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Common Ground: Community, Courts, Kids, and Education Conference

GMR News - Wed, 2019-11-20 12:48

“I had the privilege of attending the Common Ground: Community, Courts, Kids, and Education conference on November 7, 2019. The speaker for the day was Dr. Leonard Sax, a physician and psychologist focused on issues around child development and parent/child dynamics. He shared many tools with the attendees to help them better connect with the students. However, what I most connected with was learning about some of the research that has been conducted into how children develop and the tools and characteristics that need to be developed within them in order for them to grow into successful and healthy adults. It turns out that self-control is a strong indicator of these positive attributes. It was fascinating, especially when thinking about our current culture and how we seem to be pushing towards faster everything and more instantaneous feedback”.

–Amanda McKay, Effingham Public Library, Director

Conference Crowd

Adam Roloff, with SIU School of Medicine attended to represent and promote the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and the Greater Midwest Region. “I was so happy that I could be there! Dr. Sax was a phenomenal speaker and I was telling the library director here about him and she suggested that I should find out his contact information and maybe we could see about getting a grant for him to come and speak here at SIU next year. So I’d call that a success!”

–Adam Roloff

 

Categories: RML Blogs

A Librarian Can Address Substance Use Disorder

NER News - Tue, 2019-11-19 09:41

This is conference session for my job at the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region. That means I get to attend lots of different conferences and meet and connect with a lot of different people. I was at NAHSL last week, and then I attended the symposium, Communities in Crisis: Libraries Respond to the Opioid Epidemic.

The Communities in Crisis: Libraries Respond to the Opioid Epidemic symposium is aimed at librarians and how they respond to Substance Use Disorder. This is an unfortunate necessity. Mainly public librarians, but other libraries as well, are having to address substance use in their communities and in the library. Patrons, coworkers, their own families – almost everyone has been exposed to or had to deal with someone affected by Substance Use Disorder. There are well over 100 people here at this symposium today, which is enough of a testament to how important this topic is.

From the OCLC’s report Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Communities, “The United States is experiencing an opioid epidemic, and public libraries across the country are choosing to respond to this public health emergency locally. As central community institutions open to all, public libraries are finding themselves on the front lines of the opioid crisis. Together with community partners, public libraries are providing critically needed information and services, organizing education and training events, and supporting prevention and recovery efforts.”

(Side note on language; the proper terminology is Substance Use Disorder (SUD). Not, drug abuse, or substance misuse, addict, etc. SUD is less stigmatizing and acknowledges that it is a chronic medical condition, rather than a moral failing. Also, while there is a huge focus on the opioid crisis right now, there are many other substances and issues that people may be dealing with.)

I truly wish this was not a topic that libraries had to address. But they do, and libraries are in an important position in the community. My job while attending the symposium is to help librarians have the information tools and resources for their own edification and to share with patrons. I think that given the controversy and misinformation that often surrounds SUD, it is more important than ever to make sure people are getting good, reliable, vetted information. Here are a few of the resources I am promoting:

However, while this symposium is a great opportunity to share information, more significantly, it is an opportunity for so many people come together and support each other. Like I said, there are well over 100 people at the symposium. They are all learning about and starting to break down the stigma surrounding SUD. Unfortunately, people may have to deal with SUD in their work or in their lives, but they now have a whole community to connect with. Librarians love their communities, their patrons, and other librarians. They love to be able to help to make all these groups better. A librarian is not going to be able to solve all the problems facing SUD in libraries, but in some small way librarians can address Substance Use Disorder.

Martha Meacham exhibiting

A version of this was originally posted on NNLM NER Associate Director Martha Meacham’s blog, here.

Categories: RML Blogs

Getting the Most from NNLM: Public Health

NER News - Tue, 2019-11-19 09:02

If you’re reading this blog, then you’re probably familiar with what NLM, NNLM and NNLM NER do.

Over the last month, I’ve spent time at public health conferences in Connecticut, Massachusetts and the national American Public Health Association Conference and had similar conversations at all three.  Although many public health partners are familiar with MedlinePlus and PubMed, a lot of them don’t know that these resources are part of a larger group of resources and services. If you work in public health or have public health partners, here are a few reminders or new ideas for how NLM and NNLM can work for you.

