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RML Blogs

Adaptive Training in the Library

SEA News - Thu, 2019-07-25 15:34

Written By: April Wright, All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator, NNLM SEA

Durham County Library offers adaptive training programs for amputees and anyone who has limited mobility. The program has been well-received and had a positive impact on its community. Stephanie Fennel, Branch Manager at the Durham County North Regional Library brought this program to the library to address not only the practical needs of an underserved population, but also to address health and economic disparities. Here is what she says about it:

What is adaptive training?

Adaptive training is training that is tailored to meet the needs of those who may have challenges, disabilities, or limitations. This can include people who may be autistic, have suffered a stroke, or an amputation. It is a long term, ongoing process. It allows you to be able to participate in a physical activity on the level that works best for you.

How are you able to offer this program?

We work with a certified trainer to offer the program made possible with funding from the All of Us Community Engagement Award.

Who is your target audience?

The class is open to anyone who would like to attend, but I specifically went to an amputees support group and invited them to the program. People who are amputees and who use prosthetics attend the program. We also have seniors and those who have limited mobility.

Can you share any comments from participants and from library staff?

When I tell people about the program, they think it is a great idea and library staff are really excited about it. The program has brought an awareness to us that there is a real need for more library programming like this.

Our goal is to serve all members of our community. This is a group of people in our community that is being underserved. With limited options to being active, this class not only allows the participants to grow stronger physically but mentally as well.

One participant who made great progress over a six-week period, told me that this was a great thing the library offers and he wishes that is was available in more areas. He enjoys coming to class and being able to get out and socialize.  It makes him feel better and uplifts his spirit.

We plan to expand with similar classes across the Durham County Library system by offering not only the strength training, but adaptive jogging, and adaptive yoga.

Categories: RML Blogs

Connecting with PNW at the Libraries are Partners in Health Seminar in Bethesda, MD

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2019-07-25 06:30

Today’s post is from Sara Cobb, Wellness Director at the Nampa Public Library in Nampa, ID. Sara was one of six public library staff to attend the “Libraries are Partners in Health” seminar held on the NIH campus in Bethesda. MD earlier this summer. This post gives the perspective of an attendee and partners well with the posting by All of Us Coordinator,  Michele Spatz.

The National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland is beautiful and I really enjoyed the wonderful opportunity I had to attend the Libraries are Partners in Health: an NNLM Consumer Health Seminar there on Friday, June 21, 2019. It was a pleasure to meet several other library workers from the NNLM Pacific Northwest Region in our sharing session and get to know them each a bit. I learned about the health programming and services they are currently running and about the ideas they have for future programs and services.  Sharing with them gave me some fresh ideas for how to approach, develop and promote health programming and information access in my library.

group photo of librarians from PNR who attended the Seminar

Pacific Northwest Region attendees of the Libraries are Partners in Health seminar

I’m much more familiar with NLM and NNLM and the resources they have to offer public libraries, and I better understand the goals of the All of Us Community Engagement Network after attending this seminar.  I really enjoyed the tour of the National Library of Medicine facility and was amazed at amount and variety of holdings that they house. This firsthand knowledge will enable me to provide better insight to my colleagues on what resources we have access to through NLM.

As I take on a new role with my library’s Be Well Nampa project and assist in the coordination of local healthcare partnerships, the information I gathered at this seminar will help me to feel more confident and supported as we move forward with our goals to increase access to current medical information and services for our customers.

I haven’t had the chance yet to implement all I learned at the seminar, but I have shared a bit with a few of my library staff about the experience. I plan to be in touch with the folks I met from PNW shortly to continue to exchange information and ideas. I’m also looking forward to receiving the programs-in-a-box that we helped develop for NNLM Community Engagement Center during our afternoon brainstorming session, so that I can use them to help implement exciting health programs at my library.

Categories: RML Blogs

Register Now for NNLM Disaster Preparedness Webinar on August 28

PSR News - Wed, 2019-07-24 19:37

Registration is available for the free webinar Are You Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources for Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe, hosted by the NNLM New England Region on August 28, 11:00am-12:00pm PDT. Get ready for September and National Preparedness Month with NLM disaster health information and other emergency preparedness resources for community educators, families, friends and caregivers. Resources for special populations and those with special needs are highlighted.

