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Identifying and Combating Health Misinformation Webinar

MCR News - Tue, 2021-03-09 17:46

Addressing Health Misinformation at the Scale of the Internet

The world now has more internet users than people with access to essential health services such as primary care, dental care, or surgery. Exacerbated through the COVID-19 pandemic, populations around the world experience limited availability of in-person health providers or services for certain health conditions, and as a result, the internet plays a crucial role in mediating access to health through access to information. However, the consequences of online health information have never been more pertinent.

In this session, we will focus on the unique role that health practitioners, experts and library systems can play in responding to related challenges. We will review existing interventions that social media platforms are deploying to try to address health misinformation at global, internet scales, the strengths and limitations of these approaches, and how physicians of the future can contribute to a healthier online information ecosystem. Further, as the shape of health misinformation on social media platforms evolves situationally across geography, demographics, and subject matter, public health expertise must be better integrated into the design of content moderation interventions on these platforms. For public health experts to make informed and achievable recommendations, however, they must be familiar with the affordances of social media platforms that enable or limit interventions to mitigate the spread and impact of health misinformation.

Class Date and Time

Monday, March 22, 2021

10 AM PT/ 11 AM MT/ 12 PM CT/ 1 PM ET

Registration

https://nnlm.gov/Zaw

The post Identifying and Combating Health Misinformation Webinar first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: March 9, 2021

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-03-09 11:01

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

New NLM Online Exhibitions
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is known for its vast collection of biomedical information and for providing freely available and authoritative resources such as PubMed and MedlinePlus. Its History of Medicine division also provides a wonderful exhibitions program highlighting history, the arts, social issues, professions, and medicine utilizing NLM’s vast collections. Two new exhibitions are now available to view…learn more about the new exhibits on the blog

Free: Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit!
In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries. The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family friendly activities, and all the instructions and materials needed…learn more about the kit on the blog 

Fortify Your Knowledge
The NNLM Reading Club in March examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good or better for us. Learn which books were selected for this month’s reading club on the blog

DataFlash: MLA’s New Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate
Last January, MLA (Medical Library Association) announced the Data Services Specialization (DSS) certificate that librarians can earn to demonstrate their attainment of the relevant knowledge and skills necessary to provide data services. Best geared for health sciences librarians and information professionals and built upon the MLA Data Services Competency…learn more about this specialization on the blog

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account.

BLOSSOM! Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness symposium: This free three-day virtual symposium will bring together experts on morale in libraries, invisible services in libraries, vocational awe, burnout, and self-care. The symposium will provide library staff at all levels, including management, with key takeaways to improve library staff’s health and wellness. This event is open to all library staff regardless of employment status and to library science students. This virtual even provides 8 continuing education (CE) credits. March 24 – 26. Learn more and register 

NNLM Reading Club Presents….Amy Byer Shainman: Join this NNLM Reading Club Presents session where author Amy Byer Shainman will discuss her book, “Resurrection Lily: The BRCA Gene, Hereditary Cancer and Lifesaving Whispers from the Grandmother I Never Knew”.  She will be joined by Ellen Matloff, Certified Genetic Counselor, and President and CEO of My Gene Counsel. In this program, these two genetic cancer experts will share their story, their knowledge and answer your questions. Join the live stream on March 11 at 12:00 p.m. PT

Wikipedia + Libraries: NNLM: Gain insight into the value of Wikipedia as a viable reference and build the skills and knowledge needed to evaluate articles on Wikipedia for yourself or your patrons, with a specific focus on health and medical topics, through a four-week, online course using the Moodle platform. March 15 – April 9. (8 MLA CE) Register

#CiteNLM Virtual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Join your colleagues and NNLM staff for a two hour live editing session as we work to add citations and content to Wikipedia articles related to healthy aging. Held via Zoom, participants will engage in large group and breakout sessions to chat about Wikipedia, edit articles, and connect with the #CiteNLM community. No prior experience required – staff will be on hand to answer any questions and provide live demonstrations to get you started. For more information about #CiteNLM, visit our project page. March 31 from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

Addressing Health Misinformation at the Scale of the Internet: In this session, we will focus on the unique role that health practitioners, experts and library systems can play in responding to related challenges. We will review existing interventions that social media platforms are deploying to try to address health misinformation at global, internet scales, the strengths and limitations of these approaches, and how physicians of the future can contribute to a healthier online information ecosystem. March 22 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Intersectionality in Health Disparities: Focus on Black Transgender Women: This webinar is an exploration of the effects of intersectionality and social determinants of health on transgender women of color. In particular, this webinar will highlight the lived experience of one Black transgender woman and provide insights from a physician with expertise in healthcare for transgender women. March 31 at 10:00 a.m. PT. Learn more and how to register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

*REopening Archives, Libraries and Museums (REALM): Caring for Your Resources During COVID-19: Amid COVID-19, many archives, libraries and museums are reopening and expanding access to services in their communities. The challenges of reopening during a pandemic have led to many questions about policies for staff, the handling of materials as well as the management of building operations. From allowing the virus to die naturally, to using disinfectants, to applying UV light or heat treatment—there are many options to consider. This webinar features members of the REopening Archives, Libraries and Museums (REALM) project team who will share information about the project, including freely available resources to support local decision-making. March 10 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT. Register

Yoga for All with Dianne Bondy: The African American Medical Librarians Alliance invites you to attend session 10 of the Radical Self-Care & Wellness for Information Professionals webinar series. Dianne Bondy is a social justice activist, author, and accessible yoga teacher. Her inclusive approach to yoga empowers anyone to practice—regardless of their shape, size, ethnicity, or level of ability. Dianne is revolutionizing yoga by educating yoga instructors around the world on how to make their classes welcoming for all kinds of practitioners. March 11 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

Strengthening Communities: Food Access at Your Library: This WebJunction webinar will share examples of library food access initiatives including seed libraries, community gardens and farmers markets. The session will also explore how two statewide organizations support local libraries in this work through technical assistance and funding. March 24 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*“Vaccines, Vaccinations, and NLM”, from the NLM Director’s blog

The Network of the National Library of Medicine has partnered with the Collaborative Summer Library Program with 4 health programs to complement the 2021 summer reading theme, Tails and Tales

NLM Collections Tour: Vaccines

*“Israeli Study Offers First Real-World Glimpse of COVID-19 Vaccines in Action”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*NIH to evaluate COVID-19 at-home testing system- Newly authorized COVID-19 diagnostic kit is paired with smartphone app

Request for Information (RFI): Inviting Comments and Suggestions to Advance and Strengthen Racial Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Biomedical Research Workforce and Advance Health Disparities and Health Equity Research, responses due April 9, 2021.

