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RML Blogs

Join over a dozen NIH Institutes and Centers for #NIHhealthy2018!

SEA News - Thu, 2018-01-11 12:33

An NIH-wide social media event next week is planned to help people start the new year off right! The #NIHhealthy2018 campaign will include:

  • A four-hour Twitter town hall on January 16, 2018 from 12:00-4:00 p.m. ET. The town hall will include a Periscope live video panel at 12:00, and a Q&A with NIH Director Francis Collins at 2:30. Throughout the four hours, NIH Institutes and Centers will be sharing information on managing stress and anxiety (12:00-1:00); healthy eating, exercise, and healthy aging (1:00-2:00); General health and wellness, and disease prevention (2:00-3:00); and kicking unhealthy habits (3:00-4:00). Follow the conversation and ask your questions on Twitter using the hashtag #NIHhealthy2018.
  • A Facebook Live event on January 18th at 1:00. The Facebook Live will cover the same four topics listed above, and will feature experts from NIA, NIMH, NHLBI, and NCI. Tune in atwww.facebook.com/nih.gov/ on Thursday at 1:00 p.m. ET with your questions.

We hope that you’ll be able to participate!

NIH Healthy 2018 Schedule

 

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM On-Demand Online Asynchronous Moodle Classes Open for Enrollment

SEA News - Thu, 2018-01-11 12:22

NNLM introduces four asynchronous on-demand Moodle classes in 2018! You will be able to take these year-round and at your own pace. Modifications were made to existing classes to eliminate interactions with fellow students; and instead, you’ll interact directly with the class facilitator to get feedback on your assignments.

Here are descriptions of each of the classes available:

Making PubMed Work for You – This beginning level class will help to improve your effectiveness in searching PubMed, the National Library of Medicine’s free, public interface to the MEDLINE database of biomedical journal literature citations. Look for Automatic Term Mapping, Managing Search Results, the Details box and applying filters in Module 1.  Searching with MeSH will be covered in Module 2. In Module 3, we will look at My NCBI and the Topical Queries.

  • Course Facilitator: Ashley Cuffia, NNLM SEA Consumer Health Coordinator

Keeping Up with PubMed – This intermediate level class will help to improve your effectiveness in searching PubMed, the National Library of Medicine’s free, public interface to the MEDLINE database of biomedical journal literature citations. This course builds on the first PubMed Moodle course: Making PubMed Work for You.  Topics we’ll cover include MeSH (Module 1); subsets, filters, and My NCBI including applying Filters (Module 2);  email alerts of new citations, creating tables of contents alerts through the NLM Catalog (Module 3); and LinkOut plus two literature databases linked to PubMed (Module 4).

  • Course Facilitator: Ashley Cuffia, NNLM SEA, Consumer Health Coordinator

Chemicals, Drugs, Genetics: Searching PubMed and Beyond – This advanced specialized class will help improve your effectiveness in searching PubMed and related NLM and NIH databases for literature information on chemicals, drugs and genetics. The course begins with searching PubMed for drug information with MeSH terms, Supplementary Concept Records (SCR), and Pharmacologic Actions (PA). Additional topics include searching related databases for drug information, chemicals and with chemical nomenclature, and lliterature related to genetics and genomics. This course assumes a strong working knowledge of PubMed including an understanding of automatic term mapping, the importance of reviewing the Details box after searches, and using the Advanced search page and the MeSH database.

  • Course Facilitator: Tony Nguyen, NNLM SEA, Technology and Communications Coordinator

Online Resources to Support Evidence-Based Practice on Population Health: An Introduction to MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj – At the end of the course, participants will be able to: 1.) Define population health and its relation to Healthy People 2020 2.) Describe the purpose of PubMed, HSRProj, and MedlinePlus databases 3.) Identify when to use each database based on the information need 4.) Perform basic searching techniques to identify more accurate results Please note that the content in this course is for basic/beginner users of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj. This asynchronous course is offered through Moodle using Storyline Articulate software. It is designed to take approximately 2 hours to complete and can be done in one sitting or over several sessions.