As a result of attending the session, participants will be able to:

  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness information for consumers/public.
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness for special populations.
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness for those with disabilities.
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness mobile Apps for consumers/public.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Florence Nightingale and the Data Visualization Society

SEA News - Wed, 2019-07-24 14:33

Written By: Kiri Burcat, Data & Evaluation Coordinator, NNLM SEA

Here at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, the Health Sciences and Human Services Library is physically connected to the School of Nursing. The building’s façade is engraved with the last names of some of the nursing profession’s pioneers: Dorothea Dix; Clara Barton; Mary Eliza Mahoney; Florence Nightingale. I see them every day as I walk between my car and the library.


University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Nursing, from nursingonpoint.com

Florence Nightingale is famous for her accomplishments in professionalizing nursing roles during the Victorian Era. She organized care for soldiers during the Crimean war, advocated for sanitary conditions in battlefield hospitals, and established a nursing school at St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Still today, new nurses take the Nightingale Pledge at their pinning ceremonies and the Florence Nightingale Medal is awarded internationally to nurses of the highest distinction.

But I learned about her from a data visualization course.

A prolific writer, Nightingale effectively used charts and infographics to communicate medical information. One of her best-known visualizations, called the coxcomb, illustrates the fact that far more soldiers were dying from preventable contagious diseases than from battle wounds:


Florence Nightingale, from Wikimedia commons. The first part of the description reads: “The areas of blue, red, and black wedges are each measured from the centre as a common vertex. The blue wedges measured from the centre of the circle represent area for area the deaths from Preventable or Mitigatable Zymotic diseases, the red wedges measured from the centre the deaths from wounds, and the black wedges measure from the centre the deaths from all other causes.

For this, she’s also lauded as one of the pioneers of data visualization.

On July 15th, the Data Visualization Society introduced their new online publication, Nightingale, named in her honor. The Society, itself a new community, was formed “to collect and establish best practices, fostering a community that supports members as they grow and develop data visualization skills” and Nightingale will publish stories covering data viz techniques, design processes, and applications in a variety of fields.

Interested in experimenting with data visualization while earning CE credits?

Tune in to the August installment of the NNLM Research Data Management Webinar Series:  What’s in a Data Story? Understanding the Basics of Data Storytelling and keep an eye on the training calendar for an instance of Cool Creative Communications: Dazzling Data Visualization later this fall.

Categories: RML Blogs

New All of Us Speaker Series Episode This Thursday

MCR News - Tue, 2019-07-23 18:16

The All of Us Research Program will continue its Speaker Series with a new episode about the benefits of joining long-term research programs on Thursday, July 25 at 1:00 PM ET. All of Us Director of Communications and Marketing Alyssa Cotler and participant ambassador Dr. Randee Bloom will talk about the importance of long-term research programs like All of Us, the legacy participants can leave for the health of their family and future generations, and how individual health stories can help fill research gaps.

The event will be streamed through Facebook Live in collaboration with AARP’s Create the Good.

For more information, visit JoinAllofUs.org/conversations.

All of Us Speaker series

Categories: RML Blogs

New All of Us Speaker Series Episode This Thursday

MAR News - Tue, 2019-07-23 13:28

The All of Us Research Program will continue its Speaker Series with a new episode about the benefits of joining long-term research programs on Thursday, July 25 at 1:00 PM ET. All of Us Director of Communications and Marketing Alyssa Cotler and participant ambassador Dr. Randee Bloom will talk about the importance of long-term research programs like All of Us, the legacy participants can leave for the health of their family and future generations, and how individual health stories can help fill research gaps.

The event will be streamed through Facebook Live in collaboration with AARP’s Create the Good.

For more information, visit JoinAllofUs.org/conversations.

 You, Me and All of Us

Categories: RML Blogs

University of Arizona Health Sciences Library Hosts “Against All Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health” NLM Traveling Exhibit!