*NIH effort seeks to understand MIS-C, range of SARS-CoV-2 effects on children

NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health Celebrates Women’s History Month

NIH invests in next iteration of public-private partnership to advance precision medicine research for Alzheimer’s disease

Video coaching program may improve parenting skills and children’s school readiness

Advocates and Allies: The Pioneers of Progress, Meet these not-so-silent allies of yesterday and today who challenge the status quo, push for progress, and accelerate change in the world of cancer

Learn more about the DASH eating plan, a heart-healthy eating style, during National Nutrition Month

Watch the short 3:30 minute video, “The Future of Genomics: 10 Bold Predictions”

Bold Predictions for Human Genomics by 2030: An NHGRI Seminar Series

*Interim Guidance for COVID-19 and Persons with HIV

*NIH Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL), provides a variety of Fact Sheets to use and share to address vital information needs including, “Building and Maintaining Community Trust in COVID-19 Resources”

FYI: 

*COVID-19 Resources

March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
Women and girls face unique challenges when it comes to HIV prevention. Find out how you can support women and girls and help end the HIV epidemic. Visit the Office for Women’s Health website to download the NWGHAAD toolkit and the CDC Let’s Stop HIV Together campaign resources for women, available in English and Spanish.

*For Providers on Telehealth.HHS.gov: New Telebehavioral Health Care Best Practice Guide
Telehealth.HHS.gov has added a new best practice guide on telehealth for behavioral health care. Behavioral health – like other areas of health care – has changed significantly due to the COVID-19 public health emergency. It is now easier for mental health providers to offer and get reimbursed for telebehavioral health services. Telehealth can also make behavioral health services safer and more private and convenient for patients who can access care from their home. Find resources in the telebehavioral health best practice guide on getting started, developing a strategy, billing, preparing patients, and more.

*New Funding Opportunity, Health Literacy and COVID-19
The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced a new funding opportunity:  Advancing Health Literacy to Enhance Equitable Community Responses to COVID-19. This initiative seeks applications for projects to demonstrate the effectiveness of local government implementation of evidence-based health literacy strategies that are culturally appropriate to enhance COVID-19 testing, contact tracing and/or other mitigation measures (e.g., public health prevention practices and vaccination) in racial and ethnic minority populations and other socially vulnerable populations, including racial and ethnic minority rural communities. Applicant eligibility is limited to localities (e.g., cities, counties, parishes, or other similar subdivisions). OMH encourages applicants to partner with a Minority Serving Institution for quality improvement activities and program evaluation.

  • Announcement Number: MP-CPI-21-006
  • Opportunity Title:  Advancing Health Literacy to Enhance Equitable Community Responses to COVID-19
  • Award Amount: up to $4,000,000 for urban communities; up to $3,000,000 for rural communities
  • Estimated Total: $250,000,000
  • Application Due Date: April 20, 2021, 3:00 p.m. PT

The Federal Grants website provides a variety of tools and tips to get you started.

A technical assistance webinar for interested applicants will be held on Wednesday, March 17 at 2:00 PM PT. Register to attend the webinar. A recording of the webinar will be made available.

Medical Library Association Annual Conference
Registration is now open for the MLA 2021 conference. MLA’s premier event draws more than 1,500 participants including medical librarians and other health information professionals, international attendees, and exhibitors. MLA ’21 offers a variety of opportunities for attending educational sessions, seeing the latest products from exhibitors, and interacting with colleagues. The 2021 conference experience will be exclusively virtual and runs through several days in May starting with a live kickoff May 10, exploration days, live action days, and some extended time to view features later.

* Growing Share of Americans Say They Plan to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine – or Already Have
As COVID-19 vaccine production and administration efforts in the U.S. continue to ramp up, a new Pew Research survey finds public intent to get vaccinated is on the rise… Differences across demographic and political groups continue to characterize public views of COVID-19 vaccines. Yet these dynamics are fluid, and there have been some notable changes as intent has risen and vaccines become more widely available in the U.S.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: March 9, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Closure of the NNLM DOCLINE Coordination Office (NDCO)

MCR News - Mon, 2021-03-08 19:59

Dear DOCLINE Users,

Please join me in congratulating Erin Latta as she prepares for the next phase of her career. She has accepted a new position working for ICF, a consulting company, to work as an Information Specialist/Systems Librarian and provide support to the NLM DOCLINE Team. As the NNLM DOCLINE Coordinator, she served as the sole coordinator in the office responding to thousands of user support requests related to utilizing a Google Account sign-in, launch of DOCLINE 6.0, retirement of Loansome Doc, and the transition of EFTS to MLA. While I’m incredibly happy for her new opportunity and continued support with DOCLINE, I believe that she will be sorely missed throughout all of NNLM.

With her new opportunity, the NDCO office will close ahead of schedule due to the upcoming changes to the NNLM in the 2021-2026 cooperative agreement. Customer support from the NDCO will transition to the National Library of Medicine effective immediately.

For DOCLINE support, please submit a NLM Support Center Help Desk Ticket.

We would like to thank you for contacting the NDCO over the past 5 years. It was truly a pleasure supporting your library and responding to your DOCLINE customer service needs.

Best wishes,

Tony Nguyen, MLIS, AHIP
Executive Director
Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM)
Health Sciences and Human Services Library
University of Maryland, Baltimore

The post Closure of the NNLM DOCLINE Coordination Office (NDCO) first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

The Stigma of Language

MCR News - Mon, 2021-03-08 19:54

Dana Abbey – Community Engagement Coordinator/Colorado

A single word can sensationalize or stigmatize mental illness and substance use. Terms can suggest that an individual lacks quality of life, will behave in a certain way, or trivialize their desire to seek help. It’s very likely that we know someone with a mental illness or substance use disorder. Nearly one in five adults live with a mental illness[i], and one in ten adults report having resolved a significant substance use problem.[ii]

There are simple ways we can reframe the language we use. During reference interactions, teaching, and in casual conversations we can choose words that are grounded in dignity and respect.

Everymind, a research institute dedicated to reducing mental health has put together preferred language to use when communicating about mental illness. Here are a few examples of ways to reframe what we say[iii]:

Mental Health Language

The National Institute on Drug Abuse[iv] has compiled terms to use and avoid when talking about addiction. The information can be used by consumers and health care providers.

Substance Use Disorder Language

 

Resources:

________________

[i]Mental illness. (n.d.). Retrieved February 20, 2021, from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/mental-illness.shtml.

[ii] Kelly, J. F., Bergman, B. G., Hoeppner, B. B., Vilsaint, C. L., & White, W. L. (2017). Prevalence and pathways of recovery from drug and alcohol problems in the United States population: Implications for practice, research, and policy.Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 181(Supplement C), 162-169. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.09.028.

