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RML Blogs

Upcoming NNLM Course for Public Library Staff: Libraries as Partners in Healthy Communities

PSR News - Wed, 2020-01-29 17:01

WebJunction is collaborating with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to design a series of courses for public library staff related to health topics. In March, the free, two-week, instructor-led course, Libraries as Partners in Healthy Communities, will be presented in two live, online sessions, on March 3 and 10, from 11:00 am-12:00 pm Pacific Time, with two additional hours of readings and assignments for learners to complete on their own. Participants will also be encouraged to share ideas and learning with others enrolled in the course through active discussion forums. The course will explore how libraries can actively partner to promote the health of their communities through responsive programs and services, and how to incorporate this focus into the library’s strategic plan. Enroll today!

Public libraries around the country are magnifying the role they play as key contributors to community health. By understanding the health needs and challenges specific to their communities, libraries are able to respond with relevant services and programming, often created in collaboration with local agencies and health providers.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

ClinicalTrials.gov Updates Procedures for Quality Control and Posting Procedures

PSR News - Wed, 2020-01-29 16:44

On January 1, the National Library of Medicine implemented updates to ClinicalTrials.gov procedures for posting results information submitted for applicable clinical trials (ACTs). ClinicalTrials.gov is a resource maintained by NLM that provides the public with standardized, up-to-date information from sponsors and investigators about their ongoing and completed clinical studies and results. Listing of a study on ClinicalTrials.gov does not reflect endorsement by the National Institutes of Health.

Consistent with 42 CFR Part 11, the updated procedures allow NLM to publicly post submitted results information within 30 days of submission, regardless of whether the quality control (QC) review process has been completed. Only studies meeting the following criteria are posted under these updated procedures:

  • Is an applicable clinical trial
  • Has a study start date that is on or after January 18, 2017
  • First submitted results information on or after January 1, 2020

Posted study records with results information that have not completed the QC review process are identifiable by a prominent note on the study record and brief QC review comments indicating the location where there may be apparent errors, deficiencies, or inconsistencies. These submissions with QC review comments are accessed from the Results Submitted tab of the study record. When the QC process has concluded, the study record is posted without the note and QC review comments.

All previously posted versions of the study record are available through the ClinicalTrials.gov Archive, including versions with QC comments. The Archive can be accessed through the History of Changes link on a study record. The Results Submitted field has been added to the Advanced Search page, allowing searchers to find study records based on whether the study sponsor or investigator has submitted summary results information and if submissions with QC comments are available.

For further information, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Announces New PubMed Training Webinars and Toolkit!

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2020-01-28 14:50

NLM has announced the new webinar series, How PubMed Works, as the best way to get up to speed on how the new PubMed works and how to use it. Registration is available now for the first round of sessions in March. The series will take the place of some previous classes, like PubMed for Librarians. Each session is 90 minutes long.
screenshot of New PubMed Trainers' Toolkit

New PubMed Trainers’ Toolkit


Also newly released is the PubMed Trainer’s Toolkit, which will house the recordings of the new PubMed webinar series. It also includes all of NLM’s new PubMed instructional resources, such as a two-page printable factsheet with PubMed basics. It also provides a link to newly updated online training modules for PubMed Quick Tours.

Stay tuned for further developments! New banners have gone up on every legacy PubMed page, strongly urging users to switch to the new interface before it becomes the default later in the spring. NLM will continue to issue more communications, including additional webinars, blog posts, social media updates, and other messages, encouraging more users to switch to the new system.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

DataFlash: Learn More About Citizen Science in 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-01-28 13:49

Citizen science is happening all around you! Citizen science is an amazing way to participate in research efforts, and it can often be done from a mobile device, from one’s home, or from a library.

On February 24th, 2020, NNLM will be hosting a class called National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizen Scientists; participants will learn how to support citizen science in their communities and ways that libraries can participate. Participants will learn about citizen science library program models, free National Library of Medicine resources to incorporate into citizen science library programs, and sources of funding to explore for buying testing kits or supporting community research efforts. Citizen science library programs are perfect for all ages, and all types of libraries.

Class Information:

National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizen Scientists

February 24, 2020  @ 11PT/12MT/1CT/2ET

Instructor: Zoe Unno

1 MLA CE Credit

Categories: RML Blogs

Help Shape the Future of the nnlm.gov Website: Respond by February 29!

