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RML Blogs

NNLM Reading Club: Inherited Disease

NER News - Wed, 2020-12-02 07:57

We inherit many things from the people who went before us – our physical characteristics, aspects of our personality and, sometimes, our health. December’s Reading Club selections discuss inherited diseases, focusing specifically on cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell disease, and cancer caused by the BRCA mutation.

In Resurrection Lily, Amy Byer Shainman discusses her experiences after learning that she inherited a BRCA gene mutation that put her at high risk of developing certain cancers. She struggles with preventively removing her breasts even when she does not have a breast cancer diagnosis. The late Mallory Smith tells how she faced the daily challenges of cystic fibrosis in a diary she left behind in hope of aiding others who live with the disease in Salt in My Soul: An Unfinished Life.  In A Sick Life: TLC ‘n Me: Stories from On and Off the Stage, singer Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins recounts her experiences as a member of the all-time best-selling American female music group and as a person with a particularly challenging form of sickle-cell disease.

Perhaps you know someone facing one of these illnesses or another inherited disease. Perhaps you would just like to know more about what it is like to deal with such illnesses. Either way, each of these books will provide you with a first-hand account.

To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Inherited Diseases page.

The post NNLM Reading Club: Inherited Disease first appeared on NER Update.

Categories: RML Blogs

Celebrate Citizen Science All Year-round

MCR News - Tue, 2020-12-01 20:18

Margie Sheppard – Technology Coordinator

Citizen Science joins the general public with the scientific community in creating a collaborative relationship to increase scientific knowledge.  All kinds of people can take part in citizen science projects by collecting and sharing data.  The possibilities are endless, and the contributions are immense!

NLM and NIH have made Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science (CCS) a priority area for NNLM.  Using citizen science and crowdsourcing as a vehicle, NNLM can involve communities in societal needs and accelerating biomedical science, technology, and innovation.  In 2019, NNLM and SciStarter joined forces to promote Citizen Science in libraries with a goal of increasing awareness of citizen science in communities across the U.S. and to help people understand how the environment affects their health.

In 2020, the daylong event was expanded to a monthlong celebration!  Citizen Science Month is celebrated annually in April to bring attention to the exciting and fascinating work members of the public are doing to advance scientific research.  Projects range from simple to complex, big or small, done inside or out, engage technology or not! COVID-19 has altered some of the ways people take part in some projects, but many activities can be done from the comfort of home.  The good news is you don’t need to wait for April to get started.  Take time to explore the possibilities as we settle into the winter months.

Need some inspiration and ideas?  Check out these places:

Start with the SciStarter/NLM partner gateway.  You can find a variety of projects that help scientist answer questions about human and environmental health. SciStarter/NLM.

Contribute to science by connecting to iNaturalist.  Record your observations, share with fellow naturalists and discuss what you found.  Every observation can contribute to biodiversity science! iNaturalist

Browse and join hundreds of projects on any topic at Zooniverse.org/projects.

Join the Christmas Bird Count! For information on how to take part go to Audubon’s 121st Christmas Bird Count.

Take advantage of the winter months participate in citizen science.  This is an opportunity to participate in science and advance actual research.  Go to the NNLM Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science website to learn more!

The post Celebrate Citizen Science All Year-round first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

December’s NNLM Reading Club: Inherited Diseases

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-12-01 18:38

We inherit many things from the people who went before us – our physical characteristics, aspects of our personality and, sometimes, our health. December’s Reading Club selections discuss inherited diseases, focusing specifically on cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell disease, and cancer caused by the BRCA mutation.

Resurrection Lily by Amy Byer Shainman l Salt in My Soul by Mallory Smith l A Sick Life by Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Resurrection Lily, Amy Byer Shainman discusses her experiences after learning that she inherited a BRCA gene mutation that put her at high risk of developing certain cancers. She struggles with preventively removing her breasts even when she does not have a breast cancer diagnosis. The late Mallory Smith tells how she faced the daily challenges of cystic fibrosis in a diary she left behind in hope of aiding others who live with the disease in Salt in My Soul: An Unfinished Life.  In A Sick Life: TLC ‘n Me: Stories from On and Off the Stage, singer Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins recounts her experiences as a member of the all-time best-selling American female music group and as a person with a particularly challenging form of sickle-cell disease.

Perhaps you know someone facing one of these illnesses or another inherited disease. Perhaps you would just like to know more about what it is like to deal with such illnesses. Either way, each of these books will provide you with a first-hand account.

To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Inherited Diseases page.

