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RML Blogs

A.T. Still Memorial Library hosts NLM’s “Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care” Traveling Exhibit!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-10-14 04:00

by Adrienne Brodie, MLS
Liaison Librarian
A. T. Still University Memorial Library
Mesa, AZ

Students in scrubs read exhibit panel text

PA Students enjoying the NLM’s traveling exhibit, Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care.

A.T. Still Memorial Library hosted the National Library of Medicine’s Traveling exhibit, Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care. On display were six freestanding panels that explore the profession from its early beginnings to the present day; documenting its diversity, collaborative nature, and contributions to the field of medicine and patient care. The library displayed the exhibit from late August through the end of National Physician Assistant (PA) week in October.

Woman speaks to a crowd with a powerpoint slide to her left

Dr. Michelle DiBaise speaking on the history of medicine.

To celebrate PA week and our PA students and faculty, the library hosted a joint lecture and open house with our PA program. Dr. Michelle DiBaise, DHSc, PA-C, DFAAPA Chair of Physician Assistant Studies presented on the journey of American Medicine and the forces that generated the PA profession, the growth of the PA profession since its inception, and where the profession may go in the future. An open house with light refreshments followed. Attendees were our PA students, PA faculty and staff, and additional A.T Still University faculty and staff.

This exhibition was produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the Physician Assistant History Society.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month: Toan Lam-Sullivan

PNR Dragonfly - Sun, 2019-10-13 21:00

Throughout October, National Medical Librarians Month and also Health Literacy Month, NNLM is featuring Pacific Northwest Librarians and highlighting their commitment to health literacy. This week we shine a spotlight on Toan Lam-Sullivan. Toan is the Bilingual Regional Librarian at Multnomah County Library in Portland, Oregon. Multnomah County Library has 20 locations throughout the Portland metro area.

What made you interested in a library career?  When I attended elementary school in Saigon, Vietnam, I frequently visited the tiny school library. However, the books were only available for reading while at the library. After I arrived in Portland, Oregon, as a teenager, my high school teacher took our class on a school field trip to the Central Library. The place was so beautiful, and every floor was filled with books. We were even allowed to borrow books and return them in three weeks. I was completely awestruck and fell in love right there.

While attending Grant High School, my friends and I frequently visited the nearby Hollywood Library. We loved reading about airplanes and sport cars in the library’s collection. We’d read and compare which planes and cars were the fastest and most powerful. One day, while at the Hollywood Library, I made a wish about how wonderful it would be if I was a librarian so that I could read books all day long. Several years later, while attending college, a friend informed me that the Multnomah County Library was hiring; I applied and was hired as a library page at the Hollywood Library, my favorite hangout place with friends!

Five years later, I was promoted to a Bilingual Vietnamese Library Assistant at the Holgate Library. The Holgate administrator talked with me about library school and encouraged me to attend. I applied, was accepted into the Master of Library Science Program and two years later, was promoted to the Bilingual Vietnamese Youth Librarian and currently work as a Bilingual Chinese Regional Librarian.

My love of reading and serendipity led me to become a librarian. I am very grateful to be a librarian and I just want to continue reaching out to patrons, letting them know about our many wonderful library services and resources.

Please briefly describe a favorite health-related library program, activity or service offered by your library. How has the public responded to this program, activity or service? We invited Tai Chi instructors to teach and demonstrate Tai Chi Fan Dance and Tai Chi 24 Form at our Holgate, Midland and Woodstock libraries. Each of these workshops lasted four weeks. After the two Tai Chi workshops ended, patrons continued to request them. However, the cost for inviting instructors over the long term was unsustainable. To make it more sustainable and meet the needs of the community, we asked administration if we could offer a staff-facilitated Tai Chi club. The request was approved.

The purpose of the Tai Chi club is to attract folks who are interested in and want to practice Tai Chi together. Even though there was no formal instructor, a dedicated group came every Wednesday.  Library staff set up the room, laptop and projector and participants shared Tai Chi video clips, which we all followed together to learn and practice Tai Chi movements.

Recently, two Tai Chi instructors, one of whom has been practicing Tai Chi for over 30 years, heard about the club. They’ve been volunteering their time at the Library and generously showing everyone Tai Chi.

Why does health literacy matter to you? As a youngster, I experienced a debilitating illness. I was bedridden and unable to perform many simple, essential tasks. I am very fortunate and grateful because I fully recovered. However, this experience impacted me deeply. I learned to take better self- care and I try to stay as healthy as possible. According to what I understand, health literacy encompasses information on health and wellness, and the ability to make decisions based on what we know. Health literacy matters to an individual and is equally important to a community.

As recent recipients of a Health Literacy Outreach award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, we’ve been focusing on our Asian communities. Through our award, we are inviting health instructors to the Library and offering health-related programs. We’re also showing members of our Asian communities how to use MedlinePlus and other health and wellness databases. So far, we have been receiving many positive comments from patrons.

Categories: RML Blogs

October is Health Literacy Month

MCR News - Fri, 2019-10-11 18:03

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote Health Literacy Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

Categories: RML Blogs

New PubMed Slides for New Users

MCR News - Fri, 2019-10-11 17:51

Please follow the link below for slides introducing new users to PubMed.

Introduction to PubMed – NNLM Slides to Adapt

These slides were designed to introduce PubMed to new users who have no prior experience with PubMed, and can be presented in about 45 minutes, as-is. However, we encourage you to abridge, expand, adapt and/or redistribute these slides to better meet the needs of your audience:

  • We especially encourage you to review the examples provided, and to replace them with examples more appropriate to your audience.
  • Additionally, five slides (numbers 1, 2, 6, 13, and 38) should be either removed or modified, depending on your specific needs.

 These slides are free of copyright restriction, but we appreciate attribution to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

These slides were created by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and adapted by the Office of Engagement and Training (OET) at the U.S. National Library of Medicine at the beginning of October, 2019. Please keep your materials up to date by testing all examples and assertions using PubMed Labs (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pubmed/) and by monitoring the PubMed news via the NLM Technical Bulletin (https://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/).