  • Course Facilitator: Derek Johnson, NNLM GMR, Health Professionals Outreach Specialist

For additional details or to register for any of these online asynchronous classes, please contact the course facilitator directly.

Please note that you will need to set up a free NNLM Moodle account if you have not done so before in order to access these classes.

Categories: RML Blogs

Next PNR Rendezvous is January 17

PNR News - Thu, 2018-01-11 11:41

What does it mean for research to be meaningful? How do metrics help and hinder our understanding of research impact? The next PNR Rendezvous session addresses the history and evolution of meaningful metrics in higher education. Robin Chin Roemer, Head of Instructional Design and Outreach Services at the University of Washington libraries will be our guest presenter.  She will address topics such as the pros and cons of bibliometrics; the rise and risks of altmetrics; tools for tracing researcher impact; and the influence of different venues and disciplines on impact communication. The session is eligible for 1 Medical Library Association (MLA) CE credit whether attending the live session or watching the recording.

When: Wednesday, January 17 starting at 1:00pm PT, Noon Alaska Time, 2:00pm MT

Please note we are now encouraging attendees to register for PNR Rendezvous webinar sessions. It is not required. Information to register and join the webinar is included on our website.

Questions? Please contact our office nnlm@uw.edu 

Categories: RML Blogs

Cervical Health Awareness Month

SCR News - Thu, 2018-01-11 09:01

“Picture of Girl” by Samantha Gades via Unsplash, July 25, 2017, CCO.

January is National Cervical Health Awareness Month.  The goal is to raise awareness about how women can protect against HPV (human papillomavirus) and cervical cancer.

HPV is a group of viruses that are sexually transmitted and can put women at risk for developing cervical cancer.  HPV can fall into either the low risk or the high-risk category.  Low risk HPV can be asymptomatic or can cause genital warts.

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a group of related viruses. They can cause warts on different parts of your body. There are more than 200 types. About 40 of those types affect the genitals. They are spread through sexual contact with an infected partner. Some of those can put you at risk for cancer.

There are two categories of sexually-transmitted HPV. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High-risk HPV can cause cervical, anal, oral, throat, vulvar, or vaginal caner.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2014 (the most recent year numbers are available)—

  • 12,578 women in the United States were diagnosed with cervical cancer.
  • 4,115 women in the United States died from cervical cancer.

Medlineplus.gov advises that pap tests can detect changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. Pap tests, along with HPV tests, are used in cervical cancer screening.  Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading HPV. Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer.

How can Cervical Health Awareness Month make a difference?

We can use this opportunity to spread the word about important steps women can take to stay healthy.  Here are just a few ideas from healthfinder.gov:

  • Encourage women to get their well-woman visit this year.
  • Let women know that most insurance plans must cover well-woman visits and cervical cancer screening. This means that, depending on their insurance, women can get these services at no cost to them.
  • Talk to parents about how important it is for their pre-teens to get the HPV vaccine. Both boys and girls need the vaccine.

Like NNLM SCR on Facebook and like us on Twitter.

Categories: RML Blogs

New Bioinformatics Training for Librarians beginning January 29!

MAR News - Thu, 2018-01-11 07:00

The NNLM Training Office has announced a new learning opportunity for bioinformatics and biology training. Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications is a 16-week, self-paced course worth 25 hours of continuing education credit from the Medical Library Association. The course will run January 29 – May 18, 2018.

An introductory, online bioinformatics course for librarians conducted in the Moodle learning management system, this course is designed for librarians who offer, or intend to offer, bioinformatics services; as well as for librarians who use bioinformatics information on a periodic or irregular basis to serve their patrons. Modules offer in-depth exploration of several NCBI databases, including Gene, Nucleotide, Protein, Structure, ClinVar, MedGen, and Gene Testing Registry, as well as guided instructions on using BLAST to identify genetic sequences. Course content is provided in the form of videos, hands-on exercises, readings, discussion posts, and open book quizzes. The course concludes with synthesis activities built upon actual reference questions received at the NCBI Help Desk, and the creation of a personal bioinformatics action plan.

