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RML Blogs

Spotlight on the ACRL New England Research Data Special Interest Group

NER News - Thu, 2020-08-20 13:16

NER staff recently spoke to Patti Condon from the University of New Hampshire, and Melanie Radik from UMass Amherst, the co-chairs of the ACRLNE RDSIG. Those are a lot of letters, which stand for Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) New England Chapter  – Research Data Special Interest Group. The group has recently reorganized their leadership, so we thought this would be a good time to let the group introduce themselves and how they support research data services in New England. Our interview is below.

What is the RDSIG and when was it founded?  

The Research Data Services Interest Group (RDSIG) became part of ACRL-NEC in 2018. RDSIG supports communities of library professionals with research data responsibilities (Community of Practice) and library professionals with an interest in research data (Community of Interest). We strive to accomplish this by hosting low-cost/no-cost events that cater to discussion with peers about current topics, trends, and issues, and that deliver education and training on a variety of topics, including good data management practices, current funding agency and publisher standards, and tools to streamline data manipulation or analysis. We support our communities by being responsive to the evolving needs of data professionals and endeavor to work collaboratively with other ACRL-NEC SIGs and regional partners towards shared goals and initiatives.

RDSIG began life as the New England Research Data Management Event & Roundtable, known colloquially as “the Roundtables.” In 2015, Carolyn Mills (University of Connecticut), Thea Atwood (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), Tom Hohenstein (currently of U.S. Army Cyber Command), Donna Kafel (currently of Northborough Free Library), and Sally Wyman (Boston College) organized the first roundtable event, which was a morning tour of the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center and afternoon roundtable discussions. With support from the Network of the National Library of Medicine, New England Region (NNLM/NER) eScience Program, the Roundtables continued to provide low-cost/no-cost events for data professionals in the region. In 2018, the planning group successfully petitioned to become an ACRL-NEC special interest group. Since 2015 there have been twelve roundtable events.

At the heart of this group is dedication to low-cost/no-cost professional development and networking opportunities. RDSIG is founded on the ground rules of the Roundtables:

  1.     Expect to both give and get information – contribute in both ways
  2.     Allow all to talk; do not dominate the conversation
  3.     Bring materials that you are willing to share, related to the topics
  4.     Ask permission to use materials provided at the event by others
  5.     Keep sensitive information divulged at the event confidential

To learn more about the Roundtables, read Grassroots Professional Development via the New England Research Data Management Roundtables.

Who runs the SIG? How can others get involved?  

Longevity and sustainability of RDSIG depends on the involvement of the community. Volunteering for a leadership role is a great service opportunity and a great way to get involved with ACRL-NEC. If you are interested in becoming more involved with RDSIG or volunteering to host or help plan an event, please reach out to the co-chairs.

RDSIG current leadership includes:

  •         Co-chair: Patti Condon (University of New Hampshire)
  •         Co-chair: Melanie Radik (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
  •         Communications: James Burke (Mount Holyoke College)
  •         Secretary: Jennifer Chaput (University of Connecticut)

Vacant leadership positions are filled by invitation of the other members of the leadership team, though announcements of open positions and calls for interested volunteers are sent to relevant listservs such as datalibs and the ACRL-NEC list.

What does the SIG do?

RDSIG is best known for the Roundtables. We pair a professional development event – such as a panel discussion, presentation/talk, training in tools or instruction, or tour of a regional facility – with roundtable discussions that all participants take part in. The atmosphere is casual and networking/peer-to-peer learning is encouraged!

At the end of each event we have participants fill out evaluation forms, in which we ask for topics of interest for future events. The planning group reviews those topics and selects one or two as the topic of the next event. Some of our most recent events have been about research data in institutional repositories, data ethics, and data visualization.

While we will be hosting the Roundtables online for now, we are always looking for places to hold the events and help with local arrangements. In-person events are usually capped at about 30-40 participants and we like to highlight expertise or facilities at our host’s institution, if possible.

How is the SIG connected to ACRL NE?

RDSIG is one of the 9 special interest groups that are supported by ACRL-NEC. The SIGs carry our specialized programming to accommodate the numerous professional areas of librarianship and help support the mission of ACRL-NEC.

In turn, the activities of the SIG are supported with funding, access to an executive board that is invested in our success, and assistance with promotion of events and SIG membership.

If the SIG could do anything, what would it be?

In July, RDSIG just wrapped up our first collaborative Roundtable with the Scholarly Communication Interest Group (SCIG) – which was also our first online event – and it was a great success. We would like to collaborate more with SCIG as well as other ACRL-NEC SIGs and regional partners to highlight common goals and areas of interest. Also, we have been effective at building our Community of Practice and would love to begin building our Community of Interest – and collaborating is a great way to do this.

The current shift to online events presents challenges for fostering the networking that is a key part of the roundtable, but also presents opportunities for colleagues who might otherwise have been unable to travel to participate.

We want to build our community, and our connections to each other, to a place where when a data professional encounters a dilemma they don’t know how to solve on their own, they know who to contact or where to turn for advice.  To do this, we try to involve all members of our communities – both the Community of Practice and the Community of Interest – and bring them together with relevant and informative programming and opportunities to learn about each other’s roles and strengths.

Categories: RML Blogs

Congratulations and Happy Retirement to Michelle Burda!

MAR News - Thu, 2020-08-20 11:51

Michelle Burda

It is with mixed feelings that I announce the retirement of the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) Education and Health Literacy Coordinator Michelle Burda. Michelle joined the NNLM MAR staff halfway through our first year as an RML in January 2012. Prior to that, she was a Consumer Health Librarian at UPMC Shadyside and Medical Library Director at UPMC St. Margaret. Throughout her career, she has been a tireless advocate for hospital librarians, patient educators and patients. She has developed and taught courses on health literacy and the opioid epidemic. She has built partnerships with libraries, faith-based groups, community-based organizations, and emergency responders throughout our region. She has been an active member of the Health Care Education Association and Medical Library Association. During times of staff transitions, she has been the ultimate pinch hitter – willing and able to present to any audience. She has been a wonderful colleague and friend to all of us at NNLM MAR and to many of you in the Network. We will miss her terribly but know you all join us in wishing her the happiest of retirements!