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2019-07-23 13:21

by Annabelle Nuñez, M.A.
Associate Director, University of Arizona Health Sciences Library
University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona

man standing in front of a row of exhibit banners

NLM’s traveling exhibition, Against All Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health on display at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Library

The National Library of Medicine traveling exhibit, Against All Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health, is on display at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Library in Tucson July 1 – August 10, 2019. The six-banner traveling exhibition features the work communities did to improve health at home and in other destinations around the world. The banners are photographic narratives representing the collaborations between families, scientists, health advocates, governments, and international organizations working to prevent disease and improve medical care. They show the collaborations that were formed to examine the relationship between inequity and illness, and they outline the work that enabled communities to actively participate in planning for a healthy future.

The exhibition showcases health education programs such as Oral Rehydration Therapy, which teaches mothers how to treat childhood diarrhea. Also shown is the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra or Landless Workers’ Movement in Brazil, a program that empowers poor citizens to begin subsistence farming on land left idle by agricultural corporations. The exhibition also looks at historic public health campaigns that have changed today’s attitudes. For example, the role of the AIDS activist significantly raised awareness about health inequities associated with HIV and AIDS. This motivated public health stakeholders to identify problems that put some individuals at higher risk for the disease, and to work towards solutions for lifesaving policies and practices.

This exhibition is produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. You can visit the online exhibit to locate additional digital content.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Oh, the work I could do on a day without email.

NER News - Mon, 2019-07-22 14:37
The story behind the NNLM/NER & MCPHS University Instruction Retreat for Health Sciences Librarians  by Shanti Freundlich

Inevitably I leave professional development events with brilliant new ideas. Hand-scribbled notes, a new understanding of learning theory, worksheets, new active learning techniques to try, meaningful quotes, starred tweets, and/or new articles and books to read. The next day I go into my office and I put those new-to-me brilliant ideas onto my (literally) pile of brilliant ideas on the back corner of my desk. Then, I swivel around and begin triaging the questions that came in while I was out, and working through the absolutely necessary, everyday tasks of librarianship.

My pile of new-to-me brilliant ideas stays just out of reach.

This spring, I came back from ACRL 2019 and realized I didn’t need another professional development opportunity to learn; I needed time and space to start using my pile of new-to-me brilliant ideas. I needed permission to not answer my email for a day, to instead focus on my list of “important projects that I’m excited about, but since they don’t technically have deadlines, they’ll have to wait until later.”

I realized I also wanted the empowering connections and community of librarian gatherings like The Library Collective. I wanted to work near those amazing folks I only see a few times a year and be encouraged to bounce ideas around and get excited about our projects together.

That’s where the idea of a retreat emerged. Dedicated time to work on instruction-related projects is really hard to find in a regular workday, so this is that time.

. The day is organized around the following principles:

  • Having goals helps us get more out of whatever we’re doing.
    We’ll start with some quick goal-setting for the day.
  • Breaks are important.
    There will be breaks scheduled throughout the day for everyone to pause and look up from their work for a few minutes.
  • Variety is good for the brain.
    The day is divided into four blocks to encourage you to switch between projects and stumble upon connections.
  • Use the resources.
    Talk to your colleagues and explore the literature: know that you’ve got people and you don’t have to create a new wheel rubric alone.
  • Practice is key.
    The first time you use new classroom activity is when you really learn if your brilliant idea is going to work. So we have a classroom booked for folks to try out new learning activities on fellow librarians and figure out what’s working.
  • Sometimes choices are overwhelming.
    We’ll have a list of project suggestions and questions to help focus your brilliant ideas. We’ll also have articles and books (suggested by you!) in case you just want to catch up on some IL-focused reading for a little while.

 

My hope for the day is that everyone will bring their pile of new-to-you brilliant ideas and their list of “important projects that I’m excited about, but since they don’t technically have deadlines, they’ll have to wait until later” and that by being in a different place, surrounded by encouraging colleagues we’ll individually and collectively turn some brilliant ideas into meaningful practice.

About the NNLM/NER & MCPHS University Instruction Retreat for Health Sciences Librarians

  • Date: Tuesday, July 23rd 2019
  • Time: 9am – 4:45pm
  • Location: 6th Floor Griffin Building, 670 Huntington Ave, MCPHS University, Boston MA 02115
  • Transportation: Accessible by public transportation (MBTA “E” Green Line or 39 bus)
  • Cost: This retreat is funded by an NNLM/NER grant.