Subject Matter Experts for this course include Dr. Peter Cooper, PhD and Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine; and Dr. Emir Khatipov, Ph.D., National Library of Medicine.

Topics and suggested pace is listed below. Modules open progressively based on completion of the previous module.

  • Week 1 & 2 (Jan 29-Feb 9): Genetics Basics: orientation to molecular biology concepts
  • Week 3 (Feb 12-16): Introduction – What is bioinformatics and what does it have to do with librarianship?
  • Week 4 (Feb 19-23): Molecular Biology Techniques
  • Week 5 (Feb 26-Mar 2): NCBI Nucleotide Database
  • Week 6 (Mar 5-9): BLAST Sequence Similarity
  • Week 7 (Mar 12-16): NCBI Gene Database
  • Week 8 (Mar 19-23): Basics of Proteins
  • Week 9 (Mar 26-30): Catch up week
  • Week 10 (April 2-6): NCBI Protein and Structure Databases
  • Week 11 (April 9-13): Clinical Applications
  • Week 12 (April 16-20): Ethics and Policy in Bioinformatics
  • Week 13 (April 23-27): What’s Next in Genomic Research
  • Week 14-15 (April 30-May 11): Synthesis Activities
  • Week 16 (May 14-18): Additional catch up week (if needed)

Register for this exciting opportunity today!

Note: Registration closes January 24, 2018.  This course is limited to 25 participants. A 10-seat waitlist is also available. Registration preference given to residents of the United States. For more information, contact Molly Knapp, Training Development Specialist, NNLM Training Office

Categories: RML Blogs

It’s Not Too Late to Participate in National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week 2018!

PSR News - Wed, 2018-01-10 18:50

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® to be held January 22-28, 2018 links students with scientists and other experts to counteract the myths about drugs and alcohol that teens get from the internet, social media, TV, movies, music, or from friends. It was launched in 2010 by scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to stimulate educational events in communities so teens can learn what science has taught us about drug use and addiction. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism became a partner starting in 2016, and alcohol has been added as a topic area for the week. NIDA and NIAAA are part of the National Institutes of Health. Register your educational event or activity and join with hundreds of communities around the country participating in this annual observance.

Do you need event ideas?

Here are a few easy activity ideas to consider:

NIDA offers these and other FREE science based materials. Plan to order your materials by January 15 to receive them in time for NDAFW 2018.

For more information, contact Brian Marquis at NIDA at bmarquis@nida.nih.gov.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

From the UW eScience Institute: Data Science for Social Good

PNR News - Wed, 2018-01-10 18:14

University of Washington eScience Institute Data Science for Social Good logo

Are you interested in using data-driven discovery for societal benefit? 

The University of Washington eScience Institute, in collaboration with the Cascadia Urban Analytics Cooperative, is excited to announce the summer 2018 Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) program. The program brings together Student Fellows with data and domain researchers to work on focused, collaborative projects for societal benefit.

Sixteen DSSG Student Fellows will be selected to work with academic researchers, data scientists, and public stakeholder groups such as government officials, academic researchers, non-profit organizations, and the general public, on data-intensive research projects.

Who: Graduate students and advanced (junior/senior) undergraduate students are invited to apply. Spring 2018 graduates are eligible for this program. Students who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents are eligible to apply as long as their visa status allows them to work in the U.S. We cannot sponsor student visas for this program.

What: Each student will be part of a team working full-time on a research project that has concrete relevance and impact. Students are expected to work closely and collaboratively with team members onsite for the duration of the 10-week program. Projects will have an applied social good dimension and involve analysis and visualization of data from areas such as public health, sustainable urban planning, environmental protection, disaster response, crime prevention, education, transportation, governance, commerce, and social justice. Click for summaries of projects from the Summer 2015 and Summer 2016  and Summer 2017 DSSG programs.