Databases and Online Resources

NLM creates and maintains a wide array of databases of health information ranging from information for the general public to highly specialized. You can search all NLM databases, but here is a sample of databases for public health partners:

  • AIDSource offers access to a comprehensive collection of HIV-related resources on topics including living with HIV, HIV prevention and treatment, HIV statistics and surveillance, HIV and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) navigation, and more, in both English and Spanish.
  • The LactMed App information about maternal and infant drug levels, possible effects on lactation and on breastfed infants, and alternative drugs to consider. You can also find this information online.
  • The Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) develops and provides access to health information resources and technology for disaster and public health emergency preparedness, response, and recovery.
  • Environmental Health and Toxicology can help you find environmental health and resources across NLM suite of databases.
  • Community Health Maps provides information about low/no cost mapping tools including case studies and projects that organizations have done using these tools.
  • Partners in Information Access for Public Health Workforce (PHPartners) is committed to helping the public health workforce find and use information effectively and includes listings for trainings, conferences, internships, jobs and more. PHPartners is a collaboration of government agencies, public health organizations and health science libraries.

Webinars and Classes

All NNLM regions create and host webinars that are free and available nationally.  Webinars and classes cover a wide variety of health, information and data management topics including some that may be of interest to public health professionals.

Search the full NNLM class catalog or find NNLM webinars that are CHES eligible.

Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) is a certification for individuals with a bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree in health education or significant coursework in the field.

Funding

Funding is available to all NNLM members.  Learn more about funding opportunities and recent funded projects.

To learn more about funding from NER, attend the NNLM NER Funding Meeting on December 16 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (Worcester, MA).  This is a chance to hear about projects that have previously been funded and connect with NER staff. Learn more about the funding meeting and to register.

Categories: RML Blogs

The New PubMed is Here!

MAR News - Tue, 2019-11-19 07:00

After extensive development and thorough testing in the PubMed Labs environment, The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has launched an updated version of PubMed, a free resource that supports the search and retrieval of peer-reviewed biomedical and life sciences literature, with the aim of improving health–both globally and personally.

Available to the public online since 1996, PubMed was developed and is maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at NLM, located at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The PubMed database contains more than 30 million citations and abstracts of peer-reviewed biomedical literature. It does not include full-text journal articles; however, links to the full text are often present when available from other sources, such as the publisher’s website or PubMed Central (PMC).

You can start using the new PubMed today by visiting the site directly, or by clicking on the banner on pubmed.gov. What exactly is new with the new PubMed?

  • The new PubMed offers a clean, easy-to-use interface, and was designed from the ground up to be mobile-friendly. The new interface was built using modern web standards, with a responsive layout, making it easier for new users on any type of device to find what they’re looking for.
  • The new PubMed is designed to help you find what you need, fast. The improved Best Match sort order uses a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm to help elevate the most relevant articles to the top of your results list. Improved citation and title sensors are built into the search box, making it even easier to find an article based on known citation information.

While it may look different, the new PubMed still includes the features you rely on, and gives you access to the same trusted bibliographic data. The new PubMed includes the key features that have long been a part of PubMed, including:

  • customizable filters to help you narrow your search,
  • tools to save and share your search results,
  • an Advanced Search Builder that lets you search for terms in a specific field, see how your search is being translated, and review your search history; and,
  • options to set up e-mail alerts to be notified when new results are available.

Starting in Spring 2020, all PubMed users will be redirected to the new PubMed. Stay tuned to banner messages on pubmed.gov for more details, or subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on this and other National Library of Medicine tools you may be using. NLM is committed to continued PubMed development, and will continue adding features and improving user experience, ensuring that PubMed remains a trusted and accessible source of biomedical literature today and in the future.

Categories: RML Blogs

The New PubMed is Here!

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2019-11-18 18:38

The new PubMed is now available!

The new PubMed offers a streamlined and easy-to-use interface. The new PubMed interface was built using modern web standards and with a responsive layout, making it easier for mobile use.

Screenshot of the new PubMed homepage accessed on a mobile device, including basic search.

The new PubMed is designed to help you find what you need, fast. The improved Best Match sort order uses a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm to help elevate the most relevant articles to the top of your results list. Improved citation and title sensors are built into the search box, making it even easier to find an article based on known citation information.

The new PubMed includes the key features that have long been a part of PubMed, including:

  • customizable filters to help you narrow your search
  • tools to save and share your search results
  • an Advanced Search Builder that allows you to search for terms in a specific field, see how your search is being translated, and review your search history
  • options to set up e-mail alerts to be notified when new results are available

Starting in spring 2020, all legacy PubMed users will be redirected to the new PubMed. Stay tuned to banner messages on all PubMed pages for more details.