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2020-01-28 13:02

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine is gathering feedback from current users of the NNLM website to inform future planning for website development. Your feedback matters! If you have visited the website to look for training or funding opportunities, find resources on health topics, update your Membership record, order free materials, or even to contact us for assistance, we want to hear about your experience. Please provide your feedback by completing a brief survey about the features and functions of the website. The survey will be open through February 29.
screenshot of NNLM Website Feedback Survey

NNLM Website Feedback Survey


In addition, any recent applicant or recipient of NNLM funding is invited to complete a brief survey about the funding content on the website to relate your experience and provide unique insight into the features and tools related to our funding opportunities. This survey will also be open through February 29.
screenshot of Funding Section of the NNLM Website Feedback Survey

NNLM Website Feedback Survey for Funding Section


We greatly appreciate your valuable input toward improving nnlm.gov!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Upcoming SEAside Webinar: Framing the Future of Partnering with Your Community

SEA News - Tue, 2020-01-28 12:58

Date: Wednesday, February 12th, 2020

Time: 2pm – 3pm ET

Description: Discover how to engage and create long lasting partnerships with community members while disseminating consumer health information. This webinar will discuss the difference between engagement and outreach, building trust within your community to support impactful collaborations, and creating and finding community engagement resources. We will also review and discuss key takeaways from several community health engagement initiatives including helpful strategies learned and finding positive aspects from events that did not go as planned.

Presenters:

Lauren Adkins (MLIS, AHIP) is the College of Pharmacy Liaison Librarian at UF HCSL. She is also the Liaison Librarian to UF’s College of Medicine’s Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Lauren has over five years of experience of developing, coordinating and implementing consumer health outreach initiatives, panels and programs.

Margaret Ansell (MLIS, AHIP) is the Nursing & Consumer Health Liaison Librarian and Associate Chair of Gainesville faculty at the University of Florida’s Health Science Center Libraries. She works with the College of Nursing and clinical nursing staff at UF Health Shands Hospital, as well as with the College of Health and Human Performance’s Health Education and Behavior department. Her area of research involves flattening the learning curve for privileged spheres of knowledge, such as research methodology, consumer health information, and governmental affairs.

Jane Morgan-Daniel (MLIS, AHIP) is the Community Engagement and Health Literacy Librarian at the University of Florida’s Health Science Center Libraries. She is also the Liaison Librarian to the College of Medicine’s School of Physician Assistant Studies, and the College of Public Health and Health Profession’s Rehabilitation Science Program and Departments of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy. Her primary research interest is understanding and meeting the health information needs of underrepresented and underserved communities.

Registration is free and can be accessed through the NNLM class instance.

For additional information, please contact Kiri Burcat.

Categories: RML Blogs

Save the Date: Call for Requests on NLM Traveling Exhibitions

MAR News - Tue, 2020-01-28 11:37

On February 3, the next Call for Requests opens for two traveling banner exhibitions: Rise, Serve, Lead! America’s Women Physicians, and, Rashes to Research: Scientists and Parent Confront the 1964 Rubella Epidemic.

Rise, Serve, Lead! highlights the lives and achievements of women physicians who have made a difference through their medical practice and research, work as activists, service as administrators, and mentorship to the next generation of physicians. Rashes to Research looks at the 1964 rubella epidemic, during which 20,000 children were born with serious heart, hearing, and vision problems related to rubella exposure during pregnancy. While the nation’s scientists rushed to create a vaccine and develop better screening tests, families faced difficult, complicated decisions about current and future pregnancies. Each of these exhibitions consists of six graphic banners.

Looking for more information? Read about how Exhibitions Connect can bring NLM resources into your community from NLM in Focus. Next, learn more about hosting an NLM traveling banner exhibition and get important details about the Call for Requests process.

You can find a curated collection of health information resources, training and promotional materials related to the Rise, Serve, Lead! and Rashes to Research exhibitions in NLM/NNLM’s free Exhibitions Connect Moodle course – log in with your NNLM account and use the enrollment key, “connect” to access these materials. If you are new to NNLM trainings, you can create a free NNLM account in less than 5 minutes to access this course.

