National Network of Libraries of Medicine
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Hindi Japanese Korean Persian Portuguese Russian Spanish

RML Blogs

Update: Opioid Public Health Emergency

PSR News - Wed, 2018-10-24 13:54

On October 18, HHS Secretary Alex Azar signed a renewal of determination that a public health emergency exists as a result of the continued consequences of the opioid crisis. For additional information about the public health emergency, visit the following resources:

Opioid Epidemic: Collecting Now for Future Research in Circulating Now, by Susan L. Speaker and Christie Moffat, posted September 27, 2018.

This blog post describes how the National Library of Medicine Web Collecting and Archiving Working Group is archiving web content, including born-digital and social media content. The blog post includes a link to the Archive It web archive.

Opiate Addiction and Treatment Health Information Resources

This page of resources compiled by the NLM Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) includes links to information on addiction, treatment of opioid addictions, pregnancy and neonatal abstinence syndrome, data, and more. It also includes links to searches of NLM resources, including PubMed, the Drug Information Portal, MedlinePlus, and Disaster Lit.

Libraries and the Opioid Crisis Facebook Group

This Facebook group for librarians, administrated by WebJunction, is intended to inform and serve as a resource for library staff and trustees dealing with issues connected to the opioid crisis.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

MLA CHIS Training Opportunity! Health and Wellness at the Library Online Class Starts November 12!

SEA News - Wed, 2018-10-24 12:35

Are you interested in consumer health? Are you interested in a highly interactive, robust learning experience with other engaged librarians? If so, join us! Registration is now open for the 4-week online class Health and Wellness @ the Library: The Essentials of Providing Consumer Health Services. Centered around eight core competencies, this free online course provides a rich learning experience to build all the essential skills for providing consumer health information services. Completing the class gives you all the credits you need to apply for CHIS – the Consumer Health Information Specialization from the Medical Library Association! The course teaches you the tools to learn the demographics and health status of people in your community. Together we will examine issues of literacy, health literacy, and the health information needs of special populations. By understanding the needs of your own community and the information-seeking behaviors of users, you will be prepared with the right tools and resources even before the questions are asked.

From there we will explore authoritative resources for just about any type of health question, apps and mobile health technologies, how people are using social networking for health questions, and how to create fun and informative health-related programming for different age groups and special populations in your community. Participants will learn about core print reference and other materials for library collections, quality web resources beyond the major sites, and tips for helping library users evaluate health materials they encounter on their own.

A new topic area each week will expand on familiar concepts and provide exposure to new concepts, techniques and resources to take your skills to the next level. This course requires a final project; participants will have the opportunity to develop a real program or other project that can be implemented at his or her own workplace.

Important Note: This course is intended for all librarians and staff who serve members of the public, including public librarians, hospital librarians, and academic librarians.  Due to the comprehensive nature of this class, participants can expect to spend between 3 and 4 hours per week to fulfill the requirements of this course. Upon completion of all required coursework, participants will be awarded 12 Medical Library Association (MLA) CE units. In addition, this is an approved CHIS class; participants who complete the class are eligible to apply for Level I or Level II of the Consumer Health Information Specialization from MLA. Anyone who has taken and completed the Stand Up for Health class is not eligible to take this course for CE or CHIS credit. The Stand Up for Health class is based on this course content, and it is only available to public librarians.

NNLM librarians Kelli Ham, Community Engagement Librarian from the Pacific Southwest Region (PSR) and Dana Abbey, Community Engagement Coordinator from the Mid-Continental Region (MCR) are teaming up to teach this class!

The class will run from November 12 through December 14. We will be using Moodle for this free, self-paced class. More information will be sent out to registrants by November 5th. Register now!

Please contact Kelli or Dana by email if you have any questions. Thank you for your interest in this NNLM course!

Kelli Ham

kkham@library.ucla.edu

Dana Abbey

Dana.Abbey@ucdenver.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: What are you doing here?”- Advancing Health Literacy Outside of Medical Libraries

SEA News - Wed, 2018-10-24 08:40

Alex Carroll, MSLS, AHIP
Research Librarian for Engineering and Biotechnology
James B. Hunt Jr. Library
NC State University

As a librarian with “engineering” in his job title, one of the questions I routinely get at medical library conferences is “shouldn’t you be at an engineering conference?” It’s a fair question, since historically there has been a firewall between the clinical research conducted within academic medical centers and the applied science research performed at land-grant research universities. However, with the increased emphasis on interdisciplinary research from funders like the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF), many research teams now utilize engineering approaches to investigate health-related problems, which is creating new opportunities for medical librarians at institutions that aren’t typically thought of as medical libraries. An institutional priority on facilitating interdisciplinary research is exactly what brought me to NC State University, where as a medical librarian I get to do far more than just be a resident expert on PubMed.

One of the communities I support here is the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME), which trains future generations of biomedical engineers to design patient-centered hardware and software solutions in collaboration with clinicians. To supplement the observational field work these students do within local health-care settings, BME students also must learn how to find health information so that they can understand the needs of their patient populations and navigate the complexities of the healthcare economics landscape. At NC State, I teach BME students how to interpret epidemiology data to assess the prevalence of specific diseases and medical conditions, and how to evaluate journal articles and patent literature to assess current treatment options. I also help BME students understand the complexity of bringing a solution to market by demonstrating how to locate relevant FDA regulatory information and discussing which Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes apply to their device for billing and reimbursement. It is immensely rewarding to watch these students’ projects evolve from fuzzy ideas into fully developed prototypes, and occasionally into nationally and internationally renowned undergraduate projects.