Categories: RML Blogs

Updates from NER Hospital Librarians Summer Session

NER News - Fri, 2019-10-11 09:57
screenshot of PubMed website

Use MyNCBI login with new PubMed interface!

Just over two months ago, twenty-eight librarians gathered at UMass Medical School for our One-Day Summer Session for New England Region hospital librarians.

In the morning, we discussed National Library of Medicine changes to DOCLINE, LinkOut, PubMed and the elimination of LoansomeDoc, as well as the upcoming EFTS transition from UConn Health to the Medical Library Association. We took a long look at the impacts on document delivery services in hospital libraries.

In the afternoon, Michelle Bass, PhD, MSI, AHIP, lead a discussion about Impostor Phenomenon among health sciences librarians, Michelle is Manager of Research and Instruction at Countway Library, Harvard Medical School. She facilitated a brainstorming exercise on ways to cope with this phenomenon.

Participants enjoyed the entire day. They especially commented on the opportunity to catch up with colleagues, and to learn new tips and tricks from one another.

Updates on NLM Changes

During our morning discussion, several questions were raised. We have updates!

DOCLINE

Q: I heard a rumor that only e-journals will be listed in any library holdings [in DOCLINE and LinkOut] beginning in 2020. Is that true?
A: LinkOut will be e-journal only for the forseeable future. There are no plans to ONLY include e-journals in DOCLINE. We are however planning to enhance DOCLINE in ways that make e-journals easier to access.

Q: DOCLINE used to say (basically) “hey, your library reports owning this title/issue, are you sure you want to request it?” This was very helpful. Will this feature be added to the new DOCLINE?
A: The ‘you own this’ alert during borrowing is one of the features listed on the DOCLINE user feedback page as high priority for users that we heard about after the launch of DOCLINE 6.  Since then, we have added half of alerts mentioned and ‘in your holdings’ is slated to return, but is not yet on the development schedule.

Q: Several hospital librarians are frustrated with ordering book chapters and NLM books through DOCLINE. One of these librarians left a note: We need UID requesting for NLM book collections specifically. Could you give me information that I can share?
A: Although Book and Book chapter requests do not route ‘automatically’ because there are only serial holdings in DOCLINE, previously you could ‘automatically’ populate your request with all of a Book’s bibliographic information by inputting a Unique ID, whether NLM UI or an ISBN.  Because DOCLINE 6 manual ordering does allow book ordering, and because 98% of requests are for articles, UI ordering for books was not part of the DOCLINE redesign initial release.  Development plans do include improved book ordering in the future.

Q: One of our librarians left a note: We cannot send PubMed search results to “order to” DOCLINE. Not sure if this is a comment about a new change, or a request for an upgrade. Could you give me information that I can share with our hospital librarians?
A: This feature is not currently available in DOCLINE. It is also not currently on our development schedule. This feature existed in the previous version of DOCLINE. As PubMed is currently undergoing a redesign, we are waiting until the redesign is complete before we develop new integrations with the PubMed system.

Q: When will we be able to submit multiple PMIDs in DOCLINE?
A: Now available! Please check the DOCLINE blog for more updates.

PubMed 

Q: Do you know when the training handouts will be updated to reflect the new version of PubMed?
A. We now have slides for your use! Here is the link for slides introducing new users to PubMed.

Q: I am hearing a concern that the new interface will be a difficult transition for older, experienced users of PubMed (clinicians–doctors at hospitals). Are you doing usability testing with older people?
A: PubMed Labs is under active development, and features will be introduced and updated on a regular basis as we continue to enhance the system. We are continuing to prioritize features based on user research, including usability testing and feedback from users. The Labs usability testing has been and will continue to be wide-ranging. We endeavor to talk to as many users as possible [including older users familiar with the PubMed interface].

EFTS

Q: Will Medical Library Association membership be required when EFTS transitions to be a service hosted by MLA?
A: No, MLA membership will not be required. Please check the MLA blog post for more information.

Please let us know if you have a question that we did not answer. We are happy to investigate for you.

 

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-10-11 05:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote Health Literacy Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year. You can also explore health literacy with the NNLM Reading Club.

Sleep: Getting Your Z’s with My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can learn all about sleep, including how much sleep you need, sleep disorders, improving your sleep habits, and more! Subscribe to receive My MedlinePlus via email.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Request for Information (RFI): The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement (UG4) that operates on a five-year cycle. As we prepare for the start of the next cycle (in May 2021), we are seeking input and feedback from the public on ways to ensure that the NNLM can continue to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The deadline to respond is December 2, 2019.

NNLM Delivery is live! Our upgraded document delivery, storage and retrieval service is now available! The old platform, MARDelivery, will be discontinued on November 1, 2019. Visit delivery.nnlm.gov to start using NNLM Delivery today.

In the Region – This fall many of the MAR staff are on the road, we’ve welcomed a new Community Engagement Coordinator, and we launched a new service for NNLM Members! Read about more of our recent activities to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in NY, NJ, PA and DE. – MARquee News Highlights

Save the Date for the next NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, coming up on November 20, 2019! Follow #CiteNLM to get the latest details as they become available.

Increase Information Literacy: Host a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon – MCR News

Keeping Up with the Facts Related to Lung Illnesses from E-cigarettes and Vaping – NER Update

New on YouTube:  Cooking Classes without a Kitchen, September 24, 2019

NLM/NIH News

Taking NLM’s Story to Capitol Hill – Last month, [Dr. Patricia Brennan] had the honor of joining National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, and four other NIH Institute Directors to provide testimony before the U.S. House Congressional Subcommittee on Appropriations for NIH Investments in Medical Research. This was the first time in 12 years that NLM provided testimony to Congress. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

World Health Organization: Picturing Health for All – This week, World Health Organization: Picturing Health for All, a new special display, opened in the History of Medicine Division Reading Room of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The exhibition features a selection of images from the NLM Prints & Photographs collection of World Health Organization (WHO) photographs that highlight some of WHO’s work in the 20th century. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Multiplex Rainbow Technology Offers New View of the Brain – The NIH-led Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies® (BRAIN) Initiative is revolutionizing our understanding of how the brain works through its creation of new imaging tools. One of the latest advances—used to produce this rainbow of images—makes it possible to view dozens of proteins in rapid succession in a single tissue sample containing thousands of neural connections, or synapses. – NIH Director’s Blog

NIMH Twitter Chat: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) – Join the National Institute of Mental Health for a one-hour Twitter chat on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Follow or use #NIMHchats to join the conversation. October 16, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted several new features that have been added to the new PubMed.