Categories: RML Blogs

The Data Privacy Puzzle

NER News - Tue, 2020-01-28 10:26

On Friday January 17th,2020 NEASIS&T held it’s annual winter conference aptly titled, The Privacy Puzzle: Piecing Together Patron Privacy, Data Efficiency, and the Modern Web. The theme was privacy and protecting personal information.  The first keynoteCallan Bignoli, the Library Director at Olin College, was very thought provoking.  Her talk was titled  “Troublesome Tech Trends: Libraries in the Age of Surveillance“. The second Keynote speaker was Michael Leach, the Head of Collection Development at Cabot Science Library at Harvard University, was titled “Control: Giving People Authority Over Their Personal Data – A Library Perspective.”  Both talks and the following discussion highlighted the dilemma we face every day about the risks to giving up our right to control our personal information. There is the struggle of balancing our personal information versus the potential benefits from giving it up, knowing or unknowingly, to use a tool to make our lives better or easier.  The positive thing to remember is that for libraries and other stewards of information, privacy is not only a familiar conversation, but also a professional responsibility that requires us to be vigilant and proactive. It is important to be aware and to ask questions such as:

  • How can we balance protecting our privacy when it is inextricably linked to technology?
  • How should we handle vendor products that collect information when logging in? 
  • When negotiating licensing can we work together with vendors to protect our patrons? 
  • How do we appropriately use patron data to improve services?
  • How can we balance patron privacy with patron preferences for speed and convenience? 

Currently there is no solution to this enormous privacy puzzle, although there are some things that can be done to improve control of our personal information. Right now in the age of the sharing economy and data capitalists, it is up to us to prevent companies from unfairly profiling or profiting off of our personal information.  The National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus has a tutorial for evaluating health information and a special section dedicated to privacy https://medlineplus.gov/webeval/privacy1.html that may be of help. Being aware and making out patrons aware, there are issues involved in the harvesting of personal information for profit, is a big step towards protecting our patrons right to privacy.

Categories: RML Blogs

New NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) System Released!

PSR News - Mon, 2020-01-27 16:12

As promised last month, reflecting its ongoing commitment to public access support at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and beyond, the National Library of Medicine has released a new NIHMS system. The new system streamlines the submission process, ensures the continued quality of manuscripts made publicly accessible, and gives authors and investigators more transparent options for avoiding processing delays. Anyone familiar with the former NIHMS system will find the basic steps of submitting, reviewing, and approving manuscripts for inclusion in PMC unchanged in the new system. There will be an updated user interface that simplifies the login process for returning users; provides contextual help throughout; and offers user-friendly options for importing article metadata, requesting corrections, and taking over the Reviewer role for stalled submissions. Check out this four-minute video with highlights of the new system’s features. For questions, contact the NIHMS help desk.
NIH Manuscript Submission System Homepage

NIH Manuscript Submission System (NIHMS)

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Offers Resources on 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China

PSR News - Mon, 2020-01-27 14:35

The World Health Organization International Health Regulations (IHR) Emergency Committee met last week and determined that the Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak did not constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) at that time. They continue to closely monitor the situation and may meet again soon. In recognition of the public’s great interest in learning what is currently known about the virus and outbreak, NLM suggests the following information resources:

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Coronavirus Information

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2020-01-27 13:44

The following information is news from NLM’s Disaster Information Research Center (DIMRC) regarding the Novel Coronavirus. 

The WHO International Health Regulations (IHR) Emergency Committee met last week and determined that the Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak did not constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) at that time. They continue to closely monitor the situation and may meet again soon. In recognition that people are interested in learning what is currently known about the virus and outbreak, we have gathered the following information:

Additional information, regarding this outbreak, can be found on the NNLM blog, Bringing Health Information to the Community (BHIC)

Categories: RML Blogs

Registration Open for National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizens Scientists Course

MCR News - Mon, 2020-01-27 11:18

Are you interested in promoting citizen science projects at your library but unsure how to get started?  The National Library of Medicine is offering a class to help you get started.

Citizen science is happening all around you! Citizen science is an amazing way to participate in research efforts, and it can often be done from a mobile device, from one’s home, or a library.

In this class, participants will learn how to support citizen science in their communities and ways that libraries can participate. Participants will learn about citizen science library program models, free National Library of Medicine resources to incorporate into citizen science library programs, and sources of funding to explore for buying testing kits or supporting community research efforts. Citizen science library programs are perfect for all ages, and all types of libraries.

Course information

February 24, 2020

11PT/12MT/1CT/2ET

1 MLA CE Credit

Register here:

https://nnlm.gov/class/national-library-medicine-resources-citizen-scientists/20641

For more information , visit nnlm.gov to learn more.

Categories: RML Blogs

The Utah State Library Division’s Book Buzz is now offering NNLM Reading Club Book Kits

MCR News - Mon, 2020-01-27 10:40

Book titles on timely health topics are available for lending to local libraries and discussion groups under a new partnership between the NNLM MidContinental Region and the Utah State Library Division’s Book Buzz lending program.

Here are the details:

What is the Book Buzz?

The Book Buzz is a program that lends book sets to book clubs, book groups, libraries, organizations, schools, and community centers across Utah. Book sets contain 15 books that check-out for 56 days (8 weeks) and reservations can be made up to 1 year in advance.