To register: https://forms.gle/dbg6fDMPL7bzNQGT8

Please note, there are a limited number of spaces available.

Got questions? Please contact Shanti Freundlich: shanti.freundlich@mcphs.edu or 617-735-1088.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Getting the Most from NNLM: Classes

NER News - Mon, 2019-07-22 14:30

Picture with fake computer code background and the words "Professional Development"

If you’re reading this blog, than you’re probably familiar with what NNLM and NNLM NER do.  And one of the big things that we do is plan, host and teach classes.  Whether we’re teaching a webinar or through Moodle, we’re working to fulfill the NNLM’s mission to “advance the progress of medicine and improve the public health by providing all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving the public’s access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health.”

Where do our classes come from?

Classes are planned and hosted for free by NNLM staff and are taught either by staff or subject matter experts.  Class topics come from the needs of the people we serve (that’s you!).

Who is the target audience?

Classes are open to anyone who is interested and cover a wide array of health information and education topics.  Classes teach everything from NLM resources to highlighting innovative interventions from partners and funded projects.  Stay up to date on upcoming classes by following @nnlmnto on twitter or sign-up for the NER weekly newsletter.

Can I get continuing education (CE) with that?

Good news! Most NNLM webinars have some CE available.

Some NNLM classes are designed to fulfill requirements for certificate and specialization programs.  You can search the course catalogue to find classes that offer these specialization credits.

What’s coming up in August from NNLM NER?

Search the class catalogue to find your next NNLM class and check back often as classes are added regularly.  Looking to brush up on resources and information, but don’t see what you’re looking for in the course listings?  Check out recordings of past webinars and events on the NNLM YouTube Channel.

Categories: RML Blogs

Recording of June DOCLINE Talkline “Did You Know” Webinar Now Available!

PSR News - Mon, 2019-07-22 12:16

The recording of the June 2019 DOCLINE Talkline webinar is now available. DOCLINE Talkline is a webinar series from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, DOCLINE Coordination Office (NDCO) to promote and educate users on DOCLINE, LOANSOME Doc, and other resource sharing programs from the National Library of Medicine. To view the webinar, click on the YouTube player below.

Presenters, Erin Latta, NNLM DOCLINE Coordinator and Lis Unger, NLM DOCLINE Team Lead provided DOCLINE 6.0 tips and tricks, including:

  • Working with Requests: as a Lender
  • Routing: how it works & making it work for you
  • Working with Requests: as a Borrower

If you have any questions or feedback about DOCLINE 6.0, write to the NLM Help Desk, view the DOCLINE 6.0 FAQs, or contact the National DOCLINE Coordination Office.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: NNLM Resource Picks

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2019-07-22 10:00

Did you know that the National Library of Medicine has over 250 products and services? Most of them are not ones your patrons would use but it is amazing to think that this NIH institute has such a large number to offer a wide variety of users. How many have you heard of or used? Would you like to learn more about them?

The webinar series, NNLM Resource Picks is a webinar series that features National Library of Medicine (NLM) resources with experts presenting. It’s a great way to learn more about NLM resources and so you can be more confident and better utilize them in your work. NLM resources featured in the past have included:

During the hour session, attendees not only learn more in-depth information about the resources but have a unique opportunity to ask their questions to the presenter and others who may have some knowledge of the resource and can add their experience and knowledge of the resource as well. Attendees can earn 1 Medical Library Association (MLA) CE and some sessions could be justified to apply towards the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS).

Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC): Disaster Health Literature is the resource to be featured on the next NNLM Resource Picks. During a disaster, decisions are made quickly, based on the information available. This session will provide a brief overview of the essential resources needed to provide health-related information services for supporting disaster preparedness, response, and recovery workforce.

DIMRC home webpage

When: Wednesday, July 31 at 11:00 a.m. Alaska | 12:00 p.m. PT | 1:00 p.m. MT

Learn more and register

Can’t make the live session? Not to worry, all sessions are recorded and linked on the NNLM Resource Picks web page and the MLA CE credit is still good up to six months from the live session.

Categories: RML Blogs

Registration Open: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians!