Alex Carroll

Alex Carroll introducing a faculty researcher in Hunt Library’s Teaching and Visualization Lab

The mission of land-grant universities is to make the knowledge of the university available to the public, which creates opportunities for librarians with a wide variety of expertise to impact health literacy. At NC State, we help our community members better understanding the complex information systems and news streams that surround them by hosting events that feature leading data journalists like Mona Chalabi and Alberto Cairo. We are embedded within interdisciplinary research institutes like the Comparative Medicine Institute, which facilitates ground-breaking translational research studies. We encourage our researchers to adopt open research practices for the processes and the products of their science, increasing the public’s access to current information on complex medical topics. We don’t just teach students and faculty how to run BLAST searches – we demonstrate how biomolecular databases like Gene can make their findings available to the public. So even if I am one of the only librarians at the NC State who self-identifies as a medical librarian, I am surrounded by colleagues who are advancing health literacy within North Carolina.

Mona ChalabiMona Chalabi, Data Editor at Guardian US, presented on
data visualization in the Hunt Library Auditorium

But perhaps the best thing about working as a medical librarian at an academic research library is the variety of people I get to engage with – each day brings different audiences and different opportunities. On Monday, you’re helping agricultural engineers find schematics for a storm water runoff system that will protect local watersheds. On Tuesday, you’re judging research posters at a graduate student symposium. On Wednesday, you’re showing civil engineering students how to find the standards needed to build a bridge that complies with the newest Environmental Protection Agency regulations. On Thursday, you’re guiding textile engineers through the process of filing a 510(k) for a new medical device. And on Friday, you’re finally getting around to answering those emails from your colleagues in the library that have been piling up since Monday. Although, I suspect that last one isn’t so unique to those of us outside of traditional medical libraries.

Alex Carroll demonstratingAlex Carroll demonstrates using BLAST to find for biological sequence information

So the next time you see a new engineering librarian at MLA Annual, instead of asking why they are there, try asking “what took you so long?”

Categories: RML Blogs

Employment Opportunity: NNLM PSR Education and Outreach Librarian

SEA News - Wed, 2018-10-24 06:44

The NNLM PSR Region is now hiring an Education and Outreach Librarian.

The application deadline for first consideration is November 20, 2018.

Details for this position are available on the UCLA website.

Anyone wishing to be considered for this position should apply online. Applications should include: a cover letter describing qualifications and experience; a current curriculum vitae detailing education and relevant experience; and the names and addresses for three professional references, including a current or previous supervisor. UCLA welcomes and encourages diversity and seeks applications and nominations from women and minorities. UCLA seeks to recruit and retain a diverse workforce as a reflection of commitment to serve the people of California and to maintain the excellence of the university.

For questions, please contact:

Alan Carr, Associate Director

NNLM Pacific Southwest Region

UCLA L. Darling Biomedical Library

(310) 825-7263

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Recruiting for 2019-20 Associate Fellowship Program!

PSR News - Tue, 2018-10-23 15:30

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is accepting applications for its 2019-20 Associate Fellowship program, a one-year training program designed for recent library science graduates (within the past two years) and early-career librarians. All U.S. and Canadian citizens who will have earned a MLS or equivalent degree in library/information science from an ALA-accredited school by August 2019 are eligible to apply. Priority is given to U.S. citizens. Applications and additional information are available on the NLM web site. The application deadline is January 25, 2019. Three to six candidates will be selected for the program.

The September through August program is a one-year residency program (with an optional second year) for recent library science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship, offering a formal curriculum with exposure to library operations, research and development, intramural and extramural research, development and lifecycle of the NLM web-based products and services and the extensive outreach and education program reaching consumers, special populations, health professionals and librarians. In the second half of the year, Associate Fellows have the opportunity to choose projects based on real-world problems proposed by library divisions and work with librarians and library staff over a six-seven month period. Successful projects have led to peer-reviewed publications and to services that have become a regular part of the services and products of the NLM. The program is located at the National Library of Medicine on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD.

The Associate Fellowship provides knowledge and skills in project work ranging from:

  • Data analysis of programs and services such as extramural grants, indexed journal articles, controlled vocabularies, datasets, and customer inquiries.
  • Creation of online tutorials and educational awareness videos.
  • Social media outreach.
  • And more, including legislative tracking, web site enhancement, disaster information outreach studies, and review of next generation discovery interfaces.

The Associate Fellowship financial support includes:

  • Annual stipend of $56,233.
  • Additional funding to support purchase of group health insurance.
  • Up to $1,500 in relocation support.
  • Full support for attendance at local and national conferences.

For questions, contact Kathel Dunn, Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Open Access Week 2018

MCR News - Tue, 2018-10-23 15:07

Open Access Week is observed every year October. It is a global celebration of “the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need.”  This year, the theme is “designing equitable foundations for open knowledge.”

Libraries, academic institutions, and other organizations throughout our region are marking this week with a variety of events:

You can learn more at the Open Access Week website, where you can also search for events in your area.

/al

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Recruiting for 2019-2020 Associate Fellows

SEA News - Tue, 2018-10-23 12:57

Positions: National Library of Medicine Associate Fellows

The NLM Associate Fellowship Program offers a fellowship for recent library science graduates with a formal curriculum including library operations, research and development, intramural and extramural research, development and lifecycle of the NLM web-based products and services and the extensive outreach and education program reaching consumers, special populations, health professionals and librarians. In the second half of the year, Associate Fellows have the opportunity to choose projects based on real-world problems proposed by library divisions and work with librarians and library staff over a six-seven month period. Successful projects have led to peer-review publications and to services that have become a regular part of the services and product of the National Library of Medicine.