The post December's NNLM Reading Club: Inherited Diseases first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: December 1, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-12-01 10:55

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Call for Washington Artists: Seattle Traffic Box Community Connector
The All of Us Research Program is holding a call for artists’ designs to transform select traffic signal and utility cabinets in Seattle, Washington. The designs should be reflective of the program’s core values to promote diversity and inclusion in health research and represent the local community. Designs should reflect the project theme: A Healthy Future for All of Us and the diversity of the Seattle community…learn more about this opportunity on the blog

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

Library Carpentry Workshop: The NNLM Training Office is pleased to announce a new opportunity for information professionals to build data skills through online Library Carpentry workshops, at no cost to participants. 5 workshops will be offered October through January. This course is eligible for 20 continuing education credits through the Medical Library Association. Applications and more information available here. Questions can be directed to nto@utah.edu

Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions: NLM Traveling Exhibitions are a unique way to connect your patrons to valuable NLM health information resources through related public programming. To support you and your communities when your libraries borrow NLM exhibitions, the Exhibition Program is developing sample programming ideas related to individual exhibition topics. These ideas will help jump start your creative planning. Julie Botnick will discuss how those ideas can be adapted to your situations and ways to develop your own unique programming at this NNLM Resource Picks webinar session. December 2 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

DOCLINE for Health Sciences Libraries: DOCLINE is an integral part of interlibrary loan services in Health Sciences Libraries. Journal Holdings, Library Profiles, and Routing Tables guide all DOCLINE requests. In this webinar, NDCO Coordinator Erin Latta will review current best practices for maintaining your Journal Holdings, Library Profiles and Routing Tables. This webinar will include how experienced librarians participate in the FreeShare Library Group, and how they utilize the Electronic Fund Transfer System (EFTS) for borrowing costs. December 8 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications: This class is an introductory, asynchronous online bioinformatics course for librarians using the Moodle learning management system. It is a 14-week, self-paced course worth 30 hours of CE credit from the Medical Library Association. This course was designed both for librarians who offer, or intend to offer, bioinformatics services; and also for librarians who use gene or protein information on a periodic or irregular basis to serve their patrons. January 4 – April 9, 2021. (30 MLA CE) Register

*The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuff: As public health has taken the world stage during a global pandemic, the future of public health is both clear and unclear. How does COVID-19 relate to factors that impact health and future health? How do we apply lessons learned? What are the key roles of nature and mental health, in this pandemic and beyond? How can we cross sectors for change? This session will explore these questions and more. December 15 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

PubMed Tips for Expert Searchers: This 2-hour webinar covers advanced features and concepts in PubMed that can assist you in developing effective search strategies. This course is intended for those with at least an intermediate knowledge of PubMed and MeSH. This class does not cover how to perform a systematic literature review. January 27, 2021 from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PT. (2 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

World AIDS Day 2020 event – Science and Community: Working Together to Prepare for the Unexpected: Join this NIH event which will promote community engagement and emphasize the importance of building the capacity of current and future generations of HIV researchers and advocates. It will reflect on lessons learned from HIV that have prepared us to address unexpected events. December 1 from 8:00 – 9:30 a.m. PT. Learn how to join this free live videocast event

Using the new Read assembly and Annotation Pipeline Tool (RAPT) to assemble and annotate microbial genomes: Join this NCBI webinar to learn how to use the Read assembly and Annotation Pipeline Tool (RAPT). With RAPT, you can assemble and annotate a microbial genome right out of the sequencing machine! Provide the short genomic reads or an SRA run on input, and get back the sequence annotated with coding and protein coding genes. The assembly is built with SKESA and annotated with PGAP. In addition, RAPT also verifies the taxonomic assignment of the genome with the Average Nucleotide Identity tool. In this webinar, you will learn how you can run RAPT on your own machine or on the Google Cloud Platform. December 2 from 9:00 – 9:45 a.m. PT. Register

 All Health Is Not Created Equal: Where You Live Matters: Dr. Shannon Zenk, Director of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), NIH, will deliver the 2020 Stephen E. Straus Distinguished Lecture in the Science of Complementary Therapies. She will explore the science behind social determinants of health and demonstrate how vital effective integrative or multilevel approaches are when addressing health and health inequities. Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, and otherwise spend their time. They affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Join this free live NIH webcast December 9 at 9:00 a.m. PT.

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“One NLM: I Am Thankful for How Far We Have Come!”, from the NLM Director’s blog

MedlinePlus has a Social Media Toolkit

The National Library of Medicine announced the 2021 solicitation of proposals from organizations and libraries to design and conduct projects that will improve access to HIV/AIDS related health information for patients, the affected community, and their caregivers. Application deadline is December 28

Dianne Babski Appointed Associate Director for Library Operations, National Library of Medicine

Rise, Serve, Lead… And Publish

Collaborations: Organizations Working with NLM on Disaster Information

*”Vast Majority of Pregnant Women with COVID-19 Won’t Have Complications, Study Finds”, from the NIH Director’s blog

Promising Interim Results from Clinical Trial of NIH-Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

Where We Live Affects our Health and Offers an Approach To Address Health Inequities

The Impact of Cloud on Biomedical Research, Researchers share their experience leveraging the STRIDES Initiative to access industry-leading cloud resources

New NIH BRAIN Initiative awards move toward solving brain disorders

NIH to fund research of racial disparities in pregnancy-related complications and deaths

Using Mobile Technology to Improve Care for Teens with Depression

Neighborhood conditions associated with children’s cognitive function

*Request for Information (RFI): Inviting Comments and Suggestions on the NIH-Wide Strategic Plan for COVID-19 Research, deadline is December 7, 2020

Employment Opportunity, Assistant Director, Regional Medical Library at UW

FYI:

December 1, World AIDS Day #WorldAIDSDay
The theme for the 2020 observance is “Ending the HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Resilience and Impact” (“Erradicar la epidemia del VIH/SIDA: Resiliencia e Impacto”). World AIDS Day was first observed in 1988. Each year, organizations and individuals across the world bring attention to the HIV epidemic, endeavor to increase HIV awareness and knowledge, speak out against HIV stigma, and call for an increased response to move toward Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America. On December 1st at 11:00 a.m. PT, join the Live with Leadership World AIDS Day Edition with Harold Phillips, and other federal and community speakers. Learn how submit questions in advance or during the conversation.