 

Best,

Kate Flewelling

Executive Director, NNLM MAR

Categories: RML Blogs

Funding Awards Cover Denver Programming, Planning Projects

MCR News - Wed, 2020-08-19 12:36

Libraries, community-based organizations and others in the MidContinental Region have an opportunity to apply for two new NNLM funding awards designed to address specific needs.

The awards funded through the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network will cover planning projects to address health literacy needs in communities and support library programming in the Denver area.

The Health Literacy Planning Subaward for up to $4,500 will help libraries and community partners work together to develop plans for improving health literacy and access to health information.

The Denver Area All of Us Local Ambassador Program Support Award for up to $2,500 will fund programming by a library, health organization or community based organization. The programming should include a component to support the All of Us Local Ambassador Program in Greater Denver. This can include an opportunity for an All of Us ambassador to speak to program participants or distribution of information about the All of Us program.

The awards are available to applicants in the MidContinental Region of NNLM, which consists of Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri. Projects should start no earlier than Nov. 2, 2020, and be completely finished by April 15, 2021. Applications are due by Sept. 18.

For more information and instructions on how to apply, please visit the Funding Opportunities page or contact George Strawley at george.strawley@utah.edu. You may also contact NNLM MidContinental Region staff at rml4@rml4.utah.edu.

For information on the All of Us Research Program, visit joinallofus.org/nlm.

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Creating a NNLM Account and Register for Classes and Webinars

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2020-08-19 09:00

Many of you have probably already taken some of the classes offered by the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) but some of you may be new to this information.

NNLM has offered and continues to offer an array of classes and webinars for your professional development and all for free. Many of these classes and webinars include Medical Library Association CE credits to put towards the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS).

Almost all of the classes and webinars require registration which means you need to create a free account with NNLM. Note, this is not the same as NNLM membership for institutions. Creating an individual account does not include some of the perks offered to NNLM institutional members. It allows you to keep track of your class registrations and allows NNLM to send class and webinar reminders.

How do you create an account?

Select “Create New Account” which is at the bottom of every page of the NNLM website under the words NNLM Login.

Fill out the form and below are some extra tips regarding the important fields you will need to fill in:

  1. Username
  2. E-mail address
  3. First name
  4. Last name
  5. Region (Pacific Northwest)
  6. Organization (You may find your institution by keying in the first few letters or you may just need to add it.)
  7. Telephone
  8. Zip Code
  9. Role/Position (Check all the roles that may apply. Please note, the “NNLM Liaison” role is reserved for only those who are authorized to be the contact for your organization in the Members Directory. You must check “NNLM Liaison” to be able to edit your institutional account.)

Click on “Create new account.” After you have done this you will receive an email with instructions for creating a password.  Your account approval is not immediate. It may take a few days before you receive a confirmation email. Check your Spam folder too.

It is important that you log on after you have completed creating your account to review your institution’s record.

For additional help you can view these tutorials:

Now you can receive notices of newly listed classes and webinars and register to attend.

Categories: RML Blogs

Wednesday – Webinar NNLM MCR /Utah State Library Book Club Partnership

MCR News - Tue, 2020-08-18 18:40

Join us this Wednesday for this month’s MCR Webinar

Join Heidi Fendrick, Data Coordinator at the Utah State Library, as she recaps the recent partnership with the MidContinental Region on incorporating the NNLM Reading Club Book Kits in the Utah State Library’s Book Buzz Program.

The purpose of the partnership was to provide opportunities for members of the public to learn about and discuss important health-related topics through book discussion groups facilitated by local public libraries, organizations, schools, and community centers across Utah.

Register today at nnlm.gov to learn more about Fendrick’s experience and the Book Buzz program.

Webinar date

Aug 19, 2020

2:00PM – 3:00PM MT

If you have any questions about registering, please contact Suzanne Sawyer for more information.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM’s Public Health Webinar Series: September Preview

NER News - Tue, 2020-08-18 15:40

45 pm (ET)"

Public health professionals mark your calendar for the second Wednesday of every other month from 2:00-2:45 PM ET (September, November, January, etc.). We hope you’ll join us to learn about topics such as data in community health assessment and finding emergency preparedness health information and more.

Every webinar in this series will offer .75 CECH for Certified Health Education Specialists!

This webinar series aims to fulfill NNLM’s mission through regular training on a range of health information topics relevant to the public health workforce.  This series will also address the 2014 Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals related to the need for a public health workforce that is competent in locating health information and using data resources.

Recap from July:

Introduction to Community Needs Assessment: Finding the Data, on July 8, with Dr. Robert Martiniano covered health information and data related to community health assessment, reasons for conducting a community health assessment, stakeholders, identifying data, locating primary and secondary sources, how to define a target community, and prioritizing and contextualizing your findings.

Learn more by watching the webinar recording and checking out these resources:

Coming up in September:

NER is happy to support the NNLM’s new Public Health Webinar series by hosting Grey Literature Resources to Support Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery on September 9 from 2-2:45 pm (ET).

September is National Preparedness Month. Join us to learn about Grey Literature and how it can be helpful during evolving situations.

What is Grey Literature? How do you find it? And how can it help during emergency preparedness, response and recovery? This session will introduce participants to the concept of Grey Literature, its uses and resources for finding it. This session will also include a live demonstration of one resource for finding Grey Literature related to emergency preparedness, response and recovery.

Objectives:

  • Define grey literature and list three examples.
  • List an example of a non-traditional source for grey literature.
  • Identify resources to search for grey literature.
  • Describe how grey literature can help during emergency preparedness, response and recovery phases.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: August 18, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-08-18 11:02

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

NLM Seeks Comment on Strategic Opportunities and Challenges
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) invites the public to provide input and help shape the continuing implementation of its strategic plan through 2027 by responding to their Request for Information (RFI). Responses will be accepted through October 19. Read the full post to learn more

Washington State Broadband Office Survey
The Washington State Broadband Office and state Public Works Board have launched a mapping initiative to identify gaps in high-speed internet service and areas of broadband infrastructure needs in order to advance the state’s goal to have universal broadband access in Washington by 2024. Learn more and take the one-minute survey here.