[iii]“Mental Health Is Important to Every Person and Every Community.” Everymind, https://everymind.org.au/mental-health.

[iv] National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Words Matter – Terms to Use and Avoid When Talking about Addiction.” 28 Jan. 2021. Web. 20 Feb. 2021, https://www.drugabuse.gov/nidamed-medical-health-professionals/health-professions-education/words-matter-terms-to-use-avoid-when-talking-about-addiction.

The post The Stigma of Language first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Join us for the Wikipedia Spring 2021 Edit-a-thon

MCR News - Mon, 2021-03-08 19:41

Did you know Wikipedia’s health information is used by 50-70 percent of all physicians and over 94 percent of med students? Let’s make sure health information Wikipedia articles are reliable! Join your colleagues and NNLM staff for a live editing session on March 31 from 1-3 PM ET to chat about Wikipedia, edit articles, and connect with the #CiteNLM community. No prior experience required! Articles about Healthy Aging will be the focus.  NLM_NIH resources such as MedlinePlus and NCBI’s PubMed will be cited.  For more information:  https://nnlm.gov/wiki

The post Join us for the Wikipedia Spring 2021 Edit-a-thon first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Important Changes About How You Log Into your NCBI Accounts

MCR News - Mon, 2021-03-08 19:39

NCBI Log in graphicNCBI accounts are transitioning to using 3rd party logins.

Click Here

 

The post Important Changes About How You Log Into your NCBI Accounts first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit

MCR News - Mon, 2021-03-08 19:33
Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit Test the waters flyer Introduction

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries. The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family friendly activities, and all the instructions and materials needed (audio file guides are available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese). The free kits are available to the first 500 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf.

What’s in the Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit?

Family Activity Guide – A seven-page step-by-step guide to all activities found in the kit.

ACTIVITY 1 – Part 1: Water for Life (Lifestyle) Families discover just how much water our bodies are made of. You’ll learn how water helps us stay cool, helps our organs function properly, and breaks down food so our bodies can use it for energy.

ACTIVITY 1 – Part 2: Test The Intestines! (Health) Explore the journey of food through the intestines and imagine how water helps this process.

ACTIVITY 2: Down The Drain (Environment) Find out what storm drains have in common with the clean water you drink. You will see and feel what is going down the drain…be prepared!

ACTIVITY 3 – Part 1: Pipe Up! (Environment) The water coming out of your faucets took a long journey to get there, starting from a reservoir, stream or ground water. Learn how your family can become citizen scientists helping researchers find solutions to keeping our drinking water safe at home.

ACTIVITY 3 – Part 2: Get The Lead Out (Environment) Water pipes can be made of different materials. Families will learn how to test and identify pipes in your home.

ACTIVITY 4: Crowd the Tap Citizen Science Experience (Lifestyle) The mission of Crowd the Tap is to ensure safe drinking water in the United States. Make your home part of the national inventory of water pipe materials! The inventory will help prioritize areas for tap water testing and infrastructure replacement. Find more information on Crowd the Tap(link is external).

Test the Waters Kit Safety and Hygiene

Library kits like the Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit require appropriate maintenance and cleaning. During the COVID-19 pandemic the NNLM requires that all kit recipients commit to the disinfection and quarantine procedures included in this thorough sanitation guide.

You will also receive a copy of the guide with your kit.

How to Apply

To apply for the Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit:

  1. Become a member of NNLM (if your organization isn’t already)
  2. Complete the application form(link is external)
Contact Us

Questions? Let us help! Email us at lib-nnlmallofus@uiowa.edu(link sends e-mail).

Test the Waters Family Exploration Kits Resources Audio Files English Korean About Cornerstones of Science

Cornerstones of Science has been working with public libraries for over 20 years to create science experiences that spark curiosity and foster a deeper understanding of the world around us. Cornerstones of Science partnered with the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) All of Us National Program and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to increase public involvement in scientific research as a way to reduce barriers between health research and the public. Learn more about Cornerstones of Science and what they have to offer(link is external).

Funding Statement

The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kits are made available with funds from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the NIH All of Us Research Program.

Learn about the All of Us Research Program(link is external).

The post Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Library Marketing Professional Development Experience Report Webinar

MCR News - Mon, 2021-03-08 19:29

Library Marketing Professional Development Experience Report Webinar: Hear from three of the Library Marketing Professional Development grant awardees for the 2020-2021 award period. LMPD grant awardees received funding from the Network of the National Library of Medicine, MidContinental Regional Medical Library which made their attendance at the Library Marketing & Communications Conference in November 2020 possible. Awardees also received individual coaching and mentoring on library engagement for the duration of the award period.

Speakers will discuss their experience with applying for funding, virtually attending the LMCC conference, and utilizing skills learned at the event. Presenters will also share their thoughts and takeaways from the ongoing mentorship component of the LMPD award. Attendees of the program will gain insight on integrating a successful mentorship component into grants they may pursue as well as ideas for marketing projects they may utilize at their library.

When: Tuesday, March 16 at 2pm MT / 3pm CT. Register here.

For further information, please contact Ellen Thieme at ellenthieme@mail.missouri.edu.

The post Library Marketing Professional Development Experience Report Webinar first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Request for Information (RFI): NIH Effort to Advance Racial Inclusion in Biomedical Research

SEA News - Mon, 2021-03-08 14:41
Purpose

This Notice is a Request for Information (RFI) inviting feedback on the approaches NIH can take to advance racial equity, diversity, and inclusion within all facets of the biomedical research workforce, and expand research to eliminate or lessen health disparities and inequities.

Review of this entire RFI notice is encouraged to ensure a comprehensive response is prepared and to have a full understanding of how your response will be utilized.

Background

The ability of NIH to remain at the forefront of biomedical research and to ensure that scientific discoveries truly benefit all depends upon diverse skill sets, viewpoints, and backgrounds. Events of the past year sparked a national discourse around social justice and systemic racism, and have brought into focus ongoing inequities in biomedical research and healthcare – from training and recruitment to funding to the support and administrative functions, in addition to shaping the type of research supported. The notions of recruitment, training, and advancement equally apply to the support and administrative staff that sustain the research enterprise, without whom NIH could not achieve its mission. Further, COVID-19 has amplified existing systemic challenges regarding prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of illness within historically marginalized and under-resourced communities, as the disease is disproportionally affecting under-resourced and vulnerable populations, particularly those from Black/African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Hispanic/Latino populations. As a global leader in biomedical research, NIH carries a weighted responsibility to address the systemic challenges and barriers affecting the NIH workforce and NIH-supported biomedical community that hinder the progress necessary to support true health equity. Enhancing workforce diversity and equity across the biomedical enterprise are critical steps to achieving progress. NIH acknowledges the experiences of those affected by race-based discrimination and is committed to eliminating racial and ethnic inequities within our workplace, the NIH-supported external scientific workforce, and the NIH-funded research portfolio. NIH leadership established the UNITE initiative, a new effort that involves all 27 NIH Institutes and Centers and the Office of the Director, to promote and advance racial equity, diversity, and inclusion. Ultimately, NIH strives to foster a biomedical research community and an NIH workplace that are free from hostility and discrimination grounded in race, sex, or other federally protected characteristics. In addition, NIH seeks to promote research to inform and address the breadth of health disparities/inequities, which continue to contribute to increasing morbidity and mortality. The current priorities of the UNITE effort are outlined below:

Priorities

  • Listen, learn, and articulate findings
  • Engage internal and external communities
  • Change culture to promote equity, inclusivity, and justice
  • Improve policies, transparency, and oversight
  • Strengthen career pathways, training, mentoring, and the professoriate
  • Ensure fairness in review and funding deliberations
  • Enhance funding and research support for diverse institutions and historically under-resourced research areas

Request for Comments

To ensure that the broad perspective of the biomedical research community informs the development of and aligns with NIH’s future plans and approaches, this RFI invites stakeholders throughout the scientific research, advocacy, clinical practice, and non-scientific communities, including the general public, to comment. In particular, NIH is interested in comments from higher education administrators, undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scientists, biomedical faculty (especially early stage), scientific societies and advocacy organizations, community partners, academic institutions (especially Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), and other institutions that have shown a historical commitment to educating students from underrepresented groups), and racial equity organizations on strategies to enhance equity, diversity, and inclusion within the scientific workforce and advance health disparities research.

Specifically, with this RFI, NIH seeks input on practical and effective ways to improve the racial and ethnic diversity and inclusivity of research environments and diversity of the biomedical research workforce across the United States, to the extent permitted by law. This RFI will assist NIH in identifying, developing, and implementing strategies that will allow the biomedical enterprise to benefit from a more diverse and inclusive research workforce and a more robust portfolio of research to better understand and address inequities in our existing system. While it will be important to understand further the fundamental and systemic barriers, the primary focus of this RFI is on the actions and solutions – through policy, procedure, or practice – NIH should consider in order to promote positive culture and structural change through effective interventions, leading to greater inclusiveness and diversity. Please also include potential metrics for evaluating success of the suggested actions or solutions, where possible. Input is requested on approaches and strategies that can be implemented in the short-term (e.g., within the next three to six months), as well as those that can be implemented within the next one to three years.

The NIH seeks comments on any or all of, but not limited to, the following topics:

All Aspects of the Biomedical Workforce

  • Perception and reputation of NIH as an organization, specifically as an employer (e.g., culture), with respect to support of workforce diversity and as an overall advocate for racial and gender equity in NIH-funded research
  • New or existing influence, partnerships, or collaborations NIH could leverage to enhance its outreach and presence with regards to workforce diversity (both the internal NIH workforce and the NIH-funded biomedical research enterprise); including engagement with academic institutions that have shown a historical commitment to educating students from underrepresented groups (especially Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), and other institutions), racial equity organizations, professional societies, or other federal agencies
  • Factors that present obstacles to training, mentoring, or career path (e.g., training environments) leading to underrepresentation of racial and ethnic groups (particularly Black/African Americans) in the biomedical research enterprise throughout the educational and career continuum and proposed solutions (novel or proven effective) to address them
  • Barriers inhibiting recruitment and hiring, promotion, retention and tenure, including the barriers scientists of underrepresented groups may face in gaining professional promotions, awards, and recognition for scientific or non-scientific contributions (e.g., mentoring, committees), and proven strategies or novel models to overcome and eliminate such barriers
  • Successful actions NIH and other institutions and organizations are currently taking to improve representation, equity, and inclusion and/or reduce barriers within the internal NIH workforce and across the broader funded biomedical research enterprise

Policies and Partnerships

  • Existing NIH policies, procedures, or practices that may perpetuate racial disparities/bias in application preparations/submissions, peer review, and funding, particularly for low resourced institutions, and proposed solutions to improve the NIH grant application process to consider diversity, inclusion, and equal opportunity to participate in research (e.g., access to application submission resources, changes to application submission instructions/guidance, interactions with and support from NIH staff during application process)
  • Best practices or proven approaches to build new or enhance existing partnerships and collaborations between investigators from research-intensive institutions and institutions that focus on under-resourced or underrepresented populations but have limited research resources

Research Areas

  • Significant research gaps or barriers to expanding and advancing the science of health disparities/health inequities research and proposed approaches to address them, particularly those beyond additional funding (although comments could include discussion of distribution or focus of resources)

Further Ideas

  • Additional ideas for bold, innovative initiatives, processes or data-driven approaches that could advance the diversity, inclusion, and equity of the biomedical research workforce and/or promote research on health disparities

NIH encourages organizations (e.g., patient advocacy groups, professional organizations) to submit a single response reflective of the views of the organization or membership as a whole.

How to Submit a Response

All comments must be submitted electronically on the submission website.

Responses must be received by 11:59:59 pm (ET) on April 9, 2021.

Responses to this RFI are voluntary and may be submitted anonymously. You may voluntarily include your name and contact information with your response. If you choose to provide NIH with this information, NIH will not share your name and contact information outside of NIH unless required by law.

Other than your name and contact information, please do not include any personally identifiable information or any information that you do not wish to make public. Proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should not be included in your response. The Government will use the information submitted in response to this RFI at its discretion. Other than your name and contact information, the Government reserves the right to use any submitted information on public websites, in reports, in summaries of the state of the science, in any possible resultant solicitation(s), grant(s), or cooperative agreement(s), or in the development of future funding opportunity announcements. This RFI is for informational and planning purposes only and is not a solicitation for applications or an obligation on the part of the Government to provide support for any ideas identified in response to it. Please note that the Government will not pay for the preparation of any information submitted or for use of that information.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to: UNITEInitiative@nih.gov

The post Request for Information (RFI): NIH Effort to Advance Racial Inclusion in Biomedical Research first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

NH/VT Hospital Libraries Focus Group

NER News - Mon, 2021-03-08 13:05

fog over mountainsWe know that rural hospitals are economically stressed and that hospital libraries are closing. This is particularly notable in New Hampshire and Vermont. NER was interested in hearing how this is impacting the remaining hospital librarians.

On February 9, we invited twelve people who are interested in the fate of hospital libraries in NH and VT. We asked three questions: How are librarians coping with the loss of their colleagues in NH and VT? How can the NLM Public Services Division support the work of hospital librarians in NH and VT? How can NNLM support the work of hospital librarians in NH and VT? The goal was for the Network to gather perceptions, insights, and experiences of hospital librarians in New Hampshire and Vermont.

