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RML Blogs

NIH All of Us Research Program Speaker Series Continues on May 6!

PSR News - Thu, 2019-04-25 14:49

To celebrate the one-year anniversary of the launch of the NIH All of Us Research Program, the All of Us Speaker Series is hosting the 90-minute session From Data to Discoveries: Creating a Research Program for All of Us on Monday, May 6, 8:00-9:30 AM PDT. The free event is open to the public and will be hosted on the NIH Facebook page, featuring presentations from NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins, All of Us Research Program Director Eric Dishman, National Institute on Drug Abuse Director Dr. Nora Volkow, and other colleagues.

For additional details, visit the meeting agenda for speakers and talk titles. Mark your calendars and RSVP today!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

HSLANJ GROUP LICENSING INITIATIVE’S SPRING 2019 OFFER

SEA News - Thu, 2019-04-25 14:08

MAY 3: DEADLINE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE HSLANJ GROUP LICENSING INITIATIVE’S SPRING 2019 OFFER

PRINCETON, NJ (April 24, 2019) – In its 17th year of operation, the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative is offering more than 700 quality electronic resources, at 15-70 percent savings off regular pricing, to all medical librarians in the NNLM/MAR, NNLM/SEA and NNLM/NER.

The deadline for participation is Friday, May 3. Due to the online ordering system, no exceptions can be made regarding the deadline. The HSLANJ GLI greatly appreciates and welcomes early orders.

The HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative debuted in 2002 as the first consortium of its kind in the nation, specifically aimed at reducing the cost of electronic resources for medical librarians. The HSLANJ GLI is recognized by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) as the lead organization capable of assisting health sciences librarians obtain resources.

Questions? Please see www.hslanj.org or contact Robert T. Mackes (570-856-5952 or rtmackes@gmail.com).

Founded in 1972, HSLANJ is a non-profit organization which encourages the professional development and advancement of librarianship to improve the quality of library services provided by health care organizations.

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

You’re Invited to Attend a Symposium about All of Us!

MAR News - Thu, 2019-04-25 13:27

Please join the All of Us Research Program for the next event in their Speaker Series, “From Data to Discoveries: Creating a Research Program for All of Us. ” As the All of Us Research Program marks its first year working to build the largest, most diverse research programs of its kind, this symposium will address what it takes to create an engaged participant community and its potential for scientific impact.

When: Monday, May 6 from 10:00-11:30 AM ET

Where: In person or on Facebook Live (details below)

What: Speakers include: Dr. Francis Collins, National Institutes of Health; Eric Dishman, All of Us Research Program; Dr. Nora Volkow, National Institute on Drug Abuse; Ana Pavón, All of Us  Participant Ambassador; Dr. Robert A. Winn, University of Illinois at Chicago; Deven McGraw, Ciitizen; Dr. Elizabeth Cohn, Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing; and David Glazer, Verily.

Do you live in the D.C., Maryland, or Virginia area? Join the symposium in person at:

The National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Clinical Center, Building 10
Masur Auditorium

Bring your ID and arrive early to give yourself time to find the auditorium. Go to NIH’s Visitor Information page for maps and more information.

Can’t join this next event in the Speaker Series in person? No problem! The symposium will also be hosted on Facebook Live where you can tune in to the event and leave your questions. If you miss it, an archive of the event will be available. RSVP today!

For more information, visit joinallofus.org/conversations.

Categories: RML Blogs

The University of Cincinnati Mentors the University of Louisville in Developing Research Data Management (RDM) Services

GMR News - Thu, 2019-04-25 10:12

This guest post is written by Rebecca Morgan, Clinical Librarian & Assistant Professor at the University of Louisville

Last year, I completed the NNLM’s inaugural RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management (RDM) Training for Librarians course, conducted by the National Training Office (NTO). As a member of the RDM 101 cohort, I was given the opportunity in early 2019 to apply for a professional development award for RDM, also provided by the NTO. This award connected recipients to a data mentor who could provide personalized, hands on guidance on initiating or expanding data services. The provided funds would support travel to and from the mentor and/or mentee’s respective institutions.

This type of formal mentorship was exactly what my institution needed. The University of Louisville, currently has no data services program or the resources available to hire a data librarian or transition an existing staff member into a more data-centric role. Although we’ve discussed our desire to provide some degree of RDM services for some time, our lack of institutional expertise has stymied us. Having an experienced mentor to guide us might be just what we needed to get off the ground.