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Citizen Science & Libraries: Advance Alzheimer’s Research Online Presentation and Q&A: Register for this event for an introduction to citizen science, to learn more about libraries as hubs for citizen science, and to learn how to participate in the Stall Catchers citizen science project through a presentation and online Q&A. The Stall Catchers project is designed by researchers at Cornell University to advance Alzheimer’s solutions. This project focuses on one aspect of the disease: reduced blood flow in the brain. September 15 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

“Because I See What You Do”: How Microaggressions Undermine the Hope for Authenticity at Work: Despite the wealth of information available, racial microaggressions at work remain frequent and toxic. Microaggressions can push people of color out of our jobs, stymie our careers, and compromise our mental well-being. These toxic interpersonal interactions are a symptom of a deeper structural racism that damages people of color professionally and challenges our goals for inclusive and authentic work cultures. Join Jodi-Ann Burey as she explores the structural racism underpinning experiences with racial microaggressions so we can better support individuals and institutions to effectively lead an increasingly diverse, geographically dispersed and culturally complex workforce and transform our work cultures so that everyone can truly belong. September 17 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

NNLM Reading Club Presents…We Live for the We with Dani McClain: Join authors Dani McClain and Andrea Collier as they discuss McClain’s book, We Live for the We: the Political Power of Black Motherhood. We hope you will join us for this important conversation which will be livestreamed on YouTube and NNLM PNR’s Facebook Page. September 22 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Learn more about this event on the Reading Club Presents webpage

NNLM Resource Picks: PubMed Central: PubMed Central® (PMC) is a free full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM). The presentation will consider PMC’s role in supporting open access and discovery of research results as well as open data sharing, and look at how that role is evolving in response to changes in research funder priorities and the current public health emergency. Join us to learn about ways you can use PMC to support open access research! September 30 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

ABCs of DNA: Unraveling the Mystery of Genetics Information for Consumers: This class provides an opportunity to become better equipped with the resources you need to address the genetic health information needs of your community. Class runs from October 19 – November 15 on the Moodle platform. (8 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

*ALA Connect Live Monthly Series: Reopening: Join President Julius C. Jefferson, Jr for the August ALA Connect Live program focused on reopening and recovery initiatives within libraries. With the academic school year kicking off, let’s gather to discuss how libraries are approaching reopening during the coronavirus. Connect with fellow librarians and leaders within our community to discuss how to approach and tackle the difficult questions that the new school year brings. Please submit your questions in advance on any topic of interest to you, including your library’s reopening plans. August 27 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register for this session and view past sessions on the Connect Live webpage

Strengthen Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Practice Through Self-Paced Learning: Strengthen Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Practice Through Self-Paced Learning In this webinar, learn about Multnomah County Library’s Racially Just Toolkit, containing activities staff can use to learn and practice EDI. Sept. 15 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Register

*Advancing the Response to COVID-19: Sharing Promising Programs and Practices for Racial and Ethnic Minority Communities: A virtual symposium hosted by the HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) to be held on September 17. Register to learn from national, state, Tribal and local experts leading these efforts to confront the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on racial and ethnic minority populations. Continuing education credit hours (CECH) for this virtual event will be available. Visit the webpage to learn more and to register.

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Watch All About It!”, from the NLM Director’s blog

NLM seeks comment on strategic opportunities and challenges

“A New View of the 3D Genome”, from the NIH Director’s blog

Recording available for “What will it take to create health equity for sexual and gender minority young people?”, the first of the NIH Sexual & Gender Minority Research Office’s Scientific Webinar Series

Want to Learn More About Careers in Nursing Research? Watch Panel Discussion Recording

New treatments spur sharp reduction in lung cancer mortality rate

Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children

NIH Provides Cyber Safety Resources for Children and Families

Tool Helps Children Cope with Painful Procedures

*Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Information for NIH Applicants and Recipients of NIH Funding

Learn more about the advances of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases as it celebrates its 70th anniversary

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

FYI:

*COVID-19 Resources:

Public Library Association’s Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Twitter chat series
PLA’s Task Force on Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice (EDISJ) has been hosting a series of Twitter chats focusing on Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice in public libraries. On September 2, from 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. PT, the third chat will be focusing on health disparities. To participate, simply follow PLA on Twitter (@ALA_PLA). The EDISJ Task Force will tweet introductions and discussion questions to get things started. To join the conversation, tweet using the hashtags #chatPLA and #Inclusion. Visit the ALA initiatives webpage to learn more about this series of chats and  the work of the EDISJ Task Force

Say Ah! Symposium: Racism & Health Literacy
Join the Say Ah!’s free online symposium Racism & Health Literacy to further your understanding of how racism and health literacy interact to impact health equity. The three night conversational “march” kicks off with Janet Ohene-Frempong, Dr. Kirkland Vaughans, and Dr. Tyree Oreiden on Monday evening, August 24th, from 4:30-5:45pm PT. Learn more about the symposium and register

*AAMC Live Q&A: Mask Me Anything
Join Atul Grover, MD, PhD, executive director of the AAMC Research and Action Institute, and Ross McKinney, Jr., MD, AAMC chief scientific officer, on August 18 from 3:00-3:30 p.m. PT for a live Q&A event to answer questions about face coverings. Have questions such as “Is it okay to reuse the same mask” or “How often should I clean my mask?” Join this informative and engaging session or send questions ahead-of-time using #COVIDRoadMap.

Become a Certified Application Counselor Designated Organization
For any libraries interested in becoming a Certified Application Counselor Designated Organization (CDO) through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services the deadline to apply is August 31, 2020. Libraries who successfully apply and are accepted as CDOs are given access to certify and train staff members or volunteers as Certified Application Counselors (CAC) who can work with patrons to assist with health insurance enrollment during the ACA Open Enrollment window of November 1, 2020- December 15, 2020 or during any special enrollment periods. Training for CACs is self-paced, free, fully online, and takes approximately 25 hours to complete.  CACs must complete the 2021 training by the end of October 2020, which CMS will release later this summer, in order to assist patrons this year.

*Wildfire Smoke and COVID-19
Wildfire smoke can irritate your lungs, cause inflammation, affect your immune system, and make you more prone to lung infections, including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that cause COVID-19. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, preparing for wildfires might be a little different this year. Visit the CDC to know how wildfire smoke can affect you and your loved ones during the COVID-19 pandemic and what you can do to protect yourselves.