Nine hospital libraries remain in New Hampshire and Vermont. Two hospital libraries are affiliated with schools of medicine (University of Vermont and Dartmouth College), two hospital libraries are at Veterans Affairs medical centers (Manchester, NH and White River Junction, VT), and one hospital librarian serves two for-profit hospitals in New Hampshire.

Only three non-profit community hospitals have libraries, and these are located in New Hampshire. The University of Vermont Libraries provides library services to Vermont hospitals for an annual fee and pay-per-service. At least one New Hampshire hospital is contracting with Hilton Publishing Company International for virtual librarian services.

Interlibrary loan services in academic medical centers are shifting towards centralization in the academic libraries, and this is impacting their participation in DOCLINE. Participants in the Focus Group reported that Dartmouth College stopped participating in DOCLINE. They asked if the National Library of Medicine could do exit interviews for libraries that leave DOCLINE, as this impacts the collegiality that previously existed between academic medical centers and community hospitals.

Hospital librarians are concerned that hospitals are eliminating their librarians and still participate in DOCLINE by contracting with publishing companies. DOCLINE policies are listed on the NLM website, but the Focus Group participants were unclear about who is enforcing the policies.

In addition to DOCLINE concerns, participants shared stories about how changes in PubMed and MyNCBI are having a big impact on the workflow of hospital librarians. They miss the easy methods of saving their searches. When asked about ideas for future training, the Focus Group participants suggested disaster preparation. They specified needing to know more about how to prepare for cyber-attacks. The University of Vermont experienced a major cyber-attack at the end of 2020. For more information, this story was published in Becker’s Hospital Review.

The post NH/VT Hospital Libraries Focus Group first appeared on NER Update.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Reading Club Presents… Resurrection Lily

MCR News - Mon, 2021-03-08 10:15

Join NNLM and our All of Us community partners on March 11, 2021, 3-4 pm ET for a live event with Amy Byer Shainman, author of Resurrection Lily: The BRCA Gene, Hereditary Cancer & Lifesaving Whispers from the Grandmother I Never Knew.

Shainman and Ellen Matloff, a certified genetic counselor, will discuss and answer your questions about hereditary cancer syndromes.

To attend the event, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJBzdgCTn2E.

The post NNLM Reading Club Presents… Resurrection Lily first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Join us on March 11th for Resurrection Lily

PNR Dragonfly - Sun, 2021-03-07 20:00

Please join us this Thursday as Amy Byer Shainman, also known as the BRCA Responder, talks about her book, Resurrection Lily: The BRCA Gene, Hereditary Cancer & Lifesaving Whispers from the Grandmother I Never Knew with Certified Genetic Counselor Ellen Matloff.

In this powerful program, these two genetic cancer experts will share their knowledge and answer your questions.

Mar. 11, 2021

   11:00 a.m. Alaska | 12:00 p.m. PT | 1:00 p.m. MT 

Join the live stream on YouTube 

https://youtu.be/PJBzdgCTn2E

The post Join us on March 11th for Resurrection Lily first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – March 5, 2021

SEA News - Fri, 2021-03-05 10:07

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Webinars March 9 – March 11

Webinars March 16 – March 23

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – March 5, 2021 first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit

GMR News - Fri, 2021-03-05 10:02

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries. The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family friendly activities, and all the instructions and materials needed (audio file guides are available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese).

The free kits are available to the first 400 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf. Applications for the kits will be open until they are all gone/April 30th, 2021. If you are a member of NNLM you can apply for a kit by clicking here. Otherwise, it is easy and free to sign your organization up.

Test the Waters Flyer

The post Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit first appeared on Midwest Matters.
Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2021-03-05 07:30

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://covid19.nih.gov/

Learn about Older Adults & COVID-19 Vaccines with My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can get information on what older adults need to know about COVID-19 vaccines, learn about colorectal cancer, and more. Subscribe to receive My MedlinePlus via email.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit – Midwest Matters, from GMR

Words Matter – NER Update

CHES Continuing Education from the Network of the National Library of Medicine – MARquee News Highlights

New NLM Online Exhibitions – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey – Blogadillo, News from SCR

DataFlash: MLA’s New Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

Member Highlights: Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association – MARquee News Highlights

Bias Awareness Resources – NER Update

NNLM Reading Club March Selections Focus on Nutrition: In March, the NNLM Reading Club examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good, or better for us. No matter what fare typically gets you through your day, we invite you to fortify your knowledge diet with these Reading Club selections. Visit the NNLM Reading Club to see our menu. Enjoy!

NLM/NIH News

NIH News in Health: Read the March 2021 issue, featuring, “Understanding COVID-19: How to Protect Yourself During the Pandemic,” and, “Patchy Skin: Vitiligo Explained.”

Vaccines, Vaccinations, and NLMNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Antibody Response Affects COVID-19 Outcomes in Kids and AdultsNIH Director’s Blog

Taking a Community-Based Approach to Youth Substance Abuse PreventionNIH Director’s Blog

NLM Collections Tour: VaccinesCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Through All of Us program, Scripps Research launches wearable technology study to accelerate precision medicine – Scripps Research

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced that the new CORE Problem List Subset of SNOMED CT is available for download.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

March 2021

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Learning from American Indian and Alaska Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic – March 10, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: Selection – March 11, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman – March 11, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library – March 16, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Improve Mental Health and Dementia Research By Playing Games on Your Phone – March 18, 11:00 AM ET

How PubMed® Works: MeSH – March 18, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Addressing Health Misinformation at the Scale of the Internet – March 22, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

NLM’s Human Genetics Resources for Clinicians and Biologists – March 23, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Ethical Issues in Citizen Science Research – March 24, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

BLOSSOM! Building Life-Long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale and Mindfulness – March 24-26

How PubMed® Works: ATM – March 25, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

#CiteNLM Virtual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon – March 31, 1:00-3:00 PM ET

April 2021

From Being to Doing: Anti-Racism as Action at Work – April 13, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Telehealth in Rural Public Libraries – April 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Social and Environmental Determinants of Maternal Health Disparities and a Roadmap to Effective Solutions – April 20, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Launching and Leading the Librarian Reserve Corps: Developing an agile librarian network in response to COVID-19 – April 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Thinking in 3D: An Introduction to Medical Imaging and 3D-printing – March 11, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Advanced Searching Instructor-Led Courses Series 2021 – Sponsored by MLA; Both courses: $550 Members, $950 Non-members, Single course: $300 Members, $525 Non-members.

