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RML Blogs

Funding Awarded for an Outreach Award: Senior Health Outreach

GMR News - Wed, 2017-10-18 11:31

photo of the St. Charles Public Library BuildingI am thrilled to announce that the Outreach Services Department of the St. Charles Public Library (consisting of David Kelsey, Dana Hintz, Lynda Spraner, and Christine Steck) has been awarded funding to partner with Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University to develop and deliver presentations on healthcare and medical topics at senior facilities in the St. Charles, Illinois community.

Members of the Library’s Outreach Services Department, visit nine senior facilities, three homecare facilities, and fifteen homebound patrons a month. Outreach Services also provides weekly, biweekly, and monthly programs at seven senior facilities, engaging over two hundred and fifty patrons per month. They have noted a new demand for us to arrange and provide healthcare programming and training sessions at three of our senior independent living facilities. Outreach Services will collaborate with Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University  to offer programming to teach seniors how to find high-quality health information on the web. With the assistance of trained library staff, seniors will be able to use laptops to explore healthcare databases and websites suggested by the Medical Library Association’s top health websites for health consumers and patients including MedlinePlus and CDC. The speakers will encourage additional engagement through hands-on-training activities, using authoritative databases and websites to locate quality health information. Our goal is for seniors to discover methods to live healthier lives and take better care of themselves as they age.

Categories: RML Blogs

Multiple Language Resources for Domestic Violence Awareness Month

MAR News - Wed, 2017-10-18 09:52

From the NLM Outreach and Special Populations branch:

Domestic violence is a form of abuse that may involve a spouse or partner, a child, elderly relative, or other family member. Domestic violence can include physical, sexual, emotional, and economic abuse. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and the National Library of Medicine offers handouts, audio, and video resources in multiple languages on HealthReach to educate people about domestic violence, such as:

Categories: RML Blogs

Did you Know that NLM Resources Can Add Value and Evidence to Your mHealth Apps?

NER News - Wed, 2017-10-18 09:02

 

Did you know that a number of  systematic reviews of health-related mobile apps reveal they lack evidence-based content?  A major challenge to including evidence based content in apps is how to efficiently find accurate, credible, and vetted content.  The National Library of Medicine (NLM) houses the largest biomedical library in the world and provides numerous expert-developed online resources on disease and health education.  Susan Halpin from the The New England Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and Dr. Sherry Pagoto, Director of the University of Connecticut Center for mHealth and Social Media have teamed up in an upcoming webinar to share how mobile apps and social media are are being used in health care and medicine, as well as introduce you to NLM digital resources, and give examples of how they can and have been used in mobile apps.  If you or your organization is involved with creating mhealth tools or if you have an interest in this topic, you are invited to join us for this webinar on November 7th 12-1PM (EST). Not available at that time? This webinar will be recorded. All who register will receive the link to the recording, as well as the class materials.

Register here http://bit.ly/2ywASJz

Categories: RML Blogs

Comics and Medicine Panel at MICE 2017

NER News - Wed, 2017-10-18 07:29

Each year since 2010, the Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo (MICE) has been a showcase designed to build connections between local artists and a local audience. In addition to exhibiting artists, MICE includes workshops for both children and adults and panel discussions that delve deeper into the nuances of the medium.

This year, as part of NNLM NER’s growing Graphic Medicine initiative, I have worked together with the MICE team (Cathy Leamy and Dan Mazur) to coordinate a panel titled ‘Comics and Medicine’. The panel will take place at 11 am EST on Saturday, October 21st. The full description reads: “Medicine and public health are increasingly turning to comics as tools for teaching, storytelling, and more. This panel will talk about aspects of “graphic medicine”, including projects rooted in health education, medical history, and library science.”