The new PubMed will continue to evolve to meet user needs. NLM is committed to continued PubMed development, and will continue adding features and improving the user experience, ensuring that PubMed remains a trusted and accessible source of biomedical literature today and in the future.

Interested in learning more? Register for the NNLM Resource Picks webinar featuring the new PubMed, Wednesday, Nov. 20th, 12pm PT, 1pm MT. And, follow the latest news in the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: RML Blogs

The “New” PubMed Is Here!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-11-18 17:36

An updated version of PubMed is now available! The new PubMed will become the default in spring 2020 and will ultimately replace the legacy version. You can also click on the new blue banner on the legacy PubMed home page to try the new PubMed. The new responsive layout offers better support for accessing PubMed content with the increasingly popular small-screen devices such as mobile phones and tablets. The interface is compatible with any screen size, which provides a fresh, consistent look and feel throughout the application, no matter how you access it. A single, responsive website means that the features you use on the desktop are also available on your mobile device, including library icons for libraries participating in the Library LinkOut using Outside Tool service. Find highly relevant articles more easily using the Best Match sort, now the default sort order in PubMed. Best Match uses a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm that is trained on aggregated user searches. The Best Match algorithm ranks search results according to several relevance signals. For more information about Best Match, visit the article, Best Match: New relevance search for PubMed.

screenshot of the new pubmed.gov website with a blue background and a search function

The new PubMed homepage

The new PubMed includes the following features you rely on for searching, as well as saving and sharing your results.

  • Access the same trusted database of more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature.
  • Activate the default filters or customize the filter menu to meet your needs.
  • Use the Results by Year graph to see trends in literature over time or to refine your search results by publication year.
  • Save your search results to a file, email your results to yourself or a colleague, or send your results to a clipboard, collection, or your NCBI My Bibliography.
  • Go to the advanced search page to search for terms in a specific field, see the search details, review your search history and combine searches to create complex search strings.
  • Save your search and create an email alert.

NLM will continue adding features and improving the user experience, ensuring that PubMed remains a trusted and accessible source of biomedical literature today and in the future. For more details on the features in the new PubMed, watch the recorded webinar, “A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals.

Other articles of potential interest:

The New PubMed Updated: Homepage, User Guide, My NCBI Alerts and Collections, and More
PubMed Labs Update: Using Filters
PubMed Labs Update: Library LinkOut using Outside Tool
PubMed Labs Update: Add Citations to the Clipboard
PubMed Labs Update: Advanced Search, History, and Search Details
An Updated PubMed Is on Its Way

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

TOXNET Update

PSR News - Mon, 2019-11-18 14:52

As noted previously in the NLM Technical Bulletin, TOXNET will be retired on December 16. Most content will remain available through other NLM databases, as well as from external websites. Currently available information about where to find that content appears in the Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Report on The Open Access 2019 Conference

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-11-18 14:44

By Daina Dickman, MA, MLIS, AHIP
Scholarly Communication Librarian
Sacramento State University

I recently had the opportunity to attend the Open Access 2019 Conference: Open for Whom? Research Equity for Campus and Community, at San Jose State University, with the assistance of an NNLM PSR Professional Development Award. The conference theme focused on research equity, and I was able to hear many thoughtful presentations and speakers from California (and one presenter visiting from Texas). I presented my own paper on censorship concerns in medical library institutional repositories as part of a panel with Melissa Seelye of San Francisco State University, exploring the tensions between open access ideals and corporate interests. As a focused one-track conference, a common conversation was contributed to by all presenters and attendees.

For me, a highlight of the conference was hearing Alexa Hight, of Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s presentation about the open access publishing fund her library administers. I am always interested in the creative and practical ways that libraries can promote open access publishing as a viable path for scholarship at their institutions.