I am happy to say I was selected as an award recipient and that Amy Koshoffer, Assistant Director of Research and Data Services at University of Cincinnati (UC), agreed to serve as my mentor. I had met Amy during RDM 101, so I knew she was not only very knowledgeable, but also fully dedicated to helping others become more skilled and successful in providing data-related services.

On March 4th, 2019, the University of Louisville welcomed Amy to our campus to present on initiating and sustaining research data management services in academic libraries. In addition to our own faculty and staff, several colleagues from regional institutions such as the University of Kentucky, Norton Healthcare, and Sullivan University also attended.

Amy’s visit was comprised of two presentations. The first was an overview of how UC started their data services program and what services they are currently offering today. She was very candid about discussing what worked, what didn’t, and what lessons were learned along the way. This presentation not only showed attendees where and how RDM services could start, but also gave us a taste of what we could eventually build to in the future. The second presentation was a demonstration of the kind of workshop Amy and her team might provide to researchers interested in learning more about how to manage their data. This practical demonstration helped attendees conceptualize the kind of programs we might be able to someday develop at our own institutions.

The discussions after each presentation were especially valuable in helping clear up some common misconceptions about what it means to provide RDM services. Many attendees assumed that you had to manage your own data repository or be an expert in R, Python, or REDCAP to provide adequate RDM support. Amy assured attendees that building data services can be a slow and steady process that should be scaled to whatever each institution can manage or maintain.

The benefit gained from Amy’s visit was immediately apparent. Within a couple weeks of her visit, UofL established a task force to write a strategic plan for providing data services at our own institution. We are also in contact with some of our counterparts at the University of Kentucky to explore ways to work cross-intuitionally to build up a community of practice in our state. Without the knowledge and direction gained by Amy’s visit, I doubt we would have advanced in these areas as quickly as we have. Having access to someone with expertise in this field who can provide practical answers and guidance was exactly what we needed to get the ball rolling.

As part of this award, I was also able to visit Amy at the University of Cincinnati for their fourth annual Data Day. Fellow RDM 101 alum Elena Azadbahkt, who was also being mentored by Amy, also attended. To learn more about our experiences at Data Day and about our experiences at the UC, please read Elena’s wonderful report here: https://news.nnlm.gov/psr-latitudes/report-on-the-4th-annual-data-day-at-the-university-of-cincinnati/

Categories: RML Blogs

Health Disparities PubMed Special Query Updated

PSR News - Wed, 2019-04-24 18:59

This month the topic-specific PubMed Special Query, Health Disparities, was updated to include terms and resources on gender and sexual minorities. The search now retrieves over 230,000 citations. The search strategy uses MeSH headings to retrieve indexed citations, plus title and abstract words to obtain other unindexed citations. You may use additional features of PubMed to focus or expand your search.

To run the search, enter the following in the PubMed search box: healthdisparites [sb] or click on this link to launch the search. Health disparities refers to differences between groups of people, which can affect how frequently a disease afflicts a group, how many people get sick, or how often the disease causes death.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

2019-2020 Funding Opportunities now Available

MCR News - Tue, 2019-04-23 20:29

We are thrilled to announce the 2019-2020 National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region Funded Subawards!

We have added many new funding opportunities available to support you in your mission. Please take a look at the opportunities and see if any of them appeal to you.

For inspiration read how one library tackled community needs with help from NNLM.

We are here to help you. If you have any questions, please contact the subaward administrator listed on the award announcement.

Changes for this year:

The most notable is the increase in the amount of available funds. The NNLM MCR will offer nearly $90,000 in subaward funds and nearly $110,000 from the NNLM MCR All of Us program.

Other changes are:

  1. We increased the number of awards categories from 4 to 16 creating nearly 50 individual awards.
  2. We increase the base amount of project awards.
  3. The application process underwent major changes to improve application submissions.
  4. Applicant support. If this is your first time or tenth applying for a grant, we want to help you succeed.
  5. Each awardee will have ongoing support from their state coordinator for the duration of the project.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on May 6, 2019

MCR News - Tue, 2019-04-23 19:59

Check out this promotional video from NLM’s Amanda Wilson to join the next NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Monday, May 6! For more information, visit https://nnlm.gov/wiki.  We encourage you to register for your Wikipedia account now to be ready for May and tweet using #CiteNLM and #MLANet19!

Categories: RML Blogs

LinkOut Consolidation Webinars on 4/26 and 5/9

MCR News - Tue, 2019-04-23 18:00

If you will be impacted by the LinkOut consolidation, NLM will be hosting two informational webinars, on April 26 and May 9. Recordings of the presentations will be available after the live events. For registration links, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin article, https://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ma19/brief/ma19_linkout_webinars.html.