What are the NNLM Reading Club Book Kits?

Each kit contains a “ready-to-use” title along with free and downloadable materials designed to help libraries, schools, community organizations, and other groups support health information needs in their communities. The book club enables readers to discuss health and wellness topics relevant to them as well as discover NIH National Library of Medicine consumer health resources. A standard NNLM Reading Club Book Kit includes:

  • 15 books, regular print
  • 15 bookmarks
  • 15 Discussion guides
  • 15 NIH MedlinePlus Magazines
  • 15 NIH All of UsResearch Program brochures
  • 15 Reading club book bags
  • 1 library book bag.

Each book title is chosen based on the health topic that aligns with national health observances like Americans with Disabilities Act Day, LGBTQ+ Pride Month, or American Heart Month. Libraries can choose from three recommended titles for each topic.

How to request a book set?

  1. Choose a Title
  2. Check Availability
  3. Request a Title

Does my organization get to keep the kit?

All kits provided by the Book Buzz will need to be returned after completing the reading. However, if you’re interested in having your own kit, click here to learn more.

How is this made possible?

The NNLM Reading Club Book Kits in the Book Buzz program are made available with funds from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the NIH All of Us Research Program. By submitting an application, you agree to promote NLM resources and raise awareness of the NIH All of Us Research Program by sharing brochures and information included in the shipment. Within eight weeks of receiving the book kit, you will be asked to complete a short survey about the NNLM Reading Club.

For any questions about the Book Buzz and the NNLM Reading Club Book Kit, contact Samantha Nunn at sam.nunn@utah.edu for more information.

Categories: RML Blogs

Health Programming for Summer Reading!

MAR News - Mon, 2020-01-27 07:00
Michael Balkenhol

Michael Balkenhol

For a second year, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine has partnered with the Collaborative Summer Library Program to bring health programming to your library for Summer Reading! For 2020, the slogan is Imagine Your Story with a theme of Fairy Tales, Mythology, Fantasy. We have written program plans with ideas for fairy tale nutrition, nature walks, graphic medicine, tooth fairy dental health storytime, and more.

Full program plans for the following are available and free to use:

Dental Health: A Visit from the Tooth Fairy – Promote children’s dental health with help from the tooth fairy and local partners! Scale this program down to a single storytime, or partner with a local dentist or oral health organization to create an oral health fair for children and families.

Environmental Engagement: Into the Woods – Little Red Riding Hood and Hansel and Gretel embrace the pleasures and dangers of nature. Use environmental engagement programs to encourage citizen science, teach about hiking safety, and/or explore nature’s meditative and health benefits.

Fairytale Nutrition – Fairy tales and folklore are bursting with food references, from poisoned apples to magic beans. Take food and nutrition to a fantastical level with storytime, cooking, and/or gardening programs.

Graphic Medicine Book Club: Veterans’ Stories – This book club program uses graphic novels about veterans to explore veterans’ experiences and health. See resources discussion guides, including questions about At War with Yourself (2016) and When I Returned (2016).

Harry Potter’s World – The magic in the Harry Potter series is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy and natural philosophy. The National Library of Medicine’s exhibition, Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine in Harry Potter’s World explores the intersection of these worlds.

Herbology in Harry Potter: Ginger, Peppermint, and Valerian – Herbology in Harry Potter is fantastical but grounded in science! Use herbology as a platform to explore herbs and supplements, make soap or bath bombs, or focus book club discussions.

Microbes Storytime: The Spread of Germs – One child sneezes, and the whole room gets sick! After storytime with Sick Simon or Tiny Creatures, children learn about handwashing. Consider buying microbe plush toys (or cutting silhouettes out of construction paper) to show the shapes of common germs and viruses. For school age children, explore germs through citizen science.

Imagine your storyJoin me on April 7, 2020 at 3:00 PM ET for a one hour webinar to jumpstart your Summer Reading Programming to include health and wellness! Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming for Summer Reading will focus on health program ideas, guides, and resources for Summer Reading 2020 – Imagine Your Story.

Can’t get space off your mind? Still thinking about A Universe of Stories? The NNLM Summer Health Programming Manual from 2019 is archived on our Summer Reading page, along with some lesson plans for exploring genetics learning with youth audiences.

Thinking of applying for NNLM funding? Looking for health program ideas and inspiration? Don’t miss MAR’s Program Ideas and Guides page which includes programs-in-a-box, program ideas, and other resources for ideas and inspiration for public libraries and community based organizations.

If you have feedback or questions, please email me at mab602@pitt.edu.