Panelists include:

  • Cathy Leamy (@metrokitty; metrokitty.com), a medical writer and cartoonist with an interest in preventive medicine and primary care. She has a new minicomic on improving your sleep, debuting here at MICE 2017.
  • Kriota Willberg (@Kriota; kriotawelt.blogspot.com), whose comics focus on bodies (human and animal), anatomy, bioscience, women’s health, and history. Her self-care comics for artists will be published by Uncivilized Books as one book in April 2017. You can find her work in SubCultures, Awesome Possum 3, 4Panel.com, Strumpet5, Comics for Choice, Intima: Journal of Narrative Medicine, Broken Pencil, and the upcoming Graphic Canon. Willberg is a massage therapist and a health science educator. She is the first-ever Artist-in-Residence at the New York Academy of Medicine Library.
  • Iasmin Omar Ata (@DELTAHEAD_; iasminomarata.com), an intersectional comics artist, illustrator, and game designer. They focus on creating art centered around the themes of coping with illness, understanding identity, and dismantling oppressive structures.
  • Matthew Noe (@NoetheMatt; graphiclibrarian.wordpress.com), is a Library Fellow at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lamar Soutter Library and the Graphic Medicine Specialist for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region. His specialty areas include health literacy, medical humanities, and graphic medicine. He is the curator for the weekly blog posts, ‘This Week in Graphic Medicine’, which serve as a newsletter/bibliography for comics and medicine news.

The panel will be recorded and made publically available, but for those nearby, I encourage you to come out to MICE – not just to get direct contact with this panel, but to meet and a wide array of brilliant artists. And, of course, find new things to read!

More information about the panel, and MICE 2017 generally, including location, schedule, and a list of exhibitors, visit www.micexpo.org.

In anticipation of this panel, I asked each panelist to say in a few sentences what graphic medicine is to them. Here are their responses – a bit of a teaser of the panel to come!

  • Cathy: Graphic medicine is anything involving comics/cartooning and health and illness. I love that it’s not rigid and nailed down; the door is open for all kinds of explorations and investigators. Health education comics, illness memoirs, analysis of comics for medical themes, art therapy, teaching self-expression and empathy through comics making – so many applications are possible, and we all benefit from the cross-pollination of being exposed to them.
  • Kriota: My goal as a cartoonist making GM is to normalize medicine and the body. I hope to make illness, anatomy, and science a benign and familiar trio of actors in our lives, thereby mitigating the anxiety and confusion that often effects patients and their families, and stigmatizes the ill.
  • Iasmin: [To me, graphic medicine is] using unique mediums to heal through the power of art. Particularly in comics and games, there exists such an opportunity for those with illness to speak, be heard, listen, and heal.
  • Matthew: Graphic medicine, beyond the strict definitions and the difficult task of reigning in what exactly it means to be a comic, is about communication. Patients communicating with physicians. Physicians communicating with patients. Family communicating with family. Comics can give voice to the voiceless, clarity to the unclear, and can help us refocus medicine on the human.

— Matthew Noe —

Categories: RML Blogs

Testing Available for a New, Experimental PubMed Search and User Interface!

PSR News - Tue, 2017-10-17 19:45

NLM needs your input as it experiments with a new PubMed search algorithm, as well as a modern, mobile-first user interface. You can try out these elements at PubMed Labs, a website created for the very purpose of giving potential new PubMed features a test drive and gathering user opinions. The key elements being tested include:

  • A new search algorithm for ranking (ordering) the best matches to your query
    Based on analysis of data obtained from anonymous PubMed search logs, a new algorithm has been developed that NLM believes does a much better job of sorting search results by their relevance, or “best match,” to a query. This new algorithm incorporates machine learning to re-rank the top articles returned. This algorithm is already implemented in PubMed, but it is still experimental and NLM would appreciate hearing what you think. You can read more about the specifics of the algorithm in the NLM Technical Bulletin.
  • Mobile-first, responsive design with modern user interface
    PubMed Labs is designed to make searching and reading articles fast and easy, whether you are using a phone, tablet, laptop or desktop.
  • Snippets from PubMed abstracts & highlighted search terms/synonyms
    The search results page in PubMed Labs includes highlights (“snippets”) from the article abstract, when available, that are identified based on their relevance to the user query. Search terms and their synonyms are highlighted in both the title and the snippet.

