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RML Blogs

Illinois Prairie District Public Library – The Illinois PraiREAD

GMR News - Tue, 2019-10-08 11:38

 

In September and October of 2019, the Illinois Prairie District Public Library hosted its first “big read,” cleverly titled The Illinois PraiREAD. The chosen title was The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. This title was chosen in part because a local community theatre was staging the play in the fall. Additionally, it helps the library highlight offerings for patrons with autism.

There were many events held at the library over the eight-week period. Fifty copies of the novel were given away and two book clubs used the title for the month of October. Additionally, due to the convenient timing of the theatrical endeavor, tickets to performances were raffled off to patrons at each branch. All story hours during the two months included sensory-friendly elements. Finally, a guest speaker with autism was invited to speak.

The guest speaker was funded with a grant from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region. Thanks to the grant, we were able to bring in a local speaker with experience presenting her story nationwide.

Marty Murphy is an adult with Autism Spectrum Disorder, who presents Finding Normal “nationally to provide parents, school peers and educators a better understanding of the world of autism.” The presentation was uniquely adapted to speak to library staff, patrons and the cast and crew of the neighboring production.

Whether it be books or celebrities about or with autism, recognizing certain behaviors or creating welcoming and inclusive spaces, Murphy was extremely well-received and everyone in the audience took something different away from the presentation.

-Guest post by Joel D Shoemaker, Director of Illinois Prairie District Public Library

Categories: RML Blogs

In the Region

MAR News - Tue, 2019-10-08 05:00

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) staff are always working on something new! Whether we’re developing and teaching classes, exhibiting or presenting at conferences, visiting our Members and Partners, or spending time in the office, our work focuses on advancing the progress of medicine and improving public health through access to health information. Read about some of our more recent activities, highlighted below, to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania.

Erin Seger, Making Connections: I’m currently at the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences annual conference in Hershey, PA. This is a conference that brings together extension professionals to learn about evidence-based resources to address emerging issue. While cooperative extensions aren’t libraries, they offer a wealth of information and expertise to their communities and are great NNLM partners. MAR is currently funding the Penn State Extension for their program Dining with Diabetes. This program helps community members with diabetes learn how to better manage their condition and introduces them to MedlinePlus so they can locate trusted health information. There are a number of ways that cooperative extensions can partner with NNLM MAR, and I hope we can explore more opportunities with these institutions!

Michael Balkenhol, Teaching: Over the next few weeks I will be gearing up for my next class, Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community. This one-hour webinar will focus on health program ideas, guides, and resources for libraries and community/faith based organizations. I will share how you can integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies into your programs, so that you too can introduce NLM resources to your community in fun and engaging ways! Register to participate on October 22 at 3:00 PM ET.

Michelle Burda, Launching New Services: Just a few weeks ago we announced the launch of NNLM Delivery, our updated platform for document delivery, storage and retrieval that is now available to all NNLM Member institutions. Prior to the launch, Hannah Sinemus and I spent several months in development with the NNLM Web Services Office (NWSO) to complete the upgrade, and create some helpful resources for our users such as the FAQ page and User Guide with video tutorials. We also hosted an information session to prepare our current users for transitioning from MARDelivery, the old version of this service. After the launch, we’re very excited to be hearing from new and long-time users about their experiences with the system; the feedback is invaluable in helping us improve the system even further! If you’re using NNLM Delivery and have questions or comments, please reach out to us via email: nnlmmar@pitt.edu.

Kelsey Cowles, Conferences Galore! A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of traveling to Stony Brook, NY to attend a luncheon with NNLM members and NLM director Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan. Our gracious hosts at Stony Brook University treated us to a tour of their newly renovated health sciences library. I was impressed by their creative use and re-use of spaces! Dr. Brennan also presented a fascinating view of the future of AI and the NLM in the annual Antonija Prelec memorial lecture.

October is a busy month for travel! My colleague Erin Seger (Health Professions Coordinator) and I just returned from exhibiting at the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences conference in Hershey, PA. I will also be speaking and exhibiting at the Pennsylvania Library Association conference in Erie, PA, and at the Upstate NY and Ontario Chapter (UNYOC)of MLA conference in Watkins Glen, NY.

Kate Flewelling, Staff Development: This month, NNLM MAR welcomed new Community Engagement Coordinator Tess Wilson. Tess has an MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh and an MFA in Creative Writing from Chatham University. Tess was most recently at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh where she developed programming for underrepresented populations and promoted the integration of data literacy into community workshops. Two current NNLM MAR staff members were also promoted! Hannah Sinemus, MLIS, is now Web Experience Coordinator for NNLM MAR and the NNLM Web Services Office (NWSO), and Tessa Zindren was promoted to Program Manager.

I have started my term as Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Medical Library Association (MAC-MLA), an organization of health sciences librarians and other information professionals serving the District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina, Virginia, Western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. I am delighted that next year’s conference is in Pittsburgh, home of NNLM MAR. I hope many of our Network members can join us!

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Health Insurance Literacy

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2019-10-08 04:48

It is almost that time of year. Yes, it is time to sign up or renew our health insurance. Many of us have been receiving notices at work regarding the time to review our health insurance and other work benefits. Often we feel unsure of the information we are reviewing. We have an idea of what a deductible or copayment is but we might be uncertain of the difference between a HMO and a PPO.  Not understanding insurance can be costly whether it prevents consumers from using it or from not understanding its coverage.

We are offering a free webinar to help prepare libraries to assist their patrons with health insurance information as they sign up for a plan whether through work, private, or through the federal government. Your library may be one of the many who have received a mini grant from the Public Library Association (PLA) to help prepare them to provide information to their communities during the Healthcare Marketplace Open Enrollment which is from November 1 – December 15 for 2020. This webinar will help librarians address the unmet information needs that leave many unable to make appropriate health insurance choices. For those with lower levels of health insurance literacy, the ability to procure appropriate levels of health insurance coverage may be limited, which can have dire effects on individuals’ health statuses. Addressing this critical information need, Emily Vardell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Management at Emporia State University.

PNR Rendezvous session: “Health Insurance Literacy and How Librarians Can Help”

When: Wednesday, October 16 at 12:00 p.m Alaska | 1:00 p.m. PT | 2:00 p.m. MT (please adjust to your time zone)

How to attend: Registration is encouraged and to learn how to join is on the PNR Rendezvous webpage. The session will be recorded but attending live will allow for questions.

In addition the NNLM supports the PLA insurance enrollment project through the promotion of their posters highlighting the the Healthcare Marketplace enrollment. You may order these directly from the Community Engagement Network webpage.  Questions? Contact the NNLM GMR office at gmr-lib@uiowa.edu.

health insurance PLA posters

Categories: RML Blogs

Virtual Introduction: NNLM SCR 2019 Library Student Outreach Awardees!