HealthCare.gov 2021 Open Enrollment
Open enrollment has begun at the Health Insurance Marketplace. Keep, update or find a new healthcare plan for 2021. The Marketplace website provides information on finding local help with your options and application, special enrollment periods or situations, how to use your coverage and more. The Marketplace website is available in English and Spanish. Deadline is December 15.

*Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Frequently Asked Questions – Federal Office of Rural Health Policy
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) FORHP has compiled a Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Frequently Asked Questions. The FAQ includes information on the Rural Health Clinic COVID-19 Testing Program, funding and grants management, telehealth, travel and healthcare delivery and policy information.

*How are vaccines developed?
Vaccines contain tiny fragments of the disease-causing organism or the blueprints for making the tiny fragments. They also contain other ingredients to keep the vaccine safe and effective. These latter ingredients are included in most vaccines and have been used for decades in billions of doses of vaccine. Learn more about the development of vaccines from the World Health Organization.

Telehealth may worsen digital divide for people with disabilities
A recently published paper, in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, argues that design, implementation and policy considerations must be taken into account when developing virtual care technology.

*REALM Test 6 results
The REALM project has published the results of the sixth round of Battelle’s laboratory testing for COVID-19  on five materials commonly found in furnishings and exhibits of archives, libraries, and museums, were selected. The materials were proved by the National Park Service, Metropolitan New York Library Council, the Library of Congress and from vendors.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: December 1, 2020 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar: NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions

MCR News - Mon, 2020-11-30 19:59

NLM Traveling Exhibitions are a unique way to connect your patrons to valuable NLM health information resources through related public programming. To support you and your communities when your libraries borrow NLM exhibitions, the Exhibition Program is developing sample programming ideas related to individual exhibition topics. These ideas will help jump start your creative planning. Julie Botnick will discuss how those ideas can be adapted to your situations and ways to develop your own unique programming.

These programming ideas are at the heart of the new application process for NLM Traveling Exhibitions. Jill Newmark will guide participants through the logistics of preparing strong applications.

Wednesday, Dec. 2nd 1 MT/2 CT

Registration

The post Webinar: NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

World AIDS Day and New HIV/AIDS Info Outreach Funding Opportunity

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2020-11-30 16:13
Recognizing World AIDS Day

30 PM Eastern Time. There is an image of a crowd of people on the right, standing in the shape of the continents. A red ribbon is overlaid with the words World AIDS Day 2020 written on it.Since 1988, December 1st has been recognized as World AIDS Day in recognition of the global epidemic and a call to action to improve the response against HIV/AIDS. In 2018, almost 38,000 individuals in the United States were diagnosed with HIV, which can eventually develop into AIDS. The number of new diagnoses has also increased over the years, making this a great concern for communities, policy makers, and health professionals (CDC). Nearly all institutes and centers at the National Institutes of Health conduct and support research on HIV/AIDS in an effort to improve human health and quality of life. This year’s theme for World AIDS Day is Resilience and Impact (HIV.gov).

In observance of this day, NIH’s Office of AIDS Research is hosting an event titled, Science and Community: Working Together to Prepare for the Unexpected (Event Link). Leaders in HIV/AIDS research and policy will gather virtually to discuss community engagement and capacity building to sustain the future of AIDS researchers and advocates. The event is 8a-9:30a PT on December 1st, at no cost: https://www.oar.nih.gov/news-and-events/meetings-events/world-aids-day-2020

New HIV/AIDS Info Outreach Funding Opportunity

The HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Program (ACIOP), sponsored by NLM and Oak Ridge Associated Universities, recently announced its Requests for Proposals for the 2021 funding cycle.

NLM recognizes that people and communities benefit from having access to quality, accurate information about HIV/AIDS, especially as new treatment and management methods evolve with new research. According to the award announcement, “ACIOP is a competitive awards program offered to community-based organizations and libraries to improve HIV/AIDS health information access, with a focus on NIH/HHS resources.” Submitted projects must address at least one of these areas:

  • Information Retrieval
  • Skills Development
  • Resource Development and Dissemination
  • PrEP Navigator Resource Development and Dissemination

For more information and application materials about the funding opportunity, please refer to the Request for Proposals page. Deadline for proposal submission is December 28, 2020 at 11AM PT/2PM ET.

Additional HIV/AIDS Information Resources

CDC: HIV Basics

HIV.gov

Clinical Info: Interim Guidance for COVID-19 and Persons with HIV

NIH Office of AIDS Research

MedlinePlus: HIV/AIDS

MedlinePlus: Screening and Diagnosis for HIV

NNLM HIV/AIDS Coordination Center

NIAID: HIV/AIDS

The post World AIDS Day and New HIV/AIDS Info Outreach Funding Opportunity first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Join the NNLM in December for Two New Data Literacy Webinars!