Written by Michael Balkenhol, Health Programming Coordinator, for the Winter 2020 edition of The MAReport quarterly newsletter.

Categories: RML Blogs

New Request for Public Comment (RFC) on Draft Desirable Characteristics of Data Repositories: Respond by March 6!

PSR News - Fri, 2020-01-24 15:20

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has issued a Request for Public Comment on Draft Desirable Characteristics of Repositories for Managing and Sharing Data Resulting from Federally Funded Research on behalf of the multi-agency Subcommittee on Open Science of the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on Science. The proposed set of desirable characteristics is part of the Subcommittee’s efforts to improve the consistency of information that Federal agencies provide to the scientific community about the long-term preservation of data resulting from Federally funded research. The characteristics could apply to repositories operated by government or non-governmental entities.

Feedback will help the Subcommittee refine and develop a common set of characteristics that Federal research funding agencies can use to support ongoing efforts to improve the management and sharing of data from Federally funded research. To ensure consideration of comments, submit responses before 11:59 PM EST on Friday, March 6.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Adds New MeSH Supplementary Concept Record for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China

PSR News - Fri, 2020-01-24 15:01

On January 14, a new MeSH Supplementary Concept Record (SCR Class 4-Organism) was added to the 2020 MeSH Browser in response to health updates issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) for an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China:

  • Wuhan coronavirus
    2019 novel coronavirus (entry term)
    2019-nCoV (entry term)
    Wuhan seafood market pneumonia virus (entry term)

The SCR first appeared in the MeSH export file available on January 15. The SCR was updated on January 23. Note that the SCR has a heading mapped to the MeSH descriptor Betacoronavirus. Citations about the viral infection also will be indexed with Coronavirus Infections.

Here is a suggested interim PubMed search strategy to retrieve citations, including ahead-of-print citations, on the 2019 novel coronavirus:

2019-nCoV

The complete annotated genome sequence of the 2019 novel coronavirus is available now in GenBank. For more information on this outbreak and coronavirus infections, visit these resources:

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2020-01-24 11:32

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Free Health Programming for NYC Area Libraries! Through funding from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) and the All of Us Research Program, End of Life Choices New York is expanding their programming to offer additional community education presentations on end of life issues at New York libraries.

Read the MAReport: This quarter, Michelle Burda suggests some creative New Year’s resolutions for engaging with NNLM, both personally and professionally.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote health, fitness and nutrition in the new year? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

Raise Awareness of Substance Misuse with the NNLM Reading Club – looking for easy and free health programming? Check out the latest NNLM Reading Club book kit, which includes book selections, a discussion guide, and materials to talk about substance misuse.

New on YouTube: Online Privacy 101, December 18, 2019

NLM/NIH News

A New and Improved PubMed® – NLM’s PubMed has long been recognized as a critical resource for helping researchers, health care professionals, students, and the general public keep current with rapid advances in the life sciences. We are excited to introduce an updated version of PubMed that features an updated design and technology to improve the user experience. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Insurance Status Helps Explain Racial Disparities in Cancer Diagnosis – A new NIH-funded study of more than 175,000 U.S. women diagnosed with breast cancer from 2010-2016 has found that nearly half of the troubling disparity in breast cancer detection can be traced to lack of adequate health insurance. – NIH Director’s Blog

Pen to Parchment: National Handwriting Day – In honor of National Handwriting Day, Circulating Now recognizes the craft of the highly-skilled medieval scribes and artists who meticulously copied and illuminated the fifteenth-century Liber medicinalis (or The Book of Medicine). – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

New in NLM Digital Collections: Fully-Digitized Manuscript Collections – Complete with finding aids, this initial release of six manuscript collections encompasses more than 43,500 pages and represents a milestone in the evolution of NLM’s digitization capacity. Moreover, it achieves the goal of providing remote, unmediated access to manuscript collections in alignment with one of the cornerstones of the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027, to reach more people through enhanced dissemination and engagement.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently covered updates to the new PubMed.

Request for Information: ClinicalTrials.gov Modernization – The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is requesting public comment to guide efforts to enhance and better support the users of ClinicalTrials.gov, the world’s largest public clinical research registry and results database. The deadline to submit a response is March 14, 2020.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

January 2020

Are You Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources for Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe – January 27, 11:30-12:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the South Central Region (SCR), this class covers National Library of Medicine (NLM) disaster health information and other emergency preparedness resources for community educators, families, friends and caregivers. This presentation will review these resources and give updates on apps such as the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER). It will also feature government databases like PubMed and Disaster Lit for finding publications. Furthermore, opportunities for programming and a partnerships with non-traditional entities such as libraries will be discussed.