Tell NLM what you think about these features! You can comment via this blog post, as well as leave feedback via the PubMed Labs site.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

The Future of NLM’s Biomedical Informatics Course

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2017-10-17 19:15

For 24 years, since the creation of the cutting edge, week-long NLM Biomedical Informatics Course in 1992, its instructional staff offered an immersion into an initially new, yet still rapidly growing research area that blended library, engineering, computer, and biomedical sciences and had real-life applications, such as clinical decision support. But after a quarter century of progress, NLM is re-imagining the course’s future and envisioning new ways to educate librarians and informaticists, considering the Library’s increasing work with data science and biomedicine.

When the course began, there were few options for people interested in the nexus of health and computing. Recognizing the gap, Donald A. B. Lindberg, MD, then-director of the National Library of Medicine, conceived the course, bringing together professionals to learn about medical informatics from experts in the field. Initially offered once a year, the course later expanded to two times each year to accommodate growing interest. It was first hosted by the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and then moved to Young Harris, Georgia, in 2014, where it was hosted by the faculty and staff of Augusta University.

Over the years, NLM and its partners introduced more than 1,600 participants—librarians, physicians, nurses, dieticians, and educators—to biomedical informatics. The course altered participants’ career directions, expanded their ability to impact their own institutions, and changed the field of biomedical informatics itself. One study found the course influenced participants’ engagement with information technology-related activities, such as selection and training; shaped their development of undergraduate and graduate informatics curricula; and encouraged their own continuing education. Participants also found their own credibility in the field changed for the better at their home institution.

Over two decades, an established biomedical informatics community took root, with formal coursework, self-study, continuing education, and other professional development options, largely due to the seeds planted by the course and other NLM training efforts. Now Rex Robison, head of the Training and Outreach Unit in Library Operations at NLM, is leading a group to shape a successor to the NLM Biomedical Informatics Course. The restructuring process will take into account NLM’s strengths and goals, as well as the needs of the biomedical library and informatics communities.

The group is looking forward to developing the next iteration of this legendary course, while preserving at least one of its key characteristics. Robison, a 2013 alumnus of the course, hopes to maintain its collegial aspects so students can establish connections with each other and with NLM.

How would you like to see the course evolve? To submit comments and feedback, visit this NLM in Focus posting.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Testers Needed for PubMed Labs

MCR News - Tue, 2017-10-17 18:20

NLM needs your input. They are experimenting with a new PubMed search algorithm, as well as a modern, mobile-first user interface, and want to know what you think. You can try out these experimental elements at PubMed Labs, a website we created for the very purpose of giving potential new PubMed features a test drive and gathering user opinions. For more information on testing see the NCBI Insights. /ch

 

Categories: RML Blogs

MCR Voices Series 2

MCR News - Tue, 2017-10-17 16:18

“MCR Voices” is a series of short podcasts designed to inform and educate our Network members on excellent practices throughout our region. Our second series is focused on five librarians from our region discussing their involvement in professional organizations.

First up, Shawn Steidinger from the Primary Children’s Hospital Medical Library shares her experiences and the impact that professional organizations have had on her career. YouTube | MP3

After you listen to the podcast, please add a comment to the page, sharing what you found that was new or useful in the interview.

For more about “MCR Voices” and podcasts, see our MCR Voices webpage.

Categories: RML Blogs

Using Diet Pills and Supplements Can Have Life Altering Effects

NER News - Tue, 2017-10-17 15:23

Did you know that an estimated 300,000 Massachusetts residents suffer from an eating disorder? This week Massachusetts lawmakers will consider steps to prevent those under 18 years old from having access diet pills and weight-loss supplements.   Massachusetts State Representative Kay Khan along with three organizations working to help those with eating disorders,  STRIPED (Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders), MEDA (Muli-Service Eating Disorder Association of America), and NEDA (National Eating Disorder Association) have joined together to promote house bill HB1195 which aims to address the dangers of diet pills and muscle-building supplements.   Proponents of HB1195 are urging lawmakers to pass a bill requiring anyone purchasing these pills and supplements be at least 18 years old. The bill also includes a provision that they must be placed behind the counter in the stores where they are sold.