NIH News in Health: Read the October 2019 issue, featuring, “A Well-Aged Mind: Maintaining Your Cognitive Health” and “Family Health Matters: How Twin Studies Can Help Everyone.”

New PubMed Recap: Did you miss A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals? A recording, a list of key points and an FAQ page are now available from the webinar.

Job Opportunities at NLM: NLM is recruiting recent graduates with a master’s degree or higher to fill entry level positions across the Library. Applications are also being accepted for three unit head positions in the Division of Library Operations.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

October 2019

Helping Patrons Navigate “Dr. Google” – October 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Technology is continuing to improve, and more and more people are looking online for health information, managing care, and trusted advice. Despite the increasing use, there is a digital divide for many individuals with low health literacy. Sponsored by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR), this webinar will discuss how Wisconsin Health Literacy developed a digital health literacy program, Health Online: Finding Information You Can Trust, to focus on improving the digital divide. Learn about strategies to make digital resources user friendly for all patrons and ways to help them access reliable health information online.

The Tide is Rising and So are We: Stabilizing Our Communities Through Climate Change and Resilience Programming – October 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Libraries, as important communities centers and partners, have an important role to play in education around tough subjects including emergency preparedness, our relationship to climate change and brainstorming ideas for building community resilience. In this session with the New England Region (NER), participants will reflect on the outcomes of Climate Preparedness Week 2019 that included more than 50 library events across Massachusetts, discuss lessons learned, best practices and what you can do to help foster climate change and resilience discussions and events at your institutions.

Being a Better Ally to All – October 16, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) for this next installment of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt. Every organization has a group of stakeholders, staff, and volunteers who must foster effective communication through conflict, change, and crisis. With increased comfort and confidence, you can be prepared to hold and encourage others to have the challenging conversations that lead to better collaboration and teamwork. Developing a culture based on listening, speaking up, and taking responsibility builds teams of cooperation for the short- and long-term.

Health Information Needs of Immigrant Populations – October 16, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Southwest Region (PSR) for this one-hour webinar that will address the health issues, public health implications, and health literacy needs of immigrant populations. Learn about methods to improve health literacy and address information access issues. We will review reliable health information resources, which include the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus, HealthReach, and the Disaster Information Management Research Center.

Health Insurance Literacy and How Librarians Can Help – October 16, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Many adults have difficulty knowing how to find a physician, fill a prescription, use and pay for medications, and use health information to make informed decisions about their health. Libraries are prominent places in communities making libraries and librarians excellent resources for advancing health information literacy. Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and guest presenter Emily Vardell, Ph.D., for this webinar that will address these critical information needs.

2019 Fall Wikipedia Edit-a-thon Overview – October 17, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Are you interested in improving mental health information available on Wikipedia? Do you want to utilize your librarian research skills towards making Wikipedia a better, evidence-based resource? Have you always wanted to participate in, or learn how to host your own edit-a-thon? In preparation for the NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on November 20, join the New England Region (NER) for this edit-a-thon training overview with a live question and answer session.

Health Statistics on the Web – October 17, 4:30-5:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course focuses on the location, selection, and effective use of statistics relevant to health on the local, state, national, and international levels. The importance and relevance of health statistics in various contexts will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several statistics Internet resources through the use of numerous exercises. In addition to 1 MLA CE, this program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour.

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community – October 22, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course will provide an overview of ideas to conduct health outreach and create health programs for libraries and community/faith based organizations. Participants will learn how to integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies to introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways.

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW): An Overview and Action – October 23, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) and guest speaker Marisa Miakonda Cummings, Director of Native Student Services at the University of South Dakota, for a one-hour webinar on the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women. Participants will discuss a historical perspective and current challenges in reporting and jurisdiction. Opportunities for ally ship and advocacy with legislation will also be discussed. The outcome of this presentation will lead to more informed librarians and better community advocates.

November 2019

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – November 5, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention.  The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour.

PubMed for Libraries: Introduction – November 8, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – PubMed for Librarians is made up of five 90-minute classes presented via WebEx that include hands-on exercises. In the first webinar, participants will learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a basic PubMed search, assess your search results, analyze search details, customize PubMed with My NCBI, search for a known citation; plus, brief introductions to MeSH, automatic term mapping, search tags and subheadings. This class will be demonstrated in the new PubMed interface. All demonstrations will be done in PubMed Labs.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Posting:

Health Resource Highlight:  The Pennsylvania Insurance Department’s health literacy group provides resources on health insurance literacy, including mental health and substance use disorder, short-term health insurance plans, health insurance special enrollment, and health insurance appeals.

Empowering Primary Care Using Data and Analytics to Build a Healthier America – AHRQ Views

Hospital Libraries Section (HLS)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Professional Development Grant – Whether you are in the middle of your career or new to it all, or have worked for many years, the HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant is an opportunity for an amazing professional journey into education or research. The grant is open to librarians working in a hospital, health system or similar clinical settings. Grant funds can be used for professional development through MEDLIB-ED or to help attend the MLA Annual Meeting or CE courses. It may also be used to support reimbursement for expenses incurred in conducting research such as a statistician to help with survey design, analyses etc. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2019.

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship – The Medical Library Association (MLA) is now accepting applications for The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. The purpose of this fellowship is to fund research aimed at expanding the research knowledge base, linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and advances in biomedical research. The endowment will provide a grant of up to $10,000.  It is awarded by MLA through a competitive grant process, to a qualified health sciences librarian, health professional, researcher, educator, or health administrator. The deadline to apply is November 15, 2019.