Categories: RML Blogs

Connect with us at the Medical Library Association meeting in Chicago!

GMR News - Tue, 2019-04-23 13:30

MLA '19 Logo temp

Are you attending the Medical Library Association conference beginning next week? If you are, consider attending Advancing Health Equity through Evidence-Based Public Health: How to Find the Evidence, a continuing education session presented by our Health Professionals Outreach Specialist, Derek Johnson and Elaina Vitale, Academic Coordinator for the NNLM Middle Atlantic Region. There’s still room available in the session, and it’s not too late to register!

Be sure to stop by poster sessions presented by our team, Is Learning Actually Happening? Investigating Course Outcomes Beyond Traditional Evaluation, presented by Rachel Gatewood and Bobbi Newman, and Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community, presented by Bobbi Newman, Carolyn Martin, Consumer Health Coordinator for the NNLM Pacific Northwest Region and Margot Malachowski, Education and Outreach Coordinator for the New England Region. Also, check out a couple of presentations on projects funded by our office: A Health Sciences Library Empowering Community Health, presented by Tiffany Grant, Sharon Purtee, and Don Jason from the University of Cincinnati and Health Literacy of Refugee Populations, presented by Margaret Zimmerman from the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science.

Stop by the National Library of Medicine booth in the exhibit hall, where you will have the opportunity to talk with our staff about the NNLM All of Us National Program, an activity led by Britt Thomas, our Community Engagement Center manager. Check out the promotional video Britt created about this opportunity!

While you’re networking at the meeting, look for our staff, including Sam Watson, Jacqueline Leskovec, Derek Johnson, Bobbi Newman, Darlene Kaskie, Linda Walton, and myself. Have something you’d like to chat about? Reach out to us in advance and set up a meeting at MLA with one of our team members.

Categories: RML Blogs

Job Opportunity: NNLM MAR Academic Coordinator

SEA News - Mon, 2019-04-22 15:50

The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the position of Academic Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). We are looking for an energetic, creative, innovative, and service-oriented individual interested in being part of a collaborative team that works together to improve access to, and sharing of biomedical and health information resources, with an emphasis on resources produced by the National Library of Medicine.

Funded by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) through a cooperative agreement, HSLS serves as the regional medical library headquarters for the Middle Atlantic Region, one of eight regions in the NNLM nationwide program. NNLM MAR comprises Delaware, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The NNLM mission is to ensure health professionals, researchers, the public health workforce, patients, families and the general public have access to quality health information.

The Academic Coordinator has primary responsibility for designing and evaluating outreach and education programs aimed at library staff working in academic institutions, with a special focus on community colleges, research universities and colleges/universities with programs in the health sciences, health and science education, library science, emergency management, and environmental health. The position has an expanded role in aligning NNLM MAR programs for academic libraries with new and changing NLM initiatives. This position is NNLM MAR’s liaison to initiatives aligned with NLM’s call for a new generation of “data-savvy librarians”.

For a complete job description and application details please see the full job posting.

Application review will begin May 15, 2019.

NNLM MAR Executive Director Kate Flewelling will be at the Medical Library Association conference and would be happy to speak with anyone interested in the position. Please email her (flewkate@pitt.edu) to set up a time.

Categories: RML Blogs

Citizen Science Day Megathon Promotes Alzheimer’s Disease Research!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-04-22 15:33

To celebrate Citizen Science Day 2019, the Stall Catchers Megathon took place around the world on Saturday, April 13th. Citizen Science Day is an annual event to celebrate participation and engagement in real science by members of the general public. On April 13th, libraries in many parts of the country hosted the Megathon, a worldwide event for anyone to join in to analyze real research data in a game format. Local teams gathered in many locations, including public libraries, enabling this global project to have a small town feel while regular people did real science.

To build community engagement through citizen science projects in public libraries, NNLM PSR partnered with SciStarter, an online citizen science community, and Arizona State University, which had been working with public libraries in the Phoenix area on citizen science projects for over a year. The project focused on building relationships and capacity in public libraries across the country as community science centers, culminating in a common Citizen Science Day event. Citizen science projects can fall into many different scientific disciplines, including medical research. The Stall Catchers online game was created by the Human Computation Institute to support Alzheimer’s research being conducted at Cornell University; participants watch short video clips displaying blood flow in the research mice’s brains and determine if the blood is flowing or stalled.