As a new librarian to the Pacific Southwest Region, I appreciated the chance to meet and network with new local colleagues, including the health sciences librarian at San Jose State University. I highly recommend that health sciences librarians consider conferences that aren’t just focused on medical librarianship. I always come away with new ideas which I am excited to apply to my own work, and appreciate the opportunity to share the medical librarian perspective with colleagues from other areas of librarianship. Smaller regional conferences are also a great place to practice your presentation skills before the MLA Annual Meeting!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Member Spotlight: Audra Anusionwu

MAR News - Mon, 2019-11-18 07:00
Audra Anusionwu

Audra Anusionwu

I am Founder and Director of BeautiFitstrong Camp for Girls. As Director of BeautiFitstrong Camp, I curate an eight-week summer day camp for girls focused on health and overall wellness. It’s a full day program that services girls ages 5-13. We also hire WorkReady teen girls age 14-18. As a Certified Fitness Trainer and Wellness Coach, I help facilitate and coordinate activities throughout the program focused on healthy eating, fitness, STEAM, etiquette, self-esteem building, body positivity and setting smart goals. We teach girls that health is what you put in, on, and around your body.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR), was instrumental in helping map out K-12 resources for our program curriculum. The foundation of our program was built on resources such as MedlinePlus, ChooseMyPlate, BAM! Body and Mind, Nutrition.gov, girlshealth.gov, and EPA.gov.

BeautiFitstrong Camp for Girls was a recipient of the NNLM MAR Community Outreach award for our Wellness for Everybody Initiative. This initiative was an extension to our summer 2017 program. The grant allowed us to engage parents and family members of campers in some of the same wellness activities that campers enjoy during the summer. It was important to me to engage the decision-makers in the girls’ homes to really effect long term lifestyle changes in the girls, and ultimately the families we serve.

children doing yoga poses

Serving as a member of the NNLM MAR Consumer Health SAG since June of 2016 has been invaluable. Representation matters on every platform, so being able to be a voice for my community is an honor. I bring the experience of growing up in inner city Philadelphia below the poverty level, with an understanding of the importance of health equity. Having access to relevant and reliable resources to be able to make informed decisions regarding both personal and family health is important.

Written by Audra Anusionwu, Founder and Director of BeautiFitstrong Camp for Girls in Philadelphia, PA, for the Fall 2019 edition of The MAReport quarterly newsletter.

Categories: RML Blogs

American Indian and Alaska Native Health Portal and Arctic Health to Retire

MCR News - Fri, 2019-11-15 18:34

The American Indian and Alaska Native Health portal (https://americanindianhealth.nlm.nih.gov) will be retired on December 16, 2019.

The Arctic Health portal moved to a new home on September 28, 2018. The University of Alaska Anchorage will continue to host and maintain the publications database at https://arctichealth.org/. Content from NLM-hosted Arctic Health has been moved to the new site and the search engine has been enhanced. Please bookmark https://arctichealth.org for Arctic Health. The current NLM site (https://arctichealth.nlm.nih.gov/) will no longer be available after December 16, 2019.

Please visit the MedlinePlus entry for American Indian and Alaska Native Health.

Categories: RML Blogs

MedlinePlus News

PSR News - Fri, 2019-11-15 14:48

MedlinePlus has retired the How to Write Easy-to-Read Health Materials page in English and Spanish. Guides for creating health materials for a general audience are available from the National Institutes of Health, the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, and others. You can also explore the resources in the updated MedlinePlus topic on Health Literacy.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

American Indian/Alaska Native Health and Arctic Health Portals Will Retire on December 16!

PSR News - Fri, 2019-11-15 13:55

The American Indian and Alaska Native Health portal will be retired on December 16, 2019. Visit the MedlinePlus American Indian and Alaska Native Health page for information about this topic. The Arctic Health portal moved to a new home on September 28, 2018, with the University of Alaska at Anchorage. Content from NLM-hosted Arctic Health has been moved to the new site and the search engine has been enhanced. The current NLM Arctic Health site will no longer be available after December 16.

If you have any questions, contact the NLM Support Center.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-11-15 12:32

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Funding Available Now! Library and Information Science (LIS) students can apply by December 5 for funding to attend the ALA Midwinter Conference in January 2020 and participate in meetings, the National Library of Medicine exhibit booth, and other activities designed to learn about health information outreach and the All of Us Research Program. Please share this opportunity!

Read the MAReport: This quarter, Academic Coordinator Kelsey Cowles wrote about NNLM’s use of crowdsourcing to improve health information through our biannual Wikipedia Edit-a-thons. It’s not too late to participate in our Fall edit-a-thon for mental health, coming up next week on November 20!