You will:

  • Select projects ranging from operations to research and development; project opportunities are in data science, data management, open science, public access, vocabularies and ontologies, consumer health, common data elements, genetics, natural language processing, imaging, digital humanities, software preservation, exhibits, policy, and digital communication
  • Grow professionally and learn in a cohort, participating in an established curriculum, as well as through informal facilitated learning workshops, and informational interviews
  • Experience rotations such as to the NIH Library (by arrangement); Clinical Informationist experience at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Network and shadow senior staff at the National Library of Medicine
  • Develop leadership skills through a leadership curriculum, behavioral assessments, and regular self-development activities
  • Receive support from experienced mentors
  • Attend professional conferences, including the Medical Library Association’s annual meeting, the American Medical Informatics Association annual meeting, and the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of MLA annual meeting
  • Have an opportunity for a second optional year depending on fellow interest and available placements/institutions/proposals

How many: Between 3 and 6 Associate Fellows selected each year

Fellowship: One-year to learn about the National Library of Medicine, its products and services; A second optional year depending on fellow interest and available placements/institutions/proposals

Where: National Library of Medicine, campus of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

When: September 1, 2019 – August 31, 2020

Stipend: $56,233; Additional financial support for the purchase of health insurance; Up to $1,500 in relocation funding

Eligibility: Recent graduate (within the past two years) with a master’s in information science/library science

Deadline for applications: January 25, 2019

Apply online here

Contact information: Kathel Dunn, Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator at 301.827.4284 or kathel.dunn@nih.gov

Who is eligible?

All U.S. and Canadian citizens who will have earned a MLS or equivalent degree in library/information science from an ALA-accredited school by August 2019. Both recent graduates and librarians early in their career are welcome to apply.  Priority is given to U.S. citizens.

Applications and additional information are available on the Web at Associate Fellowship Program: How to Apply. Application deadline is January 25, 2019. Between 3 and 6 fellows will be selected for the program.

Feel free to contact Kathel Dunn, Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator at 301-827-4284 or kathel.dunn@nih.gov

The National Library of Medicine is located on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC. The 317-acre campus boasts plenty of green space, where we have regular cultural events for staff and the public. Excellent restaurants, shops, transportation, and entertainment make Bethesda a great place to work, and the wealth of museums, monuments, parks, sports and cultural activities in the Washington metropolitan area provides ample recreation opportunities. A metro subway station (Medical Center on the red line) and bus stops on the NIH campus provide access to DC, suburban Maryland, and North Virginia. We also have free parking.

NLM and NIH are dedicated to building a workforce that reflects diversity. NLM hires, promotes, trains, and provides career development based on merit, without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex (including gender identity), parental status, marital status, sexual orientation, age, disability, genetic information, or political affiliation.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

National Take Back Day is October 27

MCR News - Tue, 2018-10-23 12:09

Prescription Drug Take-Back Day is Saturday, October 27, 2018 from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. National Take-Back Day is a safe, convenient, and responsible way to dispose of unused or expired prescription drugs.

The last Take-Back Day brought in almost 1 million pounds of unused or expired prescription medication. This is the largest amount collected since the program began in 2010.

This brings the total amount of prescription drugs collected by DEA since the fall of 2010 to 9,964,714 pounds, or 4,982 tons.

Locate a Collection Site Near You: https://takebackday.dea.gov/.

Categories: RML Blogs

Health Sciences Librarians of Illinois Annual Conference – Rivers of Data, Streams of Knowledge

GMR News - Tue, 2018-10-23 10:18

The Health Sciences Librarians of Illinois received a GMR Professional Development award for 3 CE courses at the annual conference, held September 26-28 at the Cliffbreakers Riverside Hotel and Conference Center in Rockford, Illinois.

Attendees learned how to plan and develop working relationships in Building Partnerships with Faculty, Clinicians, and Other Stakeholders, with Gwen Wilson, the Health Informatics Coordinator/Librarian at Washburn University in Topeka, KS. Erin Foster, Data Services Librarian at the Indiana University School of Medicine provided information on Data Management in the Wild. A trio from the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, including Peg Burnette, Assistant Professor and Biomedical Sciences Librarian, Erin Kerby, Veterinary Medicine Librarian and Amanda Avery, a student at the iSchool inspired us to create or improve Your Online Professional Identity – Using Professional Profile Systems to Your Best Advantage.

Erin Foster addresses Data Management learning objectives 

Erin Foster addresses Data Management learning objectives

Gwen Wilson overviewing the course

Gwen Wilson overviewing the courseCourse evaluations were very positive and many learners had immediate plans to make use of what they learned. HSLI is grateful to GMR for the professional development funding, which helped our small organization provide excellent continuing education for members.

Amanda Avery, Erin Kerby, Peg Burnette, being introduced by Ramune Kubilius

Amanda Avery, Erin Kerby, Peg Burnette, being introduced by Ramune Kubilius

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Traveling Exhibits – An Opportunity for SEA Network Members

SEA News - Tue, 2018-10-23 08:37

The National Library of Medicine Exhibition Program creates lively and informative exhibitions and resources that enhance awareness of and appreciation for the collection and health information resources of the National Library of Medicine. These exhibitions and supportive educational resources engage diverse audiences and explore a variety of topics in the history of medicine. The National Library of Medicine provides traveling banner exhibitions free of charge to public, university, and medical libraries, as well as cultural centers across the country. Each exhibition has an accompanying web presence with additional resources and activity ideas.