Dan Stanton, Arizona State University librarian and Director of Library Programs at SciStarter:

I feel like I’ve been working on this since Citizen Science Day 2018! So for me, the amazing thing about Citizen Science Day 2019 was the progress made in getting the word out about the critical role libraries can play in Citizen Science. In the past year we’ve gone from localized displays and other programming, to a national campaign for libraries that included weekly open planning calls; quality promotional resources including bookmarks, posters, and a detailed Librarian’s Guide to Citizen Science; and a project focused on a topic that touches everyone, and includes cool science and a clear explanation of how participating contributes to ongoing scientific research. I want to thank NNLM PSR, and especially Kelli Ham, for being such important partners in the movement to connect Citizen Science and libraries!

The Los Angeles Public Library hosted multiple Megathon sites, and was declared the “winner” of the points challenge during the event. Here are some of the winning citizen scientists who participated at the Los Angeles Central Public Library composed of staff from NNLM, SciStarter, and LAPL, as well as other local citizen scientists:

participants of Citizen Science Day holding up laptops and mobile devices displaying the stall catchers app

Citizen Science Day participants at Los Angeles Public Library

The EyesOnAlz blog posted an early peak at the #Megathon research results. The post indicates that the research question addressed on Saturday was whether stalls occur more frequently in the brains of mice that have high blood pressure, and if that stalling can be reversed.

“Despite a slightly rocky road, we broke some serious records during the Megathon weekend! Never before have we done so much research in a single Stall Catchers event, and had so many people playing at the same time. We were featured on Science Friday, and Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio! Plus, we were thrilled to have Australia & Asia join us in a last minute self-organized pre-Megathon event, as well as a group of students from Dickson County High School who were keen to do their part on Monday, and help us finish up analysis of the Megathon dataset!!”

Darlene Cavalier, Founder of SciStarter and Professor of Practice at the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU, added, “The collective accomplishments of Citizen Science Day would not have been possible without the support of NNLM PSR. The support enabled libraries and others to host community-centered events and promote ongoing citizen science programs in ways that transcend a single day.”

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Resource Round-Up: New England Graphic Medicine ComicCon

NER News - Mon, 2019-04-22 14:31
 Poster boards with art produced by New England Graphic Medicine ComicCon attendees.

Art produced by New England Graphic Medicine ComicCon attendees.

As part of NNLM NER’s ongoing commitment to supporting the integration and expansion of graphic medicine in the outreach work of our partners, NER hosted the very well received New England Graphic Medicine ComicCon on April 10.

If you couldn’t attend or want a refresher on some of the resources presented, check out the links below to get caught up.  And thank you to all of our presenters for contributing to a successful and educational day.

Vermont’s own Rachel Lindsay started the day off by walking attendees through the process of creating her book Rx and the thought that went into all of the design choices from panel placement and lettering to character design. Listen to Rachel discuss her book at an event earlier in the month at Harvard.

Brittany Netherton and Matthew Noe (Matthew’s slides) shared their experiences creating and maintaining graphic medicine collections at their institutions and opened the session up to discussion.  Check out the links below for useful resources they shared:

A. David Lewis talked about creating a graphic medicine course, lessons learned, best practices and possible barriers. And he streamed it live, too. Check out the recording here.  He also makes his course presentations available on Youtube.  Check out the first presentation and find others on his Youtube channel.

To see what attendees had to say, check out the #NEGraphicMedCon tag on twitter or the round-up post by Jerry Kauppila from NNLM PSR.

If you weren’t able to attend, but are interested in giving feedback on ways NNLM NER can support graphic medicine, you can fill out the three question survey here: https://forms.gle/oW7bTW9VmHpbYrF26

Categories: RML Blogs

Tips to Co-Host/Run an Edit-a-thon

NER News - Mon, 2019-04-22 12:55

May 6th is fast approaching for MLA and the Spring NLM edit-a-thon.  We hope you’ve been keeping an eye on our WikiProject page <nnlm.gov/wiki>, as we’ve been adding more training materials and event details! Our topic this spring is Health Disparities.  

If you can’t make it in person, consider hosting an edit-a-thon at your institution.  Training videos and guides with tips and steps to host your own edit-a-thon are available.

Why run an edit-a-thon? Listed below are just a few reasons
  1. It helps build the encyclopedia
  2. It builds relationships in the community
  3. It provides access to topic experts, and to offline source materials
  4. It encourages editors to learn from each other, and to learn by doing
  5. It entices people to become new Wikipedians
  6. It helps new Wikipedians contribute their knowledge and expertise
  7. Increase information literacy and access
  8. It gives you a reason to have a part
  9. It makes you feel good – you are helping make the world a better place
  10. It’s fun!

We have curated a list of resources for hosting your own edit-a-thon:

If you are hosting your own, we’d love to hear from you! If you plan on using the Outreach Dashboard to track participation, please be sure to link to the CiteNLM campaign.