SEA News - Mon, 2020-11-30 15:48
Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization

Description: Data visualization design “best practices” often do not prioritize (or outright reject) efforts to be inclusive. Libraries have an opportunity to step into the world of data visualization and empower historically marginalized voices in data creation and sharing. This webinar will explore the intersections of equity, inclusion, accessibility, and data visualization to consider who we’re visualizing for, what we’re visualizing, and how and why we’re visualizing it.

Presenter: Negeen Aghassibake is the Data Visualization Librarian at the University of Washington Libraries. Her goal is to help researchers think critically about data visualization and how it might play a role in their work. Before coming to UW, Negeen was a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin School of Information, where she worked as an Assessment Graduate Research Assistant at UT Libraries. She holds a BA in Historical Studies and Literary Studies from the University of Texas at Dallas.

Date: Thursday, December 10th, 11 PT/Noon MT/1 CT/2 E

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/better-best-practices-inclusive-data-visualization/28122

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How to “Speak Data”: Librarians as Public Data Ambassadors

Description: Data has become central to many aspects of civic life – governments run open data portals, organizations release public datasets, newspapers publish data-driven stories. How can librarians navigate this all more effectively? How can you help library patrons learn to use what they find in these data resources? Librarians can play an impactful role as “data ambassadors”, assisting their communities in finding and using data as part of their life as citizens. Join Prof. Bhargava for an interactive virtual workshop that will introduce participatory approaches to building your ability to “speak data”. You’ll leave the session with more confidence in your own ability to work with data, a language for talking about the role data can play in civic engagement, and experience with playful activities you can run yourself to build data literacy with your colleagues or patrons.

Speaker: Rahul Bhargava leads hands-on data workshops around the world. His Data Therapy workshops have been bringing people together around data with engaging activities for over 10 years. Rahul is co-creator of the Data Culture Project, which helps individuals and organizations build their data capacity in creative ways. He combines a background in interactive robotics, education, and effective data presentation to build creative and playful activities that introduce data literacy in appropriate ways to a variety of audiences. Rahul is an Assistant Professor in Journalism and Art + Design at Northeastern University, where he leads the Data Culture Group. He is an educator, technologist, drummer, and father. Twitter: @rahulbot

Date: Tuesday, December 15th , 11 PT/ 12 MT/ 1 CT/ 2 ET

Register: https://nnlm.gov/how-to-speak-data

Learn more about the Data Culture Group: https://medium.com/data-culture-group/librarians-as-civic-data-ambassadors-407fc9fd608

The post Join the NNLM in December for Two New Data Literacy Webinars! first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

Project Showcase: Adaptive Cycling

NER News - Mon, 2020-11-30 11:31

In, its quest to continue providing adaptive recreation programs in the Blackstone River Valley, the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor (BRVNHC) has acquired a state-of-the-art, electric-assist wheelchair bicycle. A grant received from the Network of the National Library of Medicine, New England Region (NNLM,) provided the funds to purchase a Van Raam OPair bicycle from Bike-On of Warwick, RI. BRVNHC is partnering with All Out Adventures of Northampton, MA, who will be caretakers of the bike, to offer adaptive cycling to people with mobility impairments and their caregivers in the Blackstone River Valley.

On November 23, all four organizations met at the Blackstone River Valley Heritage Center in Worcester, MA, so that Bike-On could deliver the equipment. A special test ride was arranged with Susan Halpin, Education and Outreach Coordinator at NNLM, and her mother, Ellie Guild.

“Being involved with the “Opening Doors to the Outdoors” grant awarded to the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor has been rewarding both personally and professionally for me,” Halpin shared. “I have always thought that social connection was important to overall good health. With COVID-19, the importance of being connected has become very apparent to me because I am missing that connection to my family, friends and community. Those around us with physical and intellectual challenges experience the isolation many of us are feeling currently, all the time.”

According to Halpin, programs such as Opening Doors to the Outdoors and organizations like the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, All Out Adventures, and Bike-On, are addressing the need for inclusivity and for connection through opportunities that adaptive bicycles like the OPair provide. “In my experience, it’s not only the participants who receive those health benefits,” Halpin added. “Those who volunteer to make these events happen come away grateful for the opportunity to be involved. Giving my Mom a test ride on this new bike certainly showed that to me! Gratitude is essential to good health.”

Since 2017, BRVNHC has partnered with All Out Adventures to offer adaptive exercise programs in the Blackstone River Valley including adaptive cycling and adaptive kayaking. In 2019, adaptive kayaking events were made possible through a grant received from NNLM. Earlier this year, BRVNHC received an additional grant from NNLM to offer a series of adaptive cycling programs in partnership with All Out Adventures, but due to COVID-19 restrictions, those events could not be held. Instead, funds were used to acquire an adaptive bicycle that would provide additional programing opportunity in the spring of 2021.