SCR News - Mon, 2019-10-07 15:40

Learn more about our students before meeting them this weekend at SCC/MLA 2019!

LIS Students

Clockwise from top left:

Laura Rey
Library Associate II
Texas A&M University

Favorite food: Steak. With a side of steak.

Book or show you’re enjoying and why: Jon Krakauer’s “Into the Wild” because it’s a reminder we all need people.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC: One of the things I’m particularly excited to learn is more about outreach in our region and consider new ideas about outreach and librarianship.

E. Bailey Sterling
University of North Texas

Favorite kind of food: What kind of Texan would I be if I didn’t proudly proclaim my love for tacos?

Book or show you’re enjoying and why: My most recent reads were Capote’s In Cold Blood and Walker’s The Color Purple; both absolutely blew me away. I read these profound masterpieces back-to-back, and my head is still reeling. I had the pleasure of hearing Margaret Atwood speak this month, so I think the next book I dive into will be The Testaments. Right now I’m reading Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach aloud with my children. Children’s lit is my favorite; I have 3 kids, and together we have read aloud thousands of books over the years. Reading with them is my greatest joy.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC: Of specific interest to me are youth and family libraries in medical institutions, and I’m very much looking forward to meeting with industry professionals who could perhaps shed some light on which skills would be most beneficial for me to hone and what family health librarians foresee on the horizon of their profession.

Revathi Vaidyanathan
Library Technician
McKinney Public Library System

Favorite kind of food: Pad Thai

Book currently reading: Educated – a memoir. I love reading biographies and memoirs, but this book is so enthralling. The story is true. It took place 20 years ago. You will have to keep reminding yourself of that because the mindset and ideas discussed sound antiquated, but they are still alive and kicking here in America and that is just crazy! It does take me back to the rural India, where they are prevalent and relate and understand what Tara went through.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC? I am looking forward to understanding the Medical initiatives, Health Outreach programs and network with medical librarians, which I would like to utilize to incorporate at my library as well as move into the field.

Brandy Walthall
Circulation Assistant
Brookhaven College

Favorite kind of food: My favorite kind of food is pizza.

Book or show you’re enjoying and why: Brenda Jackson is one of my favorite authors; I love romance novels! I just started her Catalina Cove Series. I’m currently reading book one: Love in Catalina Cove.

What you’re excited to learn at SCC: I’m excited to learn more about the NLM databases and their resources. I’m also excited to learn more about the outreach initiatives. I’m still exploring my options with my degree, so I think this opportunity will give me a chance to learn more about this field of librarianship.

Categories: RML Blogs

Explore Health Literacy with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA News - Mon, 2019-10-07 09:56

Because it can be challenging to find a compatible health provider, choose health insurance coverage, or understand medical terms, organizations have been observing October as Health Literacy Month since 1999. It is a time to bring attention to the importance of making health information easy to understand and making the health care system easier to navigate. But you don’t have to wait until October. Any time is a good time to become a more informed health consumer.

When it comes to your health, you are your own best advocate. The NNLM Reading Club has selected three books to help you become more knowledgeable and informed.

  • An American Sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal
  • How to be a Patient by Sana Goldberg, RN
  • Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health by Sandro Galea

To learn more about each of these titles and to download book discussion guides, promotional materials and corresponding health  information resources, or to apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book kit, visit the Book Selections and Health Resources: Health Information.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month: Sara Mannheimer

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2019-10-07 08:05

In honor of National Medical Librarians Month in October, we are featuring librarians in the PNR region who are medical/health sciences librarians as well as those who provide health information to their communities.  This week of October 7th, 2019 we are featuring Montana State University’s Sara Mannheimer who is a Data Librarian.  Welcome Sara, to the PNR Dragonfly blog!

BioSketch:

  • Name: Sara Mannheimer
  • Position: Data Librarian
  • Working organization: Montana State University
  • Education history
    • BA in Literature from Bard College
    • MS in Information Science from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Personal Background
    • Sara takes ballet and modern dance classes and she performed in a local dance showcase last month. Sara also play piano and guitar (but she only performs for her partner and her cat!).  Sara was born and raised in Anchorage, Alaska, where she worked as a sea kayak guide in Alaska and the US Virgin Islands in her 20’s, and she still loves being outside—bike commuting, backpacking, camping, and cross-country skiing. Sara is also an enthusiastic extrovert and a believer in the power of community, so spending time with friends is one of her biggest sources of joy.

Interview:

Q1: It’s an honor to have you with us on the Dragonfly Blog -welcome Sara! My first question is related to the theme of medical librarianship as October is National Medical Librarians month.  So, what inspired you to work with medical data?

Thank you! It’s a pleasure to be featured! My work with data began in graduate school at UNC-Chapel Hill, where I studied archives and records management. I got into the world of data archiving through an independent study developing a digital preservation policy for Dryad Digital Repository. During the project, I had invaluable mentorship from Ayoung Yoon (who is now on the iSchool faculty at IUPUI) and Jane Greenberg (now on the iSchool faculty at Drexel). Ayoung was a PhD student at the time, and she collaborated with me on a poster that we presented at the ASIS&T annual meeting. Jane instilled in me a love for metadata and encouraged me to apply to be the Senior Curator at Dryad after I finished my master’s degree. Jane and Ayoung also mentored me by co-authoring a paper describing our digital preservation policy development process. Building on the work I did at Dryad, I decided to move to a tenure track faculty position as Data Librarian at Montana State University (MSU). At MSU, I help with data management planning, coordinate data science workshops, build data-related tools, and conduct research exploring data curation and data ethics.

Working with NNLM-PNR has been a great entrance into medical data. For example, NNLM-PNR just funded a project that will allow me and my colleagues Jason Clark and Jim Espeland to work with a research center on campus to make their restricted health sciences data available to community partners.

Q2:  Tell me, how did you get into data science?

I’m still getting into it! I began my learning process through a couple of Data Carpentries workshops—one at the Research Data Access and Preservation (RDAP) Summit in 2015, and one at the National Data Integrity Conference in 2017, and then I trained to be a certified Carpentries instructor last year. But most of the data science instruction in the library is the result of collaborations across campus. I’m partnering with Allison Theobold, a graduate student in the statistics program who teaches workshops as part of her dissertation project. She and her advisor, Stacey Hancock, have helped create a thriving R workshop series in the library that includes introductory and intermediate R concepts, as well as sessions on data wrangling and data visualization. This year, we’ve extended the partnership to include graduate students from MSU’s Statistical Consulting and Research Services in order to continue to sustain the workshops. These statistics graduate students have strong coding skills, and they are amazing teachers for their peers.

In addition to teaching practical coding skills, I have an interest in big data ethics, and I have done some writing and thinking about the ramifications of data science using social media data. And I have also begun to pursue projects that support “collections as data”—that is, computational analysis for digital collections. This work includes initiatives like making the text of our digital archival collections available for download, and mentoring students to create digital scholarship projects using archival collections. This interactive map created by former MSU student Dillon Monday is a good example of a collections as data project.