NLM is making several exhibitions available exclusively to NNLM member organizations. If you have wanted to host an exhibition but were intimidated by years-long waiting periods, now is your chance to bring an exhibition to your library, school or community setting.

Exhibition availability varies – dates are available from January 2019 until April 2021. Please visit this post to see what exhibits are available to NNLM Network Members.

Details:

  • A set itinerary of 6-week booking periods will be established that will allow for up to 6 host venues per 12-month period.
    • We will do our best to accommodate each request.
    • Schedules will be finalized in mid-December.
  • Each host library will be responsible for the cost and arrangements for outgoing shipping from their library to the next host library.*
    • FEDEX 3-day super saver service is the required shipping method.
    • For those without a FEDEX account, another reliable service such as UPS or DHL may be used as long as it meets the 3-day service with tracking.
  • NLM will provide support to host libraries by providing exhibitor resources to assist with hosting. Additional information provided includes:
    • Outgoing shipping information to know where and when to ship the exhibition next.
  • Host institutions will be required to complete a brief survey about their experience hosting the exhibit.

Once you know when/if your organization is hosting an exhibition, consider organizing related programming around the exhibition.

* Shipping costs, guest speaker and other programming fees are a great use of NNLM SEA Project Awards. NNLM SEA Network Members may be able to apply for an Exhibitor Award to offset shipping costs. Currently applications are closed. Requests for proposals will be announced in early 2019 for projects from May 1, 2019 to April 30, 2020.

To see which exhibitions are available and to indicate your interest in hosting, please complete the NLM Traveling Exhibition Form by November 9, 2018. You may need to sign in to your NNLM Account to prior to accessing the form.

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Traveling Exhibit Availability to NNLM Network Members

SEA News - Tue, 2018-10-23 08:36

The National Library of Medicine Traveling Exhibition Program creates lively and informative exhibitions and resources that enhance awareness of and appreciation for the collection and health information resources of the National Library of Medicine. These exhibitions and supportive educational resources engage diverse audiences and explore a variety of topics in the history of medicine. The National Library of Medicine provides traveling banner exhibitions free of charge to public, university, and medical libraries, as well as cultural centers across the country. Each exhibition has an accompanying web presence with additional resources and activity ideas.

NLM is making several exhibitions available exclusively to NNLM member organizations. If your institution is interested in hosting any one of these exhibits, please visit this post to learn how!

A Voyage to Health – Explores the history of Kaho’olawe and traditional voyaging, and how the resurgence of Native Hawaiian culture helped heal the soul of the community. (Available Now)

Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine in Harry Potter’s World – The magic in J.K. Rowling’s series of Harry Potter novels is partially based on Renaissance traditions which played an important role in the development of Western Sciences, including alchemy, astrology, and natural philosophy. (Available December 2018)

Surviving and Thriving: AIDS, Politics, and Culture – The title comes from a book written in 1987 by and for people with AIDS that insisted people could live with AIDS, not just die from it. Jennifer Brier, the exhibition curator, explains that “Centering the experience of people with AIDS allows us to see how critical they were and continue to be, in the political and medical fight against HIV/AIDS.” (Available December 2018)

Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health – Examines stories of the community groups that are making a difference in global health around. (Available January 2019)

Opening Doors: Contemporary African American Academic Surgeons – Recognizes the achievements of early black physicians who not only became skilled practitioners, but also educators and trailblazers and highlights contemporary surgeons and educators who exemplify excellence in their fields. (Available April 2019)

Every Necessary Care and Attention: George Washington and Medicine – During Washington’s lifetime, with the practice of medicine slowly becoming a licensed profession, he called on a growing class of experts and new knowledge about the spread and prevention of disease. Even so, Washington encountered the limits of medicine when faced with serious illness. (Available May 2019)

Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War – Explores the experiences of disabled veterans and their role as symbols of the fractured nation. (Available June 2019)

The Literature of Prescription: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and “The Yellow Wall-paper” – Explores the story behind Gilman’s indictment of the medical profession in her short story titled “The Yellow Wall-paper” and the social conventions she encountered which restricted women’s professional and creative opportunities. (Available June 2019)

“And there’s the humor of it”: Shakespeare and the four humors – The four bodily humors – blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm- were understood by Shakespeare, and the generations before him to define people’s physical and mental health and to determine an individual’s personality, as well. (Available August 2019)

From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry – Explores some of the processes, problems, and potentials inherent in technologies that use microorganisms for health and commercial purposes. (Available August 2019)

Confronting Violence: Improving Women’s Lives – In the latter half of the 20th century nurses pushed the larger medical community to recognize the harm of domestic violence, to adequately respond to victims’ needs, and to work towards prevention. (Available December 2019)

Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine – The participation of African American men and women in the war effort challenged the prescribed notions of both race and gender, and pushed the boundaries of the role of blacks in America. (Available April 2020)

For All the People: A Century of Citizen Action in Health Care Reform – Tells the lesser-known story of how movements of ordinary citizens helped shape the changing American health care system. (Available January 2021)

Pick Your Poison: Intoxicating Pleasures and Medical Prescriptions – Explores the factors that have shaped the changing definitions of some of our most potent drugs, from medical miracle to social menace. (Available January 2021)

Categories: RML Blogs

Apply for the 2019-2020 NLM Associate Fellowship Program

MAR News - Tue, 2018-10-23 08:00

The National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program is a one-year residency program for recent library science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship. The program combines curriculum and project work and is located at the National Library of Medicine on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

The Program offers a formal curriculum with exposure to library operations, research and development, intramural and extramural research, development and lifecycle of the NLM web-based products and services, and the extensive outreach and education program reaching consumers, special populations, health professionals and librarians. In the second half of the year, Associate Fellows have the opportunity to choose projects based on real-world problems proposed by library divisions and work with librarians and library staff over a six-seven month period. Successful projects have led to peer-review publications and to services that have become a regular part of the services and product of the National Library of Medicine.