We hope to see you in person or online #CiteNLM2019 on May 6 for the Spring NLM edit-a-thon!

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM New England Region Hosts the New England Graphic Medicine ComicCon & Workshop

PSR Newsletter - Fri, 2019-04-19 17:11

On April 10th, the NNLM New England Region (NER) hosted the New England Graphic Medicine ComicCon at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester.

RX A Graphic Memoir book cover

The day was filled with sessions for artists, educators, and librarians, discussing the joining of science and art in graphic medicine mediums to help promote NNLM’s mission:

“…to advance the progress of medicine and improve the public health by providing all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving the public’s access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health.”

The conference kicked off with keynote speaker, and current NNLM Reading Club Kit author, Rachel Lindsay. Rachel presented Reclaiming Patient Narrative Through Graphic Medicine, and discussed her life story that led to the creation of RX: A Graphic Memoir. You can find out more about RX by applying for a reading club kit containing Rachel’s book.

One of the panelists, Maki Naro, is a self-proclaimed illustrator, science communicator, and nerd. Maki talked about Creating Science Comics: Communicating Big Ideas in Small Panels. In 2014, Maki’s comic Vaccines Work. Here are the Facts was published on his website.

TheNib.com is a site that “looks at what is going down in the world, all in comics form.” Vaccines Work remains one of the site’s most relevant and popular posts as measles and whooping cough outbreaks continue around the nation.

Vaccines Work. Here are the Facts.

Gluten The Facts and The Fad

Cover of booklet from Vermont dairy farm seriesOther sessions included collection management, course and program design, and a case study of a cartooning project connecting migrant dairy workers in Vermont with cartoonists to document mental health issues associated with trauma and isolation, El Viaje Más Caro / The Most Costly Journey.

NER is leading the way in supporting graphic medicine as a means of communicating the NNLM mission. This conference was a great jumping off point. PSR members can apply now for several graphic medicine titles in our reading club kits, and watch out for more graphic medicine tie-ins in the near future!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-04-19 12:52

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

STEM Program in a box: Members in the Middle Atlantic Region (NY, NJ, PA, DE) can order Exploring Genetics with Kids and Teens Kit by April 30, just in time for summer programming!

NNLM Reading Club – Mental Health Awareness: Complete an application by April 30 to receive the next NNLM Reading Club book kit, featuring three book selections in support of Mental Health Awareness for May. The NNLM Reading Club is a “ready-to-use” book kit with free and downloadable materials designed to help libraries support the health information needs of their communities.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Congratulations and farewell to Elaina Vitale – Academic and Data Services Coordinator Elaina Vitale will be leaving NNLM MAR in June. We are excited for her to advance her career at Dartmouth, where she has accepted a position as a Research and Education Librarian. We’ll miss you, Elaina!

Connect with MAR at an Upcoming Conference: Check out our schedule of upcoming conferences and workshops to learn where you can meet and greet with MAR staff! If you would like to schedule a few minutes to speak with us about your projects or opportunities for partnership, please contact us.

HSLANJ Spring 2019 Offer – Medical librarians in the Middle Atlantic, Southeastern/Atlantic and New England Regions are welcome to participate in the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey’s Group Licensing Initiave. The deadline to participate in the Spring offer is Friday, May 3.

NNLM Spring 2019 Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon: Join us LIVE on May 6 at the Medical Library Association conference in Chicago to help improve Wikipedia articles related to health disparities! If you are not attending MLA, you can still participate remotely. Watch a brief introduction from Amanda Wilson, head of the National Network Coordinating Office, and learn more about this wonderful opportunity to help improve consumer health information on Wikipedia.

Project Outcome for NNLM Member Libraries – May 16, 2:00 PM ET – Learn how Project Outcome can help your public library measure the outcomes of its health programs and services. This webinar will highlight all of Project Outcome’s surveys and tools, but will focus primarily on the new health survey developed in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

New on YouTube: Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks and Benefits, February 20, 2019

NLM/NIH News

Expanding Access, Improving Health – NLM delivers on the commitment to “democratiz[ing] access to the products and processes of scientific research” by supporting the NIH Public Access Policy. This policy, passed by Congress in 2008, requires authors funded by NIH to make publicly accessible in PubMed Central (PMC) any peer-reviewed paper accepted for publication. Now, over a decade after the NIH Public Access Policy went in to effect, PMC makes more than 1 million NIH-funded papers available to the research community and the public. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Present at the Creation: Building the National Center for Biotechnology InformationNLM in Focus spoke with three scientists who were with NCBI in the beginning—and are still there. With wit and wisdom that only 20/20 hindsight can bring, these three NCBI leaders share the early struggles, uncertainty, and excitement from the first decade of NCBI. – NLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Commelin’s Worldwide Botanical WebHorti Medici Amstelodamensis Rariorum … Plantarum Historia, usually ascribed to Jan Commelin and Caspar Commelin, is one of several beautiful botanical atlases published in the Dutch Republic in the years prior to the work of taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