According to the National Institutes of Health approximately 15% of U.S. adults have used a weight loss supplement at some point in their lives. Currently, diet pills and supplements are not regulated like other medications that have to prove that they are safe and effective before they are allowed to be sold. Many who use diet pills may wrongly assume that they safe to use because they are widely available and can be purchased by the general public. The truth is that these over-the-counter medications have been found to contain illegal and even banned substances.  Doctors like those at Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA) have been studying the effects of diet pills. Dr. Elisabeth Poorman of the CHA recently remarked, “A lot of weight-loss supplements include a drug called sibutramine, which in the past has been used for weight loss, but was very quickly pulled from the market because it is associated with heart attacks and strokes.”

In a recently-aired interview on Boston’s WGBH public broadcasting station, reporter Tina Martin talks to Kristy McMillan of Watertown, Massachusetts about the traumatic effect diet pills had on her health. “I struggled with an eating disorder for 21 years, using diet pills off and on during that whole time. I started when I was 15.” In college, Kristy started to experience abnormal heart tests and heart palpitations that she now attributes to her eating disorder and the use of diet pills. When Kristy received help for the eating disorder and stopped using the pills, she thought she was OK because her health seemed to return to normal. However, Kristy learned that she had heart damage after the miscarriage of her first pregnancy.  Doctors discovered that her heart was not strong enough to carry a pregnancy. Since then Kristy has been advised that she should not get pregnant again. Through telling her painful and life altering story in such a public way,  Kristy is sharing what she has learned about the dangers of using diet pills and supplements in the hopes of helping other women.

The Natural Products Association is opposing this legislation. The association president will be in Boston when lawmakers consider this bill on October 17th. The Natural Products Association issued a statement that said in part:

“This proposal would place onerous restrictions, most notably on small businesses. Dietary supplements are simply natural ingredients found in foods, and restricting access to them is unfair to Massachusetts consumers, hurts responsible retailers and drains the state budget through lost sales taxes. Nobody wins.”

Another important piece of  HB1195 is that diet pills and supplements would be required to carry a warning label on the package, in addition to having them placed behind the counter. Kristy McMillan believes these types of restrictions would have helped her if they had been in place with she was a teen.

The National Library of Medicine has several educational resources that provide information about what is in dietary supplements. The Dietary Supplement Database from the National Library of Medicine and NIH Office of Dietary Suplements currently includes free full label information to over 17,000 dietary supplement products marketed in the U.S. and is expected to grow to include most of the more than 55,000 different dietary supplements. Here is the link to that database: https://dsld.nlm.nih.gov/

This screen capture shows additional NLM resources that can help you learn more about over-the-counter pills and supplements:

If you would like to listen to this story, click on the link to the WGBH interview by Tina Martin.

http://bit.ly/2ynyNjY

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Stand Up for Health: PLA preconference!

GMR News - Tue, 2017-10-17 14:17

PLA 2018 We're Sponsoring E-mail Signature Badge

The Greater Midwest Region office of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine is offering a preconference workshop at the Public Library Association (PLA) 2018 Conference in Philadelphia. The preconference is titled “Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community” and will be held on March 20th from 9:00am – 5:00pm.

This one-day preconference will review core competencies of providing health and wellness services; coach participants through understanding their communities’ needs; and explore how to create fun and informative health-related programming for different age groups and special populations. Participants will learn about core reference and other materials, tips for helping library users evaluate health materials, and an action plan to put your new expertise to work.

Public library staff are invited to apply for a limited number of $500 stipends for this preconference! Up to 50 stipends will be made available to support travel and registration for attendees. For information about the stipends, please Read the stipend opportunity guidelinesread the Frequently Asked Questions or start your online application.

Attendees who participate in the workshop and complete pre- and post- work will receive the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certification offered by the Medical Library Association.

The preconference workshop is part of “Promoting Healthy Communities,” a nationwide initiative from PLA and National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) that will increase public library workers’ knowledge and skills related to consumer health services. You’ll hear more updates about this initiative in our blog, stay tuned!

Categories: RML Blogs

MLA Precision Medicine Webcast

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2017-10-17 11:30

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Southwest Region (NNLM PSR), sponsored seven sites for MLA’s recent webcast, Helping Patients and Health Care Consumers Understand Precision Medicine.