*The Nation’s Doctor to America
The Surgeon General asks America to join him in taking these actions with #COVIDStopsWithMe. Watch the short YouTube video

Through the Window and Into the Mirror: Narratives of African American STEM Professionals
The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAACH) invites middle and high school students to explore careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Through the Window and into the Mirror is a video conversation series about the experiences of African American STEM professionals today. Through the Window and into the Mirror aims to inform, inspire, and be a starting point for students as they take steps towards having careers in STEM, but hurry this series ends August 28th!

New Interactive DiY Apps to Supplement the Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code DiY Panel Exhibition
Have you signed up for Genome: DiY Panel Exhibition? You may have noticed a password for an app in the Educator’s Resource Guide. A brand new Genome: DiY App is now available on iPad and tablet devices. Navigate engaging interactives and supporting resources to enhance your DiY exhibition experience. Download your copy today.

Categories: RML Blogs

Seeking Input: RFI Strategic Opportunities and Challenges for the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

NER News - Tue, 2020-08-18 10:57

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) invites you to help guide the continuing implementation of our strategic plan through 2027 by responding to our Request for Information, and encouraging others to respond as well.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and leads, conducts, and supports research and research training in biomedical information science, informatics, and data science.  NLM is also the world’s largest biomedical library, advancing open science and scholarship by making biomedical information more findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable and helping create a more diverse and data-skilled workforce. Our work enables researchers, clinicians, and the public to translate a vast wealth of biomedical information into better health.

In the years since NLM’s current strategic plan was released, there have been dozens of initiatives, projects, and other NLM activities in pursuit of its goals. To assure that implementation of the Plan remains current, NLM seeks comment on major opportunities or challenges relevant to the NLM mission that have arisen or become significantly more important in the last five years through responses to a recently issued Request for Information.

We hope you will take the time to share your perspectives of recent opportunities and challenges as they relate to the role of NLM.

The RFI can be found at this link (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-LM-20-015.html). Responses must be received by October 19, 2020.

Categories: RML Blogs

ICYMI Webinar Recap: Reframe & Renew

SCR News - Mon, 2020-08-17 05:35

Were you unable to attend a recent live SCR CONNECTions session? Keep a lookout for ICYMI “In Case You Missed It” blog posts which provide a brief overview of SCR webinar sessions and links to related information. If you would like to access an archived version of this webinar and many more, please click here.

In case you missed it, our July 2020 SCR CONNECTions webinar was presented by MJ Abell, Talent Management Consultant at The Ohio State University, Certified Narrative Coach, SoulCollage® facilitator, poet, and speaker. 

There’s no denying that the world we are currently living in is unusual. MJ starts this talk by affirming that, yes, challenges are indeed dramatically different now from those even just a few months ago; our problems, personally and collectively, are more layered than ever before. This webinar was the first time she has given a newly-retooled version of this presentation, now called “Reframe & Renew 2020 Reboot”.

MJ makes it a point to acknowledge the challenges of the time we are currently living in. She defines the “reframing” of a situation or idea as the act of intentionally viewing it through a new lens. MJ tells us that the act of reframing can help us take control of our thoughts and turn difficult situations around. Reframing can help us to move forward and become “unstuck”. She uses a story to explain reframing and tells us about a friend who flipped isolation on its head; instead of “shelter in place”, he began to call his now extended time at home “sanctuary in place”, where he could grow to center and better understand himself. Leveraging this shift in perspective can allow all of us a moment to retool and fine-tune some things in our lives, whether they be negative emotions or long-forgotten hobbies.

This shift in perspective, no matter how small, can help us to move forward, find meaning in our current situations, and even enhance our health.

Once the concept of reframing had been established, MJ answers an important question; what kinds of things can we reframe? The answer to this is subjective and could include almost anything, but common thoughts that lend themselves to reframing include the common sensation of feeling stuck, that nagging belief about ourselves that limits us, a disappointment, a regret, or a transition/change.

How do we go about reframing our thoughts? MJ provides a tool kit to do just that; these tools and techniques are not meant to be used in succession, but are rather meant to be used individually whenever they are most appropriate. 

  • NAME the challenging situation or feeling. This simple act can cause us to think logically and more clearly. This may also reduce emotional impact and help us to make a decision or set a goal instead of fretting needlessly. Verbally describing a thought (such as “This was disappointing to me.” or “I am feeling angry.”) can help us to gain control over that thought.
  • ASK questions. Get to the bottom of your thoughts and reactions – what’s really going on? Am I losing perspective because I’m focused on a small part of this situation? Am I losing sight of the forest because I’m so focused on the trees?
  • ALLOW hope to grow, even if it’s just a little sprout. Intentionally allowing ourselves to possess a small bit of hope helps us to be more open to positive outcomes and avoid spiraling into unfounded worrying about a potentially negative outcome that may not happen.
  • CHECK the voices you’re listening to. Are you hearing most loudly to the voices from the so-called peanut gallery who are anonymous or whose impressions have little to no actual influence in your life? Are the loudest voices from your critics, who constantly send negative messaging? Or are you focused to feedback from your support section, who consistently have your back?

Using these techniques to help reframe a challenging situation can lead us into a sense of renewal and give us newfound agency over negative thoughts.

You can reach MJ by emailing her at abell.1@osu.edu. This webinar is available to watch on YouTube.

Please look out for ICYMI more blog posts for a recap of recent NNLM/SCR webinars.

Remember to follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Seeks Comment on Strategic Opportunities and Challenges

PNR Dragonfly - Sun, 2020-08-16 21:00

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) invites the public to provide input and help shape the continuing implementation of its strategic plan through 2027 by responding to this Request for Information (RFI).

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and leads, conducts, and supports research and research training in biomedical information science, informatics, and data science.  NLM is also the world’s largest biomedical library, advancing open science and scholarship by making biomedical information more findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable and helping create a more diverse and data-skilled workforce. Our work enables researchers, clinicians, and the public to translate a vast wealth of biomedical information into better health.

In the years since NLM’s current strategic plan was released, there have been dozens of initiatives, projects, and other NLM activities in pursuit of its goals. To assure that implementation of the Plan remains current, NLM seeks comment on major opportunities or challenges relevant to the NLM mission that have arisen or become significantly more important in the last five years through responses to a recently issued Request for Information.