Congratulations to Debra Youngfelt, Executive Director at the Eastcentral and Northeast PA Area Health Education Centers in Lehighton, PA, for being named the 2019 State Rural Health Leader of the Year! Learn more about Debra’s amazing work in rural health outreach from her Member Spotlight in the Spring 2019 edition of the MAReport.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

The MAR offices will be closed on Wednesday, November 20 for our yearly planning retreat. Follow #nnlmmarRetreat next week to see how we use creative activities to spark new ideas for our next year of training and outreach in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware.

Request for Information (RFI): The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement (UG4) that operates on a five-year cycle. As we prepare for the start of the next cycle (in May 2021), we are seeking input and feedback from the public on ways to ensure that the NNLM can continue to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The deadline to respond is December 2, 2019.

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote American Indian Heritage or Family Health History? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

Clinical eCompanion: We’d like your feedback on the point of care tool, Clinical eCompanion! This feedback will help us to determine the future of this website. To let us know what you think, visit the Clinical eCompanion site and select the highlighted link on the homepage.

In the Region – attending the New York Library Association (NYLA) conference this weekend? Meet up with Michael Balkenhol and Tess Wilson to talk about citizen science, youth services, teen mental health, or just to say hello! Read about more of our recent activities to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in NY, NJ, PA and DE. – MARquee News Highlights

Are your DOCLINE staff ready? – DOCLINE Talkline

NLM Releases New “About MedlinePlus” Website Information – Newsbits from PSR

National Rural Health Day – Mental Health – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

NLM/NIH News

Saluting All Veterans with a Salute to my Father, Thomas Michael Flatley – In honor of Veteran’s day, Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan talks about her father, and the strong link between NLM and the uniformed services. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

How Measles Leave the Body Prone to Future Infections – With the big push to get kids vaccinated, you’ve probably heard about some of the very serious complications of measles: hearing-threatening ear infections, bronchitis, laryngitis, and even life-threatening forms of pneumonia and encephalitis. But now comes word of yet another way in which the measles can be devastating—one that may also have long-term consequences for a person’s health. – NIH Director’s Blog

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted a new asynchronous online course that defines and describes Continuity of Operations (COOP) planning and why it is important for libraries to have a continuity plan.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

November 2019

Registration closing soon! Thinking Outside the PubMed Box – November 18, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Do you develop or support wellness programming at your library or help patrons find health information? Do you support health sciences instructors or students at a school, college, or university? Are you familiar with PubMed, but curious if there are other resources out there that might be better suited to your patron audience? Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will introduce you to a range of trustworthy and freely available online health information resources developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Awareness of these resources will help you “think outside the PubMed box” when assisting patrons or developing programming, allowing you to better tailor your resource usage and recommendations to particular contexts.

Celebrate Native American Heritage Month: What’s New Since 1492? – November 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) in observing Native American Heritage Month with a presentation by Eugene Fracek, member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota and a cultural ambassador who teaches people of all ages about American Indian Tribes. In this one-hour webinar, Mr. Fracek will present an overview and perspective of the history, cultural values and behaviors, and legal issues impacting American Indian Tribes and members of those Tribes.

The New PubMed – November 20, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join the New England Region (NER) for the next installment of NNLM Resource Picks, our collaborative, bimonthly, webcast series featuring the National Library of Medicine resources. This session will preview the new, modern PubMed with its updated features including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You’ll also learn about the reasons for the change and how this new improved Pub Med will make mobile searching easier.

How Public Health Can Learn From and Inform the Precision Medicine All of Us Research Program – November 21, 9:00-10:30 AM ET – The National Institute of Health (NIH)-led All of Us research program aims to enroll over one million people in the U.S. in a research cohort to improve understanding of how individual differences in lifestyle, socioeconomics, environment, and biology affect health outcomes. Recruiting a diverse research cohort is key to ensuring that findings will be broadly applicable, and All of Us strives to include participants from groups historically underrepresented in biomedical research. Join the Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Office of Science, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for this presentation to learn more about the All of Us research program, better understand how the approaches used to recruit All of Us participants can inform future public health efforts to address diversity, and share your expertise in increasing diverse participation in your own public health work.

From the Mountains to the Sea: Rural Health Issues and Resources – November 21, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from higher incidence of chronic illness, they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. Sponsored by the New England Region (NER), this session will describe hallmarks of rural America, identifying access challenges of living in rural communities and equipping participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities. After completing an assignment, participants are eligible for 2 MLA CE.