Exceptional Lives – January 29, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) and guest Julie McKinney, Health Literacy Specialist and Director of Product Content at Exceptional Lives, Inc., for this webinar. Exceptional Lives is a not-for-profit organization which provides easy-to-read information for parents and caregivers of children and adults with developmental disabilities. Their free online tools help families find the resources they need and walk them through the complicated processes of getting services and benefits for their child. The tools are developed using health literacy principles, and include comprehensive step-by-steps Guides as well as a searchable Resource Directory of local providers and support services. This webinar will discuss the need for this type of resource and include NLM and other government resources that are relevant to the topic.

NNLM Resource Picks: Bookshelf – January 29, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) for the next installment in this collaborative, bimonthly, webcast series featuring National Library of Medicine resources. Bookshelf provides free access to the full text of books and documents in the biomedical and life sciences as well as health care, medical humanities and social sciences. Through integration with other NCBI databases, such as PubMed, Gene, Genetic Testing Registry, and PubChem, Bookshelf also provides reference information for biological, chemical and other biomedical data and facilitates its discovery. This webinar will provide an overview of Bookshelf, including why it is a trusted resource of reference and health information, how it is related but different from PubMed Central and PubMed, and how to best find and navigate the content it archives.

Data Presentations: The Good, Bad and Unethical – January 30, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the New England Region (NER) and Massachusetts Health Science Library Network (MAHSLIN) for a presentation on the Edward Tufte One Day course on Presenting Data and Information workshop. Edward Tufte’s course has a focus on fundamental design strategies for information displays such as tables, diagrams, charts and data visualizations. This class will focus on Mr. Tufte’s evaluation of data visualizations, ethics of data visualization design, and the pitfalls of PowerPoint. This presentation will provide a fun and informative overview of the class, tips on how to spot deceptive data visualizations and evaluate data presentations.

Struggles and Strategies for Survival Beyond the Walls of Jail – January 30, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join the New England Region (NER) for this webinar to hear a personal story of substance use disorder and incarceration from Louie Diaz, a substance use disorder counselor and re-entry specialist with the Middlesex County Sheriff’s Office. Louie will discuss the work he is doing in Lowell and Lawrence, Massachusetts to address the addiction crisis, and what it was like to be followed by a film crew for 5 years during the making of a documentary. He will also share why the film is important as we begin to treat substance use disorder as a public health issue instead of a law enforcement issue.

February 2020

Food for Thought: Creating Resilient Rural Communities – February 6, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – A lack of access to fresh food leads to an increase in obesity, diabetes, and other health concerns. The Southern Adirondack Library System (SALS) and the Comfort Food Community food pantry teamed up to address these and other challenges (adult literacy, food scarcity, food waste, food access, rural food deserts, and transportation) by launching the Fresh Food Collective Farm-2-Library initiative. They reduced food waste by gleaning produce from local farms, then distributed the produce through small, rural libraries where food scarcity, limited food pantry access, and transportation all limit access to fresh fruits and vegetables. In the first year, nearly 2,500 pounds of fresh produce were distributed, bringing new faces into the library, creating and deepening relationships with the community fostering renewed interest in library services from populations that were previously reluctant users. Join the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) for this webinar to learn more about this project.

Framing the Future of Partnering with Your Community – February 12, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Discover how to engage and create long lasting partnerships with community members while disseminating consumer health information. Sponsored by the Southeastern Atlantic Region (SEA), this webinar will discuss the difference between engagement and outreach, building trust within your community to support impactful collaborations, and creating and finding community engagement resources. This presentation will also review and discuss key takeaways from several community health engagement initiatives including helpful strategies learned and finding positive aspects from events that did not go as planned.

Wellness in the Library Workplace – February 17-March 8, 2020 – You’re a library worker – you’re already helping those in your community find health information. What are you doing to manage your own well-being? Individual and community well-being are inherently connected. Thus, it is critical that workplaces be an area of wellness for their employees. Join NNLM for this asynchronous online course to discover ways to improve your own personal well-being and create a healthy workplace. If you are a supervisor, how are you helping to ensure your staff stays healthy (physically, emotionally, etc.)? This class will also discuss ways to increase overall wellness for all staff in libraries so that we have happy, healthy and safe work environments.