Engaging Citizen Scientists: Will the Walls of the Ivory Towers Come Tumbling Down? – October 16, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Citizen scientists have been engaged to measure bird migration, the proliferation of plastics pollution, and disease outbreaks. As a scientist, are you afraid of competition from members of the public? If you are a member of the public, would you like to join this movement? In this free webinar, listen in as a group of citizen science gurus discusses its pros and cons. Sponsored by Fondation IPSEN.

MLA Diversity and Inclusion Task Force Critical Librarianship Webinar Series – Want to know what critical librarianship looks like in practice? In this free webinar, hear three working librarians talk about how they use critical librarianship in their everyday practice. Sponsored by MLA – October 21, 2:00-3:30 PM ET.

Grey (Literature) Matters: Structuring Your Google Search – November 6, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Join Sarah Bonato for the second of a two-part series on grey (literature) matters.  You’ll learn how to address the challenges of Google searches, adapt a database search, employ decision aids, set search limits, optimize data saturation, track search results, and select a search scope. You’ll also examine examples of published research projects that used Google and look at alternative search engines, such as DuckDuckGo, MillionShort, and WolframAlpha. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Navigating LGBTQ Adolescent Health for the Healthcare Provider – The New York State Area Health Education Center System, in collaboration with the Clinical Education Initiative, will be hosting a continuing education seminar on Saturday, October 12 in Buffalo, NY titled Navigating LGBTQ Adolescent Health for the Healthcare Provider. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth must navigate the typical challenges of adolescence while also managing the social stigma associated with their emerging sexual/gender identities. This seminar will highlight the unique health and developmental challenges of LGBTQ youth, and discuss ways to address these issues in the clinical setting. Registration is $125 for health professionals and $25 for students.

Western Pennsylvania Health Literacy Event – Visit Carlow University in Pittsburgh on Friday, October 25 to celebrate Health Literacy Month! Hosted by the Healthcare Council of Western Pennsylvania (HCWP) in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Health Literacy Coalition, this free event will feature sessions on the basics of health literacy, unconscious bias, and cultural humility. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn how to apply health literacy techniques to their personal and professional lives.

OpenCon 2019 in Philadelphia, PA – Join Temple University on November 1 for OpenCon Philly, a free one-day series of panels and interactive workshops for idea exchange and learning around open access, open education, and open data. Connect with regional colleagues and find future collaborators as you share success stories, learn from each other’s failures, and discuss challenges in your work towards making research, educational materials, data, and government information more equitable and accessible to all. This event is free and open to all! Registration for the event is now available.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

Increase Information Literacy: Host a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

MCR News - Thu, 2019-10-10 13:51

Liz Waltman, Outreach, Education, and Communications Coordinator, NNLM SEA

April Wright, All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator, NNLM SEA

 

NNLM’s mission “to improve the public’s access to information to facilitate making informed decisions about their health” relies on building the skills of consumers and librarians in finding, reading, understanding, and using authoritative health information.

Information literacy, and more precisely related to NNLM’s mission, health information literacy, is a practice. As with any skill, information literacy must be learned, practiced, refined, and used for school assignments, looking critically at the news, and evaluating websites. In this regard, Wikipedia edit-a-thons are excellent tools for teaching and learning information literacy skills – they require that participants assess existing information, decide where changes need to be made, and add citations to relevant and authoritative sources.

This fall, join NNLM in our ongoing #citeNLM campaign by hosting a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at your organization. By hosting an event you will be joining a network of librarians, health professionals, and students from around the country working to improve the quality of mental health articles on Wikipedia using trusted National Library of Medicine resources. To get you started, we have created a Guide for Organizers that will walk you through the steps of hosting your own edit-a-thon. In this toolkit you will find an overview of the #citeNLM project, a comprehensive planning checklist, sample marketing materials, and a guide to share with your participants. We also invite you to attend our training session on Thursday, October 17 where you will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn more information, and connect with the #citeNLM community.

No matter if you host your own event or join us for our virtual edit-a-thon on November 20, we look forward to working with you to improve mental health information on Wikipedia! Check out nnlm.gov/wiki to learn more about the project and make sure to follow along on Twitter with the hashtag #citeNLM to ask questions, post photos, and share your Wikipedia experience.

Categories: RML Blogs

NMLM Feature: Mental Health Day

SEA News - Thu, 2019-10-10 10:06

Pratt Chat blog by Lauren Read

Mental Health Day

October is Health Literacy Month, and this post serves to highlight mental health, which often is given shorter shrift. 10 October’s commemoration as World Mental Health Day has sparked further interest in exploring and sharing the topic.

The 2019 theme of World Mental Health Day is “Working Together to Prevent Suicide.”  Suicide is an astounding public health issue. No demographic is immune to depression and its effects, and the statistics are most harrowing for young adults.  About 50% of suicide attempts involve major depressive disorder; 90% involve some diagnosable (and treatable) psychiatric disorder.

If this information has gotten you concerned, the good news is that there is plenty to do about it. Recognizing and treating (with or without pharmacology) depression and poor mental health is key. Building and maintaining personal connection and relationships can make the difference between feeling supported and seeming utterly alone. So whether you are in need or know someone who may be, regular communication makes all the difference. Be a life-line and potentially save a life!

One local group that has community education for talking with individuals in need as well as crucial support groups for survivors of suicide attempts and survivors of suicide loss is the Maryland chapter of the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention. The World Health Organization, which supports World Mental Health Day, has a wealth of information as well. And an easy-to-remember suicide crisis hotline is simply dialing 2-1-1.

The Pratt has a substantial research guide for Senior Mental Health Awareness in particular.  Of course, we have numerous books and other materials that cover mental health and suicide prevention. Pennsylvania Avenue Branch has an upcoming program for men and for women with expert-facilitated conversations on living with mental illness. And – not to be understated – increasing one’s social capital through the human connections fostered in “third places” such as the library is always a good thing. Be well.