PubMed for Librarians: Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) – November 22, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – Attend this webinar with the NNLM Training Office (NTO) to learn how PubMed uses ATM to map your keyword searches to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn how ATM lets you search PubMed effectively with keywords. This class will also look at the automatic explosion feature, what is and isn’t included in Search Details, and explore how to search for phrases in PubMed.

December 2019

Astronaut Health: Health Information Resources to Support Science Education – December 5, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Public and school libraries throughout the nation have been celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing this year with the reading theme “A Universe of Stories”. Join the South Central Region (SCR) for this class that will walk through various resources from NLM, NIH, and NASA, as well as wonderful communities of practice that are ready to help you continue to incorporate science and health programming into the library. Learn about partnerships and programs that took place this year for the Summer of Space, and get ready to explore where space and health resources collide!

Engaging Parents and Caregivers in Substance Use Disorder Prevention and Recovery – December 5, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join this webinar with the New England Region (NER) and guest presenter Fred Muench, PhD, President of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. Fred will present on family-based interventions to engage parents and caregivers, as well as data on the resources the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids offers for families addressing every aspect of substance use and addiction, from prevention to recovery.

Data Visualization: Theory to Practice – December 6, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Join the South Central Region (SCR) to take data visualization instruction to the next level and start creating your own visualizations. This webinar will consist of an overview of data visualization, a discussion of ethical considerations to take when creating visualizations, and a demonstration of a free, in-browser data visualization tool that you can start using immediately.

More Than a Bandage: Health Information Resources for K-12 Professionals – December 10, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course is an introduction to free health information and educational resources for K-12 professionals provided by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other trusted organizations. Participants will learn about consumer health sites with an emphasis on MedlinePlus, covering general health resources, drug information, multi-cultural and multi-language resources, career/professional resources, and youth heath issues.

Substance Use Disorder and Heredity: It’s a Family Disease – December 10, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join the New England Region (NER) for a special webinar that explores the many facets of substance use disorders in teens, through a candid interview with a Recovery High School student, her father, and her grandmother. Participants will learn about the roles of genetic predisposition and choice in the disease of addiction, and become familiar with quality information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other partners.

Staying Healthy Abroad – December 11, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Are you preparing for holiday travel? Has winter inspired you to get out and see the world? Maybe you have questions about what vaccines are required. Perhaps you and your travel companions have preconceived ideas regarding travel, especially when it comes to international trips. Sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR), this webinar will discuss a number of strategies by which to reduce risk to a minimum.

Online Privacy 101 – December 18, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) for an introduction to online privacy in the digital age. We live in an era of data breaches and constant surveillance. Learn how to keep your data safe, consider the risks versus rewards of common internet browsing behavior, and navigate best practices for public computer labs, mobile phones, and personal browsing.

New classes on-demand! Looking for more self-paced learning opportunities? Check out In Case of Emergencies: Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planning. This asynchronous online course defines and describes COOP planning, why it is important for libraries to have a continuity plan, and provides a one-page COOP plan template with instructions that librarians or information specialists can use to develop their own plan. This course fulfills one of the requirements of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Disaster Information Specialization, and provides four MLA continuing education (CE) credits.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Posting: Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services, Stony Brook University Libraries, Stony Brook, NY

New course on health insurance enrollment added to PLA’s DigitalLearn website – In coordination with Affordable Care Act (ACA) Open Enrollment for 2020, which runs November 1–December 15, 2019, the Public Library Association (PLA) has released a new online tutorial to help consumers sign up for health insurance. This 18-minute online tutorial explores the processes of determining eligibility, preparing to enroll, creating an account, and finding local help to successfully enroll in an ACA health insurance plan.

Maize Day: The day after Thanksgiving is recognized annually as Maize Day and celebrates the traditional role of corn in Native American cultures. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, corn is low in phosphorus which can help protect your bones and blood vessels. After the holidays, incorporate some corn and other ingredients to help you and your family get back on track to living active and healthy. Try vegetables such as squash, beans, mushrooms, persimmons, and asparagus. For more ways to enjoy corn, visit the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website.

General Information on New EFTS by MLA – The Medical Library Association (MLA) has developed the specifications of a new Electronic Funds Transfer System (EFTS) platform. If your institution relies on the current version of EFTS, operated by the University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), learn more about how this change may impact service through 2020. MLA will proceed with actual development and implementation of a new EFTS if a minimum of 750 users sign up for the new platform by January 10, 2020.