We hope you will take the time to share your perspectives of recent opportunities and challenges as they relate to the role of NLM.

The RFI can be found at this link (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-LM-20-015.html).

Responses must be received by October 19, 2020.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – August 14, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-08-14 13:27

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars August 18 – August 27

Webinars August 31 – September 15

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Washington State Broadband Office Survey

PNR Dragonfly - Fri, 2020-08-14 12:14

The Washington State Broadband Office and state Public Works Board have launched a mapping initiative to identify gaps in high-speed internet service and areas of broadband infrastructure needs in order to advance the state’s goal to have universal broadband access in Washington by 2024. Learn more and take the one-minute survey here.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2020-08-14 10:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

NLM Seeks Feedback on Strategic Opportunities and Challenges: The National Library of Medicine (NLM) invites the public to help guide the continuing implementation of its strategic plan through 2027 by responding to this Request for Information. Comments must be submitted by October 19.

Resource Update: On January 29, 2021 the National Library of Medicine’s Pillbox program will be discontinued. This includes the Pillbox drug identification and search websites as well as production of the Pillbox dataset, image library, and application programming interfaces (APIs).

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

RDM Snippets – Stable File Formats – NER Update

Upcoming CHES Opportunities from NNLM – MARquee News Highlights

New on YouTube: Part 1: Citizen Science in the Academic Library, July 24, 2020

NLM/NIH News

Watch All About It!NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Symptoms in SchizophreniaCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Addressing the Twin Challenges of Substance Use Disorders and COVID-19NIH Director’s Blog

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using!

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

August 2020

Summer Reading Meets Citizen Science Series – Webinars throughout August 2020. Recordings from past events are available to watch.

NLM and Support for Health Services Research: Assessing Current Needs and Planning for the Future – August 18, 12:00-1:00 PM ET

NLM Resources for Images – August 18, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

MCR/Utah State Library Bookclub Partnership – August 19, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Reaching the Hard to Reach: Empowering Community Members to Think Differently & Embrace Teens with SUD and Mental Health Challenges – August 25, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

We Mapped This City: Centering Health Resources and Engagement Around Community Assets – August 26, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Librarians Supporting Researchers – Managing Data While Working Remotely – August 27, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

COVID-19: Health Literacy and the Misinformation of the LatinX Community – August 31, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

September 2020

NIH Inclusion Across the Lifespan II – September 2, 10:30 AM-5:00 PM ET

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – September 4-October 2, 2020

Grey Literature Resources to Support Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery – September 9, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library – September 10, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Healthy Aging at Your Library: Connecting Older Adults to Health Information – September 11, 12:00-1:00 PM ET

Beyond the Binary: Health Resources for Sexual and Gender Minorities – September 14-October 9, 2020

ClinicalTrials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians – September 15, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

“Because I See What You Do”: How Microaggressions Undermine the Hope for Authenticity at Work – September 17, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

NNLM Reading Club Presents…We Live for the We with Dani McClain – 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Operationalizing the CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance in Research Data Management (NNLM Research Data Management Webinar Series) – September 24, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Correction of Health Misinformation on Social Media – September 28, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out the classes below that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Mapping COVID-19 with QGIS – August 14, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by Community Health Maps & the University of Michigan Libraries

Healthy People 2030 Launch – August 18, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Collecting Data Using the Free and Open Source Software: Input and QGIS – August 21, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by Community Health Maps & the University of Michigan Libraries

Systematic Searching: Improving Effectiveness and Efficiency – September 24, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Virtual Symposium: Advancing the Response to COVID-19: Sharing Promising Programs and Practices for Racial and Ethnic Minority Communities – September 17 – Hosted by the HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH)

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar: NLM and Support for Health Services Research

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2020-08-13 11:54
Please join us! What: NLM and Support for Health Services Research: Assessing Current Needs and Planning for the Future 

When: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 from 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM (Pacific)

Where: https://nih.webex.com/nih/onstage/g.php?MTID=ee612cab52947d58f79ae0664df8ad220 (No Registration Required)

About the webinar:  NLM is strategically evaluating all of its products so that they better align with the needs of the communities that we serve. This webinar is one part of a larger evaluation plan focused on assessing the needs of the HSR community and the quality, sustainability, and usefulness of NLM resources. Featuring a panel discussion with health services researchers led by Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan, the discussion will focus three questions:

1. Tell us how you use NLM products and services?
2. What tools, products, or health services literature are the most critical for NLM to collect or support?
3. What health services research areas or policy topics are the most critical for NLM to support?

Panelists include:

  • Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, Director, National Library of Medicine
  • Doug Joubert, MS, MLIS, Head of User Services and NICHSR, National Library of Medicine
  • Patricia Gallagher, MLS, MA, AHIP, National Library of Medicine
  • Peter J. Embi, MD, MS, FACP, FACMI, FAMIA, President & CEO, Regenstrief Institute, Inc.
  • Anthony K. Wutoh, PhD, RPh, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Howard University
  • Nate C. Apathy, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Health Services Research, University of Pennsylvania Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics

 

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Resource Picks – PubMed Central

PSR Newsletter - Thu, 2020-08-13 05:00

Join us for the next NNLM Resource Picks webinar on Wednesday, September 30, 2020. In this session, Kathryn Funk from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will present her work with PubMed Central (PMC), the free full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature. In 2005, the voluntary NIH Public Access Policy was announced, and since that time over 700,000 author manuscripts have been processed and archived in PubMed Central. In 2009, the Omnibus Appropriations Act mandated NIH-funded investigators to submit final peer-reviewed journal manuscripts to the database. More recently the NLM adopted a new Collection and Preservation Policy in 2019 to develop high-traffic NLM databases such as PMC in order to link the biomedical and scientific literature with data and other research objects in a digital landscape.