Lauren Read is celebrating 10 years a librarian, having studied at Boston University (BA) and Rutgers University (MLIS) and having enjoyed an interesting, winding career path that has led to her present position in the Business, Science, and Technology Department at Enoch Pratt Free Library’s majestic Central Library. She walks to work from her home in Baltimore, where she lives with her husband, daughter, and Patience & Fortitude, cats named after NYPL’s lions.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Sign Up to the Host the All of Us Journey Exhibition in 2020

MCR News - Wed, 2019-10-09 17:19

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine invites public libraries and community organizations to host the All of Us Journey during its visit in the MidContinental Region. The Journey is a hands-on experience to engage and build awareness about the All of Us Research Program.

The All of Us Research Program aims to sign up a million or more participants to share their health data in the interest of expanding biomedical research. The nationwide effort is designed to accelerate research and improve health by considering each individual’s lifestyle, surrounding environment and biology that can impact their health differently than others.

The Journey can make visits to events and venues within 2-3 hours of the area at each stop. The two Journey units are scheduled to stop in the following areas:

Education and Awareness Exhibit

  • Casper, WY

July 5th-11th

  • Cheyenne, WY

July 12th-18th

  • Denver, CO

July 19th– 25th

  • Aurora, CO

July 26th– August 1st

  • Wichita, KS

August 2nd– 8th

  • Park City, KS

August 9th-15th

Education, Awareness and Enrollment Center

  • Louis, MO

August 23rd – 31st

If you or an organization you know is interested in hosting the Journey or you know of any events where the Journey could participate, please contact George Strawley at george.strawley@utah.edu or (801) 581-5242.

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

New Guide Available for Organizers of NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons!

PSR Newsletter - Wed, 2019-10-09 15:44

by Liz Waltman; Outreach, Education, and Communications Coordinator, and
April Wright, All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator
NNLM Southeastern/Atlantic Region
Health Sciences and Human Services Library
University of Maryland, Baltimore

NNLM’s mission “to improve the public’s access to information to facilitate making informed decisions about their health” relies on building the skills of consumers and librarians in finding, reading, understanding, and using authoritative health information. Information literacy, and more precisely related to NNLM’s mission, health information literacy, is a practice. As with any skill, information literacy must be learned, practiced, refined, and used for school assignments, looking critically at the news, and evaluating websites. In this regard, Wikipedia edit-a-thons are excellent tools for teaching and learning information literacy skills since they require that participants assess existing information, decide where changes need to be made, and add citations to relevant and authoritative sources.

This fall, join NNLM in our ongoing #citeNLM campaign by hosting a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at your organization. By hosting an event you will be joining a network of librarians, health professionals, and students from around the country working to improve the quality of mental health articles on Wikipedia using trusted National Library of Medicine resources. To get you started, we have created a Guide for Organizers that will walk you through the steps of hosting your own edit-a-thon session. In this toolkit you will find an overview of the #citeNLM project, a comprehensive planning checklist, sample marketing materials, and a guide to share with your participants. We also invite you to attend a training session on October 17, where you will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn more information, and connect with the #citeNLM community.

No matter if you host your own event or join the virtual edit-a-thon on November 20, we look forward to working with you to improve mental health information on Wikipedia! Learn more about this project and follow along on Twitter with the hashtag #citeNLM to ask questions, post photos, and share your Wikipedia experience!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Increase Information Literacy: Host a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

SEA News - Wed, 2019-10-09 13:58

Liz Waltman, Outreach, Education, and Communications Coordinator, NNLM SEA
April Wright, All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator, NNLM SEA

NNLM’s mission “to improve the public’s access to information to facilitate making informed decisions about their health” relies on building the skills of consumers and librarians in finding, reading, understanding, and using authoritative health information.

Information literacy, and more precisely related to NNLM’s mission, health information literacy, is a practice. As with any skill, information literacy must be learned, practiced, refined, and used for school assignments, looking critically at the news, and evaluating websites. In this regard, Wikipedia edit-a-thons are excellent tools for teaching and learning information literacy skills – they require that participants assess existing information, decide where changes need to be made, and add citations to relevant and authoritative sources.

This fall, join NNLM in our ongoing #citeNLM campaign by hosting a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at your organization. By hosting an event you will be joining a network of librarians, health professionals, and students from around the country working to improve the quality of mental health articles on Wikipedia using trusted National Library of Medicine resources. To get you started, we have created a Guide for Organizers that will walk you through the steps of hosting your own edit-a-thon. In this toolkit you will find an overview of the #citeNLM project, a comprehensive planning checklist, sample marketing materials, and a guide to share with your participants. We also invite you to attend our training session on Thursday, October where you will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn more information, and connect with the #citeNLM community.

No matter if you host your own event or join us for our virtual edit-a-thon on November 20, we look forward to working with you to improve mental health information on Wikipedia! Check out nnlm.gov/wiki to learn more about the project and make sure to follow along on Twitter with the hashtag #citeNLM to ask questions, post photos, and share your Wikipedia experience.

Categories: RML Blogs

Updated Features Available for the “New” PubMed!

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2019-10-08 14:06

Several new features have been added to the new PubMed, including an updated homepage, an online user guide, the CSV file format, My NCBI Filters, My Bibliography and Collections, and search integration with the MeSH and NLM Catalog databases. The National Library of Medicine continues to develop features on the PubMed Labs platform, and this new version of PubMed will eventually replace the legacy PubMed. Visit An Updated PubMed Is on Its Way for more information.

  • Homepage and User Guide: An updated homepage includes links to many popular sites including E-utilities, Advanced search, and the MeSH database. A link has also been added to the recently published FAQs and User Guide.
  • CSV File Format: The save citation to file feature was updated to include a CSV format.
  • My NCBI Features: My NCBI filters now display above the “Results by Year” timeline for signed in users that have activated filters. Collections and My Bibliography selections were added to the send to action menu. A “Create alert” link is also available after running a search to create My NCBI automatic email updates for saved searches.
  • MeSH and NLM Catalog: Search integration has been added to the NLM Catalog for journal title abbreviations on the Abstract display format. Search integration has also been added to the MeSH database for MeSH terms, Publication Types, and other terms appearing on the Abstract display format.