If you weren’t able to attend the live session and would like to view a recording of the event, please click here to complete a brief survey. Once your request has been approved, you will be e-mailed a code that will provide access to resources, an evaluation, and a certificate to claim 1.5 MLA CE contact hours. Please note: Codes will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis and preference will be given to NNLM PSR members until November 1, 2017.

A total of 86 people viewed or registered to view the webcast:

Arizona

Central Arizona Biomedical Libraries (CABL)
Host: Harold Bright
Attendees: 14

University of Arizona (Arizona Health Sciences Library)
Host: Maribeth Slebodnik
Attendees: 11

California

University of California at Irvine
Hosts: Alison Regan and Linda Murphy
Attendees: 21

University of California at San Francisco (Parnassus Ave. Library)
Host: Peggy Tahir
Attendees: 10

University of Southern California (Norris Medical Library)
Host: Jin Wu
Attendees:  3

Hawaii

Tripler Army Medical Center
Host: Mabel Trafford
Attendees: 18

Nevada

University of Nevada, Las Vegas (Health Sciences Library)
Host: Dana Thimons
Attendees:  9

Thanks to all the location hosts who made it possible for members from our region to attend!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Infection Control Week

SCR News - Tue, 2017-10-17 10:44
Bacteria

“Achromobacter xylosoxidans” by CDC/Todd Parker is licensed under CC0.

Every year, at least 2 million people in the U.S. become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a direct result of these infections. Bacteria adapt to the antibiotics designed to kill them, making our antibiotics less effective and limiting our treatment options. For more information on prevention, see the CDC’s Antibiotic/Antimicrobial Resistance page: https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/index.html

Also follow the “ABCs of Antibiotics”, provided by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC):

  • Ask – “Are these antibiotics necessary?”
  • Bacteria – Antibiotics do not kill viruses. They only kill bacteria.
  • Complete the course – Take all of your antibiotics exactly as prescribed (even if you are feeling better).

For more information, check out the infographics at http://professionals.site.apic.org

Like NNLM SCR on Facebook and like us on Twitter.

Categories: RML Blogs

Visiting Faculty Position at NNLM MCR – Community Engagement

MCR News - Tue, 2017-10-17 08:44

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) has embarked on a 3-year pilot program with the NIH All of Us Research Program  to stimulate and facilitate community engagement and participant support through the NNLM, including developing community based participatory programming for geographic areas. This includes engaging participants and other interested parties in management of their personal health data, leveraging the public library as a convener for local All of Us partners and stakeholders, and assessing the impact of libraries on participant retention in the All of Us program. The Community Engagement Coordinator will be responsible for the oversight and implementation of the All of Us Community Engagement activities in the MidContinental Region of the NNLM.  We’re looking for a self-starter who wants to contribute to a national program and work at the regional level.

Full Posting

Claire

Claire Hamasu, Associate Director
NNLM MidContinental Region
University of Utah Eccles Health Sciences Library
10 North 1900 East Bldg 589
Salt Lake City UT 84112-5890
Voice 801 587-3412, Option #1
chamasu@rml4.utah.edu

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Funding Stipend: Public Library Health Workshop at the 2018 PLA Annual Conference – Applications Due November 19, 2017

SEA News - Tue, 2017-10-17 08:23

Stipends Available for Public Library Health Workshop with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine

Public library workers are invited to apply for a $500 stipend to attend “Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community,” a pre-conference workshop held at the Public Library Association (PLA) 2018 Conference in Philadelphia.

The conference will be held from March 20 to 24, 2018, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

The one-day preconference (Tuesday, March 20) will review core competencies of providing health and wellness services; coach participants through understanding their communities’ needs; and explore how to create fun and informative health-related programming for different age groups and special populations. Participants will learn about core reference and other materials, tips for helping library users evaluate health materials, and an action plan to put your new expertise to work.

Read the stipend opportunity guidelines, read the Frequently Asked Questions or start your online application. The deadline for applications is November 19, 2017 by 11:59 pm (CDT).

The preconference workshop is part of Promoting Healthy Communities, a new nationwide initiative from PLA and National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) that will increase public library workers’ knowledge and skills related to consumer health services.

Fifty stipends of $500 each will be distributed. Stipends can be used to support the preconference registration fee, travel and lodging expenses (not including meals). 