GMR News - Fri, 2019-07-19 17:10

Course Title: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians

An asynchronous online National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Moodle course that will take place from September 9 – November 8, 2019. Enrollment will be limited to the first 100 who register!

Description: The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. There are eight self-paced modules and students may customize their experience by completing the modules of most interest and use to them.

The course topics include:

  • An overview of research data management
  • Choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset
  • Addressing privacy and security issues with data, and
  • Creating data management plans

CE Credits

Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be eligible to claim up to 32 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association (MLA). Credit will be dependent on the number of modules completed. To receive credit, components must be submitted by November 8.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in this course.

For more information and to Register for this course go to the Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians course page

Questions about the course?
Please contact nto@utah.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

Data Flash: New RDM Moodle Course for Librarians!!!

PNR Dragonfly - Fri, 2019-07-19 16:51

An Upcoming Online Course Opportunity for Librarians Interested in Research Data Management! There is no application deadline as enrollment will be limited to the first 100 who register!

 Course Title: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians

An asynchronous online National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Moodle course that will take place from September 9 – November 8, 2019.

Description: The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. There are eight self-paced modules and students may customize their experience by completing the modules of most interest and use to them.

The course topics include:

  • An overview of research data management
  • Choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset
  • Addressing privacy and security issues with data, and
  • Creating data management plans

CE Credits

Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be eligible to claim up to 32 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association (MLA). Credit will be dependent on the number of modules completed. To receive credit, components must be submitted by November 8.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in this course.

For more information and to Register for this course go to the Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians course page

Questions about the course?
Please contact nto@utah.edu

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Welcome Christian Minter as the new CHIS Trainer for the NNLM MCR

MCR News - Fri, 2019-07-19 15:45

Christian Minter is a part-time CHIS Trainer for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region.

In this role, she will teach online and in-person consumer health information classes. Her goal is to equip public library staff to provide health information to their communities, encourage continued engagement with NNLM, and increase the number of public library staff in the region who achieve CHIS certification.

Christian is also the Community Engagement and Health Literacy Librarian at University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb. No stranger to NNLM, she previously worked as an Education Coordinator for MCR.

Christian received a BA in Biblical Studies from Washington Bible College and an MS in Library and Information Science from The Catholic University of America. She is currently pursuing a Master of Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Christian looks forward to working with NNLM again, and she is always happy to collaborate on classes and projects.

Categories: RML Blogs

Fall 2019 NNLM Research Data Management Online Course Begins September 9!

PSR News - Fri, 2019-07-19 15:31

Register now for Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians, also known as RDM 101, an asynchronous online NNLM Moodle course that will take place from September 9 – November 8, 2019. The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. There are eight self-paced modules and students may customize their experience by completing the modules of most interest and use to them. There is no charge to participate in the class. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be eligible to claim up to 32 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association. Credit will be dependent on the number of modules completed. To receive credit, components must be submitted by November 8.

Enrollment will be limited to the first 100 registrants, so don’t delay!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Update on EFTS Continuation

PSR News - Fri, 2019-07-19 14:44

On May 22, 2019, Electronic Funds Transfer System (EFTS) users received a communication from Janice Swiatek, director of the Lyman Maynard Stowe Library at the University of Connecticut (UConn) Health Center, stating that UConn would be unable to continue operating the EFTS billing agent for DOCLINE interlibrary loan (ILL) transactions past December 31, 2019.

The Medical Library Association, in collaboration with UConn and the National Library of Medicine, is developing upgraded technical specifications and a business model to be operated by MLA for a successor to the current EFTS. Assuming MLA can implement a high-quality, cost-effective, and sustainable solution for EFTS, the MLA Board of Directors supports this initiative to provide an essential service to the health sciences library community. Should this process prove successful, MLA will communicate the terms of the new EFTS user agreement by the end of August. The goal is to ensure continuity of service for EFTS during a transition from UConn to MLA.

For more information, visit this blog post from the NNLM National DOCLINE Coordination Office.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Learn how your Library can be a Hub for Citizen Science

MCR News - Fri, 2019-07-19 12:57

Libraries can now be a place where patrons can engage in real scientific research by participating in citizen science programs.