2021 Virtual Forum for Migrant and Community Health – March 22-26, 2021 – Sponsored by the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH), North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA), and Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA)

SOPHE 2021dX Annual Conference – April 6-9, 2021 – Sponsored by SOPHE

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

Words Matter

NER News - Thu, 2021-03-04 12:37

Did you know that illicit drug use disorder is the most stigmatized health condition in the world and alcohol use disorder was ranked not far behind as fourth in the world? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3353607/

A study was conducted by the Recovery Research Institute that asked participants how they felt about two people “actively using drugs and alcohol”.

One person was referred to as a “substance abuser” and the other person was referred to as “having a substance use disorder.” No further information was given about these hypothetical individuals. This study directly addressed the stigma associated with substance use disorder and whether the language we use to describe individuals with substance-related problems has an effect on the stigmatizing attitudes of their peers and care providers. The person labeled as the “substance abuser” provoked a more punitive reaction because they were thought to be more in control and willfully engaging in misconduct.

Specifically, study participants thought that the “substance abuser” was:

  • less likely to benefit from treatment.
  • more likely to benefit from punishment.
  • more likely to be socially threatening.
  • more likely to be blamed for their substance related difficulties and less likely that their problem was the result of an innate dysfunction over which they had no control.
  • they were more able to control their substance use without help.

Those participating in this study had a less harsh reaction to the person with a “substance use disorder” because the word “disorder” conveys the notion that they have some kind of medical condition that is the causing their difficulty.

There also have been other studies conducted (related to alcohol use disorder) that seem to suggest that those who perceived that their alcohol-related problems were highly stigmatized by their families and friends were less likely to seek treatment. While those who felt less stigmatized by those around them were more likely to seek treatment.

The common use of the term “abuser” among clinicians, scientists, policy makers and the general public could be contributing significantly to the stigma of addiction. These studies are part of a body of literature that is helping to bring about a change in the language we use about the disease of addiction.

“Recently, the International Society of Addiction Journal Editors, based in large part on these studies, provided guidance strongly cautioning against use of the term “abuse”, and advocated instead for either substance use disorder (if substance use meets diagnostic thresholds) or several variations on substance use that may cause harm, such as hazardous substance use or harmful substance use.”

Here are 4 general language rules to keep in mind when talking about substance use disorder:

  • Respect the worth and dignity of all persons.
  • Focus on the medical nature of substance use disorders and treatment.
  • Promote the recovery process.
  • Avoid perpetuating negative stereotype biases through the use of slang and idioms.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recommends that “substance use” be used to describe all substances, including alcohol and other drugs, and that clinicians refer to severity specifiers (e.g., mild, moderate, severe) to indicate the severity of the SUD. This language also supports documentation of accurate clinical assessment and development of effective treatment plans.7 When talking about treatment plans with people with SUD and their loved ones, be sure to use evidence-based language instead of referring to treatment as an intervention.

The following chart is from the NIDA website and is a helpful resource to use as it identifies terms to avoid, terms to use and also the reason why. Consider using these recommended terms to reduce stigma and negative bias when talking about addiction. Language is powerful and can affect people in ways that we cannot always predict or anticipate.  The authors challenge readers not to underestimate the importance of using language and terminology that gives dignity and respect to those suffering from substance use disorders.

The post Words Matter first appeared on NER Update.
Categories: RML Blogs

Online Library Carpentry Workshop Opportunity: March 25th – 26th

SEA News - Thu, 2021-03-04 11:53

The NNLM SEA is pleased to host an online Library Carpentry workshop on March 25th – 26th 2021.

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective, and reproducible data and software practices.

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. The instructors put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower researchers and enable data-driven discovery. Biomedical and health sciences librarians and LIS students are encouraged to participate.

In this interactive, hands-on workshop you will learn core software and data skills, with lessons including:

Logistics:

  • This workshop will be held via Zoom, from 9 am – 5:00 pm ET each day.
  • Participants must have access to a computer (no tablets or Chromebooks) with Windows, Mac, or Linux operating system and an internet connection that can support a Zoom video meeting.
  • Participants must agree to follow theCarpentries Code of Conduct.
  • Participants will be responsible for downloading some files and software before the workshop. Setup instructions will be provided.

To apply, please complete the NNLM SEA Library Carpentry application.

There are 20 seats available. They will generally be awarded on a first-come-first serve basis, but applicants from organizations in the Southeastern Atlantic region of the NNLM will be prioritized.

Notice of acceptance to the workshop will be announced on Monday, March 15th.

Questions? Contact Kiri Burcat at kburcat@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

The post Online Library Carpentry Workshop Opportunity: March 25th – 26th first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

CHES Continuing Education from the Network of the National Library of Medicine

MAR News - Thu, 2021-03-04 10:00
Upcoming CHES Eligible Webinars

All CHES-eligible courses from NNLM are free. To register, select the link in the title of the course in which you are interested and sign up with your username and password on nnlm.gov.

Please note: to claim CHES CECH, a participant must log in to the session using the WebEx or Zoom link provided upon registration. In addition, you may only receive CHES CECH for a session if you have not previously received credit for attending the same course or watching the recording of the course.

As of April 30, the NNLM Middle Atlantic Region offices will be closing due to a consolidation of NNLM regions. As a result, we will no longer be approving courses for CHES CECH. Please send any outstanding inquiries regarding CHES CECH to nnlmmar@pitt.edu by April 23, 2021.

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2021, 2:00 – 3:00PM ET – As public health practice and public librarianship evolve to meet the current needs of communities, their goals and missions are converging, but we use different language. In this webinar, we’ll discuss how to find common ground, establish shared language, and identify how libraries and public health departments can work together to promote the health of their communities.

Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe current and past programs involving public health and public library partnerships, including the outcomes of those partnerships
  2. Explain current needs, gaps, barriers, and opportunities for collaboration between public health and public libraries
  3. Identify opportunities for collaboration within your own community

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Learning from American Indian and Alaska Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic – March 10, 2021, 11:00AM – 12:00PM ET – This talk will cover the complexities and nuances between American Indian and Alaska Native Communities and COVID-19. Specifically, I will discuss the unique environmental, social, and cultural implications for COVID-19 for Indian country. This discussion will extend beyond the limitations and hardships that AIAN populations have had to shoulder during the pandemic and highlight the resilience that AIAN communities have emulated as lessons for public health officials.

Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe the environmental, social, and cultural implications for COVID-19 for Indian country
  2. Discuss the limitations and hardships that AIAN populations have had to shoulder during the pandemic
  3. Explain how the resilience that AIAN communities have emulated are lessons for public health officials

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2021, 2:00 – 2:45PM ET – Public health practice depends on quality information but there isn’t a lot of time for busy practitioners to find what they need and put it to use. This webinar will share resources and strategies from three public health-trained librarians to help you optimize the time you spend searching so you can focus on sharing what you find with your clients and colleagues. Through examples of diverse questions, we will suggest efficient and quality health information sources, as well as strategies to address technical challenges with terminology, a lack of useful evidence, and limitations to access to journal articles and other content for professional audiences.

Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe efficient approaches to retrieving public health content from free online resources
  2. Explain gaps in discoverability due to terminology differences between public health practitioners and content producers, and suggest opportunities to improve this by collaboration between public health and librarians
  3. Identify ways to share published information within your community of practice and the communities you serve

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Recorded Webinars Available for CHES CECH

Did you miss a live class? The recorded webinars listed below are available for CHES CECH. Please note: You can only get credit from recorded classes if you have not previously received credit for attending the live webinar version or a previously offered recorded version of the same course.

HESPA II 2020 Curricular Mapping for Advancing Health Education Specialist Professionals Webinar – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 8, 2021 The New HESPA II 2020 Curricular Mapping for Advancing Health Education Specialist (HESPA) Professionals Webinar, is a one hour webinar for any public health professional who would like to learn how to map Health Education curriculum to the new HESPA II 2020 competencies.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the steps in conducting a complete HESPA II 2020 curriculum mapping process
  2. Identify the need for curricular mapping using HESPA II 2020 Competencies and Sub-competencies to create curricular improvements and changes
  3. Discuss the importance of the HESPA II 2020 model for professional preparation and practice
  4. Discuss the steps involved with health department activities relating to the HESPA II 2020 Competencies

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 1

Health Statistics on the Web Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 This course focuses on the location, selection, and effective use of statistics relevant to health on the local, state, national, and international levels. The importance and relevance of health statistics in various contexts will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several statistics Internet resources through the use of numerous exercises.

Objectives: 

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Identify selected key websites for use in the location of data sets and statistics for use at the local, state and national level, including PHPartners and MedlinePlus.
  2. Discuss of the types of data sets and statistics available on the Internet.
  3. Define the 4-step process used to successfully locate relevant health statistics for a particular circumstance or issue.
  4. Describe where to locate additional health statistics training through the National Information Center on Health Services Research & Health Care Technology (NICHSR)

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Rural Health Resources – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This webinar will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities. Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from higher incidence of chronic illness, they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. This webinar will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities. We will explore websites from the National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, Rural Health Information Hub and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The origins of each website will be explained. Each of the websites contain consumer-level information and offers an opportunity for data downloads. The downloads will be demonstrated. These resources are relevant to nurses, librarians, public health workers, allied healthcare professionals, educators, faith- and community-based organizations.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Describe current demographic trends in rural America
  2. Download data sets and visualizations from rural health resources
  3. Find information on health conditions, demographic groups and social issues
  4. Identify methods of discovering potential community partners

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

DNA to Z: Direct-to-consumer genetic testing – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This webinar class will provide an overview of the history and current state of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, which has become extremely popular in recent years. The differences between ancestry and health testing will be explored. The veracity of claims commonly made by testing companies will be assessed, and concerns and challenges surrounding these tests will be examined. Attendees will learn where to go to find essential background information about genetics needed to understand DTC tests and how to locate more advanced professional assistance. This class can also provide a template for information professionals looking to offer similar programs at their own libraries.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Describe the general history and current technological state of DTC genetic testing
  2. Assess the veracity of claims commonly made by testing companies
  3. Recognize specific NLM and other resources for providing basic genetics information
  4. Discuss practical and ethical challenges surrounding DTC testing
  5. Explore essential background information about genetics and genetic testing
  6. Explore resources for professional assistance

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in our Lives – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – The webinar will help “de-mystify” the concept of behavioral and mental health by describing the continuum of human thoughts and emotions from wellness to illness to chronic impairment. Speakers will share insights and updated approaches for managing common conditions such as depression and anxiety. Additionally, new ways of approaching mental health outside specialty care as well as methods to address the persistently mentally ill will be inventoried. Special focus will be given to the role society can play in recognizing the impact of childhood trauma and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Describe a framework for characterizing human behavior in a continuum from well to ill
  2. Describe two methods to impact the listener’s own behavior
  3. List two conditions that if depression coexists, outcomes are worse if depression is unaddressed
  4. Describe the traditional structure of medical and behavioral funding in health benefits
  5. List one outcomes-demonstrated solution for integrating mental health into medical settings

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Partnering for Improved Communication: A Health Literacy Program-in-a-Box – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – Are you interested in health literacy? Are you unsure of what types of health literacy programs exist or what resources are available to you? This session will discuss the NNLM program Engage for Health, a community health education “program in a box” that you can offer. Engage for Health teaches community members how to effectively communicate with their health care providers. Program materials are freely available for use by libraries, community and faith based agencies, public health organizations or others who promote health literacy in their community. Available materials include presentation slides with speaker notes, a role-play exercise, pre-post evaluation tool, and marketing materials. This presentation will also emphasize the importance of public health and public library partnerships in engaging the community around the topic of health literacy.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Demonstrate how to locate the Engage Health Program on nnlm.gov
  2. List the materials included in the Engage for Health Program-in-a-Box
  3. Describe the community partners typically involved in the implementation of Engage for Health

CECH: .75
Advanced CECH: 0

On-demand CHES Eligible Courses

Learn on your own time! Select the hyperlink in each course title to register on the NNLM website for these free, on-demand courses.

Online Resources to Support Evidence-Based Practice on Population Health: An Introduction to MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProjAvailable for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – The course is designed to teach public health professionals and librarians to use MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj to find reliable health information and data related to population health and Healthy People 2020. This asynchronous course is offered through Moodle using Storyline Articulate software. Please note that the content in the course is for basic/beginner users of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss population health and its relation to Healthy People 2020
  2. Describe the purpose of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj databases
  3. Identify when to use each database based on the information need
  4. Perform advanced searching techniques to identify more accurate results

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Accessing Health Information in Multiple LanguagesAvailable for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with some basic statistics on individuals with limited English proficiency in the United States and demonstrate how to use resources from the National Library of Medicine to access reliable health information in multiple languages. Attendees will learn about data from the American Community Survey and U.S. Census Bureau, and then receive demonstrations on how to access reliable health information in multiple languages through the National Library of Medicine’s HealthReach and MedlinePlus databases.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current population of non-native English speakers in the United States
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health information in multiple languages
  3. Analyze resources to access reliable health information in multiple languages

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Building Cultural Competence and Humility into the Workplace Available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with an introduction to the concepts of culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility. Participants will learn about some of the current critiques to using cultural competence principles and how cultural humility can be supplemented to create a more accepting, welcoming, and reflective working environment. Short demos of Think Cultural Health, PubMed, and Project Implicit are included to showcase three external resources that can be used to further explore this topic.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility;
  2. Describe the differences between cultural competence and humility; and
  3. Utilize three online resources to help build a more culturally competent and humble workplace.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Finding Data on Health DisparitiesAvailable for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This course is designed to introduce attendees to health disparities and how the social determinants of health contribute to an inequity in health. Participants will be shown demonstrations on how to utilize tools from the National Library of Medicine, the Office of Minority Health, and HealthyPeople.gov to locate data on health disparities.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss health disparities in public health
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health disparity data
  3. Analyze resources to access data on health disparities

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Sponsored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine – Middle Atlantic Region, a designated provider of contact hours (CECH) in health education credentialing by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc., these programs are designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour. Advanced level CECH is indicated on a course by course basis above.