In this way, the use of PMC in scholarly communications supports Goal 1 of the NLM’s 2017-2027 Strategic Plan – “Accelerate discovery and advance health by providing the tools for data-driven research”. With Open Access Week taking place from October 19-25, we would love to hear how you use PMC and other open access resources to support and engage in research.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

“Because I See What You Do”: How Microaggressions Undermine the Hope for Authenticity at Work

SEA News - Wed, 2020-08-12 14:29

“I can’t believe what you say, because I see what you do.” – James Baldwin

Resources abound on how to identify racial microaggressions, what to do when they happen, and how to communicate at work without adding to the overabundance of slights and insults people of color already experience chronically everyday. Despite the wealth of information available, racial microaggressions at work remain frequent and toxic. Microaggressions can push people of color out of our jobs, stymie our careers, and compromise our mental well-being. These toxic interpersonal interactions are a symptom of a deeper structural racism that damages people of color professionally and challenges our goals for inclusive and authentic work cultures.

Join Jodi-Ann Burey as she explores the structural racism underpinning experiences with racial microaggressions so we can better support individuals and institutions to effectively lead an increasingly diverse, geographically dispersed and culturally complex workforce and transform our work cultures so that everyone can truly belong.

PresenterJodi-Ann Burey (she/her) has a mission to disrupt “business as usual” to achieve social change. She is a speaker, writer, and equity advocate. Her work is grounded in centering the experiences of historically underrepresented communities and the systemic intersectional approaches needed to address inequities. Jodi-Ann holds a Masters in Public Health from the University of Michigan. She prides herself on being a cool auntie, a twist-out queen, cancer survivor, adventurer and reluctant dog owner. Jodi-Ann is currently working on her first book and podcast called Black Cancer, which explores the stories about women of color and healthcare.

Date: September 17th, 2020, 1 PM ET

Learn More and Register: https://nnlm.gov/ZhG

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar Recording Available

MCR News - Tue, 2020-08-11 19:32

Using the Community Tool Box to Support Health Education and Health Promotion Efforts

Recording: https://youtu.be/-RJoegthuuI

The Community Tool Box (https://ctb.ku.edu/) is a web site that serves as a significant source of information, training and tools for community health improvement worldwide. Our approach to community health improvement is to build the capacity of community members to identify their health issues, the root causes, and to adapt approaches that work to their context. This webinar will provide an overview of the contents of the web site and our approach, with relevant examples from communities in the USA and elsewhere. We will discuss examples of how we worked with librarians in the past, and opportunities to collaborate in the future to address the variety of community health crises facing us today.

Presenter:
http://communityhealth.ku.edu/vincent-thomas-francisco-phd
Dr. Vincent Francisco is Kansas Health Foundation Professor of Community Leadership in the KU Department of Applied Behavioral Science, and Director of the Center for Community Health and Development, a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre at the University of Kansas. In his work, he uses behavioral science methods to help understand and improve conditions that affect population health and health equity. He publishes widely in the areas of health promotion, capacity building, and community-based research and intervention. Dr. Francisco is a co-developer of the Community Tool Box, a widely-used Internet-based resource for promoting community health and development.

He brings expertise and experience to implementing community–based research, especially for prevention of HIV and chronic disease. He has years of experience mentoring undergraduate and graduate researchers and practitioners with community-based organizations throughout the United States and abroad. He has years of experience in partnering with community based organizations for applied health promotion research that includes access to care, risk reduction for HIV and sexual risk reduction, as well as capacity building for empowerment of marginalized groups. He has been a consultant with numerous federal and state agencies on community-based and community-engaged approaches to prevention and treatment of behavioral disorders, and is recognized internationally as a resource among foundations and governmental agencies.

Categories: RML Blogs

Request for Information (RFI): Strategic Opportunities and Challenges for the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

SEA News - Tue, 2020-08-11 15:39
Notice Number

NOT-LM-20-015

Key Dates

Release Date: August 6, 2020

Response Date: October 19, 2020
Introduction

The purpose of this Request for Information (RFI) is to solicit public comment to assist and guide the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in identifying new, and updating ongoing, efforts to implement the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027: A Platform for Biomedical Discovery and Data-Powered Health.

Background

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the world’s largest biomedical library. Like other NIH Institutes and Centers, NLM supports and conducts research and research training relevant to its mission; for NLM, this includes information science, informatics, data analytics, and data science to advance computational biology and computational health science. Research is conducted intramurally in the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications (LHNCBC) and is supported extramurally through the Division of Extramural Programs.

As a national library, NLM is steward of a world-renowned collection of medical materials spanning ten centuries and originating from nearly every part of the globe, and it supports, promotes, and advances open science and scholarship through development and stewardship of integrated standards, tools, platforms, practices, policies, and resources that make biomedical information (including literature, research data, software tools, etc.) findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable to the world. Library functions are conducted by the Division of Library Operations, and are also integrated with the world-class digital platforms, resources, assets, and expertise of NCBI and LHNCBC.

The current NLM Strategic Plan for 2017 – 2027: A Platform for Biomedical Discovery and Data-Powered Health, was written in 2016 with input from many diverse stakeholder communities. Since then, many dozens of initiatives, projects, and other activities have been conducted to address the objectives of the Plan. Also, since then, significant changes have taken place in NLM mission-space in terms of science, technology, public health, library functions, scholarly communication, stakeholder perspectives, policies, workforce, and more. These include an urgent focus on understanding a novel coronavirus and the disease it causes; an increased prominence of artificial intelligence in biomedical research and library functions; new policies reflecting the embrace of open science by governments, funders, publishers, scientists, and the public at large; issuance of the NIH Strategic Plan for Data Science; an accelerating use of social media and preprints by researchers to disseminate their findings; and an increasing need for data-savvy scientists and a data-ready public to make the most of digital assets to improve biomedical understanding and health.

60 Day Comment Period

Comments must be received no later than October 19, 2020.

Information Requested

NLM is requesting public comment on major opportunities or challenges relevant to the NLM mission that have arisen or become more important in the last five years and that have implications for the future of NLM in its capacity both as an institution conducting and supporting research and as a national library providing biomedical information products, services, training, capacity-building, and other resources to the world. This information will be used to guide NLM’s continuing implementation of its strategic plan. Response to this RFI is voluntary. Respondents are free to address any or all topics listed below and are encouraged for each topic addressed to describe the opportunity or challenge and how NLM might address it.