Q3:  In your time as Montana State University’s Data Librarian, what has been your most favorite project to date?

I think my favorite project is actually the first grant I was awarded from NNLM-PNR in 2017! The project took an evidence-based approach to creating a data management planning toolkit aimed at health sciences researchers. After identifying a need to improve the data management planning resources that the library provides to the campus community, I proposed a grant to analyze data management plans from grant proposals at MSU, and then to interview principal investigators about their data management practices.

The research I conducted (with fantastic student research assistant Wangmo Tenzing) showed that most investigators practice internal data management in order to prevent data loss, to facilitate sharing within the research team, and to seamlessly continue their research during personnel turnover. However, it also showed that investigators still have room to grow in understanding specialized concepts like metadata and policies for reuse. I used the research results to inform a data management planning toolkit that includes guidance on facilitating findable, reusable, accessible, and reusable data—for example, using metadata standards, assigning licenses to their data, and publishing in data repositories. If you want to read more, I’ve published a talk  and a paper about the project.

Q4:  Are you working on anything new and exciting that you would like to share with us?

I’m getting my PhD right now from Humboldt University in Berlin (with advisor Vivien Petras), and my dissertation is a comparative study of qualitative secondary analysis and social media research. I’m still early in the process, but I’m loving the opportunity to take a deep dive into the topic of qualitative and social media data sharing.

Q5:  To date, what is your favorite data tool?

I’m really enjoying becoming more literate in R. We use RStudio Cloud in our workshops, and it simplifies the setup process for learners. I’m also keeping an eye on the development of Annotation for Transparent Inquiry (ATI), an annotation tool for qualitative research that’s being developed at the Qualitative Data Repository.

Q6:  If you could give one piece of advice/words of wisdom to anyone interested in medical librarianship/data science what would that be?

Collaborate. Our library and academic communities are vibrant and varied, and I’ve done my most impactful work when partnering with colleagues and students. Data librarianship overlaps and connects with many fields, and it’s impossible to have expertise in everything. Working with collaborators allows me to extend my own knowledge, develop better ideas, and provide stronger data services on campus.

Categories: RML Blogs

Recording for the September 2019 NNLM Resource Picks Webinar Is Now Available!

PSR News - Fri, 2019-10-04 18:53

The September 25 recording of the NNLM Resource Picks webinar, Finding Clinically-Relevant Genetic Information, is now available. Peter Cooper, NCBI staff scientist, provides an introduction to resources for finding clinically-relevant genetic information. The webinar also includes an overview and search demonstrations of three NCBI Clinical databases:

  1. Explain the validity of clinical variation information in the ClinVar database.
  2. Locate information about a genetic condition related to a specific list of symptoms using MedGen.
  3. Locate tests for a clinical feature, gene or disease using the Genetic Testing Registry.

View the webinar by clicking on the YouTube video player below or go to the NNLM Resource Picks YouTube page.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

October 2019 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Fri, 2019-10-04 18:40

Illustration of older adults volunteering to build a houseCheck out the October issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Eye Safety Tips for Kids
    It’s important for kids to learn how to take care of their eyes and know what to do if they’re injured, so they can act fast and get help.
  • Cancer Information Service
    If you have cancer questions, NIH specialists can help. Get free information on clinical trials, finding treatment, the latest cancer research, and more.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – October 4, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-10-04 13:54

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars October 9 – October 15

Webinars October 16 – October 17

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Keeping Up with the Facts Related to Lung Illnesses from E-cigarettes and Vaping

NER News - Fri, 2019-10-04 12:31

 

screen shot of the MedlinePlus website when a search about "vaping" is done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My adult kids vape. Neither ever smoked cigarettes.  Until very recently, I honestly thought, “I have got better things to worry about.” Well, I was wrong.

For a health professional who educates others about substance use and addiction, I was seriously uninformed! The only bright spot in the devastating news of  vaping-related illnesses  that are all over the media, is that this enormous problem of increased tobacco and marijuana use in our younger population is getting a lot of attention. Hopefully, the wide dissemination of health-related information related to e-cigarettes and vaping will save lives.

Did you know?

  • There were 1.5 million more current youth e-cigarette users in 2018 that 2017?
  • 9 million youth were current tobacco product users in 2018
  • Use of any tobacco product grew by 38.3% among high school students (2017-2018)

Massachusetts is  2 weeks into a temporary statewide ban on the sale of all e-cigarettes and vaping products to consumers in retail establishments online, and through any other means. The ban includes all non-flavored and flavored vaping products, including mint and methol, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and any other cannabinoid. The four-month temporary ban will allow researchers, public health and medical professionals time to try to understand the link between vaping and at least 530 cases of lung injury reported across 38 states and the US Virgin Islands (according to the CDC).

In a recent hearing on Capitol Hill of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Deputy Director Dr. Anne Schuchat reported “We don’t know the cause. No single product, brand, substance or additive has been linked to all cases. This investigation is ongoing and it’s very dynamic. CDC is working closely with state and local public health, with the FDA and clinical community, to get to the bottom of this.”

The purpose of this post is to share some helpful health-information resources you can use to keep yourself  informed, as well as to be a resource to your family and your community about the dangers of e-cigarettes and vaping.

Even if you do not live in Massachusetts, the information provided in a recently issued guide “Vaping Public Health Emergency,” from Mass.gov (https://www.mass.gov/guides/vaping-public-health-emergency) has valuable information for consumers, as well as local boards of health and healthcare providers. There are also resources to help those wanting to quit their tobacco use. There is also a link to national information from the CDC about the recent facts related to the lung injury associated with e-cigarettes and vaping .

CDC Vitalsigns (#vitalsigns) published in February of 2019, (https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/youth-tobacco-use/pdf/vs-0211-youth-tobacco-use-H.pdf ) is a short 2-page fact sheet with eye-catching visuals that quickly explain health statistics related to the increase of tobacco use among youth and young adults.

The FDA and the CDC are working closely with state and local officials to investigate incidents of severe respiratory illnesses associated with the use of vaping products. Here is a link to recently gathered  information issued by the FDA (https://www.fda.gov/news-events/public-health-focus/lung-illnesses-associated-use-vaping-products).

A guide from The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids “What You Need to Know and How to Talk to Your Kids About Vaping (https://drugfree.org/article/how-to-talk-with-your-kids-about-vaping/) is chock full of information about how to have informed conversations within your family about Vaping.

If you type Vaping into the search box of MedlinePlus (https://medlineplus.gov) you will receive up-to-date and expertly written information from the National Library of Medicine, the Nemours Foundation, American College of Emergency Physicians and National Institute of Drug Abuse.