“This bike will open doors and break down barriers, and we are thrilled to be able to use it in our programs,” noted Karen Foster, executive director of All Out Adventures. “At All Out Adventures we see time and again how providing access to outdoor recreation for people of all abilities has the power to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. The OPair Wheelchair Tandem will help us to extend the opportunity to participate in cycling to people with mobility impairments and their caregivers.”

The post Project Showcase: Adaptive Cycling first appeared on NER Update.

Categories: RML Blogs

RDM Snippets: Working with Data

NER News - Mon, 2020-11-30 08:04

Now that we’ve gone over the basics of research data management, here is a roundup of tools you can use for working with data, or tools you can teach to researchers to help them better manage their data. Some of these might be familiar to you, but we hope this will be helpful to have them listed in one place, or that you might discover something new to you.

Tools for working with data can encompass a wide variety of skills and applications. Some are very user friendly, and some require more of a learning curve. The great thing is that there are lots of ways to learn these tools, from online training, or to in-person workshops when gatherings are able to resume.

Openrefine is a “free, open source, powerful tool for working with messy data “. This browser-based tool is great for cleaning up spreadsheets and organizing messy data sets. OpenRefine allows you to explore your data sets by easily sorting them, as well as cleaning, transforming, reconciling, and matching data. Now it’s easy to make sure all your terms are matched and spelled correctly, empty rows can be deleted quickly, and different types cells can be merged together. OpenRefine offers free training videos and resources through their website and has a robust support community.

Jupyter Notebook is an “open-source web application that allows you to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations and narrative text. Uses include: data cleaning and transformation, numerical simulation, statistical modeling, data visualization, machine learning, and much more.” Jupyter’s strength lies in the ability to integrate many different types of data in one place, and to run live code and other tools all contained in one “notebook”. Like with OpenRefine, Jupyter has a robust community of users and support documentation.

Tableau is a data visualization tool that allows you to create dynamic data analysis. The tool is easy to learn but offers many levels of data analysis, and has versions of its software from basic users up to industry. Tableau was originally free, but now offers different subscription levels for their tools. It is still mentioned here even though it is no longer free since it is a commonly used tool and very powerful.

Coding in different software languages has become a vital part of the data analysis process, and many librarians are learning to code to work with their own data, or to help teach researchers how to use these tools. Some of the most common languages being currently being used by researchers are R and Python.

Information about R can be found here and Python information is here. In addition to the resources on the code developers’ websites, many places offer free lessons to learn these coding languages and how to use them to automate tasks or perform research analysis.

Automate the Boring Stuff has a free copy of a Python lesson book. Other free online platforms such as CodeAcademy offer lessons in many different coding languages.

Once you have learned how to code and used it for your research analysis, a code sharing site like CodeOcean is a great place to share code so others can use it. CodeOcean says “Our cloud-based platform lowers the barriers for researchers to follow best practices of reproducibility. Researchers’ work is stored in compute capsules, preserving work for reuse today, tomorrow, or next year.” Code can be run live online, and you are able to use this platform for sharing with journal publishers and other resources.

In addition to the free online resources for all of the tools mentioned in this post, workshops through The Carpentries offer workshops on many of these programs and code languages. Typically the Carpentries workshops are held in-person, but many are now starting offer online workshops as well. If you are in the New England region, check out NESCLiChttps://nesclic.github.io/, The New England Software Carpentry Library Consortium, for local events and resources.

We hope this RDM Snippets series has been useful and informative! Stay tuned for more informative blog posts and other content on this page in the new year.

The post RDM Snippets: Working with Data first appeared on NER Update.

Categories: RML Blogs

Call for Washington Artists: Seattle Traffic Box Community Connector

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2020-11-25 14:32

The All of Us Research Program is holding a call for artists’ designs to transform select traffic signal and utility cabinets in Seattle, Washington. The designs should be reflective of the program’s core values to promote diversity and inclusion in health research and represent the local community. Designs should reflect the project theme: A Healthy Future for All of Us and the diversity of the Seattle community.

 

The project aims to drive awareness and education about All of Us and boost enrollment in communities historically underrepresented in biomedical research. This project utilizes public art to celebrate community diversity and enhance the visual landscape. Artists designs will be printed on vinyl and installed on locally-maintained signal box cabinets in high-traffic areas. In addition, each traffic box will contain a prominently placed QR code that engages passersby in an augmented reality experience introducing the program’s values and goals.

Deadline: December 18, 2020 5:00pm Eastern Time

For more information and submission guidelines, click here.

The post Call for Washington Artists: Seattle Traffic Box Community Connector first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Wed, 2020-11-25 10:41

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

Funding Opportunity: The Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region (NNLM PSR) is offering a professional development award dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC). The award will pair the student in an ALA-accredited program with a BIPOC librarian working in a health sciences position or providing health information. The award provides up to $2,000 for students to participate in meetings, conference sessions, conduct a research project, and other activities designed for them to learn the importance of health information outreach and services conducted by health sciences librarians. Read the recent blog post published by NNLM PSR about the award and visit the funding opportunity page to learn more.  Note: This award is open for all BIPOC LIS students nationwide.

Upcoming Webinar on Evidence-Based Public Health: Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. This webinar will take place on December 10 at 2:00 PM ET. Visit the class page for more details and to register.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

National Family Health History Day – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Provide Health Information Like an Expert – MCR News

Share your story with us! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach projects and activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware.