Where: Most work will be conducted on the UW campus in the WRF Data Science Studio, but some field excursions in the City of Seattle or King County may also be involved.

When: This is a 10-week long, full-time program beginning June 11th and ending August 17th 2018.

Compensation: Students will be given a stipend of $6,500 for the 10 weeks.

Desired qualifications:

  • Demonstrated experience in issues related to social good
  • Research experience with quantitative or qualitative tools
  • Strong academic record
  • Previous programming experience

How to Apply: CLICK HERE FOR THE APPLICATION FORMPlease note: a copy of your CV and unofficial transcripts are required to complete the form.

Questions may be directed to exec-director@escience.washington.edu.

Application Deadline: February 12th at midnight Pacific Time

Categories: RML Blogs

Join NIH Institutes and Centers for #NIHhealthy2018 Events in January!

PSR News - Wed, 2018-01-10 17:32

Next week’s #NIHhealthy2018 campaign will include the following NIH-wide social media events to help you start the new year off right!

  • A four-hour Twitter town hall on January 16, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. PST. The town hall will include a Periscope live video panel at 9:00, and a Q&A with NIH Director Francis Collins at 11:30. Throughout the four hours, NIH Institutes and Centers will be sharing information on managing stress and anxiety (9:00-10:00); healthy eating, exercise, and healthy aging (10:00-11:00); general health and wellness, and disease prevention (11:00-12:00); and kicking unhealthy habits (12:00-1:00). Follow the conversation and ask your questions on Twitter using the hashtag #NIHhealthy2018.
  • A Facebook Live event on January 18 at 10:00. The Facebook Live will cover the same four topics listed above, and will feature experts from NIA, NIMH, NHLBI, and NCI. Tune in at www.facebook.com/nih.gov/ on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. PST with your questions!
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

It’s Not Too Late to Participate in National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week 2018

SEA News - Wed, 2018-01-10 13:13

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® to be held January 22-28, 2018 links students with scientists and other experts to counteract the myths about drugs and alcohol that teens get from the internet, social media, TV, movies, music, or from friends. It was launched in 2010 by scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to stimulate educational events in communities so teens can learn what science has taught us about drug use and addiction. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism became a partner starting in 2016, and alcohol has been added as a topic area for the week. NIDA and NIAAA are part of the National Institutes of Health. Register your educational event or activity and join with hundreds of communities around the country participating in this annual observance.

Do you need event ideas?

Here are a few easy activity ideas to consider:

  • Take the National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge. https://teens.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/DrugIQChallenge-2018-508.pdf. This quiz is a fun way to test teens’ drug and alcohol knowledge and helps provide the facts.
  • Print the “I want to SHATTER THE MYTHS because…” pledge cards and ask youth to answer the question: “Why do you want to shatter the myths about drug use?” Take a picture and share it with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) on Twitter and Facebook by including the hashtag #NDAFW with your photo.
  • Test teens’ knowledge of drugs and alcohol with the NDAFW BINGO card. Download the card and the glossary and play this game with others.
  • Register Your Event!

NIDA offers these and other FREE science based materials. Plan to order your materials by January 15 to receive them in time for NDAFW 2018.

For more information, contact Brian Marquis at NIDA at bmarquis@nida.nih.gov.

Categories: RML Blogs

Participate in National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week 2018

MCR News - Wed, 2018-01-10 12:12

It’s not too Late to Participate in National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week 2018

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® to be held January 22-28, 2018 links students with scientists and other experts to counteract the myths about drugs and alcohol that teens get from the internet, social media, TV, movies, music, or from friends. It was launched in 2010 by scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to stimulate educational events in communities so teens can learn what science has taught us about drug use and addiction. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism became a partner starting in 2016, and alcohol has been added as a topic area for the week. NIDA and NIAAA are part of the National Institutes of Health. Register your educational event or activity and join with hundreds of communities around the country participating in this annual observance.