The Associate Fellowship provides knowledge and skills in project work ranging from:

  • Fundamentals of data science, and projects in data wrangling, data analysis, data visualization, programming, and data policy
  • Creation of online tutorials and educational videos, conducting user needs assessments
  • Development of an in-depth understanding of the development, production, implementation of NLM product and services

The Associate Fellowship offers opportunities for professional development through:

  • Participation in lectures, exercises, conferences, short and extended visits to other health sciences libraries
  • Workshops on work style, resume review, negotiation, and presentation skills
  • Mentorship from a program coordinator and NLM staff who serve as preceptors

Applicants that are selected for the Associate Fellowship will:

  • Select projects ranging from operations to research and development; project opportunities are in data science, data management, open science, public access, vocabularies and ontologies, consumer health, common data elements, genetics, natural language processing, imaging, digital humanities, software preservation, exhibits, policy, and digital communication
  • Grow professionally and learn in a cohort, participating in an established curriculum, as well as through informal facilitated learning workshops, and informational interviews
  • Rotate to the NIH Library (by arrangement); Clinical Informationist experience at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Network and shadow senior staff at the National Library of Medicine
  • Develop leadership skills through a leadership curriculum, behavioral assessments, and regular self-development activities
  • Receive support from experienced mentors
  • Attend national professional conferences, including the Medical Library Association’s annual meeting, the American Medical Informatics Association annual meeting, and the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of MLA annual meeting
  • Potentially complete a second year fellowship at a health sciences library in the United States (based on funding)
Details

Between 3 and 6 Associate Fellows are selected each year. NLM is currently accepting applications for the 2019-2020 program, September 1, 2019-August 31, 2020.

Eligibility:

  • Master’s degree in an ALA-accredited library/information science program, earned by August of the year of appointment or within 2 years. (Undergraduate degree can be in any major.)
  • United States or Canadian citizenship
    *Note: Canadians with ALA-accredited Master’s degrees should use the same application process as U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens will receive first preference.
  • Desirable, but not essential: work experience in a library or health sciences environment; demonstrated interest or experience in leadership

Benefits:

  • Annual stipend of $56,233
  • Additional funding to support purchase of group health insurance
  • Up to $1,500 in relocation support
  • Full support for attendance at local and national conferences

Deadline for applications: January 25, 2019.

Interested parties can submit an application online. For more information about the program, contact Kathel Dunn, Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator, via email: kathel.dunn@nih.gov or telephone: (301) 827-4284.

About the National Library of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine is located on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC. The 317-acre campus boasts plenty of green space, where they have regular cultural events for staff and the public. Excellent restaurants, shops, transportation, and entertainment make Bethesda a great place to work, and the wealth of museums, monuments, parks, sports and cultural activities in the Washington metropolitan area provides ample recreation opportunities. A metro subway station (Medical Center on the red line) and bus stops on the NIH campus provide access to DC, suburban Maryland, and North Virginia. They also have free parking.

NLM and NIH are dedicated to building a workforce that reflects diversity. NLM hires, promotes, trains, and provides career development based on merit, without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex (including gender identity), parental status, marital status, sexual orientation, age, disability, genetic information, or political affiliation.

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Mourns the Loss of Elizabeth Fee, PhD, former Chief of the NLM History of Medicine Division

PSR News - Mon, 2018-10-22 17:42
Elizabeth Fee talking in front of a podium

Elizabeth Fee

Elizabeth Fee, PhD, died from complications of ALS, on October 17, 2018. Dr. Fee served most recently as NLM Senior Historian and previously as Chief of the NLM History of Medicine Division (HMD). She recently retired to become an independent researcher, continuing her world-renowned scholarly research in the history of medicine and public health. Dr. Fee was born in Ireland in December, 1946, daughter of John Fee and Deirdre Fee. As a child, she traveled with her parents to China, Malaysia, India, Egypt and throughout Europe and Great Britain, eventually going to school in her native Ireland. She was a Cambridge scholar, completing her coursework in biology, although equally gifted in mathematics. She continued her education at Princeton University where she earned her PhD in the History of Philosophy and Science. Dr. Fee began teaching at the State University of New York at Binghamton and was extremely popular as a scholar of science and medical history, as well as new and controversial courses in human sexuality. She moved to Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in Baltimore in the 1980s, where she was a professor. Baltimore is also where she met and fell in love with her lifetime partner and wife, Mary Garafolo, an artist and a nurse. They married in Vancouver, Canada, in 2005.

Following her tenure at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Fee dedicated twenty-two years of outstanding service to NLM, as chief of the History of Medicine Division. In this leadership role, she supported internal staff development, and brought subject specialists from all over the world to surface and explore the rich historical collections held by NLM. Under her leadership, HMD reached new levels of global access and support for broadly-based scholarship. These were some of her proudest achievements alongside paving the way for the division to restructure formally to include three sections: Rare Books and Early Manuscripts, Images and Archives, and the Exhibition Program, with which we are all familiar today. Combined with widespread support of the value of history as part of NLM’s institutional mission, this administrative accomplishment confirmed and assured the role of the history of medicine for future generations as NLM continues to grow, to reach millions of individuals annually, and to share important historical medical stories and connect them to current events which inform the lives of NLM’s many stakeholders.