NLM Welcomes Applications to its Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine for 2020 – The NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine provides up to $10,000 to support research in the historical collections of the National Library of Medicine. To receive consideration, all required materials must be submitted to the online application portal, by midnight ET on September 30, 2019.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

Astronaut Health: Science Education Resources – April 23, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join SCR for the first online offering of this course and get ready to spend this summer celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing with your community and network partners! Instructor Debbie Montenegro, NNLM SCR Consumer Health Coordinator and recently recognized NASA Solar System Ambassador, will walk through various resources from NLM, NIH, and NASA, as well as wonderful communities of practice that are ready to help you get your summer programming together. Get ready to explore where space and health resources collide!

A Nursing Liaison’s Role in Evidence-Based Practice – April 25, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a key part of healthcare today and is of growing importance to nursing practice. The increasing interest in EBP provides librarians with an avenue for partnering with nursing colleagues and demonstrating the value librarians can bring to an organization. This SEA webinar will situate evidence-based practice in modern healthcare and describe how it has become central to nursing practice. The webinar will focus on identifying key roles and strategies librarians can employ to support nurses in applying evidence-based practice to patient care.

LinkOut Consolidation – April 26, 12:00-12:45 PM ET – Please join the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for a webinar to answer questions about the LinkOut Consolidation Announcement. A 15 minute presentation will go over what this consolidation means for you, and how to continue to see your library’s icon in PubMed. Following the presentation will be a 30 minute question and answer session with LinkOut experts. This webinar is aimed at librarians whose institutions currently have a LinkOut for Libraries service set up. The webinar will be hosted again on May 9 with the same content to allow as many librarians as possible to participate, and it will be recorded.

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – April 26, 2:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by SCR, this class will teach you the basics of providing consumer health information at your library, from the health reference interview and planning your own health program, to free health resources from the National Library of Medicine and other trustworthy sources. This class is eligible for 2 hours of MLA Continuing Education credit that can be counted toward a Consumer Health Information Specialization.

Eye Health Across a Lifespan – May 8, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – May is Health Vision Month! To get more information about eye health, this webinar features a guest presentation from the director of EyeMobile for Children, a California-based program providing eye exams and vision care for the underserved. Participants of this SCR webinar will get a quick look at how important eye health is from infancy to the elderly. The presentation will discuss topics which may affect all ages and cover issues which may have no symptoms.

LinkOut Consolidation – May 9, 2:00-2:45 PM ET – Please join the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for a webinar to answer questions about the LinkOut Consolidation Announcement. A 15 minute presentation will go over what this consolidation means for you, and how to continue to see your library’s icon in PubMed. Following the presentation will be a 30 minute question and answer session with LinkOut experts. This webinar is aimed at librarians whose institutions currently have a LinkOut for Libraries service set up.

The Opioid Hydra: Understanding Mortality Epidemics and Syndemics Across the Rural-Urban Continuum – May 14, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Join GMR for this session that will be presented by Dr. David J. Peters, Ph.D. Dr. Peters has research, teaching, and extension appointments at Iowa State University. His primary research areas include social and economic change in rural communities, rural demography, rural poverty and inequality, rural crime, and adoption of agricultural and other technologies.

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library – May 21, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Responding to questions involving topics on mental health is challenging even for the most experienced librarian. Join MAR for this interactive webinar where participants will learn how to effectively provide mental health information at their libraries. Participants will learn about the best electronic resources to consult as well as ways to improve their print collections. Best approaches for handling interactions with emotional patrons will also be discussed. Other topics covered include: bibliotherapy; assessment/testing; and the future of mental health.

Healthy Aging: Celebrate National Senior Health & Fitness Day® with “Go4Life” – May 22, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by MAR, this webinar focuses on Go4Life, an exercise and physical activity campaign for older adults, along with other programs from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). The session will introduce library staff, healthcare professionals and community outreach educators to the free Go4Life materials that will be useful in planning and promoting future programs. This webinar also supports the 26th anniversary of National Senior Health & Fitness Day, the nation’s largest annual older adult health and wellness event.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job postings:

  • Outreach Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region (NNLM PNR), University of Washington Health Sciences Library, Seattle, WA
  • Academic Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR), University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System, Pittsburgh, PA
  • User Services Supervisor (PT, multiple positions), Stony Brook University Libraries, Stony Brook, NY

WHO releases first guideline on digital health interventions – On April 17, the World Health Organization released new recommendations on 10 ways that countries can use digital health technology, accessible via mobile phones, tablets and computers, to improve people’s health and essential services.

