away with new ideas for outreach. Attendance also introduced staff to ABOS and they are now part of the listserv information sharing community.

Our library was awarded a CA State Library “Bringing the Library to You” grant. This grant award will help us to outfit a mobile library to visit senior care facilities. The Adult Services Department will schedule lobby stops to senior care facilities where we will bring resources to seniors to browse and checkout. Senior health care and telehealth resources will be a vital component to complement our outreach services. One major takeaway from the session NNLM & All of Us: Opportunities to Engage with Your Community Around Health Information was the community collaboration piece. The suggestions of local agencies to partner with will help to expand these efforts to serve seniors where they are. The impact this will have will be twofold: Adult Services librarians will become aware of vital resources to share with our communities when performing outreach throughout the county; and our library system will contribute to the All of Us project goal to help speed up medical research.

We hope to implement the NNLM Health Kiosks program into our branches in the future, and we plan to participate in the NNLM Reading Club. We will include our county public health department in bringing a holistic health experience in 2021 and beyond, including hyper local resources and book discussions in line with the National Health Observances calendar.

Additional valuable information from All of Us presentations was the exposure to UBR or Underrepresented in Biomedical Research populations. These are the communities that libraries strive to serve, and we are now able to spotlight health programs specific to this demographic with a more clear understanding of resources available and challenges that these communities face. We are excited to get started in bringing resources that lead to the overall wellbeing of our communities. Thank you, NLM!

The post Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – January 29, 2021

SEA News - Fri, 2021-01-29 10:19

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars February 2 – February 9

Webinars February 10 – 17

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – January 29, 2021 first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2021-01-29 07:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://covid19.nih.gov/

Love Data Week: This February 8-12, in celebration of International Love Data Week, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.” The event will feature four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions with guest speakers throughout the week and a moderated panel discussion with all speakers on Friday. Registration is now open for each session.

Focus Group Opportunity: The Game of Health was developed to provide public libraries with a fun interactive game to introduce patrons to trusted health information resources. NNLM has been approved by the All of Us Engagement Team to develop and pilot the digital format of the Game of Health. If you work (or have worked) in public libraries and are available to participate in a virtual focus group, please reach out to Michael Balkenhol (mab602@pitt.edu) for more information. Stipends are available.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

Living on the Data Fringes: Making Sense of Competencies – MCR News

Creating Healthier Communities through Health Literacy – MCR News

CHES Continuing Education from the Network of the National Library of Medicine – MARquee News Highlights

GMR Funds Two New COVID-Focused Outreach Awards – Midwest Matters, from GMR

New Guide from the NNLM: Substance Use Disorders – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

MLA Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Instructor Training from The Carpentries and NNLM: The NNLM Training Office (NTO) invites applications to participate in online Instructor Training from The Carpentries (Data CarpentryLibrary Carpentry, and Software Carpentry). This highly-sought after training is the first step in becoming a certified instructor for The Carpentries. Instructors organize and teach Carpentry workshops to spread data literacy and programmatic skills both locally and globally. Workshops will be held online March 2-5 from 12:00-4:00 PM ET. To apply: Please complete the Instructor Training Application. In the Application Type, select pre-approved registration and enter NNLM2021 as the registration code.

NLM/NIH News

NIH Launches New Website on COVID-19 Research: NIH recently launched a website that provides trusted, up-to-date, and accurate information about COVID-19 research at NIH and the agency’s role in the pandemic. The site will serve as a central location for all NIH COVID-related content including funding and information on vaccines, treatments, and testing.

Health Data Standards: A Common Language to Support Research and Health CareNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Following COVID-19 Vaccines Across the United StatesNIH Director’s Blog

Nanoparticle Technology Holds Promise for Protecting Against Many Coronavirus Strains at OnceNIH Director’s Blog

COVID-19 Web Collecting: Reflections at One YearCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NIH to Advance Nutrition Research in All of Us’s First Ancillary StudyThe All of Us Research Program

NIMHD Envisioning Health Equity Art Challenge 2020 – National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

NLM Launches a New Online Exhibition – Fifty Years Ago: The Darkening Day

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced the RxNorm January monthly release.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

February 2021

Concrete Recommendations for Cutting Through Misinformation During the COVID-19 Pandemic – February 2, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Self-Care During Stressful Times – February 3, 12:00-1:00 PM ET

NIMHD Director’s Seminar – Where Clouds Meet the Ground: Democratizing Health Data to Address Community Health Equity – February 4, 2:00-3:30 PM ET

Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community for Public Libraries – February 8-March 7

Love Data Week: Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training – February 8, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

Love Data Week: How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response – February 9, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

The Power of Public Health-Public Library Collaborations: Examples from Iowa Libraries – February 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

SCR CONNECTions: Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Community – February 10, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Love Data Week: Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications – February 10, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” – February 11, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

A Conversation on COVID-19 Vaccine with Dr. Anthony Fauci & the American-Muslim Community – February 11, 1:30-2:30 PM ET

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation – February 12, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles – February 15-March 26

Effective Health Communication and Health Literacy: Understanding the Connection – February 16, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Serving Library Users with Mental Illness: A Crash Course on Controlling Clashes – February 17, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Getting Started with Creating RNA-based Medicines by Solving Puzzles – February 18, 6:00 PM ET

Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information – February 22-March 22

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community – February 23, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Ethics and Bias Mitigation – February 23, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

NLM’s History of Medicine Division: A Research Collection of Rare Medical Materials – February 24, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizen Scientists – February 25. 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Ask Questions About Creating RNA-based Medicines by Solving Puzzles – February 25, 6:00 PM ET

March 2021

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – March 1-26

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – March 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: Introduction – March 4, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: Selection – March 11, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Librarian WikiWisdom Forum – Library of Congress’ Kluge Center

Women Making Gains in STEM Occupations but Still Underrepresented – United States Census Bureau

A Conversation on COVID-19 Vaccine with Dr. Anthony Fauci & the American-Muslim Community – February 11, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – Sponsored by American Muslim Health Professionals

Introduction to Evaluating Public Datasets using FAIR Data Principles – February 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

2021 Virtual Forum for Migrant and Community Health – March 22-26, 2021 – Sponsored by the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH), North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA), and Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA)

SOPHE 2021dX Annual Conference – April 6-9, 2021 – Sponsored by SOPHE

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

Living on the Data Fringes: Making Sense of Competencies

MCR News - Wed, 2021-01-27 17:19

Organizations are striving to become data driven as they realize that data is becoming a mission critical topic. Finding, wrangling, analyzing, and managing data can require advanced computation skill sets. However, not everyone wants to be a data scientist, data analyst, or what the EDC Oceans of Data Institute calls a ‘data practitioner’. All members in an organization, no matter what their job, should have an appreciation of the scope of data, an awareness of how data is used in the organization, as well as, some basic data literacy skills. Striving to become data savvy should not be limited to those with science jobs who work with data on a daily basis. It is a competency that is also found in areas such as business, the social sciences, and even the humanities. We all need to understand how data is integrated into our lives. It would be helpful for someone diagnosed with a serious disease and researching at a public library to know how to interpret statistics about treatment and care options. Students in k-12 and up to the college level need to know how to find and interpret data as they conduct research in their classes. Humanities researchers might need to know how to do text mining to analyze a text corpus. But how do we know if we are data literate or competent in data skills? One way is to look at data competency models and find areas that you can relate to your daily work situation. What do you already know and/or do already? What competency areas do you need or want to learn more about?

Competence wordcloudLet’s start with the definition of a competency. A competency is a collection of knowledge, skills and behaviors that together demonstrate effective work performance in a particular area. It is a visible application of knowledge and behaviors. For example there may be managerial/leadership competencies, technical competencies, or functional competencies related to particular disciplines or job tasks. A competency does not equal a skill (although both are action-oriented). A skill may be one of the components of a competency, or several skills may be part of one competency. This competency concept is also important in k-12 and higher education where it is called competency-based education (CBE).

Now, thinking about data competencies, I believe the best approach to using competencies is to look at a variety of competency models or frameworks to better understand the expectations for knowledge, skills and behaviors related to your work position or desired job.  Many of the published competency models overlap, and you may be surprised to learn that your professional organization may have already established some data competencies for your role or position. Different competency models or frameworks might also overlap, so try looking outside of your specific area for more general competency areas such as research, communication, and collaboration. Use the competencies you find to guide personalized data professional development. What competency areas are you comfortable with? Which ones do you need to learn more about? You can combine the competency components that best fit your particular work situation, and use that as guide a build a professional development plan. The competencies can be a way to focus your learning and reflect on how to level up your data knowledge and skills.

Here are a few models to review and reflect on and find focus areas for your professional development:

So enjoy reflecting on your librarian role and how you can expand your competencies! It will help you articulate your strengths and skills and make a better case for your impact on the library and community.

Image: Gerd Altmann from Pixabay 

The post Living on the Data Fringes: Making Sense of Competencies first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Creating Healthier Communities through Health Literacy

MCR News - Wed, 2021-01-27 16:32

The goal of NNLM is to provide health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and the public with consumer health materials that help them make informed decisions about their health. One way NNLM does this is by promoting health literacy. Being health literate informs people how to calculate the right medication dosage, communicate with healthcare providers, interpret test results, and locate and evaluate health information.

Kiara Comfort, Education and Outreach Coordinator, for Mid Continental Region in Nebraska worked with Creighton University’s Porto Clinic at the Heart Ministry Center to create a way to promote health literacy to its patients. We discussed what would best fit their patient’s needs. This included materials that could be easily read and available in a variety of languages to serve its diverse community.

It was decided upon to get a consumer health information kiosk with MedlinePlus for its clinic. The kiosk was modeled after the All of Us health information technology kiosk. MedlinePlus is a robust consumer health information tool that is available in Spanish, provides easy to read materials, and is available in many languages. Genetics Home Reference is now integrated into its website as well as links to ClinicalTrials.gov. There are also resources that give patients access to a variety of health topics, information about drugs and supplements, and tips to maintain a healthy lifestyle. The consumer health information kiosk will be a tool that will help patients be proactive in making decisions about their health.

The post Creating Healthier Communities through Health Literacy first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

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