Have you wondered about the health issues related to e-cigarettes Vaping that are occurring in other countries where tobacco use is more prevalent? In the September 12, 2019 (updated on September 16) issue of Politico there is an informative article about what European countries are seeing for health issues. (https://www.politico.eu/article/us-vaping-illness-death-toll-rises-fear-reversals-anti-smoking-campaigns/).

The NER hopes the websites and resources mentioned in this post help to keep you informed as new information is discovered about the health issues related to using e-cigarettes and vaping.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-10-04 05:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Read the MAReport: This quarter, Health Professions Coordinator Erin Seger wrote about her current work to develop a clinical program in a box.

NLM Resource Update: ToxNet, an integrated system of toxicology and environmental health information, will be retired on December 16, 2019.

Breast Cancer Awareness with My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can learn about mammograms, walking for endurance and better health, Medicare, and get a recipe for baked cinnamon tortilla chips! Subscribe to receive My MedlinePlus via email.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Request for Information (RFI): The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement (UG4) that operates on a five-year cycle. As we prepare for the start of the next cycle (in May 2021), we are seeking input and feedback from the public on ways to ensure that the NNLM can continue to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The deadline to respond is December 2, 2019.

NNLM Delivery is live! Our upgraded document delivery, storage and retrieval service is now available! The old platform, MARDelivery, will be discontinued on November 1, 2019. Visit delivery.nnlm.gov to start using NNLM Delivery today.

In the Region: Fall Travel – MAR staff are hitting the road! Learn where you can connect with us at upcoming conferences and meetings to talk about your projects, see our presentations, or just to say hello. – MARquee News Highlights

Save the Date for the next NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, coming up on November 20, 2019! Follow #CiteNLM to get the latest details as they become available.

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote Health Literacy Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

A Librarian Can Help in a Crisis – NER Update

DOCLINE 6.2 Released – DOCLINE Talkline

New on YouTube:  ECRI Guidelines Trust, September, 18, 2019

NLM/NIH News

The Healing Natures of NLM’s Herb Garden – Stressed? Perhaps the scent of lavender or the sight of flowers could soothe you. That’s what a group of gardeners have discovered while tending to the NLM Herb Garden. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bottled Milk: A Mother’s Reach for Infant Health – For millennia, mothers around the world have made great sacrifices to ensure the survival of their children. These efforts have changed over centuries as civilizations around the world made strides towards improving infant survival. After its development, infant formula (or bottled milk) was a symbol of exactly that to many mothers—a tool of modern ways and advanced nutrition. If women of social and financial stature were buying infant formula, what could possibly go wrong? – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Americans Are Still Eating Too Much Added Sugar, Fat – Most of us know one of the best health moves we can make is to skip the junk food and eat a nutritious, well-balanced diet. But how are we doing at putting that knowledge into action? Not so great, according to a new analysis that reveals Americans continue to get more than 50 percent of their calories from low-quality carbohydrates and artery-clogging saturated fat. – NIH Director’s Blog

NIMH Twitter Chat: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) – Join the National Institute of Mental Health for a one-hour Twitter chat on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Follow or use #NIMHchats to join the conversation. October 16, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently announced the upcoming retirement of the TOXNET website.

New PubMed Recap: Did you miss A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals? A recording, a list of key points and an FAQ page are now available from the webinar.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

October 2019

Don’t Forget Animals When Planning for Disasters – October 9, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – Experience has taught that in order to protect public safety and health we must include animals in planning for disasters. Join the South Central Region (SCR) for this talk that will provide examples highlighting the need to plan for animals in disasters. The five phases of emergency management will be discussed and the various roles of local, state and federal governments will be explained. Additionally, the types of threats that may impact animals will be covered. Examples of the partnerships needed for the effective planning for animals in disasters will be provided.

A Myth Shattering Look at Addiction, Prevention and Treatment, Based on Research – October 9, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join the New England Region (NER) and guest presenter David Sheff, the author of Beautiful Boy: A Father’s Journey Through His Son’s Addiction, for this webinar about his research and personal experience. This presentation will explore the importance of recognizing addiction as a chronic brain disease that affects the whole family. He will discuss how co-existing psychiatric disorders such as anxiety or depression can be underlying conditions and must be considered when deciding how to treat addiction. The stigma and shame attached to addiction is hindering our recovery from this public health issue. What can we learn from the past about other public health epidemics about getting rid of the stigma to make way for effective prevention and treatment?

Helping Patrons Navigate “Dr. Google” – October 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Technology is continuing to improve, and more and more people are looking online for health information, managing care, and trusted advice. Despite the increasing use, there is a digital divide for many individuals with low health literacy. Sponsored by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR), this webinar will discuss how Wisconsin Health Literacy developed a digital health literacy program, Health Online: Finding Information You Can Trust, to focus on improving the digital divide. Learn about strategies to make digital resources user friendly for all patrons and ways to help them access reliable health information online.

The Tide is Rising and So are We: Stabilizing Our Communities Through Climate Change and Resilience Programming – October 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Libraries, as important communities centers and partners, have an important role to play in education around tough subjects including emergency preparedness, our relationship to climate change and brainstorming ideas for building community resilience. In this session with the New England Region (NER), participants will reflect on the outcomes of Climate Preparedness Week 2019 that included more than 50 library events across Massachusetts, discuss lessons learned, best practices and what you can do to help foster climate change and resilience discussions and events at your institutions.

Being a Better Ally to All – October 16, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) for this next installment of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt. Every organization has a group of stakeholders, staff, and volunteers who must foster effective communication through conflict, change, and crisis. With increased comfort and confidence, you can be prepared to hold and encourage others to have the challenging conversations that lead to better collaboration and teamwork. Developing a culture based on listening, speaking up, and taking responsibility builds teams of cooperation for the short- and long-term.

Health Information Needs of Immigrant Populations – October 16, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Southwest Region (PSR) for this one-hour webinar that will address the health issues, public health implications, and health literacy needs of immigrant populations. Learn about methods to improve health literacy and address information access issues. We will review reliable health information resources, which include the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus, HealthReach, and the Disaster Information Management Research Center.

Health Insurance Literacy and How Librarians Can Help – October 16, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Many adults have difficulty knowing how to find a physician, fill a prescription, use and pay for medications, and use health information to make informed decisions about their health. Libraries are prominent places in communities making libraries and librarians excellent resources for advancing health information literacy. Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and guest presenter Emily Vardell, Ph.D., for this webinar that will address these critical information needs.

2019 Fall Wikipedia Edit-a-thon Overview – October 17, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Are you interested in improving mental health information available on Wikipedia? Do you want to utilize your librarian research skills towards making Wikipedia a better, evidence-based resource? Have you always wanted to participate in, or learn how to host your own edit-a-thon? In preparation for the NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on November 20, join the New England Region (NER) for this edit-a-thon training overview with a live question and answer session.