Do you need event ideas?

Here are a few easy activity ideas to consider:

  • Take the National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge. https://teens.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/DrugIQChallenge-2018-508.pdf. This quiz is a fun way to test teens’ drug and alcohol knowledge and helps provide the facts.
  • Print the “I want to SHATTER THE MYTHS because…” pledge cards and ask youth to answer the question: “Why do you want to shatter the myths about drug use?” Take a picture and share it with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) on Twitter and Facebook by including the hashtag #NDAFW with your photo.
  • Test teens’ knowledge of drugs and alcohol with the NDAFW BINGO card. Download the card and the glossary and play this game with others.
  • Register Your Event!

NIDA offers these and other FREE science based materials. Plan to order your materials by January 15 to receive them in time for NDAFW 2018.

For more information, contact Brian Marquis at NIDA at bmarquis@nida.nih.gov. /da

Categories: RML Blogs

DOCLINE Quarterly & Yearly Statistical Reports Now Available!

PSR News - Wed, 2018-01-10 11:51

NLM has released the following DOCLINE quarterly statistical reports for October-December 2017. It’s important to note that request reports are not archived and should be saved quarterly by libraries who wish to have a historical record of statistics. The reports include:

  • Summary DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Report 1-1A)
  • Summary DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-1B)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Reports 1-2A)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-2B)
  • Resource Library Quarterly Report – Fill Rate (Report 2-14)
  • Loansome Doc Detailed Lender Statistics (Report 5-1A)
  • Loansome Doc Summary Statistics Report (Report 5-1B)

NLM has also released the following DOCLINE yearly statistical reports for January-December 2017:

  • Ranked List of Serial Titles – Borrower (Report 1-8B)
  • Ranked List of Serial Titles – Lender (Report 1-8D)
  • Summary DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Report 1-1AY)
  • Summary DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-1BY)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Report 1-2AY)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-2BY)

DOCLINE statistical reports are available by going to Requests, then Reports in the DOCLINE menu. Instructions for downloading and printing reports may be found in the “Request Reports” section of the online User Guide or in the NLM Customer Support Knowledgebase.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

So you want to be an outreach librarian? Spotlight on Marcia Francis

GMR News - Wed, 2018-01-10 11:33
Marcia_Francis_exhibit_ 2017

Marcia Francis exhibits on behalf of the GMR.

In the far northwest corner of the GMR is the state of North Dakota, so large and rural that the University of North Dakota (UND) Partner Outreach Librarians have divided the state into four quadrants to maximize their outreach potential.  Today we spotlight Marcia Francis, who conducts outreach on behalf of the GMR, presenting educational sessions on National Library of Medicine resources. See our website to learn more about our Partner Outreach Libraries.

Name: Marcia Francis
Title: Southwest Clinical Campus Librarian, University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences

Our five questions:

  1. How long have you been in the role of an outreach librarian? Outreach has been part of my current position for the past five or so years at UND. I also did outreach work for about 14 years when working at another position in Idaho.
  2. How did you get involved in outreach? I have worked at outreach/resource libraries in the NNLM, so outreach has always been an expected part of my work.
  3. What is your favorite outreach project that you’ve done so far? I cannot think of one specific project, but probably talking with health consumers at trainings and exhibits has been the most rewarding. Consumers are well aware they are expected to take more responsibility for making health choices, but they are not always confident they have access to quality information and skills to evaluate information. NLM has great resources to share with these individuals, and watching health consumers feel empowered as they use those resources makes the time seem well spent.
  4. What outreach activity do you hope to do in the future? I am not sure what the next outreach activity might be as our library is waiting to learn the results of an information needs assessment project we are working on. I am blessed to work with a team of smart outreach librarians, which will make whatever future project we tackle easier and more fun, too.
  5. What is the one thing you wished you had known before you got started in outreach? When I started in outreach, my supervisor cautioned me to have a Plan B, C, and maybe even a Plan D to fall back upon when (not if) Plan A does not work. That was good advice that I still try to follow as being prepared for the unexpected and being flexible can make all the difference in how successful (and fun) outreach work can be.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Protected: Lyman Maynard Library Acquires Tablets to Teach Diabetes Resources