The Importance of Digital Literacy and Its Impact on Understanding Health Information – February 17, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Technology is continuing to improve, and more and more people are looking online for health information, managing care, and trusted advice. Despite the increasing use, there is a digital divide for many individuals that greatly impact their ability to find and access trusted quality health information. Wisconsin Health Literacy developed a digital health literacy program, Health Online: Finding Information You Can Trust, to focus on improving the digital divide. Join this webinar with the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network (CEN) to learn about digital literacy strategies to make digital health resources user friendly for all patrons and ways to help them access reliable health information online.

What Works for Health? Using County Health Rankings and Roadmaps in Grant Writing – February 19, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this session will provide an overview of What Works for Health, a resource from County Health Rankings and Roadmaps (CHRR). What Works for Health rates the evidence of a broad range of strategies that can affect health through changes to health behaviors, clinical care, social and environmental factors, and the physical environment. From the National Network of Public Health Institutes, Toni Lewis will discuss how those preparing funding applications can use What Works for Health when writing their evidence of need. This class will also provide examples of past funded NNLM projects that align with strategies Toni highlights. The audience will learn a practical way to use CHRR as it relates to applying for NNLM funding or other funding opportunities. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour, including 1 advanced level CECH. Participants are also eligible for 1 MLA CE.

The Ten Most Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Testing – February 19, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Advertising for DNA testing companies proliferates the media these days, but many individuals spit or swab, and then wonder how to get beyond their ethnicity results. The first questions usually asked regarding genetic testing are: “Where should I test?” and “I got my results, now what?”. Sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR), participants will explore these questions and more in this presentation, as an introduction to the world of DNA and interpreting test results. More advanced tools will be introduced that are fun and give the researcher real information they can use. If you have tested, review your results before the session.

Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community for Public Libraries – February 24-March 22, 2020 – Do you work in a public library? Are you interested in engaging with other public librarians and staff members to improve your knowledge and comfort with health and wellness related reference and services? Join NNLM for this free online course for public librarians to create a cohort learning experience. Over four weeks this class will explore consumer health, health reference in a public library environment, free health resources for library staff and patrons, and developing health and wellness related programming. This course offers 12 MLA CE credits and covers the five competencies required for Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) level 1.

National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizen Scientists – February 24, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Citizen science is happening all around you! Citizen science is an amazing way to participate in research efforts, and it can often be done from a mobile device, from one’s home, or from a library. In this class with the Pacific Southwest Region (PSR), participants will learn how to support citizen science in their communities and ways that libraries can participate. Participants will learn about citizen science library program models, free National Library of Medicine resources to incorporate into citizen science library programs, and sources of funding to explore for buying testing kits or supporting community research efforts. Citizen science library programs are perfect for all ages, and all types of libraries.

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – February 26, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? Sponsored by the New England Region (NER), this class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour. Participants are also eligible for 1 MLA CE.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Write the Vision: Make Your Plan to Protect Your Sight – Looking for materials to promote eye health all year long? From the National Eye Institute (NEI), Write the Vision is a calendar-based eye health awareness initiative that provides organizations with articles, fact sheets, infographics, social media content, and other resources to promote healthy vision and help prevent vision loss and blindness in African American communities. Materials for the month of January focus on Glaucoma Awareness.

Assessing Culturally Appropriate Treatment in Communities of Color: Role of Providers to Improve Quality of Care for Opioid Use Disorder – January 28, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the HHS Office of Minority Health, this webinar is the third of a three-part webinar series for providers aimed at raising awareness about and addressing opioid-related disparities among racial/ethnic minority populations. This webinar will highlight the use of the National CLAS Standards to improve engagement and care of racial/ethnic minority patients with an opioid use disorder. Speakers will discuss how their population or community-specific program has improved OUD treatment by using culturally and linguistically approaches/strategies. This webinar will be offered for Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) credit, and is eligible for 1.0 Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit through Meharry Medical College.

Ready, Set, PrEP Webinar – January 29, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – What is the new Ready, Set, PrEP program and how does it work? How does it fit into the federal plan to end the HIV epidemic in the United States? And how can you help implement it in your community? Public health and healthcare service providers, including staff from local health departments, community-based organizations, sexually transmitted infection clinics, community health centers, Title X clinics, and substance-use-disorder treatment providers can learn the answers to these questions by joining this webinar. Sponsored by the HHS Office of Infectious Disease and HIV/AIDS Policy (OIDP).