With New Challenge Competition, AHRQ Asks Innovators for a Tool to Forecast the Future – AHRQ Views

Libraries are protectors of democracy, says new director of Lancaster County library system [Q&A] – Formerly director of Adams County’s library system, Karla Trout wants to see that kids have more access to books than she did as a child. – Lancaster Online

A partnership between academic and public librarians: “What the Health” workshop series – Journal of the Medical Library Association

State of America’s Libraries Report 2019 – American Library Association

Tips for Using Move Your Way Resources – April 30, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month. Join the Move Your Way campaign for this webinar to learn how to use their free campaign materials in your physical activity initiatives. Presenters will share tips and strategies to help you add Move Your Way digital tools to your website, promote Move Your Way resources on social media, and print and distribute posters and fact sheets in community settings. Stay tuned for a second Move Your Way webinar this summer where they will be sharing implementation tips and lessons learned from the Move Your Way pilot communities.

Funding Opportunity: Using Data Analytics to Support Primary Care and Community Interventions to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Management and Population Health – A new funding opportunity from AHRQ aims to improve the health of individuals and populations at risk for suboptimal health outcomes through the use of primary care and community interventions that address chronic conditions.

Health Care Education Association (HCEA) 2019 conference – Proposals are still being accepted for the HCEA 2019 conference, happening in Nashville, TN, October 23-25. The theme of this year’s conference is Striking a Chord: Creating Harmony in Patient Education. Abstracts should address one of the following: (1) Measuring the Impact and Outcomes of Health Education Programs, Materials, and Interventions, (2) Technology in Health Education: Best health education practice integration, or (3) Creating Health Education Processes and Programs: Evidence-based practices. The deadline to submit is April 26.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – April 19, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-04-19 11:19

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunity

Webinars April 23 – April 24

Webinars April 25 – April 26

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Apply to be NNLM MAR’s Academic Coordinator

MAR News - Thu, 2019-04-18 09:55

The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the position of Academic Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). We are looking for an energetic, creative, innovative, and service-oriented individual interested in being part of a collaborative team that works together to improve access to, and sharing of biomedical and health information resources, with an emphasis on resources produced by the National Library of Medicine.

Funded by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) through a cooperative agreement, HSLS serves as the regional medical library headquarters for the Middle Atlantic Region, one of eight regions in the NNLM nationwide program. NNLM MAR comprises Delaware, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The NNLM mission is to ensure health professionals, researchers, the public health workforce, patients, families and the general public have access to quality health information.

The Academic Coordinator has primary responsibility for designing and evaluating outreach and education programs aimed at library staff working in academic institutions, with a special focus on community colleges, research universities and colleges/universities with programs in the health sciences, health and science education, library science, emergency management, and environmental health. The position has an expanded role in aligning NNLM MAR programs for academic libraries with new and changing NLM initiatives. This position is NNLM MAR’s liaison to initiatives aligned with NLM’s call for a new generation of “data-savvy librarians”.

For a complete job description and application details please see the full job posting.

Application review will begin May 15, 2019.

NNLM MAR Executive Director Kate Flewelling will be at the Medical Library Association conference and would be happy to speak with anyone interested in the position. Please email her (flewkate@pitt.edu) to set up a time.

Categories: RML Blogs

Report on the 4th Annual “Data Day” at the University of Cincinnati

PSR Newsletter - Wed, 2019-04-17 18:11

by Elena Azadbakht
Health Sciences Librarian
University of Nevada, Reno Libraries

In early 2018, I secured a spot in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s inaugural RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, conducted by the National Training Office (NTO). I learned quite a bit about research data management (RDM) during the eight-week online course. At the time, I was the Health and Nursing Librarian at the University of Southern Mississippi, and I wrote about my RDM 101 experience in a post on the Southern Chapter’s blog, Southern Salutations. I have since moved into my current position as the Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), but I remain intensely interested in developing a robust RDM program.