NLM/NIH News Rise, Service, Lead…And PublishCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Reasons for Gratitude Amid the COVID-19 PandemicNIH Director’s Blog

Read assembly and Annotation Pipeline Tool (RAPT) is available for use and testingNCBI Insights, Providing Insights into NCBI Resources and the Science Behind Them

NIH expands research to improve COVID-19 testing among underserved and vulnerable populations

Community Engagement Alliance Against COVID-19 Disparities (CEAL) Social Media Resources

National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program: NLM is now recruiting for 2021-2022 Associate Fellows. The Associate Fellowship Program (AFP) provides opportunities for recent library/information science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship. The program combines curriculum and project efforts at the NLM on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. Applications and additional information are available on the Web at Associate Fellowship Program: How to Apply. The deadline to apply is January 28, 2021.

RFI Seeking Input on NIH-wide COVID-19 Strategic PlanNIH has issued an RFI inviting comments and suggestions on the NIH-wide strategic plan for COVID-19 research. A Request For Information released this week seeks public feedback on the current plan (NOT-OD-21-018). You or your organization can submit ideas here by December 7, 2020.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced that registration is open for the seventh cohort of Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials for Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

December 2020

Genetics 101 – December 1-15

NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions – December 2, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Rise, Serve, Lead! America’s Women Physicians – December 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

All of Us Research Program’s Virtual Face-to-Face – December 7-9, 12:00-3:30 PM ET

DOCLINE for Health Sciences Libraries – December 8, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Better On The Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self-Care For Incarcerated Persons – December 9, 10:00-11:00 AM ET

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives – December 9, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

How to “Speak Data”: Librarians as Public Data Ambassadors – December 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuff – December 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Citizen Science & Libraries: Help Develop RNA-based Medicines Online Presentation and Q&A – December 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET

Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources – December 17, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

January 2021

Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications – January 4-April 9

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – January 8-Feburary 4

Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks and Benefits – January 14, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Trauma Informed Approach in Libraries – January 21, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

PubMed Tips for Expert Searchers – January 27, 1:00-3:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Re-imagining AHRQ’s Insight Platform – AHRQ Views

Covid-19 Comorbidities and Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases in Adults and Children – December 2, 1:00-2:15 PM ET – Sponsored by the Skin of Color Society Foundation, NEJM Group, and VisualDx

Grey (Literature) Matters: Searching for Preprint Sources – December 10, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Family Health History Day

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2020-11-24 13:55

Happy family having Thanksgiving dinner at homeThanksgiving is coming up in the United States, and with it, time for conversations and catching up with loved ones and family. Though we may be “zooming” one another instead of sharing our meals at the same table this year, it is still a wonderful opportunity to share family memories, special stories and history. That is why Thanksgiving Day is also National Family Health History Day. These conversations can be difficult, but there are some great resources available to help.

  • My Family Health Portrait – This is a resource from the Surgeon General to help you document your own family health history online. Similar to programs that let you share your cultural heritage, this assists you in tracking your health heritage. This can help you identify if you might be at higher risk for certain conditions. You can use this document to start a conversation with your doctor and with other family members.
  • Does It Run In The Family? Toolkit – This toolkit, made up of two books from Genetic Alliance, is available in English, Spanish and Tagalog. Book 1 can help guide you in having health history conversations with your family, including suggested activities and conversation starters. Book 2 helps you learn more about genes, genetics and how they might influence your own health outcomes.
  • Family Health Resources from NNLM – The NNLM Reading Club has created a page full of resources about family health, heritable conditions, genetics and more. There are also several recommended titles for book club kits. If you would like to learn more about the NNLM Reading Club program you can reach out to the PSR All of Us Community Engagement Librarian, Amy, at abreyes@library.ucla.edu.

If having a family health history conversation leads to questions about conditions you would like more information on, a great place to start is with Medline Plus Genetics. On Medline Plus Genetics you can search for genetic information by the name of a condition or by a particular gene. Of course it is advised to share all of your health history and any questions you might have with you personal healthcare provider.

The post National Family Health History Day first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award!

SEA News - Tue, 2020-11-24 13:22

This post was originally published in PSR Latitudes. Though sponsored through NNLM PSR, this award is open for all BIPOC LIS students nationwide.

—-

As part of the NNLM Student Engagement Initiative, the Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region (NNLM PSR) librarians are excited to announce the first professional development award dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC). The NNLM, made up of eight different regions across the U.S., aims to serve these populations with equal access to health information and promoting a workforce representative of them is one way to reach this goal.

This program aims to help students meet the following objectives:

  • introduce the student to medical librarianship and explore areas of interest,
  • prepare them to work in a health sciences library, and
  • provide them with tools to navigate the complexities and issues of working as BIPOC in a primarily white institution.

The award will pair the student in an ALA-accredited program with a BIPOC librarian working in a health sciences position or providing health information. The award provides up to $2,000 for students to participate in meetings, conference sessions, conduct a research project, and other activities designed for them to learn the importance of health information outreach and services conducted by health sciences librarians. The goal of the award is to promote awareness of health sciences librarianship to LIS students who may not be familiar with the field or conducting research within it. Award activities will be ongoing until April 31, 2021.