NER News - Wed, 2018-01-10 08:52

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Categories: RML Blogs

Promote Your Health Outreach Programs Request

MAR News - Wed, 2018-01-10 07:00

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine is working closely with the Public Library Association (PLA) on Promoting Healthy Communities, a joint consumer health initiative that focuses on  increasing public library workers’ knowledge and skills related to consumer health services, so that they may better assist patrons in navigating complex issues such as health care, insurance, and aging. You can locate additional information regarding the PLA/NNLM initiative through the PLA website initiatives page. As a part of this initiative, we are eager to spread the word about the great consumer health-related programs already underway in our nation’s public libraries.

We are encouraging network members to submit a brief write-up about health and wellness programs they are doing, to ALA’s Programming Librarian website. This free website contains a wide variety of program ideas for libraries. Library professionals are encouraged to submit their own programs for publication in a section of the website called Program Models.

To submit your program for consideration, please fill out the “Share Your Program” webform available on the website. If you prefer, you can email your submission in a Word Document format to programminglibrarian@ala.org.

Programs from all library types are welcome. Please limit your submissions to programs that have taken place within the past two years. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Sarah Ostman, communications manager for ALA’s Public Programs Office, at sostman@ala.org.

NNLM MAR would also like to hear about the amazing work you are doing in your community. You can share your stories with us about any health outreach projects and activities you are conducting by filling out the short Share Your Health Outreach Activity form.

Thank you for your consideration! Together, we hope to inspire more public libraries to take on this important work.

Categories: RML Blogs

It’s Not Too Late to Participate in National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week 2018!

MAR News - Tue, 2018-01-09 14:31

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® to be held January 22-28, 2018 links students with scientists and other experts to counteract the myths about drugs and alcohol that teens get from the internet, social media, TV, movies, music, or from friends. It was launched in 2010 by scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to stimulate educational events in communities so teens can learn what science has taught us about drug use and addiction. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism became a partner starting in 2016, and alcohol has been added as a topic area for the week. NIDA and NIAAA are part of the National Institutes of Health. Register your educational event or activity and join with hundreds of communities around the country participating in this annual observance.

Do you need event ideas?

Here are a few easy activity ideas to consider:

NIDA offers these and other FREE science based materials. Plan to order your materials by January 15 to receive them in time for NDAFW 2018.

For more information, contact Brian Marquis at NIDA at bmarquis@nida.nih.gov.

Categories: RML Blogs

Folic Acid Awareness Week

SCR News - Tue, 2018-01-09 10:07

“Folic Acid” via medlineplus.gov, October 16, 2017, public domain.

January 7th through January 13th is Folic Acid Awareness week.  What is folic acid and what should we be aware of?

Medlineplus.gov defines Folic acid as “a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid.”  Folic acid is especially important for women who are pregnant or are trying to get pregnant.  The Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says, “Folic acid protects unborn babies against serious birth defects.”  It is recommended that women get 400 mcg of folic acid daily.

The potential for birth defects as a result of folic acid deficiency is serious.  CDC statistics show that every year in the United States we see the following:

  • There are 3,000 pregnancies affected by spina bifida or anencephaly, which are neural tube defects (NTDs) caused by the incomplete closing of the spine and skull.
  • About 1,300 babies are born without a neural tube defect since folic acid fortification.
  • Many, but not all, neural tube defects could be prevented if women took 400 mcg of folic acid daily, before and during early pregnancy.
  • Half of all pregnancies are unplanned.

Folic acid can be found in food such as leafy green vegetables, fruits, dried beans, peas and nuts.  It can also be obtained by consuming enriched breads, cereals and other grain products.  Those that do not get sufficient folic acid from their diet can take a dietary supplement.