Over the course of her entire career, Dr. Fee authored, co-authored, edited, or co-edited nearly thirty scholarly books and hundreds of articles, all containing her masterful prose which inspires new ways of learning and understanding the history of medicine and public health, and its significance for today and the future. Dr. Fee’s impressive body of scholarship will continue to help us understand profoundly that key figures and major events of the past have valuable currency today as we think critically about public health, epidemic disease, and the interplay of science and society as it touches of the lives of millions of people, as it has for centuries.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM to Discontinue PubMed Health on October 31, 2018

MCR News - Mon, 2018-10-22 11:37

Just a reminder that the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will discontinue PubMed Health effective October 31, 2018. Much of the content in PubMed Health is available in other NLM resources such as PubMed, Bookshelf, and MedlinePlus. For more information on this change, please see the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: RML Blogs

Tox Town Redesign

MCR News - Mon, 2018-10-22 11:26

Tox Town, which provides consumer-level information on everyday locations and situations where toxic chemical exposure might occur, has some new design features and content organization. Due to low usage, the Website no longer contains Spanish language materials.  For more information, please see the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Meet Marlena Barber, MLIS – From Internships to Professional Service to Assistant Director: How to Chart your Course as a Medical Librarian

SEA News - Mon, 2018-10-22 08:11
Marlene Barber

Marlena Barber, MLIS
Assistant Director of Collections and Historical Services
Laupus Health Sciences Library
East Carolina University – Greenville, NC

“Volunteer at libraries and archives while still in school. Look into internships, including virtual internships if available.”

Yunting Fu, MLS
Research, Education & Outreach Librarian
School of Nursing Librarian
Health Sciences & Human Services Library
University of Maryland – Baltimore, MD

When I first met Marlena Barber, the Assistant Director of Collections and Historical Services at Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University in 2013, she had been on board as a Collection Services & Metadata Librarian for a couple months. We started to get familiar with each other by sitting on the same committees and going to various meetings and events. The more I got to know her, the more I was impressed by how much extra work she has taken on besides the job responsibilities, and amazed by how well she was able to manage all of them.

So when I learned that she recently moved up to the position of Assistant Director, I took the chance to interview her with the hope she can share her wisdom of building a successful career, and more importantly, to inspire those who want to follow the path of medical librarianship.

What is your expert area in librarianship, and what are your main job responsibilities?
I believe that cataloging resources would be my specialized area in librarianship (though, there’s always more to learn with evolving technologies!). I provide guidance with collection development, collection management, and material donation management for electronic, print circulating, and historical collections at the Laupus Health Sciences Library. I also currently supervise five direct reports and six indirect reports.

What do you strive to accomplish in your current job?
Currently, I am working toward increasing efficiencies with resource description of the library’s circulating and online materials. I am also completing various courses with the American Association of State and Local History to broaden my knowledge set in managing historical collections. My goal is to complete work that will lead to increased educational opportunities for our students, faculty and staff, and members of the community who use and view our resources.

What is the biggest misconception people may have about your job?
People might think I work a lot with physical books and helping guests of the library, but that’s actually a rarity for me. My work is primarily behind the scenes working with electronic resources, historical items, and the employees at the library.

What does a typical work day involve?
It is a variety. Some items that usually happen daily are me reviewing and responding to emails, attending meetings, reviewing cataloged records from an employee who I have been training, corresponding with our sister library on various technical issues, and planning events, exhibits, and projects with employees. For instance, a research project I am working on for the Charleston Conference spurred a new project today of upgrading a large number of catalog records for electronic resources.

What makes your job unique?
I do such a variety of work, but it is tied together in that I oversee resource description for a variety of material types including the library’s circulating resources, the archival collections, and the artifacts. I supervise three departments at my library: Collection Services, History Collections, and The Country Doctor Museum. I oversee collection development, historical event programming, exhibit development, and I work on promotion of each at the library. My work with the museum is primarily administrative, but I also aid in promoting the collections and events and in staffing needs from the library.

What aspect do you like least of your job?
Delivering negative feedback or news to employees would be the thing I like the least.

What advice would you like to impart to current and future LIS students who are considering a career path similar to yours?
Take coursework both in cataloging and in archives to broaden your knowledge base. Volunteer at libraries and archives while still in school. Look into internships, including virtual internships if available.

After become a librarian, get involved in academic and professional organizations: I am Past Chair of MLA’s Technical Services Section. I have chaired and served on a number of search committees at the library level. I serve on a university committee that works on various issues regarding Faculty Welfare. I also recently completed two years of service as a faculty senator. All of this committee work has helped me get to learn about the different work that is going on all over campus.

Categories: RML Blogs

DOCLINE 6.0 preview coming in November!

MCR News - Fri, 2018-10-19 18:44

The preview period for the newly redesigned DOCLINE 6.0 will begin in November 2018; watch for an email with your library’s invitation. During the preview, please confirm your login and connection to your library.

As you might imagine, NLM DOCLINE customer support resources are limited.  In order to provide support to each library that needs it, there will be phased login testing over multiple weeks. You will receive an email when your individual preview period begins.

The existing system will be available until DOCLINE 6.0 is ready for borrowing and lending.

If you have any questions, please send them to the NLM Help Desk or refer to the documentation.

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar Discusses Reaching Latino Population

MCR News - Fri, 2018-10-19 13:38

Hear how one agency reached Latinos in rural Minnesota at a webinar on Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities Through Virtual Community Health and Wellness Workshops on Wednesday, Oct. 24, from 1-2 pm CT.