Reach out to Erin Seger, MPH, CHES at ers166@pitt.edu with any questions about receiving CECH for these courses.

If you want to learn more about the Network of the National Library of Medicine in your area, find your region on our website.

The post CHES Continuing Education from the Network of the National Library of Medicine first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

New NLM Online Exhibitions

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2021-03-04 06:27

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is known for its vast collection of biomedical information and for providing freely available and authoritative resources such as PubMed and MedlinePlus. Its History of Medicine division also provides a wonderful exhibitions program highlighting history, the arts, social issues, professions, and medicine utilizing NLM’s vast collections.

You may be familiar or even have hosted past exhibitions such as Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Wellness or Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine in Harry Potter’s World.

Two new exhibitions are now available to view.

Outside/Inside: Immigration, Migration, and Health Care in the United States
Guest curated by Dr. Beatrix Hoffman, PhD, Outside/Inside features items from the NLM historical collections and explores the history of ideas about immigrant health and immigrants’ and migrants’ experiences with U.S. health care since the late 1800s.

This online exhibition includes education resources featuring a K-12 lesson plan and a university module developed by the guest curator. The digital gallery showcases a photo album from the 1930s created by and depicting visiting nurses from the Henry Street Settlement social service agency, at work caring for an immigrant community in the Bronx.

Making a World of Difference: Stories About Global Health
The exhibition explores how communities around the world, in collaboration with scientists, activists, governments, and international organizations, prevent disease and improve quality of life in their communities and beyond. It revives stories featured in the 2008 exhibition Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health for a contemporary audience.

Featured in the online exhibition are two timely, newly-developed videos: “The Power of Memory: Fighting Disease With Vaccines & Immunization” and “Bitten! Mosquito-Borne Illness and You”. The online exhibition also includes a K-12 lesson plan and a digital gallery that further explores selected works from the historical collections of the NLM.

Though the traveling exhibitions are on hold, the online exhibitions are freely available for you to enjoy and include in your library or organization’s programming. The Exhibitions’ staff are available to support your development of programming based on the digital exhibition and accompanying resources.

The best way to keep in the know about upcoming opportunities to host and announcements of new exhibitions is to join the listserv and explore the NLM Exhibitions’ webpage

The post New NLM Online Exhibitions first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey

SCR News - Wed, 2021-03-03 19:37

This week’s guest blog post comes from Paula Mozen, Director of the film LIFE INTERRUPTED. In this post, Paula shares a bit of her story and her journey with this film about the trials of breast cancer survivors. Please note that portions of the original post have been edited for clarity.

I was a documentary filmmaker long before I became a breast cancer survivor. When I was first diagnosed, I wanted to take care of my situation and move on. The last thing I wanted to do was to make a film about it, a project that I knew would take several years to fundraise and complete. As time passed and I gained perspective on my own situation, I realized I was NOT alone; there are hundreds of thousands of us out here. In the United States, 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2021, an estimated 330,000 new cases will be diagnosed. 

Breast Cancer is indeed an epidemic. It can be found across all age, gender, socio-economic, ethnic, and geographic groups. It does not discriminate; however, as we know, access to quality healthcare can be very discriminatory.

MSU photo by Kelly Gorham

Holding these truths together plus having the inside track to my own experience, I decided to make the film I wish I could have seen when I was diagnosed – both times. I wanted LIFE INTERRUPTED to put a face to the statistics and tell meaningful stories in order to inspire change. 

Breast cancer patients are often asked to make their own choices in terms of treatments available. The moment the diagnosis is received, each person must gather information and make life-altering decisions under extreme emotional duress, all in a relatively short period of time. While individual circumstances are unique, hearing about the personal journeys from articulate women who have traveled this road before is invaluable for navigating treatments and keeping hope alive. Knowledge is power; the successful prevention and treatment of breast cancer depends on this. 

Persistence is a common theme for indie filmmakers and breast cancer survivors alike. Just when you think you are finished, there is usually another mountain to climb.

From Berkeley to Berlin to Beirut and back to Bozeman, MY LIFE INTERRUPTED was screened, was reviewed, and won several awards at festivals. After these events, I wanted to connect directly with audiences who cared about the themes and issues the film covered, including Healthcare Advocates, Providers, and survivors. My hope was to provide empowerment for survivors to be self-advocates  and to share with family members, advocates and healthcare providers what it truly means to survive breast cancer.

I learned about the All of Us Research Program and partnership with NNLM through Julie Sherwood, the Partnership & Community Engagement Manager for the Wichita Public Library. After a series of emails, a partnership was formed that would involve collaborations with NNLM staff from throughout the organization, including Brittany Thomas, Brian Leaf, Linda Loi, Darlene Kaskie, Michelle Spatz, George Strawley, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Richard McLean, Helen Spielbauer, Rachel Maller, Holly Stevenson, Laura Bartlett, and Frost Keaton. 

Beginning March 3rd through April 15th, NNLM and I look forward to presenting the LIFE INTERRUPTED Virtual Screening Series which includes live interactive panel discussions in partnership with The Black Women’s Health Imperative, The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS), Asian Health Coalition, Henry Ford Health System, Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library.

During the panel discussions, hear from medical or research professionals who specialize in breast cancer, breast cancer survivors, and advocates who represent populations historically underrepresented in medical research. Panelists will share their experiences and knowledge on diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, living with breast cancer, advancing treatments and cures for breast cancer, and advocating for precision medicine and diversity of medical research through programs like All of Us.

It has been an absolute honor and pleasure to work with the entire team so far, a group of talented, motivated and detail-oriented individuals who are dedicated to creating the best possible audience user experience. Everyone is focused on making each event engaging, interactive, relevant and accessible. To work with a team like this is – well – a filmmaker’s dream come true; we are all on the same page, doing the right thing for the right reasons, all to empower patients and share meaningful stories. 

Thank you to Paula Mozen for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post! We look forward to seeing the great things that come from this project.

For more information or to attend any of these upcoming free events, visit watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted

For more Information on the film LIFE INTERRUPTED, click here: www.lifeinterruptedfilm.com

Remember to like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

The post Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey first appeared on Blogadillo.
Categories: RML Blogs

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