Like NNLM SCR on Facebook and like us on Twitter.

Categories: RML Blogs

Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles

MAR News - Tue, 2018-01-09 07:00

The National Network of Librarians of Medicine (NNLM) invites you to participate in Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles. This course will be primarily held via the Moodle platform with optional WebEx discussions. This course is designed to help health sciences librarians understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. Register today!

DatesFebruary 5 – March 30, 2018

The class size for this course is limited to 60 students. We will begin a waitlist if there are more interested in participating.

Course instructors for the winter session are Ann Glusker, Pacific Northwest RegionDerek Johnson, Greater Midwest RegionAlicia Lillich, MidContinental Region, Ann Madhavan, Pacific Northwest Region, Tony Nguyen, Southeastern/Atlantic Region, and Elaina Vitale, Mid-Atlantic Region.

Please contact Tony Nguyen with questions.

About the Class

The Big Data in Healthcare:  Exploring Emerging Roles course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. Course content comes from information shared by the presenters at the March 7, 2016 NNLM Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes Forum, top selections from the NNLM MCR Data Curation/Management Journal Club and NNLM PSR Data Curation/Management Journal Club’s articles, NINR’s Nursing Research Boot Camp, recommended readings from previous cohorts, and Big Data University’s Big Data Fundamentals online course.

Participants will have the opportunity to share what they learned with the instructor from each section of the course content either through WebEx discussions or Moodle Discussions within each Module. These submissions can be used to help support the student’s views expressed in the final essay assignment.

Objectives

Students who successfully complete the course will:

  • Explain the role big data plays in clinical patient outcomes.
  • Explain current/potential roles in which librarians are supporting big data initiatives
  • Illustrate the fundamentals of big data from a systems perspective
  • Articulate their views/options on the role health sciences sector librarians is in supporting big data initiatives

NOTE: Participants will articulate their views on why health sciences librarians should or should not become involved in supporting big data initiatives by sharing a 500-800 word essay. Students are encouraged to be brave and bold in their views so as to elicit discussions about the roles librarians should play in this emerging field. Participants are encouraged to allow their views to be published on a NNLM online blog/newsletter as part of a dialog with the wider health sciences librarian community engaging in this topic. Your course instructors will reach out to you following the completion of the course.

On top of information gained, being a part of the big data in clinical care dialog, and earning 9 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association, students may earn an IBM Open Badge program from the Big Data University.

This is a semi-self-paced course (“semi” meaning there are completion deadlines). While offered primarily asynchronously, your course instructors plan to offer opportunities in which participants can join a WebEx discussion to discuss some of the content.

Course Expectations

To complete this course for nine hours of MLA contact hours, participants are expected to:

  • Spend 1-2 hours completed the work within each module.
  • Commit to complete all activities and articulate your views within each module.
  • Complete course requirements by the deadline established in each module.
  • Coordinate with a course instructor to publish your observations/final assignments on a NNLM blog/newsletter
  • Provide course feedback on the Online Course Evaluation Form
Grading

Grades for this course is simply a pass/fail grading system. When your submission meets the assignment’s expectations, you will receive full credit for the contact hours for that Module. For submissions that are unclear or incomplete, you may be requested for more information until your instructor approves.

  • For discussion posts, your activity will be marked as complete after you’ve submitted a discussion AND your instructor assigns a point to mark as complete
  • If you participate in WebEx Journal Club Discussions (when available), your instructor will assign points in the Discussions for that module.
  • Students have the option to accept fewer contact hours. However, you will need to inform your course instructors ahead of time.
Categories: RML Blogs

Catalog Display Changes for Journal Titles Not in the NLM Collection

PSR News - Mon, 2018-01-08 15:33

Beginning in 2018, LocatorPlus and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Catalog displays were modified to better indicate which journals were not selected for the NLM collection. LocatorPlus and the NLM Catalog are public search interfaces to the bibliographic data about the NLM collection. Finding a record for a journal in either resource does not necessarily mean that NLM collects the title. A journal record may be added to the catalog for the following reasons:

  • the journal is selected for the NLM collection;
  • to support the processes of NLM products and services such as PubMed Central (PMC), MEDLINE, GenBank, interlibrary loan, and others.