The session offered by the Greater Midwest Regional Medical Library will describe how CLUES (Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio) designed, implemented, and evaluated a virtual health and wellness workshop series covering mental health and wellness topics and targeting the Latino community. The session will wrap up with considerations for other organizations when targeting outreach efforts to the Latino population within their hard-to-reach rural communities.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2018-10-19 12:05

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

The MAReport: read the Summer/Fall 2018 issue of the MAReport newsletter! This quarter, Health Professions Coordinator Erin Seger wrote about her experiences at the 17th annual Philadelphia Trans Wellness Conference, and LGBT health information needs in her article, “LGBT Health Information Resources.”

Member Highlights: Stony Brook University, Southampton, NY – learn about how the Applied Health Informatics Program at Stony Brook used NNLM MAR funding to conduct a Wellness Fair for seniors, and later encorporated the project into the curriculum of the AHI program, providing students with a “real-life” learning experience. Has your organization developed a similar program? Share your story with us to receive a Member Highlight on the MARquee!

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Awards: NNLM MAR is accepting applications for the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Award, for projects that broaden access to, and awareness of health information resources, aim to increase health literacy for the general public in their service community, and raise awareness of the All of Us Research Program. Applications are due November 9 (for projects between $20,000 and $50,000) and November 16 (for projects up to $19,000). If funded, all projects must be completed by April 30, 2019.

New Opportunity for NNLM MAR members: apply to host a traveling exhibition – complete a brief survey by November 9 to indicate your interest in hosting a traveling exhibition from the National Library of Medicine.

The Fall 2018 offering for The Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey’s Group Licensing Initiative (HSLANJ GLI) is still available. MAR members are eligible for this cost-saving opportunity! The deadline to participate is Friday, November 9. Interested in future participation? Join us on November 5 for a 1-hour webinar to learn more about the HSLANJ GLI, with Project Manager Robert T. Mackes!

Meet MAR Staff: Michelle Burda, Education and Health Literacy Coordinator for NNLM MAR,  will be presenting Engage for Health: Taking an Active Role in Your Health Care, at the Where to Turn Resource Fair in Pittsburgh, PA on Tuesday, October 23, 2018. She will be exhibiting and sharing NLM’s health information with social service, human resource, education and health care professionals from the Western PA region.

NLM/NIH News

Data in the Scholarly Communications Solar SystemNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Laughter at the National Library of Medicine?NLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

“Fit to Fight”: Home front Army doctors and VD during WW ICirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NLM Funding Opportunity: Information Resource Grants to Reduce Health Disparities – This funding opportunity announcement calls for projects that develop and deploy a new information resource or service, or expand and improve an existing resource or service in order to meet the needs of a health disparity population. The application deadline is October 22, 2018, by 5:00 PM local time of the applicant organization.

NIH Request for Information on Proposed Provisions for a Future Draft Data Management and Sharing Policy: On October 10, 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a Request for Information (RFI) in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts to solicit public input on proposed key provisions that could serve as the foundation for a future NIH policy for data management and sharing. The feedback they obtain will help to inform the development of a draft NIH policy for data management and sharing, which is expected to be released for an additional public comment period upon its development. Comments on the proposed key provisions will be accepted through December 10, 2018. To further engage stakeholders, NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the proposed key provisions on November 7, 2018, from 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. ET.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

All are webinars, unless noted. Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities Through Virtual Community Health and Wellness Workshops – October 24, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by GMR, this session will provide attendees with background information about the Latino community, inlcuding demographics and health issues, both in the United States and in Minnesota. The presenters will describe how they designed, implemented, and evaluated a virtual health and wellness workshop series, covering mental health and wellness topics, targeting the Latino community in rural Minnesota towns. The session will wrap up with considerations that other organizations can use when targeting outreach efforts to the Latino population within their local and hard-to-reach rural communities.

NNLM Wikipedia Fall 2018 Edit-a-thon training – October 31, 2:00-2:30 PM ET – Register for this three-part training series in preparation for our Fall 2018 Edit-a-thon! Are you interested in improving the consumer health information available on Wikipedia? Do you want to utilize your librarian research skills towards making Wikipedia a better, evidence-based resource? Have you always wanted to participate in an edit-a-thon? This final session will provide a highlight of women’s health resources from the National Library of Medicine, including how to identify and evaluate pertinent information resources for possible use during the edit-a-thon.

HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative – November 5, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join MAR for this webinar about the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey’s Group Licensing Initiative (HSLANJ GLI). Project Manager Robb Mackes will provide an overview of the GLI, including the benefits and what you need to consider in order to participate. If you have been thinking about participating, this is a perfect opportunity to have your questions answered! All medical librarians in a 20-state area including the NNLM’s Middle Atlantic (MAR), Southeastern/Atlantic (SE/A), and New England (NER) Regions are welcome to participate in this technology-sharing, cost-cutting consortium.

Help Us Combat the World’s Most Dangerous Animal with an App! – November 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – Mosquitoes are the world’s most dangerous animal, and there is something we can all do to reduce the threat of mosquito-transmitted disease in our communities. Join SCR for this webinar to find out why mosquitoes are so dangerous and to learn how NASA Earth-observing satellite data is being used in an effort to predict, monitor, and respond to vector-borne disease around the world. In this presentation, participants will be introduced to a program that connects with citizen scientists of all ages to monitor changes in the frequency, range, and distribution of potential disease vector mosquitoes by reporting observations using the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper app.