Health Statistics on the Web – October 17, 4:30-5:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course focuses on the location, selection, and effective use of statistics relevant to health on the local, state, national, and international levels. The importance and relevance of health statistics in various contexts will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several statistics Internet resources through the use of numerous exercises. In addition to 1 MLA CE, this program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour.

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community – October 22, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course will provide an overview of ideas to conduct health outreach and create health programs for libraries and community/faith based organizations. Participants will learn how to integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies to introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Posting:

Health Resource Highlight:  The Pennsylvania Insurance Department’s health literacy group provides resources on health insurance literacy, including mental health and substance use disorder, short-term health insurance plans, health insurance special enrollment, and health insurance appeals.

Hospital Libraries Section (HLS)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Professional Development Grant – Whether you are in the middle of your career or new to it all, or have worked for many years, the HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant is an opportunity for an amazing professional journey into education or research. The grant is open to librarians working in a hospital, health system or similar clinical settings. Grant funds can be used for professional development through MEDLIB-ED or to help attend the MLA Annual Meeting or CE courses. It may also be used to support reimbursement for expenses incurred in conducting research such as a statistician to help with survey design, analyses etc. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2019.

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship – The Medical Library Association (MLA) is now accepting applications for The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. The purpose of this fellowship is to fund research aimed at expanding the research knowledge base, linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and advances in biomedical research. The endowment will provide a grant of up to $10,000.  It is awarded by MLA through a competitive grant process, to a qualified health sciences librarian, health professional, researcher, educator, or health administrator. The deadline to apply is November 15, 2019.

After 20 Years of Improving America’s Healthcare, AHRQ Makes Bold Plans for Future Successes – AHRQ Views

New Data on How We’re Measuring a Culture of Health Culture of Health Blog, from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

MLA Diversity and Inclusion Task Force Critical Librarianship Webinar Series – Want to know what critical librarianship looks like in practice? In this free webinar, hear three working librarians talk about how they use critical librarianship in their everyday practice. Sponsored by MLA – October 21, 2:00-3:30 PM ET.

Grey (Literature) Matters: Structuring Your Google Search – November 6, 2:00 – 3:30 PM ET – Join Sarah Bonato for the second of a two-part series on grey (literature) matters.  You’ll learn how to address the challenges of Google searches, adapt a database search, employ decision aids, set search limits, optimize data saturation, track search results, and select a search scope. You’ll also examine examples of published research projects that used Google and look at alternative search engines, such as DuckDuckGo, MillionShort, and WolframAlpha. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Navigating LGBTQ Adolescent Health for the Healthcare Provider – The New York State Area Health Education Center System, in collaboration with the Clinical Education Initiative, will be hosting a continuing education seminar on Saturday, October 12 in Buffalo, NY titled Navigating LGBTQ Adolescent Health for the Healthcare Provider. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth must navigate the typical challenges of adolescence while also managing the social stigma associated with their emerging sexual/gender identities. This seminar will highlight the unique health and developmental challenges of LGBTQ youth, and discuss ways to address these issues in the clinical setting. Registration is $125 for health professionals and $25 for students.

Western Pennsylvania Health Literacy Event – Visit Carlow University in Pittsburgh on Friday, October 25 to celebrate Health Literacy Month! Hosted by the Healthcare Council of Western Pennsylvania (HCWP) in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Health Literacy Coalition, this free event will feature sessions on the basics of health literacy, unconscious bias, and cultural humility. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn how to apply health literacy techniques to their personal and professional lives.

OpenCon 2019 in Philadelphia, PA – Join Temple University on November 1 for OpenCon Philly, a free one-day series of panels and interactive workshops for idea exchange and learning around open access, open education, and open data. Connect with regional colleagues and find future collaborators as you share success stories, learn from each other’s failures, and discuss challenges in your work towards making research, educational materials, data, and government information more equitable and accessible to all. This event is free and open to all! Registration for the event is now available.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

Explore Health Literacy with the NNLM Reading Club

MAR News - Wed, 2019-10-02 17:29

Because it can be challenging to find a compatible health provider, choose health insurance coverage, or understand medical terms, organizations have been observing October as Health Literacy Month since 1999. It is a time to bring attention to the importance of making health information easy to understand and making the health care system easier to navigate. But you don’t have to wait until October! Any time is a good time to become a more informed health consumer.

When it comes to your health, you are your own best advocate. The NNLM Reading Club has selected three books to help you become more knowledgeable and informed.

  • An American Sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal
  • How to be a Patient by Sana Goldberg, RN
  • Well: What We Need to Talk About When We Talk About Health by Sandro Galea

three book club selections for health literacy

To learn more about each of these titles, download book discussion guides, promotional materials and corresponding health information resources, or to apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book kit, visit the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network’s Book Selections and Health Resources: Health Information guide.

Categories: RML Blogs

A Librarian can help in a crisis

NER News - Wed, 2019-10-02 08:52

From the earliest outbreaks of Bubonic plague many centuries ago, to recent outbreaks of Ebola, I started to think about the information resources people had when confronting these crises. There couldn’t have been much during the dark ages in Europe. As people faced overwhelming illness and mortality, if they turned to anyone at all it would have been the Church. Evidence-based medicine was not really a thing yet.

Even relatively recently, libraries couldn’t do much to assist a population faced with an epidemic. In the article In Flew Enza, Nora Quinlan (https://www.jstor.org/stable/27771411) notes that during the 1918-1919 influenza epidemic that claimed millions of lives, most libraries Quinlan looked at closed or had dramatic drops in circulation. She writes,

When the flu pandemic hit, many libraries imposed limited access in response to quarantine orders. Across the country, circulation statistics dropped an average of 10%. Libraries already strapped by staff enlistments saw employees sickened, work time lost, and event the death of staff. Library buildings were utilized for projects related to combating the pandemic, including meeting space and work areas for volunteers.

Nothing in the article discusses what type of information resources were provided to the public during the flu epidemic, but it is not a stretch to imagine that with closures and other limitations, it would have been hard for staff to spend the time and energy need to supply health information to anyone.

Technology has produced a massive change in the way libraries can now respond to emergencies, health or otherwise. Even if a library closes, resources can still be made available. And with the rise and insistence on quality evidence-based information, the public has greater access to reliable information. They just need to know how to find it, something the library can continuously assist with.

The National Library of Medicine has Disaster Lit: A database for disaster medicine and public health (https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/disaster-lit). The CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html).  and the National Library of Medicine (https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/ebola-2014) had  information available about Ebola almost immediately as the most resent large-scale outbreak was starting. MedlinePlus (https://medlineplus.gov/) has information on almost every known disease, all made accessible to the general public. Information is also available for other crises that have arisen that many call epidemics. From AIDS (https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/) to Substance Use Disorder (https://envirotoxinfo.nlm.nih.gov/opiate-addiction-and-human-health.html), information is available that is current and reliable. There are many, many other examples. It is not the lack of resources that is now the issue. It is the ability of the public to find and use the best resource.