Beyond PRISMA– Health Research Reporting Guidelines: Your new secret weapon! – November 18, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – How often have you been asked for guidance from a medical student or resident who wants to submit a case study to a journal? Maybe a systematic review team member has asked for help with a data extraction form? Or you’ve been asked to lead journal club—now what? Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) with support from the NNLM South Central Region (SCR), this webinar will take you beyond PRISMA by introducing you to the family of health research reporting guidelines, and discuss the ways in which they can be used for more than just reporting. This class will also examine study execution assessment tools.

Reimagined In America: What Can the World Teach Us About Building a Culture of Health? – November 21, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – Join the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for the next installment in this webinar series that will discuss how people can tackle social isolation and strengthen social connectedness in their communities, inspired by ideas from around the world. You can also browse the webinar archive to watch recordings of other sessions in this series.

Developing Health Literacy Skills in Youth: A Workshop – Presented by the National Academy of Sciences, the Roundtable on Health Literacy will convene on November 19 for a public workshop to discuss the necessity of developing health literacy skills in youth, examine the research on developmentally appropriate health literacy milestones and transitions and measuring health literacy in youth, learn from programs and policies that represent best practices for developing health literacy skills in youth, and explore potential collaborations across disciplines for developing health literacy skills in youth. Register to attend this event in person or via live webcast!

Hospital Libraries Section (HLS)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Professional Development Grant – Whether you are in the middle of your career, new to it all, or have worked for many years, the HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant is an opportunity for an amazing professional journey into education or research. The grant is open to librarians working in a hospital, health system or similar clinical settings. Grant funds can be used for professional development through MEDLIB-ED or to help attend the MLA Annual Meeting or CE courses. It may also be used to support reimbursement for expenses incurred in conducting research such as a statistician to help with survey design, analyses etc. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2019.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 15, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-11-15 09:56

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars November 18 – November 20

Webinars November 21 – December 3

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Rural Health Day – Mental Health

PNR Dragonfly - Fri, 2019-11-15 06:42

The National Organization of State Offices of Rural created National Rural Health Day to celebrate the ongoing efforts and contributions of rural healthcare workers and organizations who work tirelessly to address the unique challenges in accessing and delivering health care services in rural communities. National Rural Health Day is observed each year on the third Thursday of November which is November 21 in 2019.

farm and rolling hills

For those living in less populated areas, keeping healthy can be a challenge due to a number of factors.  Fewer healthcare providers live and work in rural areas requiring longer trips to visit a dentist or doctor to obtain basic services such as checkups, preventative testing, and prescriptions. Living in more remote areas often means fewer specialty services if any are available. Close knit communities may make it difficult to seek care when it comes to more stigmatized health issues such as substance misuse, sexually transmitted diseases, birth control, and mental health.

Mental health is a topic of great concern in many rural communities. It can be especially difficult for those suffering from depression, anxiety, and other conditions. Smaller communities can be a great source of strength and support when it comes to the flu, a broken arm, or hip surgery. But, with a diagnoses of bipolar, schizophrenia, or anxiety, it can be isolating. Some of this is due to lack of knowledge about mental health, stigma, and awareness.

Want to help and learn more? Events and resources are provided below.

The Rural Health Information Hub offers 2 health toolkits which contain resources and information to develop and implement programs on mental health and suicide prevention.

Participate in a Mental Health First Aid course to gain skills and understanding to provide help and support.

The Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) is providing several events to help organizations to address rural health including mental health:

  • Agriculture Workers Mental Health Twitter Chat
    Tuesday, November 19 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PT
    Join by using the hashtag #AgMentalHealth
  • Rural Suicide Prevention in Farm and Ranch Communities, webinar
    Tuesday, November 19 from 12:30 – 1:45 p.m. PT
    Join the webinar
    Dial-In: 888-989-7695; Participant Passcode: 6473800

More complete information is on the HRSA website.

Categories: RML Blogs

Next NNLM RDM Webinar on December 6: Data Visualization

PSR News - Thu, 2019-11-14 18:15

Register for the next session of the NNLM Research Data Management (RDM) Webinar Series on December 6, 10:00-11:00 AM PST, Data Visualization: Theory to Practice. The NNLM RDM webinar series is a collaborative, bimonthly series intended to increase awareness of RDM topics and resources. The series aims to support RDM within the library to better serve librarians and their institutional communities. Topics include, but are not limited to, understanding a library’s role in RDM, getting started, data management planning, and different RDM tools.