Citizen science is a way for communities to participate in real scientific research by lending a hand to scientists in discovering groundbreaking advancements in a wide range of research projects. There are no limitations to who can participate and no science background is required. This is a great way for people to learn about the world around them and for libraries to make connections with scientists and their community.

If you would like to start a citizen science program in your library, check out the Librarian’s Guide to Citizen Science for program ideas and the article “Citizen Science: How librarians can energize their patrons to advance science” to learn about how you can engage your patrons to become a citizen scientist.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-07-19 11:50

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or Summer Reading? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Why Wikipedia Matters for Health and Medical Information – The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is partnering with WebJunction to facilitate a 4-week online course for public librarians on Wikipedia health and medical information, to be offered this coming fall! Join us for a webinar on August 14 at 3:00 PM ET to learn more about the upcoming course, and the importance of improving health and medical information on Wikipedia.

We want your feedback! NNLM is reaching out to public library members to solicit feedback about the National Health Observances content being piloted by the NNLM All of Us National Program. The content, which includes program kits, posters, printer-ready handouts, and slides, is intended to raise awareness of select health observances and associated National Library of Medicine (NLM) resources. We invite you to take a short survey to provide us with feedback and recommendations for this project.

Update on EFTS Continuation – Updated information regarding the collaboration between MLA, Uconn, and NLM to create an EFTS 2.0 that will continue to support the billing component of DOCLINE. – DOCLINE Talkline

Think Before You Ink – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

NLM/NIH News

The Significance of Network Biology – The functioning of any complex system involves interactions between elements of that system. These many interactions, from the microscopic to the macroscopic, can be described as networks, which comprise nodes connected via links that designate the relationships between nodes. But how can we discover which nodes are connected? And how can we learn about the nature of those connections? – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Lunar Landing: The 50 Year Anniversary – On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 crew members Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon. This mission was the fulfillment of the challenge President John F. Kennedy set for the nation in 1961 to land a man on the moon, and safely return him to Earth before the end of the decade. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted updates to PubMed Labs involving the Library LinkOut using Outside Tool service, and the closure of NLM’s Specialized Information Services division.

NIH News in Health: The July 2019 issue is now available, featuring, “Beyond Games: Using Virtual Reality to Improve Health,” and, “Hypnosis for Health: Can Trances Work?” Other topics include testing your home for Radon, processed foods, and heart-healthy eating.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

July 2019

PubMed for Librarians: Automatic Term Mapping – July 23, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Attend this class with the National Training Office (NTO) to learn how PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) to map your keyword searches to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn how ATM allows you to effectively search PubMed with keywords. This course will also look at the explosion feature, what is and isn’t included in Search Details, and how to search for phrases in PubMed.

Promoting Public Health through the Public Library – July 25, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Richland Public Health and the Mansfield/Richland County Public Library have formed a unique partnership to improve the health and overall quality of life of Richland County community members through innovative health education and promotion programming. This webinar with the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) will feature an overview of three successful initiatives: The Health Information Kiosk program, The Free Blood Pressure Cuff Loan program and The Free Bike Loan program. Recommendations on how other health departments and their local library systems can pursue opportunities to collaborate will also be discussed.

From A(ddiction) to Z(its): Supporting Teens with Health Information – July 26, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Body image, identity, depression, sexuality, and stress are just some of the issues facing teens as they experience many physical and mental changes. When it comes to health issues they, their friends, or their family, may be experiencing, it is important that they have access to reliable health information. However, seeking that information can be difficult. This class with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) will look at how social determinants of health affect teens, and how libraries, schools, and community organizations can support youth health literacy. Presenters will discuss health information resources for teens, best practices for answering difficult questions, and health-focused activities.

Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC): Disaster Health Literature – July 31, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – The core purpose of the Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) is to develop and provide access to health information resources and technology for disaster and public health emergency preparedness, response, and recovery. During a disaster, decisions are made quickly, based on the information available. This session with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) will provide a brief overview of the essential resources needed to provide health-related information services for supporting disaster preparedness, response, and recovery workforce.