Libraries now play and important role in epidemics, disasters, and public health. The public needs access and guidance to these resources. The internet is a scary place, especially when it comes to health information. There is too much out there, and much of it is garbage. Libraries need to help educate and disseminate evidence-based, reliable information. This takes time and training of patrons, but libraries have always been a trusted resource. That should be leveraged in the important and daunting task of educating about health. Because it is important that a librarian can help, especially during a crisis.

Categories: RML Blogs

A New PubMed is Coming Soon

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2019-10-02 04:00

A new PubMed, with an updated interface and infrastructure, is coming soon! We’ll continue to receive information and announcements from NLM in the coming months.

In the new PubMed, you’ll continue to have access to your favorite features, and you’ll have access to exciting new features. The new and improved features include; improved navigation, a cite feature, highlighted keywords in search results, enhanced synonymy, enhanced American / British English language mapping, improved sensors for citation searching, improved best match filtering, and more. The new PubMed interface is responsive, for an improved mobile experience. Searching best practices in PubMed are the same best practices for searching in the new PubMed.

You can test the new interface and many new features in PubMed Labs.

Screenshot of PubMed Labs, including the searchbox

The webinar “A New PubMed: Updates for Information Professionals” was offered in September and filled quickly. If you were not able to attend, you can view the recording. Additionally, NNLM is offering a reprise of the webinar “The New PubMed” on November 20th as part of the “NNLM Resource Picks” series, with no cap on the number of attendees. (Download and share the promotional flyer).

More information will be coming soon from NLM. To keep current:

 

Questions or feedback? Go to PubMed Labs and click the “feedback” link.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Request for Information Issued: Respond by December 2!

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2019-10-01 19:55

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) seeks new ideas to help improve access to health information and help inform the design of the NNLM request for applications for the 2021-2026 project period. The NNLM is managed by the National Library of Medicine. This Request for Information (RFI) offers health sciences and public libraries, health professionals, public health workers, community organizations, and the public the opportunity to provide information about how the NNLM can best provide U.S. health professionals with better access to biomedical information and improve the public’s access to trusted health information. A fact sheet summarizing the NNLM program is available. The submission deadline for submitting responses is December 2, 2019. Please limit comments to no more than three pages.

The NNLM comprises eight Regional Medical Libraries funded via five-year competitive cooperative agreements. The Regional Medical Libraries engage with 7,500+ members. Five national offices provide professional services to support the NNLM in achieving its national initiatives, as well as serve regional needs: the NNLM DOCLINE Coordination Office, the NNLM Web Services Office, the NNLM Training Office, the NNLM Evaluation Office, and the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office. The current structure has enabled the NNLM to launch several national initiatives, including a focus on data science and a series of new or enhanced partnerships with the NIH All of Us Research Program, the NLM HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Program (ACIOP), and public libraries and public library associations. From the first two partnerships, new NNLM centers have been created: the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network, the All of Us Training & Education Center, and the NNLM ACIOP Coordinating Center.

NLM seeks input from current and potential user communities to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of the NNLM, particularly on the following topics.

Priorities, Strategies, Partnerships

  1. Priorities NNLM should address. Consider themes related to the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027.
  2. Strategies to reach new and existing audiences more effectively, especially minority and underserved populations.
  3. Effective ways to partner with libraries, health organizations, and community organizations to reach health professionals, researchers, and the public.
  4. The top three health information outreach priorities for your organization in the next five years.
  5. Important new partnership opportunities for the NNLM.

Outreach Programs, Engagement, and Training

  1. New outreach roles and outreach opportunities and barriers for the NNLM.
  2. NNLM programs, activities, or other components that are of less significance and/or might be considered for elimination.
  3. Strategies to support staff at NNLM member organizations in their knowledge and ability to support NLM products and services.
  4. Types of NNLM engagement activities to promote NLM’s wide array of offerings to all audiences.
  5. Contribution of resource sharing to the NNLM’s mission to promote access to biomedical and or health information.

Membership, NNNLM Structure, Service Coordination

  1. Responsibilities and benefits of NNLM membership.
  2. Types of organizations that could be potential members for the NNLM.
  3. Structure of the NNLM steering committee, which currently consists of leaders of the Regional Medical Libraries, national offices, NNLM centers, and NLM.
  4. The geographical configuration of the NNLM. A tool and map are available to help you develop and submit suggestions.
  5. Services of the NNLM that could be coordinated nationally. Services that are best coordinated at a local or regional level.

All responses to this RFI must be submitted to NLMEPLM@mail.nlm.nih.gov by December 2.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Requests your Input on Evolving the National Network of Libraries of Medicine

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2019-10-01 19:07

Request for Information (RFI): Evolving the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (UG4)

Notice Number: NOT-LM-19-005

Key Dates

Release Date: October 1, 2019
Response Date: December 02, 2019

Related Announcements
None

Issued by
National Library of Medicine (NLM)

Purpose

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) seeks new ideas to help improve access to health information and help inform the design of the NNLM request for applications for the 2021-2026 project period. The NNLM is managed by the National Library of Medicine.

This Request for Information (RFI) offers health sciences and public libraries, health professionals, public health workers, community organizations, and the public the opportunity to provide information about how the NNLM can best provide U.S. health professionals with better access to biomedical information and improve the public’s access to trusted health information. A fact sheet summarizing the NNLM program is available.

Background

The NNLM is a key partner in helping NLM achieve the vision outlined in the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027 “to reach more people in more ways through enhanced dissemination and engagement pathways.” In addition, NLM seeks to enhance its research, development, training, and information services to make more biomedical data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR), to invent the tools and services to turn data and information into knowledge and insight, and to develop the workforce for this work. Implementing this vision will require new partnerships and ways to engage with stakeholders in the public and private sectors, including researchers, librarians, health professionals, entrepreneurs and innovators, underserved communities, and the public.

Through its products and services, NLM supports researchers, health care providers, librarians, and members of the public who seek current and trusted biomedical information and data. NLM’s many databases, tools, and services, including PubMedMedlinePlusClinicalTrials.govHazardous Substances Data BankGenetics Home Referencedatabase of Genotypes and PhenotypesUnified Medical Language Systemcover health, genetics, drugs, chemicals, and many other topics. Effective community engagement is critical to assuring the NLM resources reach its wide range of audiences — from librarians to researchers and clinicians, from teenagers to their parents and seniors, from policymakers to the public. Engagement encompasses promoting awareness of available information resources, developing an understanding of users’ information needs, facilitating access and ensuring the ability to use information resources. NLM will continue to leverage the 7,500+ member organizations of the NNLM, which act as trusted ambassadors between NLM and the communities they serve. NLM also partners with the NNLM to enable a new generation of data-ready librarians and informationists to transform libraries into hubs for data literacy.