  1. Major opportunities or challenges that have emerged over the last five years and that have implications for the future of NLM in the area of:
    1. Science (including clinical health sciences, biomedical science, information science, informatics, data analytics, data science, etc.)
    2. Technology (including biotechnology, platforms, hardware, software, algorithms, processes, systems, etc.)
    3. Public health, consumer health, and outreach (including epidemic disease surveillance, culturally competent engagement, optimizing the experience of resource users, etc.)
    4. Library functions (including collection development, access, preservation, indexing, library metadata, service agreements with other libraries, etc.)
    5. Modes of scholarly communication (including researchers’ use of social media, preprints, living papers, changes in the roles and practices of publishers, data-driven approaches to studying historical medical texts, images, and datasets, etc.)
    6. Perspectives, practices, and policies (including those related to open science, the need for diversity, equity, and inclusion in research, algorithmic bias, expectations of reproducibility of research, etc.)
    7. Workforce needs (including data science competencies, effective strategies for recruitment and retention of underrepresented minorities, opportunities for training and continuing education for middle- and late-career researchers and librarians, etc.)
  2. Major opportunities or challenges that have emerged in the last five years and that have implications for the future of NLM in other areas or areas not well captured above.
  3. Opportunities or challenges on the horizon over the next five years that fall within the purview of the NLM’s mission

Submitting a Response

For consideration, your responses must be received by October 19, 2020. Please include: 1) the name, 2) organizational affiliation of the commenter, and 3) the role the commenter plays at that organization (e.g., librarian, healthcare provider, scientist, student, etc.). Responses to this RFI must be submitted electronically using the web-based form at:: https://rfi.grants.nih.gov/?s=5f15a5e3104800009c001082.

NLM will use the information submitted in response to this RFI at its discretion and will neither provide responses to nor acknowledge receipt of the submissions. The information provided will be analyzed and may be shared publicly or appear in reports without the name or affiliation of the commenter. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in your response. The Government reserves the right to use any non-proprietary technical information in any resultant summaries of the state-of-the-science or solicitation(s).

This RFI is for information and planning purposes only and shall not be construed as a solicitation, grant, or cooperative agreement, or as an obligation on the part of the Federal Government, the NIH, or individual NIH Institutes and Centers to provide support for any ideas identified in response to it. The Government will not pay for the preparation of any information submitted or for the Government’s use of such information. No basis for claims against the U.S. Government shall arise as a result of a response to this request for information or from the Government’s use of such information.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to:

Office of Strategic Initiatives
National Library of Medicine
Email: NLMStrategicPlanning@nih.gov

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: August 11, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-08-11 10:55

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Gain Perspective on Pandemics with the NNLM Reading Club
Diving into fiction can help us understand more about the realities we face. As day-to- day life continues to be shaped by the COVID-19 pandemic, NNLM Reading Club calls your attention to three literary works focusing on the impact of pandemics or infectious disease. Learn about the selected books on the blog post

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

I am … Safe Zone: Messages I Learned: Doing Social Justice work is a simple concept, but it isn’t easy. While moving forward, we must also trace from where we have come from and what we have learned. This activity is primarily a silent self-reflection journey through one’s past to better inform our futures. This is the last session of the webinar series, “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt”. August 12 at 9:00 a.m. PT. Please remember to bring paper and pencil or device to participate in the activity planned. (1 MLA CE) Register

We Mapped This City: Centering Health Resources and Engagement Around Community Assets: When service providers and practitioners enter a new community or neighborhood, they can carry a top-down map of existing assets. They may rely on geographic systems that make sense on paper or are designed to make sense with existing programs. However, community members and residents do not navigate resources based on program maps and systems. Germantown Info Hub Coordinator Diana Lu will share approaches to stakeholder engagement and trust-building. Using urban design evaluation tactics introduced by architect Kevin Lynch in The Image of the City and as well as models in community-based journalism, Lu shows ways that practitioners can work with community members, stakeholders, and local organizations to build the base layer of information. August 26 at 8:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

*Librarians Supporting Researchers – Managing Data While Working Remotely: How have librarians supported researchers with data management while working remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic? Once institutions transitioned to remote work, data analysis and other data management tasks became more prominent tasks. Data librarians found new ways to assist their researchers while. August 27 at 10:00 a.m. PT. Register

Grey Literature Resources to Support Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery: September is National Preparedness Month. Join us to learn about Grey Literature and how it can be helpful during evolving situations. This session will introduce participants to the concept of Grey Literature, its uses and resources for finding it. This session will also include a live demonstration of one resource for finding Grey Literature related to emergency preparedness, response and recovery. Sept. 9 from 11:00 – 11:45 a.m. PT. (.75 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Reborn Not Reformed: Re-Imagining Policing for the Public’s Health: The third webinar in  the American Public Healath Association’s Advancing Racial Equity series will:

  • Describe how racism operates in policing and the limitations of reform efforts
  • Discuss the acute and chronic health impacts of over policing on Black and Latinx communities
  • Explain what “Re-Imagining Policing” means for public safety, public health and society overall; and
  • Identify and address the ways in which policing occurs in public health and other sectors.

August 11 at 9:30 a.m. PT. Learn more and register

The Methodology of Indigenous Digital Storytelling: A Healing Journey in Data Collection: Indigenous digital storytelling (DST) within the framework of Indigenous research methodology, allows Indigenous women to share their health stories in a safe and respectful context. This decolonizing methodology allows for self-representation that challenges stereotypes and allows Indigenous communities to prioritize their own social and community needs and to protect their identities and cultural values in the process. Furthermore, it is essential to the decolonization process that Indigenous people speak with our own voices about our histories, culture, and experiences. The intention is to demonstrate how academics can use the methodology of Indigenous digital storytelling for their data collection and how to incorporate it into their academic work. August 18 at 9:00 a.m. PT. Learn more and register

Evidence-Based Practice for the Medical Librarian: This 8-week online course is designed to be an introduction to the process of evidence-based practice (EBP) and to the supporting roles and opportunities for medical librarians. Participants will learn how to identify the basic study designs for clinical medicine, compose focused clinical questions, peer review search strategies, and assess the risk of bias in published studies. Evidence Based Practice for the Medical Librarian will be offered from August 31, 2020 – November 1, 2020. The cost for this course will be $500. Learn more and register for this course

NLM and Support for Health Services Research: Assessing Current Needs and Planning for the Future: This webinar will explore the critical issues that are driving the information needs of health services researchers. Specifically, a panel of experts (including NLM Director, Dr. Brennan) will focus on these three strategic questions:

  • What services or resources that NLM currently offers in the areas of health services delivery or health services research do you use?
  • What tools, data, resources, or health services literature are the most critical for NLM to collect or support?
  • What health services research areas or policy topics are the most critical for NLM to support?