The PSR are also seeking BIPOC librarians to participate in the program as well. We invite people from a variety of backgrounds and different types of health science libraries to share their stories as a BIPOC, challenges, and what they love most about being medical librarians. All librarian participants will be compensated up to $300; please reach out to us at psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu if you would like to join and/or have suggestions.

The PSR librarians created an ongoing list of references and resources, which include:

For more information and the application form, please refer to the Funding Opportunities listing for BIPOC LIS Students Professional Development Award. We are currently accepting applications on a rolling basis until funds are depleted.

Interested LIS students, please email your complete application or send any questions to psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu.

The post Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award! first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: November 24, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-11-24 12:18

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award: We are pleased to share this guest post by Nora Franco, NNLM Pacific Southwest Region Consumer Health Librarian about a funding opportunity dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC) and who reside in any NNLM region. Please spread the word and contact psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu for… Read More »

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for clases and create a free account

Library Carpentry Workshop: The NNLM Training Office is pleased to announce a new opportunity for information professionals to build data skills through online Library Carpentry workshops, at no cost to participants. 5 workshops will be offered October through January. This course is eligible for 20 continuing education credits through the Medical Library Association. Applications and more information available here. Questions can be directed to nto@utah.edu

NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions:  This December, join Julie Botnick of the NLM to learn more about public programming and NLM traveling exhibitions.  December 2nd at 12 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

PNR Rendezvous: Better on the Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self Care for Incarcerated Persons: This presentation describes findings from an Information Resource Grant to Reduce Health Disparities project, funded by the National Library of Medicine. The project aims to engage justice-involved individuals with health education to enhance their knowledge and use of health services and resources. This project won the Frank Bradway Rogers Health Information Advancement Award from the Medical Library Association in 2020. December 9th at 1 p.m. PT (1 MLA CE) Register

Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization: Data visualization design “best practices” often do not prioritize (or outright reject) efforts to be inclusive. Libraries have an opportunity to step into the world of data visualization and empower historically marginalized voices in data creation and sharing. This webinar will explore the intersections of equity, inclusion, accessibility, and data visualization to consider who we’re visualizing for, what we’re visualizing, and how and why we’re visualizing it.  December 10th at 11 a.m. PT (1 MLA CE) Register

Citizen Science and Libraries: Help Develop RNA-based Medicines Online Presentation and Q & A: Eterna invites contributors to become RNA scientists. Contributors solve puzzles to design specialized RNA-based medicines and sensors, receive feedback after their designs are built and tested in a lab at Stanford, and work together to build knowledge about how RNA works. December 16th at 11 a.m. PT (1.5 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Call for Applications to the MLA Research Training Institute (RTI):  The Medical Library Association (MLA) Research Training Institute (RTI) is a unique, highly-effective, and collaborative online research training and support program. The RTI ‘21 immerses practicing librarians in scholarly research, inquiry, and publishing. Librarians of all levels of professional experience and types of work environments who provide health information, services, and support and who have an interest in increasing their research skills and confidence and want to improve library and health care outcomes, are encouraged to apply to the RTI program. The institute is a one-year online program that consists of a series of online modules in advanced research methods, mentoring by faculty experts and peer coaches, preparing and implementing a research project, and an opportunity to present findings at the MLA ‘22 virtual conference. RTI ‘21 features an expanded research curriculum and greater affordability and flexibility for participants. Learn more about RTI program details. Deadline to apply is January 4, 2021. Fees apply

Centering Native Voices: Engagement, Knowledge, and Participation for Prevention from Indigenous Communities: Health Promotion Practice, a journal of the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), curated a collection of articles focusing on health promotion in AI/AN communities: “Centering Native Voices: Engagement, Knowledge, and Participation for Prevention from Indigenous Communities”. The papers in this Special Collection highlight collaborative, participatory strategies developed in and with AI/AN communities on topics as diverse as youth substance use prevention, community food insecurity, HIV activism and commercial tobacco use. Papers are available for free download November 15 – 30, 2021.

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

BLAST+ 2.11.0 now available with limited usage reporting to help improve BLAST

NLM Director’s Blog: Dr Isaac Kohane – Making Our Data Work for Us!

New CORE Problem List Subset of SNOMED-CT Available for Download

NIH to fund research of racial disparities in pregnancy – related complications and deaths

Study of “exceptional responders” yields clues to cancer and potential treatments

New NIH BRAIN Initiative awards move toward solving brain disorders

* NIH expands research to improve COVID-19 testing among underserved and vulnerable populations

Injectable birth control may increase blood lead levels in African American women

CDC Expands US Diabetes Surveillance System with new Social Determinants of Health Module

50.6 Million US Adults Currently Use Tobacco Products

FDA Releases New Outbreak Investigation Table

FDA Approves First Treatment for Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Some Progeroid Laminopathies

Applications are being accepted until January 28, 2021 for the NLM Associate Fellowship program for librarians

*COVID-19 Travel Health Notice Levels and Testing for International Travelers

FYI:

*Join the National COVID-19 Resiliency Network (NCRN)
The HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is working with the Morehouse School of Medicine through a cooperative agreement to develop a national network of state, territorial, tribal and local public and community-based organizations to help address the impact of COVID-19 among racial and ethnic minority populations. Morehouse School of Medicine established the National COVID-19 Resiliency Network (NCRN) which will share important messages and linkages to healthcare and social services in communities across the nation and in areas hardest hit by the pandemic. OMH invites organizations and individuals across the country to be a part of this initiative. To sign up for updates and become a part of this effort, please visit the NCRN website.