When the new PubMed becomes the default site, searches built in the MeSH database will be routed to the new site. In the meantime, copy and paste your query from the MeSH database to try it in the new PubMed. For further details and illustrations, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

New Self-Paced NLM Course for Disaster Information Specialists!

PSR News - Tue, 2019-10-08 13:44

The new course In Case of Emergencies: Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planning defines and describes continuity of operations planning and why it is important for libraries to have a continuity plan in case of emergencies. This course also provides a one-page COOP plan template with instructions that librarians or information specialists can use to develop their own plan. This self-paced course fulfills one of the requirements of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Disaster Information Specialization, and  provides four MLA continuing education (CE) credits.

This course was developed by Dan Wilson, Associate Director for Collections & Library Services / School of Nursing Librarian, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia. Dan is the former coordinator for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Emergency Preparedness Initiative. To see a complete list of free online courses and learn how to earn the MLA Disaster Information Specialist certificate, review the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) Training Course page.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Illinois Prairie District Public Library – The Illinois PraiREAD

GMR News - Tue, 2019-10-08 11:38

 

In September and October of 2019, the Illinois Prairie District Public Library hosted its first “big read,” cleverly titled The Illinois PraiREAD. The chosen title was The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. This title was chosen in part because a local community theatre was staging the play in the fall. Additionally, it helps the library highlight offerings for patrons with autism.

There were many events held at the library over the eight-week period. Fifty copies of the novel were given away and two book clubs used the title for the month of October. Additionally, due to the convenient timing of the theatrical endeavor, tickets to performances were raffled off to patrons at each branch. All story hours during the two months included sensory-friendly elements. Finally, a guest speaker with autism was invited to speak.

The guest speaker was funded with a grant from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region. Thanks to the grant, we were able to bring in a local speaker with experience presenting her story nationwide.

Marty Murphy is an adult with Autism Spectrum Disorder, who presents Finding Normal “nationally to provide parents, school peers and educators a better understanding of the world of autism.” The presentation was uniquely adapted to speak to library staff, patrons and the cast and crew of the neighboring production.

Whether it be books or celebrities about or with autism, recognizing certain behaviors or creating welcoming and inclusive spaces, Murphy was extremely well-received and everyone in the audience took something different away from the presentation.

-Guest post by Joel D Shoemaker, Director of Illinois Prairie District Public Library

Categories: RML Blogs

In the Region

MAR News - Tue, 2019-10-08 05:00

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) staff are always working on something new! Whether we’re developing and teaching classes, exhibiting or presenting at conferences, visiting our Members and Partners, or spending time in the office, our work focuses on advancing the progress of medicine and improving public health through access to health information. Read about some of our more recent activities, highlighted below, to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania.

Erin Seger, Making Connections: I’m currently at the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences annual conference in Hershey, PA. This is a conference that brings together extension professionals to learn about evidence-based resources to address emerging issue. While cooperative extensions aren’t libraries, they offer a wealth of information and expertise to their communities and are great NNLM partners. MAR is currently funding the Penn State Extension for their program Dining with Diabetes. This program helps community members with diabetes learn how to better manage their condition and introduces them to MedlinePlus so they can locate trusted health information. There are a number of ways that cooperative extensions can partner with NNLM MAR, and I hope we can explore more opportunities with these institutions!

Michael Balkenhol, Teaching: Over the next few weeks I will be gearing up for my next class, Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community. This one-hour webinar will focus on health program ideas, guides, and resources for libraries and community/faith based organizations. I will share how you can integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies into your programs, so that you too can introduce NLM resources to your community in fun and engaging ways! Register to participate on October 22 at 3:00 PM ET.

Michelle Burda, Launching New Services: Just a few weeks ago we announced the launch of NNLM Delivery, our updated platform for document delivery, storage and retrieval that is now available to all NNLM Member institutions. Prior to the launch, Hannah Sinemus and I spent several months in development with the NNLM Web Services Office (NWSO) to complete the upgrade, and create some helpful resources for our users such as the FAQ page and User Guide with video tutorials. We also hosted an information session to prepare our current users for transitioning from MARDelivery, the old version of this service. After the launch, we’re very excited to be hearing from new and long-time users about their experiences with the system; the feedback is invaluable in helping us improve the system even further! If you’re using NNLM Delivery and have questions or comments, please reach out to us via email: nnlmmar@pitt.edu.

Kelsey Cowles, Conferences Galore! A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of traveling to Stony Brook, NY to attend a luncheon with NNLM members and NLM director Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan. Our gracious hosts at Stony Brook University treated us to a tour of their newly renovated health sciences library. I was impressed by their creative use and re-use of spaces! Dr. Brennan also presented a fascinating view of the future of AI and the NLM in the annual Antonija Prelec memorial lecture.

October is a busy month for travel! My colleague Erin Seger (Health Professions Coordinator) and I just returned from exhibiting at the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences conference in Hershey, PA. I will also be speaking and exhibiting at the Pennsylvania Library Association conference in Erie, PA, and at the Upstate NY and Ontario Chapter (UNYOC)of MLA conference in Watkins Glen, NY.

Kate Flewelling, Staff Development: This month, NNLM MAR welcomed new Community Engagement Coordinator Tess Wilson. Tess has an MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh and an MFA in Creative Writing from Chatham University. Tess was most recently at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh where she developed programming for underrepresented populations and promoted the integration of data literacy into community workshops. Two current NNLM MAR staff members were also promoted! Hannah Sinemus, MLIS, is now Web Experience Coordinator for NNLM MAR and the NNLM Web Services Office (NWSO), and Tessa Zindren was promoted to Program Manager.