Attendees who participate in the workshop and complete some pre/post work will receive the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certification offered by the Medical Library Association.

Throughout the nine-month Promoting Healthy Communities Initiative, PLA and NNLM will assess health information needs among public librarians and share free resources and professional development opportunities that will help public library staff better serve their patrons’ consumer health needs. In early 2018, the initiative will unveil a new website for public libraries that gives them easy access to training, tools and resources for consumer health information, health literacy programming and more.

Categories: RML Blogs

California Wildfires Declared Public Health Emergency

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2017-10-16 19:28

Following President Trump’s major disaster declaration for California, Acting Health and Human Services Secretary Eric D. Hargan has declared a public health emergency in California due to wildfires burning across ten Northern California counties and threatening the lives of tens of thousands of people. A public health emergency declaration extends to HHS a variety of legal actions to assist in response efforts, including waiving or modifying certain Medicare, Medicaid, Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule requirements. The public health emergency declaration is effective retroactively to October 8.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) has compiled resources to assist with response and and recovery from the California wildfires. Information guides on disaster topics and the Disaster Lit® database provide access to curated, reliable information from vetted federal, state, and local governments and organizations.

Key National Resources

Key California Resources

Key Documents

Hashtag: @CAWildfires

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Social Exchange Theory and Questionnaires Part 1: Questionnaire Design

NEO News - Mon, 2017-10-16 16:40

Getting a high response rate is an important part of trusting the information you get from a questionnaire.  Don Dillman, a guru of questionnaire research, says that to get a good response rate it helps to see questionnaires as part of a social exchange.  Social Exchange Theory is the theory that “people are more likely to comply with a request from someone else if they believe and trust that the rewards for complying with that request will eventually exceed the costs of complying.”1 Specifically he says that when designing your questionnaires, distributing them, or communicating about them, you need to think specifically about ways to lower the perceived cost of responding to the questionnaire, and increase perceived rewards and perceived trust.

Social Exchange Theory Diagram

What do we mean by perceived cost, rewards and trust?  A cost might be the amount of time it takes to do the survey, but the perceived cost is how long that survey feels to the person answering it.  For example, if the survey is interesting, it could be perceived as taking less time than a shorter, but confusing or poorly worded survey.  A reward could be an actual monetary reward, or it could be the reward of knowing that you are participating in something that will make important change happen.  Perceived trust could be trusting that the organization will make good use of your responses.

Today I will only focus on questionnaire design — in future blog posts we will write about how social exchange theory can be used in communicating about and distributing your questionnaires.

One of the things I like about social exchange theory in questionnaire design is that normally I would be looking at the questions I’m writing in terms of how to get the information that I want.  This is fine of course, but by looking at the questions from a social exchange perspective, I can also be thinking about ways I might write questions to improve someone’s likelihood of completing the survey.

Ask yourself these three questions:

  • How can I make this easier and less time-intensive for the respondent? (Lower cost)
  • How can I make this a more rewarding experience for the respondent? (Increase reward)
  • How can I reassure the participants that it is safe to share information? (Increase trust)

Here are some ideas that might get you started as you think about applying social exchange theory to your questionnaire design.

Decrease Cost

  • Only ask questions in your survey that you really need to know the answers to so you can keep it as short as possible.
  • Pilot test your questionnaire and revise to ensure that the questions are as good as possible to minimize annoying your respondents with poorly worded or confusing questions.
  • Put open-ended questions near the end.

Increase Reward 

  • Ask interesting questions that the respondent want to answer.
  • As part of the question, tell the respondent how the answer will be used, so they feel that by answering the question they are being helpful (for example “Your feedback will help our reference librarians know how to provide better service to users like you.”)

Increase Trust

  • A status bar in an online survey lets you know how much of the survey is left and helps you to trust that you won’t be answering the survey for too long
  • Assure respondents that you will keep responses confidential and secure. While this may have already been stated in the introduction, it could help to state it again when asking a sensitive question.