Inside Our Minds – November 16, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Inside Our Minds is a Pittsburgh-based organization that works to elevate the voices of people with lived experience of mental illness and madness. As an entirely peer-controlled organization, Inside Our Minds works in response to the lack of people with lived experience of the mental health system involved in leading and advising mental health advocacy organizations. Sponsored by MAR, this webinar will discuss the foundations of Inside Our Minds and its commitment to community-based radical mental health programming, providing an overview of what Inside Our Minds offers and why it is important for our community.

Understanding Grief After an Overdose Death – November 28, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Sponsored by NER, this webinar focuses on the dynamics of grief after a death caused by substance use. It begins with a look at three key questions people bereaved by an overdose death commonly ask themselves: “Why did the person die from an overdose?” “Did the person intend to die?” “Was the death preventable?” It also covers the stigma, stress, and trauma that can come with grief after a death from substance use, and it considers issues that begin to influence survivors’ experience of grief and loss long before a death occurs, such as struggling with a loved one’s addiction and the demands of caring for a chronically ill person.

Understanding the Opioid Crisis: Where do I begin? – November 28, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – An estimated 1.9 million people in the U.S. have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder. Sponsored by MAR, this class will help you to understand what addiction and opioids are and where you can find authoritative information to understand this complex epidemic. Participants will learn about many resources and explore ideas for their use in community outreach education and programs. This class is appropriate for anyone providing health information to the general public including public and medical librarians, patient or community educators and healthcare professionals.

New classes on-demand! Looking for more self-paced learning opportunities? Check out the new Community Health Maps online course from the National Library of Medicine. This class will help you gain the skills needed to assist communities and individuals collect and map health-related data: to build a plan for collecting data; to create the forms for capturing data points; to use a mobile device to collect the data; and to visualize health data by creating online and printable maps that can be customized to meet the needs of your audience and stakeholders.

Other Items of Interest

Job posting: Electronic Resources Librarian, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scott Memorial Library at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.

Grants.gov will be down for maintenance October 20-22, 2018 to allow for a system upgrade. Details.

October is Health Literacy Month – health.gov, from the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2018 – NLPPW, held October 21-27, 2018, is a call to action to bring together families, individuals, community-based organizations, state and local governments and others, to increase lead poisoning prevention awareness and increase efforts to reduce childhood exposure to lead.

Diversity in Clinical Research – Monday, October 22, 2:00 PM ET – The Office of Minority Health at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will host this one-hour webinar to discuss strategies for increasing Hispanic enrollment in clinical trials.  The FDA does not conduct clinical trials, but relies on data discovered in them to determine whether medical products are safe and effective. Participation from certain populations, however, is low.  As of the 2010 Census nearly ten percent of the population in rural and small-towns is Hispanic, making them the largest minority group in these areas.

Learn About the Rural Health Research Gateway – Tuesday, October 23, 3:30 PM ET – Hear from Dr. Shawnda Schroeder, principal investigator of the Rural Health Research Gateway, as she gives a brief overview of the Gateway and how the website and its resources can benefit rural community programs and State Offices of Rural Health. In this 30-minute presentation, Schroeder will discuss how to use the resources available, and why rural health research is important for rural community and healthcare facility planning.

Seeking Applications to Curb the Public Health Impact of Unhealthy Alcohol Use – AHRQ Views

Who Doesn’t Love a Good Story? Using Stories in Academic and Community-Based Health Education – November 7, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Are you looking for ways to grab attention, increase recall, and improve understanding in your bioscience, clinical, or community-based health information literacy skills courses or workshops? Stories are a well-documented means for accomplishing these goals! They are an innovative pedagogical tool that supports active learning, builds context, transcends culture, and brings complex ideas to life. Join this MLA webinar to gain fundamental knowledge and strategies on using stories in health education. You will discuss benefits and challenges of using stories and experience, and interact with stories as part of your learning. And you will leave inspired to spin tales in your next class! #MLAStories. The cost of this webinar is $65 for MLA members/ $85 for non-members.

Easy Steps to Building a Team-Based Systematic Review Service-A new model – Novemver 9, 9:30 AM-12:00 PM ET – The Philadelphia chapter of MLA is sponsoring a CE course at Temple’s Ginsburg Library. If you are interested in implementing a team-based systematic review service at your library, but don’t know where to begin, this course is for you. It will support librarians who have to educate, guide, and support researchers throughout all stages of the process. This interactive course will consist of hands-on learning activities, give you the tools to be successful, and perhaps the confidence needed to lead a systematic review team! Earn 2 MLA CE credits and meet with your local library colleagues during this engaging class. Lunch and CE credits included with cost.

Apply now to participate in the 2019 Critical Appraisal Institute for Librarians! – Craving more confidence in leading EBM sessions for medical students? Puzzled on how to guide students about study design and in depth critical appraisal? Frustrated with statistics? This six week online program will develop librarian’s critical appraisal skills via enhanced understanding of research design, biomedical statistics, and clinical reasoning to apply knowledge in teaching target populations. The program will take place January 23-March 4, 2019. Participants may be eligible for up to 35 MLA CE credits (approval pending).

Call for Applications to the MLA Research Training Institute (RTI) – Apply by December 1 for this week-long residential workshop that provides librarians and library information professionals with the opportunity to work intensively on research design and planning to conduct research, that improves practice and adds to the professional knowledgebase. The workshop will be held in Chicago from July 15–19, 2019.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – October 19, 2018

SEA News - Fri, 2018-10-19 08:28

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Celebrating National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunity

Webinars October 22-26

Webinars October 29 – November 2

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Pages