August 2019

ABCs of DNA: Unraveling the Mystery of Genetics Information for Consumers – August 1-31, 2019 – Consumers need access to information and resources about genetic information in an understandable manner. Librarians working with the public need to be aware of the issues surrounding genetics and resources to assist patrons in locating and evaluating sometimes complex and confusing information. Offered in collaboration by the Greater Midwest and Pacific Northwest Regions (GMR/PNR), this asynchronous online class provides an opportunity to become better equipped with the resources you need to address the genetic health information needs of your community. Participants are eligible for 8 MLA CE.

From Beyond our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information – August 5-30, 2019 – Join the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) for this asynchronous course that provides an overview of the current landscape of refugees, immigrants, asylees, and seasonal and migrant farm workers in the United States, and explores some of the unique health challenges that impact these population groups. This course will discuss culture, cultural competency and cultural humility, and reflect on how your organization is addressing these principles. An introduction to numerous health information websites will be provided that showcase where you can access resources in multiple languages. This class will help you think about ways your organization can develop programs and services to assist immigrants, refugees, asylees, and seasonal and migrant farm workers in your communities.

Graphic Public Health: Comics for Health Literacy, Health Promotion, and Advocacy – August 7, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Comics are uniquely suited for conveying health information in engaging, economical, and culturally sensitive ways. Graphic public health can also give voice to the people in our communities who are impacted by the policy and programmatic decisions made by public health officials. In this webinar sponsored by the New England Region (NER), Meredith Li-Vollmer from Public Health – Seattle & King County will share examples of how she has applied comics to health literacy, health promotion and advocacy for public health. She will also discuss aspects of the creative process of developing graphic public health.

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – August 12-September 9, 2019 – This hands-on, asynchronous class with the MidContinental Region (MCR) will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will leave equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites, discuss creative ideas for health information outreach, and wrap up with an opportunity to explore effective marketing approaches and develop an elevator speech.

True North: Navigating Your Way to Freely Available Public Health Resources – August 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – This collaborative course covers concepts related to searching for freely available public health resources, reviewing resources for bias, and thinking outside-the-box for your search strategies. Join the National Public Health Coordinating Office (NPHCO) in this session for a review of pressing issues in public health.

Fostering Resilience in Older Adults – August 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – Resilience, the process of adapting well in the face of significant sources of distress, plays an increasingly important role in successful aging. Join this webinar with the South Central Region (SCR) to learn more about ways aging network providers and community partners can support older adults in problem solving, preparing for challenges and cultivating this essential component for well-being across the lifespan.

Collection Management for Healthy Communities – August 14, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Public library collections address many health-related needs and interests from which librarians and many others draw information in response to questions about disease, wellness, chronic conditions, prescription and non-prescription drugs, and therapies. To provide accurate and therefore valuable and correct support for these information needs, the print, media, and online collections on which your public library relies must be cultivated with new resources added and outdated ones weeded. This  webinar with the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) will provide library staff with support in identifying appropriate health and wellness resources for both the reference and circulating collections, and maintaining the public library’s health-related resources so that they offer your community the highest quality resources they need.

Understanding the Opioid Crisis: Where do I begin? – August 20, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – An estimated 1.9 million people in the U.S. have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder. This class with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) will help you to understand what addiction and opioids are, and where you can find authoritative information to understand this complex epidemic. The National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health provide resources for both the general public and health professionals to learn about opioid abuse and overdose prevention and treatment options.

Copyright, Fair Use and Creative Commons: Allies in Educational Settings – August 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Is copyright automatic? When is Fair Use, well, fair? Does a Creative Commons license grant unlimited use of the work? Determining whether you have the rights to use an article, image, video, or table can take some of the fun out of developing a presentation, class, or course. In this session with the Mid-Continental Region (MCR) you will be introduced to a practical framework for understanding what can and cannot be copyrighted, with some typical scenarios librarians and educators encounter. You will also learn about where and in what context Fair Use applies, the different types of Creative Commons licenses, and how those licenses can help minimize copyright risk.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job postings:

POPLINE to retire on September 1, 2019 – POPLINE has been a valuable resource to the population, family planning, and reproductive health community for over 40 years.

Q&A with Melissa Adams, publisher of The Merck Manuals – For more than a century, The Merck Manuals have been a trusted source of information for health care providers and patients alike. Public Health Newswire spoke with Melissa Adams, publisher of The Merck Manuals, about how they’ve evolved over the years and the significance of making reliable medical information easily accessible for advancing public health.