NLM considers hundreds of journals annually but many are not selected for the collection. These journals may not be selected because they are out of scope, or because they do not demonstrate sound editorial practices, effective peer review or scientific merit. Journal selection is based on the journal guidelines from the NLM Collection Development Manual. The journal record in the catalog indicates the Library’s decision. Not selected journal title records may support:

  • the NIH Public Access Policy and research articles deposited in PMC as a result of NIH funding;
  • DOCLINE libraries in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, members of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, which perform interlibrary loan and document delivery services.

In LocatorPlus, a not selected journal can be identified from the following fields in the “Summary View:”

  • Electronic Links: Access not provided by NLM
  • Location: Not at NLM
  • Call Number: Not selected

NLM no longer provides electronic links to journals that are not in the collection. For further details, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Announces 2018 History of Medicine Lecture Series

PSR News - Mon, 2018-01-08 15:17

The National Library of Medicine has announced its History of Medicine Lecture Series for 2018. Complete details are available from the NLM History of Medicine Division. Kicking off the series on Monday, January 29, at 8:00 am PST will be Stevens Institute of Technology’s Theresa MacPhail, PhD, Assistant Professor Science and Technology Studies, who will speak on The Evolution of Viral Networks: H1N1, Ebola, and Zika. Author of The Viral Network: A Pathography of the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic (Cornell University Press, 2014).

The NLM History of Medicine Lecture Series promotes awareness and use of NLM historical collections for research, education, and public service in biomedicine, the social sciences, and the humanities. The series also supports the commitment of the NLM to recognize the diversity of its collections–which span ten centuries, encompass a range of digital and physical formats, and originate from nearly every part of the globe–and to appreciate the individuals of various disciplines who value these collections and use them advance their research, teaching, and learning.

All NLM History of Medicine Lectures are free, open to the public, live-streamed globally, and subsequently archived by NIH VideoCasting. Interviews with the speakers in the History of Medicine Lecture Series are published in Circulating Now, the blog of the NLM History of Medicine Division. Explore interviews with past lecturers on the blog and stay informed about the Lecture Series on Twitter at #NLMHistTalk.

Additional events in the 2018 Lecture Series include:

  • March 1: A Conversation about Graphic Medicine, a special program in conjunction with Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well Drawn, a new NLM special display, traveling banner exhibition, and online exhibition launching soon
  • April 5: Trevor Owens, Head of Digital Content Management, Library of Congress, who will speak on Scientists Hard Drives, Databases, and Blogs: Preservation Intent and Source Criticism in the Digital History of Science, Technology and Medicine
  • May 24: Heidi Morefield, MSc, 2017 NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellow in the History of Medicine, Doctoral student, Department of the History of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, who will offer the 2nd Annual Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine, on the subject of Transplanting Technology: Dr. Michael DeBakey and Cold War Technology Transfer
  • September 20: David S. Jones, MD, PhD, A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine, Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the Faculty of Medicine, Harvard University, who will offer the 10th Annual James H. Cassedy Memorial Lecture in the History of Medicine, on the subject of Making the Case for History in Medical Education
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

January 2018 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Mon, 2018-01-08 13:09
Illustration of kids playing music in a classroom

Check out the January issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Health Capsule: Become Your Healthiest Self
    Make better health your resolution all year round. You can learn simple ways to prevent disease and improve your relationships, emotional well-being, physical health, and surroundings.
  • Featured Website: PregSource
    How common is morning sickness? How does pregnancy affect sleep? Does chronic disease or disability change the pregnancy experience? Pregnant women are helping researchers answer questions like these by joining the PregSource research project.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

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