During the first week of April, I visited the University of Cincinnati (UC) for a few days, also courtesy of the NNLM NTO. I attended UC’s 4th annual Data Day and had the opportunity to learn about the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ data initiatives in the meantime. Amy Koshoffer, UC Science Informationist and a RDM 101 course mentor, graciously served as my host for the trip. Rebecca Morgan, librarian at the University of Louisville, also attended. It was nice to have a “buddy” who was there with similar aims.

Rebecca and I met with the Research and Data Services (RDS) team as well as liaisons and informationists at the UC Health Sciences Library. We also toured key library and campus spaces. All the while, we learned about how the RDS team does their work, such as taking a close look at their consultation form/log, and how their RDM program came about and has evolved. It was amazing hearing about these things from the people doing the work in the context in which it takes place (as opposed to reading about it in a formal publication or presentation.)

Data Day was a bit different than what I’d expected, but in a good way. Before studying the schedule, I had imagined it would be almost entirely hands-on skills development – the “how” of research data. And while the event featured a power session that introduced participants to the R programming language, most of the day’s sessions focused instead on the big picture of research data – the “why.” Drawing in over 100 attendees, Data Day serves as a community building venture for those interested in data and data issues at UC and within the region. This year’s theme was Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Data. Keynote speakers included Amanda J. Wilson, Head of the NLM’s National Network Coordinating Office, who presented on the All of Us Research Program, and Debra Guadalupe Duran, Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, who discussed big data’s impacts on health disparities.

I would ultimately like to host a similar, albeit smaller, event here at UNR. My co-workers and I are brainstorming ways we can support RDM and data science skills development on our campus. Amy and her colleagues emphasized educational activities as a starting point, e.g., tailored workshops based on the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum, and described how they came together to create a strategic plan and a set of goals for data at UC. Rebecca also noted how her library has established a similar sort of group. Since my return, we’ve made plans to establish a data working group within the UNR Libraries. We already have a LibGuide, a Canvas module available to all faculty and staff, and have led a few workshops on RDM. But we’ll use UC and others as a guide when developing our own goals in this area.

Not everything I encountered or heard about at UC is applicable or achievable at UNR – at least not immediately. But I feel a lot more confident that we’re on the right track with RDM and data science. Over time, some of the distinctive aspects of UC’s program will find their way into our work at UNR. Starting small and planning on a “slow burn” is perfectly okay! Moreover, visiting other campuses and their libraries is invigorating, as is meeting colleagues who are interested in the same topics and issues as you are. Apart from Rebecca, I also met librarians from Miami University (in Oxford, OH) and the University of Kentucky who attended Data Day. Now I have a handful of fellow librarians that I can easily reach out to when an interesting data-related idea springs to mind or when planning a data-related activity or event. Although I’m not adverse to cold calling other librarians who I’ve noted are doing interesting activities, it is great to have built a rapport with specific individuals within the NNLM and RDM communities! This was also one of the primary benefits of the RDM 101 course itself.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Register Now for NLM LinkOut Consolidation Informational Webinars on 4/26 and 5/9!

PSR News - Wed, 2019-04-17 15:07

Join the National Library of Medicine for a webinar to answer questions about the LinkOut Consolidation Announcement. A 15-minute presentation will review what this consolidation means for libraries, and how to continue to see your library’s icon in PubMed. Following the presentation, there will be a 30-minute question and answer session with LinkOut experts. This webinar is aimed at librarians whose institutions currently have a LinkOut for Libraries service set up. The webinar will be hosted twice with the same content to allow as many participants as possible.

Date and Time: Friday, April 26, 9:00-9:45am PDT

Date and Time: Thursday, May 9, 11:00-11:45am PDT

After the live presentations, recordings will be available on the LinkOut for Libraries Training and Educational Resources Web page and in the Learning Resources Database.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Project Outcome Health Survey

MCR News - Tue, 2019-04-16 21:03

For Public Libraries:

Most of you may already be familiar with Project Outcome. NNLM has partnered with them to develop the Project Outcome Health Survey.

A sneak peek training will be available for NNLM member libraries, before it is widely available to PLA audiences beginning on May 29, 2019. This introductory training is designed to help public libraries measure the outcomes of its health programs and services. The webinar registration information is below.

Project Outcome for NNLM Member Libraries

Date: May 16, 2019

Time: 2:00 pm ET/ 1:00 pm CT / 12:00 pm MT / 11:00 am PT

Webinar (registration required): Project Outcome for NNLM Member Libraries

Project Outcome is a FREE toolkit designed to help public libraries understand and share the impact of essential library services and programs by providing simple surveys and an easy-to-use process for measuring and analyzing outcomes. Project Outcome also provides libraries with the resources and training support needed to apply their results and confidently advocate for their library’s future.

Categories: RML Blogs

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