For more information, see:

NNLM Evaluation Office: Booklet 3 in Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects series: Collecting and Analyzing Evaluation Data https://nnlm.gov/neo/guides/bookletThree508

NEO Shop Talk Blog posts on Questionnaires: https://news.nnlm.gov/neo/category/questionnaires-and-surveys/. Some

NEO Questionnaire Tools and Resources Guide on Data Collecting: https://nnlm.gov/neo/guides/tools-and-resources/data-collection

——————

1 Dillman, Don A., et al. Internet, Phone, Mail, and Mixed-Mode Surveys : The Tailored Design Method, John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2014. ProQuest Ebook Central, p. 24.

Categories: RML Blogs

Attend Instructional Videos and Open Educational Resources webinar with MCR funds

MCR News - Mon, 2017-10-16 16:24

Don’t forget – MCR has Professional Development funds available for librarians who work in the health sciences to attend webinars such as Cheap, Fast, and Good: Instructional Videos and Open Educational Resources from MLA. If you’re an MLA member, the cost is $65 per person; if not, it’s $85 per person. Site licenses are also available.

 

[apm]

Categories: RML Blogs

Images, quotes, and tools from the UK to help advocate for medical librarians

MCR News - Mon, 2017-10-16 16:08

The CILIP library and information association in London, England developed “A Million Decisions” campaign to demonstrate the usefulness and need of librarians in making healthcare decisions. On the site, you can find messages, images, posters, and impact case studies to share or to give you ideas on ways you or your supporters can advocate.

CILIPS, Scotland’s library and information professionals, have done something similar – “The Right Decision: NHS Scotland librarians providing evidence for the right decision, for the right person, at the right time.” This site also has a number of images, case studies, supportive quotes, and messages including ones that explain what the health librarians do.

[apm]

Categories: RML Blogs

Stipends available for public library health workshop at PLA

MCR News - Mon, 2017-10-16 15:53

Public library workers are invited to apply for a $500 stipend to attend “Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community,” a preconference workshop held at the Public Library Association (PLA) 2018 Conference in Philadelphia from March 20 to 24, 2018, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

The one-day preconference (Tuesday, March 20) will review core competencies of providing health and wellness services; coach participants through understanding their communities’ needs; and explore how to create fun and informative health-related programming for different age groups and special populations. Participants will learn about core reference and other materials, tips for helping library users evaluate health materials, and an action plan to put your new expertise to work.

The preconference workshop is part of Promoting Healthy Communities, a new nationwide initiative from PLA and National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) that will increase public library workers’ knowledge and skills related to consumer health services. Fifty stipends of $500 each will be distributed. Stipends can be used to support the preconference registration fee, travel and lodging expenses (not including meals). Attendees who participate in the workshop and complete some pre/post work will receive the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certification offered by the Medical Library Association.

Throughout the nine-month Promoting Healthy Communities initiative, PLA and NNLM will assess health information needs among public librarians and share free resources and professional development opportunities that will help public library staff better serve their patrons’ consumer health needs. In early 2018, the initiative will unveil a new website for public libraries that gives them easy access to training, tools and resources for consumer health information, health literacy programming and more.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Says Goodbye to Terri Ottosen

SEA News - Mon, 2017-10-16 14:44

Terri Ottosen

Terri Ottosen has accepted a position with the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and on October 27, Terri will leave the NNLM Southeastern Atlantic Region (SEA) to begin her work as UNC’s Community and Health Literacy Librarian. The new position builds on her years of service focused on consumer health at the SEA. While we are excited about this new opportunity for Terri, it is difficult for us at SEA to say goodbye to our long-time friend and colleague. Terri has been with SEA since February of 2005, providing health information outreach to an audience of lay persons, public librarians, health sciences librarians interested in consumer health, and health professionals needing to provide easy-to-read information to patients. While employed at SEA, Terri has shown selfless service to the consumer health program and to the profession at large, serving as chair of MAC and ANCHASL and being named the MLA Consumer and Patient Health Information Section (CAPHIS) Consumer Health Librarian of the Year (this is not an exhaustive list). Terri pioneered SEA’s (and NNLM’s, in general) distance education program, and developed a number of consumer health classes that drew national attention and have been taught by many others. We will miss Terri and wish her good luck in her new endeavor.

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