The Medical Library Assistance Act of 1965 (MLAA, P.L. 89-291) established the NNLM to assist the development of medical libraries’ services and to facilitate the dissemination and use of information related to health sciences. Over time, a growing emphasis has been placed on increasing the impact of the NNLM through partnerships with NLM and member organizations, including health sciences, hospital, academic, and public libraries, as well as health professionals, data organizations, and community-based organizations. The NNLM is coordinated by the NLM Office of Engagement and Training, working through the National Network Steering Committee. See The Nation’s Health Information Network: History of the Regional Medical Library Program, 1965-1985, and an historical overview of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, 1985-2015 for more information.

The NNLM provides convenient access to biomedical and health information resources for U.S. health professionals, researchers, educators, and the public. As a core component of NLM outreach, the NNLM seeks to reduce health disparities and improve health information literacy, by providing funding, professional development, and learning opportunities for NNLM members.

The NNLM comprises eight Regional Medical Libraries funded via 5-year competitive cooperative agreements. The Regional Medical Libraries engage with 7,500+ members (for a map and more information about each region and its members/partners, see NNLM Regions). Five national offices provide professional services to support the NNLM in achieving its national initiatives, as well as serve regional needs: the NNLM DOCLINE Coordination Office, the NNLM Web Services Office, the NNLM Training Office, the NNLM Evaluation Office, and the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office. The current structure has enabled the NNLM to launch several national initiatives, including a focus on data science and a series of new or enhanced partnerships with the NIH All of Us Research Program, the NLM HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Program (ACIOP), and public libraries and public library associations. From the first two partnerships, new NNLM centers have been created: the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network, the All of Us Training & Education Center, and the NNLM ACIOP Coordinating Center.

Information Requested

NLM seeks input from current and potential user communities to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of the NNLM. We’re interested in your responses to the following topics and other suggestions.

Priorities, Strategies, Partnerships
  1. Priorities NNLM should address. Consider themes related to the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027.
  2. Strategies to reach new and existing audiences more effectively, especially minority and underserved populations.
  3. Effective ways to partner with libraries, health organizations, and community organizations to reach health professionals, researchers, and the public.
  4. The top three health information outreach priorities for your organization in the next five years.
  5. Important new partnership opportunities for the NNLM.
Outreach Programs, Engagement, and Training
  1. New outreach roles and outreach opportunities and barriers for the NNLM.
  2. NNLM programs, activities, or other components that are of less significance and/or might be considered for elimination.
  3. Strategies to support staff at NNLM member organizations in their knowledge and ability to support NLM products and services.
  4. Types of NNLM engagement activities to promote NLM’s wide array of offerings to all audiences.
  5. Contribution of resource sharing to the NNLM’s mission to promote access to biomedical and or health information.
Membership, NNLM Structure, Service Coordination
  1. Responsibilities and benefits of NNLM membership.
  2. Types of organizations that could be potential members for the NNLM.
  3. Structure of the NNLM steering committee, which currently consists of leaders of the Regional Medical Libraries, national offices, NNLM centers, and NLM.
  4. The geographical configuration of the NNLM. A tool and map are available to help you develop and submit suggestions.
  5. Services of the NNLM that could be coordinated nationally. Services that are best coordinated at a local or regional level.
How to Submit a Response

All responses to this RFI must be submitted to NLMEPLM@mail.nlm.nih.gov by December 2, 2019. Please limit your comments to no more than 3 pages.

Responses to this RFI are voluntary and may be submitted anonymously. Please do not include any personally identifiable or other information that you do not wish to make public. Proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should not be included in responses. The Government will use the information submitted in response to this RFI at its discretion. The Government reserves the right to use any submitted information on public websites, in reports, in summaries of the state of the science, in any possible resultant solicitation(s), grant(s), or cooperative agreement(s), or in the development of future funding opportunity announcements. This RFI is for informational and planning purposes only and is not a solicitation for applications or an obligation on the part of the Government to provide support for any ideas identified in response to it. Please note that the Government will not pay for the preparation of any information submitted or for use of that information.

The data collected and maintained in the eRA system are covered under NIH Privacy Act Systems of Record Notice (SORN) 09-25-0225.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to:

Mike Davidson
Office of Engagement and Training, National Library of Medicine
mike.davidson@nih.gov

Categories: RML Blogs

New PubMed Presentations

MCR News - Tue, 2019-10-01 18:10

Please follow the links below for slides introducing the new PubMed to an audience of experienced users (such as health sciences librarians).

We’ve created two versions for your use:

A New PubMed – NNLM Slides to Adapt – this is a 25-30 minute presentation as is.

A New PubMed SHORT version – NNLM Slides to Adapt – this is a 5-10 minute presentation as is.

These slides were created with librarians and other regular users in mind. Another slide deck: An introduction to PubMed for new users is forthcoming.

We encourage you to adapt these slides to your outreach and training needs and style appropriate to your audience.  These slides are free of copyright restriction, but we appreciate attribution to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

These slides were created by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and adapted by the Office of Engagement and Training (OET) at the U.S. National Library of Medicine at the end of September, 2019. Please keep your materials up to date by testing all examples and assertions using PubMed Labs (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pubmed/) and by monitoring the PubMed news via the NLM Technical Bulletin (https://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/).

If you have questions, comments, or requests regarding these slides, please write to Kate Majewski, Aimee Gogan or Mike Davidson at NLMTrainers@nih.gov

Categories: RML Blogs

Evolving the National Network of Libraries of Medicine

MCR News - Tue, 2019-10-01 18:03

As you know, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement that operates on a five-year cycle. As NLM prepares for the start of the next funding cycle in May 2021, your input is needed on ways to ensure that the NNLM continues to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health.

A Request for Information (RFI) has been posted and is available by visiting https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-LM-19-005.html. The submission deadline is December 2. Please consider responding to the RFI and shaping the future of NNLM! Also, feel free to share this information with anyone who has benefited from NLM and NNLM resources that contributed to their research, teaching, education, and outreach efforts.

Categories: RML Blogs

Request for Information (RFI): Evolving the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (UG4)

SEA News - Tue, 2019-10-01 15:54

Notice Number: NOT-LM-19-005

Key Dates
Release Date: October 1, 2019
Response Date: December 02, 2019

Related Announcements
None

Issued by
National Library of Medicine (NLM)

Purpose

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) seeks new ideas to help improve access to health information and help inform the design of the NNLM request for applications for the 2021-2026 project period. The NNLM is managed by the National Library of Medicine.

This Request for Information (RFI) offers health sciences and public libraries, health professionals, public health workers, community organizations, and the public the opportunity to provide information about how the NNLM can best provide U.S. health professionals with better access to biomedical information and improve the public’s access to trusted health information. A fact sheet summarizing the NNLM program is available.