August 18 at 9:00 a.m. PT. Learn more about this event and register

* U.S. Military COVID-19 Information Resources: This FDLP webinar will discuss publicly available U.S. military information resources on COVID-19. These will include Department of Defense (DOD) documents on force health protection, Congressional committee hearings on topics such as the security of the defense industrial base, and analyses from the military. August 18 from 11:00 – 11:45 a.m. PT. Register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Introducing the NIH Guide Notice Encouraging Researchers to Adopt U.S. Core Data for Interoperability Standard” from the NLM Director’s blog

NLM @ MLA – 2020

NLM to Retire Pillbox on January 29, 2021

Dental Cartoons (CA. 1945)

*“Charting a Rapid Course Toward Better COVID-19 Tests and Treatments” from the NIH Director’s blog

*NIH clinical trial to test antibodies and other experimental therapeutics for mild and moderate COVID-19

*NIH launches clinical trial to test antibody treatment in hospitalized COVID-19 patients

* Volunteer for a COVID-19 Prevention Trial. Participe en un Estudio Clínico para la prevención del COVID-19

Honoring Health — Resources To Prevent and Treat Alcohol Problems in Native Populations, July newsletter

New tool compares rates of severe pregnancy complications across U.S. hospitals

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

FYI:

Graphic Medicine Quantified: An Annotated Bibliography
A challenge for Graphic Medicine is its being juxtaposed alongside biomedical and scientific fields of work that operate largely in the realm of statistics and quantifiable analytics. Often, the scholarship in Graphic Medicine comes without numbers. It is anecdotal, experiential, aesthetic/literary, or theoretical, customarily, and only occasionally calculable. Read the blog post to view the annotated bibliography offered to highlight just a few of the cases where Graphic Medicine has already delivered quantifiable results.

The MRCT Center releases the Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity in Clinical Research Guidance, Toolkit and Website
The Guidance Document aims to clarify the importance and advance the goals of improving diverse representation of participants in clinical research. It distills the scientific, ethical, and social arguments for diverse inclusion, reinforces its business value, and identifies barriers to inclusion of diverse populations. Importantly, it provides potential approaches and applicable ways to increase diversity and inclusion. Subsequent chapters explore broadening engagement, data standards, data analysis, study design and conduct, the role of the IRB, genetics, and the accountability of each stakeholder. Specific recommendations and case examples are provided. The guidance is then followed by practical resources and tools (The Toolkit) to facilitate change.

Learning Community: The HHS Telemedicine Hack
To support wide adoption of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, the HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response is partnering with the ECHO Institute at the University of New Mexico and the Public Health Foundation’s TRAIN Learning Network to deliver Telemedicine Hack, a free, virtual peer-to-peer learning community to accelerate telemedicine implementation to accelerate telemedicine implementation for ambulatory providers. Choose from several dates with the first being August 12 at 9:00 a.m. PT. Learn more and register

Health Observance: Immunization Awareness Month
August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM), an annual observance held to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. Visit the CDC’s NIAM webpage for toolkits for reaching healthcare professionals, parents and patients, as well as social media graphics and other resources. To access data on immunizations among racial and ethnic minorities, visit the Office of Minority Health’s Minority Population Profiles.

Pin with Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code
Unlocking Life’s Code’s Pinterest page is overflowing with ideas gathered from around the Internet that can change your lesson plan presentations in an instant! Look beyond the board names and you will find hundreds of valuable ideas from around the world on innovative ways to teach, celebrate genomics.

Counting Down with #19Suffrage Stories: 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment
Tune in on Instagram and Twitter to learn 19 stories you may not know from the Library of Congress, Smithsonian and National Archives. Every weekday from August 3 through Women’s Equality Day, August 26, we’re counting down from 19 to 1 with a new story each day on our Instagram and Twitter feeds.

Categories: RML Blogs

RDM Snippets – Stable File Formats

NER News - Tue, 2020-08-11 10:52

In this installment of RDM Snippets, let’s look at stable file formats. These formats will ensure that your data is (hopefully) preserved as long as possible, and your files are open and accessible to people with various types of software and operating systems. Once you’re done working on your project and preparing your data for long-term storage, you’ll want to convert your files to one of these formats for future accessibility.

Technology changes quickly, and while some programs such as Word or Excel are currently standard, it’s possible they will someday be replaced with another program. Many people also use open-source programs such as LibreOffice or Google, so saving your work in a format that can be used with multiple programs is a great idea.

Most software, and many lab instruments, have their own proprietary file formats for saving outputs. Those formats can only be opened using that original software or instrument. The good news is that those can usually be converted to the most generic, open format for the types of files you have.

Spreadsheets can be saved as comma-separated values (.csv), and word processing documents can be saved as .txt files. This will ensure that the document can be opened by the widest amount of software possible.

Examples of Proprietary Formats  Open Format Equivalents Excel (.xls, .xlsx) Comma Separated Value (.csv) Word (.doc, .docx) Plain Text (.txt) PowerPoint (.ppt, .pptx) PDF/A (.pdf) Photoshop (.psd) TIFF (.tif, .tiff) or PNG (.png) Quicktime (.mov) MPEG-4 (.mp4) MPEG 4 Protected Audio (.m4p) MP3 (.mp3)

 

Some of these open formats also help preserve documents for the long term. A PDF file is an open format that is readable by many software programs, and is also a way to preserve the contents of the document so they are locked and uneditable. This is something to consider based on the potential future use of the document.

Saving image files in TIFF or PNG format prevents the loss of image quality that comes with editing and reuse of JPG files. If you have high-quality image outputs from microscopes or other equipment, this is important to consider.

Now that you’ve got your data saved in an open format, next month we’ll talk about best practices for long-term storage and preservation.

files

Categories: RML Blogs

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