Troubleshooting Systematic Reviews: Refining the Research Question – August 7, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – How do you judge when a scoping review rather than a systematic review is appropriate? What reference interview questions best help refine a research question for a feasible study? Join Margaret Foster, AHIP, and Sarah Jewell, co-editors of Assembling the Pieces of a Systematic Review: A Guide for Librarians, for the first of two webinars that address these and other troublesome questions that all librarians interested in consulting on systematic reviews will want to be able to answer. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Apply now to host ‘Americans and the Holocaust’ traveling exhibition – The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) and the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office invite libraries to apply to host Americans and the Holocaust, a traveling exhibition that examines the motives, pressures and fears that shaped Americans’ responses to Nazism, war and genocide in Europe during the 1930s and 1940s. The special library exhibition — based on the exhibition at the USHMM in Washington, D.C. — will travel to 50 U.S. public and academic libraries from 2020 to 2022. Read the project guidelines and apply online by August 9.

2020 Symposium on the Future of Libraries – The Center for the Future of Libraries is accepting session proposals for this three-day symposium exploring the near-term trends already inspiring innovation in academic, public, school, and special libraries, and the longer-term trends that will help us adapt to the needs of our communities. The Symposium on the Future of Libraries is included with full registration for the 2020 ALA Midwinter Meeting and Exhibits. First review of proposals will begin July 15 – priority placement will be given to those proposals received by the first review date. The call for proposals will close on August 15.

AJPH Call for Proposals: Special Issue about Health Misinformation on Social Media – The American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, intends to publish a special issue focusing on research that can help us better understand and address the proliferation of health misinformation on social media. If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send an extended proposal to Ms. Anna Gaysynsky, Assistant Guest Editor, at Anna.Gaysynsky@nih.gov by 11:59 PM ET on Friday, August 30.

OpenCon 2019 in Philadelphia, PA – Join Temple University on November 1 for OpenCon Philly, a free one-day series of panels and interactive workshops for idea exchange and learning around open access, open education, and open data. Connect with regional colleagues and find future collaborators as you share success stories, learn from each other’s failures, and discuss challenges in your work towards making research, educational materials, data, and government information more equitable and accessible to all. This event is free and open to all. RSVP to stay in the loop and be notified of the call for presentations! A registration form will be forthcoming closer to the event.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – July 19, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-07-19 09:53

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars July 23 – July 26

Webinars July 30 – July 31

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Announcing Additional PNR Stops for the NIH All of Us Journey

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2019-07-18 15:35

 

Additional opportunities to “check out” the NIH All of Us Journey as it travels through the Pacific Northwest were just announced. The All of Us Journey Exhibit and the All of Us Mobile Education and Enrollment Center visit communities nationwide to raise awareness about the All of Us Research Program. Both exhibits feature hands-on activities for visitors to learn about research, precision medicine, and the opportunity to enroll in All of Us. The Journey will be visiting the following locations throughout the Pacific Northwest:

WSU Health Sciences Spokane Campus, 412 E Spokane Falls Blvd., Spokane, WA 99202
(Corner of Spokane Falls Blvd. and Front Avenue). Dates: Tuesday, July 23 – Friday, July 26, 2019. Hours: 10:00am – 4:00pm

International Market Plaza, 5800 NE Fourth Plain Blvd, Vancouver, WA 98661. Dates: Tuesday, July 30 – Friday, August 2, 2019. Hours: 10:00am – 5:00pm

Sunrise Center – Rockwood Community Development Center, 18901 E Burnside Street, Gresham, OR 97233. Dates: Monday, August 5 – Friday, August 9, 2019. Hours: Noon – 6:00pm

National Alliance for Hispanic Health & Oregon State University, Memorial Union Brick Mall, 1500 SW Jefferson St., Corvallis, OR 97331. Dates: Monday, August 19 – Friday, August 23, 2019. Hours: 9:00am – 4:00pm

I hope you’ll take advantage of this unique way to learn more about the NIH All of Us Research Program by stopping by and “checking it out” when it’s in your area!

Categories: RML Blogs

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