Basic Statistics for Research Appraisal – February 13, 2:00-3:30 PM ET -You don’t need to take years of statistics to gain a significant amount of useful knowledge. With a basic understanding of the core concepts and principles of statistics, you’ll gain the confidence to tackle a wide range of stats questions. You’ll also be able to assess the quality and value of research, locate specific methodological papers, and communicate research conclusions to users. This webinar takes a gentle approach to teaching you about study design, probability, sampling, distributions, generalizability, hypothesis testing, and other basic concepts in statistics. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Basic Statistics for Research Design – March 25, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – If you want to do research or assessment and are confused by statistics, this webinar is for you. You will gain an overview of five common statistical tests and practical guidance on choosing which to apply when. This practical approach targets key basics to keep in mind when choosing a test to answer a research or assessment question. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Make Fun of Learning! Game-Based Learning for Student Success – April 15, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – This course will explore the use of games in the classroom to enhance student participation and learning. The instructor will discuss the differences between gamification and game-based learning, why those distinctions are important, and the psychology behind both philosophies. Participants will learn how to spot opportunities for games in their own classrooms, the board game design process, and when games are appropriate in a class setting. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Libraries Transform Communities Engagement Grant – The American Library Association (ALA) invites library workers to apply for a new annual grant to support innovative and meaningful community engagement efforts in libraries. The Libraries Transform Communities Engagement Grant will provide $2,000 for a school, public, academic, tribal or special library to expand its community engagement efforts. Libraries are invited to apply by designing and outlining activities for a library-led community engagement project. View the full award guidelines and apply by February 3, 2020.

Summer Health Professions Education Program – Share this opportunity with college students interested in the Health Professions! Sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, this free summer enrichment program is designed to improve access to information and resources for college students that identify with groups that are underrepresented in the health professions. The program includes academic enrichment in the basic sciences and quantitative topics; learning and study skills development; clinical exposure through small-group rotations in healthcare settings, simulation experiences, and seminars; career development sessions directed toward exploration of the health professions, the admissions process, and the development of an individualized education plan; a financial literacy and planning workshop that informs students of financial concepts and strategies; a health policy seminar series to expose scholars to a larger view of healthcare, health systems, and the social determinants of health; and an introduction to interprofessional education that addresses effective collaboration across health professions. Applications are due February 5, 2020.

2020 Public Health Learning Forum & TRAIN Learning Network Annual Meeting – Join the Public Health Foundation (PHF) and TRAIN Learning Network at the 2020 Public Health Learning Forum & TRAIN Learning Network Annual Meeting, May 4-7, in Pittsburgh, PA. Working Together, Training Together: Public Health, Emergency Preparedness, and Healthcare is this year’s meeting theme and highlights effective practices in workforce development, online learning, and learning platform administration across the health sector. This four-day event features the latest innovations in health workforce training and presentations from the individuals leading these transformative initiatives.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – January 24, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-01-24 09:39

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars January 27 – January 29

Webinars January 30 – February 6

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Coronavirus Update

SEA News - Thu, 2020-01-23 11:30

This post was originally published in the Bringing Health Information to the Community blog. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring an outbreak caused by a novel (new) coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Visit the following websites for more information:

 

 

  • World Health Organization (WHO) Coronavirus Health topics page

 

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Categories: RML Blogs

Free Health Programming for NYC Area Libraries!

MAR News - Wed, 2020-01-22 07:00

End of Life Choices New York is a leading organization in New York working to improve end of life care and expand end of life options, to ensure a humane and peaceful death. They address issues such as quality of health care, health care choices, and human rights, autonomy, justice and the relief of human suffering.

Through funding from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) and the All of Us Research Program, End of Life Choices New York is expanding their programming to offer additional community education presentations on end of life issues at New York libraries. The overall goals of the program are to educate seniors and caregivers, provide resources that will improve quality of life at the end of life, and to promote the respect of healthcare wishes. This opportunity is open to libraries in Long Island (Suffolk and Nassau), Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, Bronx, Westchester, and Rockland counties; possibly to Dutchess, Orange, Albany, Ulster, and Monroe county.

Two educational presentations are available:

Planning for a Better End of Life: This 60-minute program is designed to educate seniors and caregivers about their rights and options at the end of life. Attendees will learn about the benefits of palliative care, the benefits of hospice, how to inform their doctor about their end of life goals and treatment preferences, the difference between a health care proxy, living will and DNR; and New York state laws. This program is also available in Spanish.

Being Mortal: Rights, Choices, and Important Conversations: This 90-minute program is designed to promote discussion about advance care planning, healthcare proxy forms, treatment options, and health care rights. It includes the screening of the 50 minute PBS Frontline documentary Being Mortal, based on the New York Times bestselling book Being Mortal by Dr. Atul Gawande.

If your institution would be interested in hosting one or both of these programs between January and April 2020, or if you have any questions about the programs, please contact info@endoflifechoicesny.org.

Categories: RML Blogs

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