I have started my term as Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Medical Library Association (MAC-MLA), an organization of health sciences librarians and other information professionals serving the District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina, Virginia, Western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. I am delighted that next year’s conference is in Pittsburgh, home of NNLM MAR. I hope many of our Network members can join us!

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Health Insurance Literacy

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2019-10-08 04:48

It is almost that time of year. Yes, it is time to sign up or renew our health insurance. Many of us have been receiving notices at work regarding the time to review our health insurance and other work benefits. Often we feel unsure of the information we are reviewing. We have an idea of what a deductible or copayment is but we might be uncertain of the difference between a HMO and a PPO.  Not understanding insurance can be costly whether it prevents consumers from using it or from not understanding its coverage.

We are offering a free webinar to help prepare libraries to assist their patrons with health insurance information as they sign up for a plan whether through work, private, or through the federal government. Your library may be one of the many who have received a mini grant from the Public Library Association (PLA) to help prepare them to provide information to their communities during the Healthcare Marketplace Open Enrollment which is from November 1 – December 15 for 2020. This webinar will help librarians address the unmet information needs that leave many unable to make appropriate health insurance choices. For those with lower levels of health insurance literacy, the ability to procure appropriate levels of health insurance coverage may be limited, which can have dire effects on individuals’ health statuses. Addressing this critical information need, Emily Vardell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Management at Emporia State University.

PNR Rendezvous session: “Health Insurance Literacy and How Librarians Can Help”

When: Wednesday, October 16 at 12:00 p.m Alaska | 1:00 p.m. PT | 2:00 p.m. MT (please adjust to your time zone)

How to attend: Registration is encouraged and to learn how to join is on the PNR Rendezvous webpage. The session will be recorded but attending live will allow for questions.

In addition the NNLM supports the PLA insurance enrollment project through the promotion of their posters highlighting the the Healthcare Marketplace enrollment. You may order these directly from the Community Engagement Network webpage.  Questions? Contact the NNLM GMR office at gmr-lib@uiowa.edu.

health insurance PLA posters

Categories: RML Blogs

Virtual Introduction: NNLM SCR 2019 Library Student Outreach Awardees!

SCR News - Mon, 2019-10-07 15:40

Learn more about our students before meeting them this weekend at SCC/MLA 2019!

LIS Students

Clockwise from top left:

Laura Rey
Library Associate II
Texas A&M University

Favorite food: Steak. With a side of steak.

Book or show you’re enjoying and why: Jon Krakauer’s “Into the Wild” because it’s a reminder we all need people.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC: One of the things I’m particularly excited to learn is more about outreach in our region and consider new ideas about outreach and librarianship.

E. Bailey Sterling
University of North Texas

Favorite kind of food: What kind of Texan would I be if I didn’t proudly proclaim my love for tacos?

Book or show you’re enjoying and why: My most recent reads were Capote’s In Cold Blood and Walker’s The Color Purple; both absolutely blew me away. I read these profound masterpieces back-to-back, and my head is still reeling. I had the pleasure of hearing Margaret Atwood speak this month, so I think the next book I dive into will be The Testaments. Right now I’m reading Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach aloud with my children. Children’s lit is my favorite; I have 3 kids, and together we have read aloud thousands of books over the years. Reading with them is my greatest joy.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC: Of specific interest to me are youth and family libraries in medical institutions, and I’m very much looking forward to meeting with industry professionals who could perhaps shed some light on which skills would be most beneficial for me to hone and what family health librarians foresee on the horizon of their profession.

Revathi Vaidyanathan
Library Technician
McKinney Public Library System

Favorite kind of food: Pad Thai

Book currently reading: Educated – a memoir. I love reading biographies and memoirs, but this book is so enthralling. The story is true. It took place 20 years ago. You will have to keep reminding yourself of that because the mindset and ideas discussed sound antiquated, but they are still alive and kicking here in America and that is just crazy! It does take me back to the rural India, where they are prevalent and relate and understand what Tara went through.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC? I am looking forward to understanding the Medical initiatives, Health Outreach programs and network with medical librarians, which I would like to utilize to incorporate at my library as well as move into the field.

Brandy Walthall
Circulation Assistant
Brookhaven College

Favorite kind of food: My favorite kind of food is pizza.

Book or show you’re enjoying and why: Brenda Jackson is one of my favorite authors; I love romance novels! I just started her Catalina Cove Series. I’m currently reading book one: Love in Catalina Cove.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC: I’m excited to learn more about the NLM databases and their resources. I’m also excited to learn more about the outreach initiatives. I’m still exploring my options with my degree, so I think this opportunity will give me a chance to learn more about this field of librarianship.

Categories: RML Blogs

Explore Health Literacy with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA News - Mon, 2019-10-07 09:56

Because it can be challenging to find a compatible health provider, choose health insurance coverage, or understand medical terms, organizations have been observing October as Health Literacy Month since 1999. It is a time to bring attention to the importance of making health information easy to understand and making the health care system easier to navigate. But you don’t have to wait until October. Any time is a good time to become a more informed health consumer.

When it comes to your health, you are your own best advocate. The NNLM Reading Club has selected three books to help you become more knowledgeable and informed.

  • An American Sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal
  • How to be a Patient by Sana Goldberg, RN
  • Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health by Sandro Galea

To learn more about each of these titles and to download book discussion guides, promotional materials and corresponding health  information resources, or to apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book kit, visit the Book Selections and Health Resources: Health Information.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month: Sara Mannheimer

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2019-10-07 08:05

In honor of National Medical Librarians Month in October, we are featuring librarians in the PNR region who are medical/health sciences librarians as well as those who provide health information to their communities.  This week of October 7th, 2019 we are featuring Montana State University’s Sara Mannheimer who is a Data Librarian.  Welcome Sara, to the PNR Dragonfly blog!