Description: This presentation will take data visualization instruction to the next level for you to start creating your own visualizations. This webinar will consist of an overview of data visualization, a discussion of ethical considerations to take when creating visualizations, and a demonstration of a free, in-browser data visualization tool that you can start using immediately.

Presenter: Negeen Aghassibake is the Data Visualization Librarian at the University of Washington Libraries under the Assessment and Planning department.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Training: In Case of Emergencies: Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planning

SEA News - Thu, 2019-11-14 13:46

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce a new online course “In Case of Emergencies: Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planning.” This asynchronous online course defines and describes COOP planning and why it is important for libraries to have a continuity plan. This course also provides a one-page COOP plan template with instructions that librarians or information specialists can use to develop their own plan.

This self-paced course fulfills one of the requirements of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Disaster Information Specialization, and provides four MLA continuing education (CE) credits.

This course was developed by Dan Wilson, Associate Director for Collections & Library Services / School of Nursing Librarian, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia. Dan is the former coordinator for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Emergency Preparedness Initiative.

Review the NLM Disaster Information Management (DIMRC) Training Course page to see a list of free online courses, and to learn how you can earn the MLA Disaster Information Specialist certificate.

Take the course here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/dis_courses/coop/

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH Issues Request for Public Comment on Draft Data Management and Sharing Policy

PSR News - Wed, 2019-11-13 16:11

The NIH has released a Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and supplemental draft guidance for public comment. The purpose of this draft policy and supplemental draft guidance is to promote effective and efficient data management and sharing that furthers NIH’s commitment to making the results and accomplishments of the research it funds and conducts available to the public. Complete information about the draft Policy and draft supplemental guidance can be found on the NIH Office of Science Policy (OSP) website. Stakeholder feedback is essential to ensure that any future policy maximizes responsible data sharing, minimizes burden on researchers, and protects the privacy of research participants. Stakeholders are invited to comment on any aspect of the draft policy, the supplemental draft guidance, or any other considerations relevant to NIH’s data management and sharing policy efforts that NIH should consider.

NIH has established a web portal to facilitate commenting. Comments must be received no later than January 10, 2020. For additional details about NIH’s thinking on this issue, visit Dr. Carrie Wolinetz’ latest Under the Poliscope blog post, “NIH’s DRAFT Data Management and Sharing Policy: We Need to Hear From You!” NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the draft policy in the near future. Details will be available soon.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Releases New “About MedlinePlus” Website Information

PSR News - Wed, 2019-11-13 15:14

The information about MedlinePlus on the website has been expanded and updated, with the following highlights:

To streamline this area of MedlinePlus, the FAQs, awards and recognition page, milestones page, bibliography, and MedlinePlus tour have been discontinued. When applicable, these links have been redirected to related content on MedlinePlus. As always, feedback is welcome. Use the “Customer Support” button at the top of any page to submit a comment or question.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Libraries as Partners in Health: Memphis Public Library

SEA News - Wed, 2019-11-13 11:16

Date: Tuesday December 3, 2019

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM ET

Description 

All of Us in Memphis is a two-year initiative focused on increasing the health literacy of the Greater Memphis community by providing educational programs and resources through the Memphis Public Library.  The All of Us project team developed a framework to increase health literacy which included building the capacity of the library staff to provide health information services, augmenting health programming and establishing health information kiosks.

After attending this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss ways to increase health literacy in their communities through programming and partnerships
  • Identify health-related program ideas & best practices

Presenter

Andrea Jacobo is the project coordinator for the All of Us in Memphis initiative with the Memphis Library Foundation and public library system. Since 2018, she has been organizing, planning, and implementing programs and resources to improve health literacy among patrons of the Memphis Public Library. Andrea is currently a Doctor of Public Health student at the University of California. She earned a bachelor in exercise physiology from the University of Miami and a Master’s of Public Health from the University of Memphis. Before joining UC Berkeley, Andrea worked in Memphis for five years where she focused on building a healthier, vibrant community via interdisciplinary collaboration, increasing food access, and addressing the root causes of health disparities through policy, systems, and environment.

Registration is free and can be accessed at: https://nnlm.gov/class/libraries-partners-health-memphis-public-library/19580

For additional information, please contact April Wright.

Categories: RML Blogs

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