Background

The NNLM is a key partner in helping NLM achieve the vision outlined in the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027 “to reach more people in more ways through enhanced dissemination and engagement pathways.” In addition, NLM seeks to enhance its research, development, training, and information services to make more biomedical data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR), to invent the tools and services to turn data and information into knowledge and insight, and to develop the workforce for this work. Implementing this vision will require new partnerships and ways to engage with stakeholders in the public and private sectors, including researchers, librarians, health professionals, entrepreneurs and innovators, underserved communities, and the public.

Through its products and services, NLM supports researchers, health care providers, librarians, and members of the public who seek current and trusted biomedical information and data. NLM’s many databases, tools, and services, including PubMedMedlinePlusClinicalTrials.govHazardous Substances Data BankGenetics Home Referencedatabase of Genotypes and PhenotypesUnified Medical Language Systemcover health, genetics, drugs, chemicals, and many other topics. Effective community engagement is critical to assuring the NLM resources reach its wide range of audiences — from librarians to researchers and clinicians, from teenagers to their parents and seniors, from policymakers to the public. Engagement encompasses promoting awareness of available information resources, developing an understanding of users’ information needs, facilitating access and ensuring the ability to use information resources. NLM will continue to leverage the 7,500+ member organizations of the NNLM, which act as trusted ambassadors between NLM and the communities they serve. NLM also partners with the NNLM to enable a new generation of data-ready librarians and informationists to transform libraries into hubs for data literacy.

The Medical Library Assistance Act of 1965 (MLAA, P.L. 89-291) established the NNLM to assist the development of medical libraries’ services and to facilitate the dissemination and use of information related to health sciences. Over time, a growing emphasis has been placed on increasing the impact of the NNLM through partnerships with NLM and member organizations, including health sciences, hospital, academic, and public libraries, as well as health professionals, data organizations, and community-based organizations. The NNLM is coordinated by the NLM Office of Engagement and Training, working through the National Network Steering Committee. See The Nation’s Health Information Network: History of the Regional Medical Library Program, 1965-1985, and an historical overview of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, 1985-2015 for more information.

The NNLM provides convenient access to biomedical and health information resources for U.S. health professionals, researchers, educators, and the public. As a core component of NLM outreach, the NNLM seeks to reduce health disparities and improve health information literacy, by providing funding, professional development, and learning opportunities for NNLM members.

The NNLM comprises eight Regional Medical Libraries funded via 5-year competitive cooperative agreements. The Regional Medical Libraries engage with 7,500+ members (for a map and more information about each region and its members/partners, see NNLM Regions). Five national offices provide professional services to support the NNLM in achieving its national initiatives, as well as serve regional needs: the NNLM DOCLINE Coordination Office, the NNLM Web Services Office, the NNLM Training Office, the NNLM Evaluation Office, and the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office. The current structure has enabled the NNLM to launch several national initiatives, including a focus on data science and a series of new or enhanced partnerships with the NIH All of Us Research Program, the NLM HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Program (ACIOP), and public libraries and public library associations. From the first two partnerships, new NNLM centers have been created: the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network, the All of Us Training & Education Center, and the NNLM ACIOP Coordinating Center.

Information Requested

NLM seeks input from current and potential user communities to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of the NNLM. We’re interested in your responses to the following topics and other suggestions.

Priorities, Strategies, Partnerships

  1. Priorities NNLM should address. Consider themes related to the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027.
  2. Strategies to reach new and existing audiences more effectively, especially minority and underserved populations.
  3. Effective ways to partner with libraries, health organizations, and community organizations to reach health professionals, researchers, and the public.
  4. The top three health information outreach priorities for your organization in the next five years.
  5. Important new partnership opportunities for the NNLM.

Outreach Programs, Engagement, and Training

  1. New outreach roles and outreach opportunities and barriers for the NNLM.
  2. NNLM programs, activities, or other components that are of less significance and/or might be considered for elimination.
  3. Strategies to support staff at NNLM member organizations in their knowledge and ability to support NLM products and services.
  4. Types of NNLM engagement activities to promote NLM’s wide array of offerings to all audiences.
  5. Contribution of resource sharing to the NNLM’s mission to promote access to biomedical and or health information.

Membership, NNLM Structure, Service Coordination

  1. Responsibilities and benefits of NNLM membership.
  2. Types of organizations that could be potential members for the NNLM.
  3. Structure of the NNLM steering committee, which currently consists of leaders of the Regional Medical Libraries, national offices, NNLM centers, and NLM.
  4. The geographical configuration of the NNLM. A tool and map are available to help you develop and submit suggestions.
  5. Services of the NNLM that could be coordinated nationally. Services that are best coordinated at a local or regional level.

How to Submit a Response

All responses to this RFI must be submitted to NLMEPLM@mail.nlm.nih.gov by December 2, 2019. Please limit your comments to no more than 3 pages.

Responses to this RFI are voluntary and may be submitted anonymously. Please do not include any personally identifiable or other information that you do not wish to make public. Proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should not be included in responses. The Government will use the information submitted in response to this RFI at its discretion. The Government reserves the right to use any submitted information on public websites, in reports, in summaries of the state of the science, in any possible resultant solicitation(s), grant(s), or cooperative agreement(s), or in the development of future funding opportunity announcements. This RFI is for informational and planning purposes only and is not a solicitation for applications or an obligation on the part of the Government to provide support for any ideas identified in response to it. Please note that the Government will not pay for the preparation of any information submitted or for use of that information.

The data collected and maintained in the eRA system are covered under NIH Privacy Act Systems of Record Notice (SORN) 09-25-0225.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to:

Mike Davidson
Office of Engagement and Training, National Library of Medicine
mike.davidson@nih.gov

Categories: RML Blogs

DOCLINE 6.2 Now Available!

PSR News - Tue, 2019-10-01 15:37

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the release of DOCLINE version 6.2, with multiple-PMID requesting! As of October 1, the “Got PMID? Get Article!” input field, and the Place Request: PMID option in the Borrow menu now support input of multiple PMIDs. With this release, borrowers can retrieve up to five PubMed article citations, select all (or some) citations, add/modify request information (ex. Patron Name, Need by date, routing) as needed, and complete their requests.

The new request “Success!” system message for multiple-PMID requests includes both the PMID and citation of each request, as well as the lender. New information included in the “Success!” display includes: Borrowing Library name (to assist those responsible for multiple libraries), Patron Name (if input by borrower), date/time requests were placed, and submitting user.

DOCLINE 6.2 also adds:

  • Updated Manual request receipts with second Author field (if input by borrower);
  • Updated Journals Search to include user options when “No Journal Found;”
  • Manual request form updated with user help;
  • Borrow button labels updated for clarity;
  • User Account application emails updated;
  • Additional help on “Permission Denied” login error message (for trouble-shooting account issues);
  • Additional search options on Administration Dashboard for customer support; and
  • Updated NLM Customer Support links in website.

Check out the quick tour video for an overview of the feature. A complete list of release changes is available.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

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