BioSketch:

  • Name: Sara Mannheimer
  • Position: Data Librarian
  • Working organization: Montana State University
  • Education history
    • BA in Literature from Bard College
    • MS in Information Science from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Personal Background
    • Sara takes ballet and modern dance classes and she performed in a local dance showcase last month. Sara also play piano and guitar (but she only performs for her partner and her cat!).  Sara was born and raised in Anchorage, Alaska, where she worked as a sea kayak guide in Alaska and the US Virgin Islands in her 20’s, and she still loves being outside—bike commuting, backpacking, camping, and cross-country skiing. Sara is also an enthusiastic extrovert and a believer in the power of community, so spending time with friends is one of her biggest sources of joy.

Interview:

Q1: It’s an honor to have you with us on the Dragonfly Blog -welcome Sara! My first question is related to the theme of medical librarianship as October is National Medical Librarians month.  So, what inspired you to work with medical data?

Thank you! It’s a pleasure to be featured! My work with data began in graduate school at UNC-Chapel Hill, where I studied archives and records management. I got into the world of data archiving through an independent study developing a digital preservation policy for Dryad Digital Repository. During the project, I had invaluable mentorship from Ayoung Yoon (who is now on the iSchool faculty at IUPUI) and Jane Greenberg (now on the iSchool faculty at Drexel). Ayoung was a PhD student at the time, and she collaborated with me on a poster that we presented at the ASIS&T annual meeting. Jane instilled in me a love for metadata and encouraged me to apply to be the Senior Curator at Dryad after I finished my master’s degree. Jane and Ayoung also mentored me by co-authoring a paper describing our digital preservation policy development process. Building on the work I did at Dryad, I decided to move to a tenure track faculty position as Data Librarian at Montana State University (MSU). At MSU, I help with data management planning, coordinate data science workshops, build data-related tools, and conduct research exploring data curation and data ethics.

Working with NNLM-PNR has been a great entrance into medical data. For example, NNLM-PNR just funded a project that will allow me and my colleagues Jason Clark and Jim Espeland to work with a research center on campus to make their restricted health sciences data available to community partners.

Q2:  Tell me, how did you get into data science?

I’m still getting into it! I began my learning process through a couple of Data Carpentries workshops—one at the Research Data Access and Preservation (RDAP) Summit in 2015, and one at the National Data Integrity Conference in 2017, and then I trained to be a certified Carpentries instructor last year. But most of the data science instruction in the library is the result of collaborations across campus. I’m partnering with Allison Theobold, a graduate student in the statistics program who teaches workshops as part of her dissertation project. She and her advisor, Stacey Hancock, have helped create a thriving R workshop series in the library that includes introductory and intermediate R concepts, as well as sessions on data wrangling and data visualization. This year, we’ve extended the partnership to include graduate students from MSU’s Statistical Consulting and Research Services in order to continue to sustain the workshops. These statistics graduate students have strong coding skills, and they are amazing teachers for their peers.

In addition to teaching practical coding skills, I have an interest in big data ethics, and I have done some writing and thinking about the ramifications of data science using social media data. And I have also begun to pursue projects that support “collections as data”—that is, computational analysis for digital collections. This work includes initiatives like making the text of our digital archival collections available for download, and mentoring students to create digital scholarship projects using archival collections. This interactive map created by former MSU student Dillon Monday is a good example of a collections as data project.

Q3:  In your time as Montana State University’s Data Librarian, what has been your most favorite project to date?

I think my favorite project is actually the first grant I was awarded from NNLM-PNR in 2017! The project took an evidence-based approach to creating a data management planning toolkit aimed at health sciences researchers. After identifying a need to improve the data management planning resources that the library provides to the campus community, I proposed a grant to analyze data management plans from grant proposals at MSU, and then to interview principal investigators about their data management practices.

The research I conducted (with fantastic student research assistant Wangmo Tenzing) showed that most investigators practice internal data management in order to prevent data loss, to facilitate sharing within the research team, and to seamlessly continue their research during personnel turnover. However, it also showed that investigators still have room to grow in understanding specialized concepts like metadata and policies for reuse. I used the research results to inform a data management planning toolkit that includes guidance on facilitating findable, reusable, accessible, and reusable data—for example, using metadata standards, assigning licenses to their data, and publishing in data repositories. If you want to read more, I’ve published a talk  and a paper about the project.

Q4:  Are you working on anything new and exciting that you would like to share with us?

I’m getting my PhD right now from Humboldt University in Berlin (with advisor Vivien Petras), and my dissertation is a comparative study of qualitative secondary analysis and social media research. I’m still early in the process, but I’m loving the opportunity to take a deep dive into the topic of qualitative and social media data sharing.

Q5:  To date, what is your favorite data tool?

I’m really enjoying becoming more literate in R. We use RStudio Cloud in our workshops, and it simplifies the setup process for learners. I’m also keeping an eye on the development of Annotation for Transparent Inquiry (ATI), an annotation tool for qualitative research that’s being developed at the Qualitative Data Repository.

Q6:  If you could give one piece of advice/words of wisdom to anyone interested in medical librarianship/data science what would that be?

Collaborate. Our library and academic communities are vibrant and varied, and I’ve done my most impactful work when partnering with colleagues and students. Data librarianship overlaps and connects with many fields, and it’s impossible to have expertise in everything. Working with collaborators allows me to extend my own knowledge, develop better ideas, and provide stronger data services on campus.

Categories: RML Blogs

Recording for the September 2019 NNLM Resource Picks Webinar Is Now Available!

PSR News - Fri, 2019-10-04 18:53

The September 25 recording of the NNLM Resource Picks webinar, Finding Clinically-Relevant Genetic Information, is now available. Peter Cooper, NCBI staff scientist, provides an introduction to resources for finding clinically-relevant genetic information. The webinar also includes an overview and search demonstrations of three NCBI Clinical databases:

  1. Explain the validity of clinical variation information in the ClinVar database.
  2. Locate information about a genetic condition related to a specific list of symptoms using MedGen.
  3. Locate tests for a clinical feature, gene or disease using the Genetic Testing Registry.

View the webinar by clicking on the YouTube video player below or go to the NNLM Resource Picks YouTube page.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

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