Compassion in Action – A Guide for Faith Communities
The HHS Center for Faith and Opportunity Initiatives Compassion in Action: A Guide for Faith Communities Serving People Experiencing Mental Illness and Their Caregivers seeks to help faith leaders from all religious and spiritual traditions, as well as their congregants and community-based organizations, increase awareness and build capacity to serve people in their midst experiencing mental illness, and to care for their family or caregivers.

Worldwide Social Media Event: Rock your Mocs
November is Native American Heritage Month. As part of this national observance, OMH invites you to Rock Your Mocs throughout November 15-21. Rock Your Mocs is a week-long social media event that offers American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) a positive opportunity to be united and celebrate tribal individuality by wearing moccasins. The event honors ancestors and indigenous peoples worldwide. Use the hashtag #ROCKYOURMOCS 

*Best Practices for American Indian and Alaska Native Data Collection
Current standard data collection practices by many federal, state, and local entities effectively omit or misclassify American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations, both urban and rural. This is particularly concerning in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic as these current standards of practice are resulting in a gross under count of the impact COVID-19 has on Native people. Learn about best practices by downloading Best Practices for American Indian and Alaska Native Data Collection

#WhiteCoatsForBlackLives — Addressing Physicians’ Complicity in Criminalizing Communities
A recent commentary in the New England Journal of Medicine takes a look at the role of physicians in contributing to health inequities and the continued racism of the medical and legal systems.

Hate-Motivated Behavior: Impacts, Risk Factors, And Interventions
A recent Health Affairs policy brief states that hate-motivated behavior is a public health threat with structural, interpersonal, and individual antecedents and effects. There is a need for interdisciplinary, multilevel research to better understand the causes of such behavior and to test prevention strategies and interventions.

New Interactive “Family Health: Understanding Family Health History”
November is Family Health History month and we are celebrating by presenting a brand new interactive “Family Health: Understanding Family Health History.” Learn about what family health history is, why it is important, and how to record it.

*Similarities and Differences between Flu and COVID-19
Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19.

*COVID-19 Multilingual Resource Hub
The UCLA Asian American Studies Center, in partnership with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the UCLA Institute of American Cultures, has created the COVID-19 Multilingual Resource Hub, which includes resources in Vietnamese, Swahili, Somali, Hmong, Spanish, Chinese, Chukese and more.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: November 24, 2020 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award!

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2020-11-23 13:30

We are pleased to share this guest post by Nora Franco, NNLM Pacific Southwest Region Consumer Health Librarian about a funding opportunity dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC) and who reside in any NNLM region. Please spread the word and contact psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu for more information.

As part of the NNLM Student Engagement Initiative, the Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region (NNLM PSR) librarians are excited to announce the first professional development award dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC). The NNLM, made up of eight different regions across the U.S., aims to serve these populations with equal access to health information and promoting a workforce representative of them is one way to reach this goal.

This program aims to help students meet the following objectives:

  • introduce the student to medical librarianship and explore areas of interest,
  • prepare them to work in a health sciences library, and
  • provide them with tools to navigate the complexities and issues of working as BIPOC in a primarily white institution.

The award will pair the student in an ALA-accredited program with a BIPOC librarian working in a health sciences position or providing health information. The award provides up to $2,000 for students to participate in meetings, conference sessions, conduct a research project, and other activities designed for them to learn the importance of health information outreach and services conducted by health sciences librarians. The goal of the award is to promote awareness of health sciences librarianship to LIS students who may not be familiar with the field or conducting research within it. Award activities will be ongoing until April 31, 2021.

The PSR are also seeking BIPOC librarians to participate in the program as well. We invite people from a variety of backgrounds and different types of health science libraries to share their stories as a BIPOC, challenges, and what they love most about being medical librarians. All librarian participants will be compensated up to $300; please reach out to us at psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu if you would like to join and/or have suggestions.

The PSR librarians created an ongoing list of references and resources, which include:

For more information and the application form, please refer to the NNLM PSR Funding Opportunities listing for BIPOC LIS Students Professional Development Award. We are currently accepting applications on a rolling basis until funds are depleted.

Interested LIS students, please email your complete application or send any questions to psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu.

The post Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award! first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Provide Health Information Like an Expert

MCR News - Fri, 2020-11-20 19:10

The MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) offers training to librarians in providing health information services to consumers and recognizes them for the accomplishment of acquiring new health information skills.

By earning a CHIS, you develop the skills and knowledge needed to become a confident, expert provider of health information to your community. Your CHIS shows employers, colleagues, and the public you serve that you are committed to offering quality health information services. It also shows that you are staying current with developments in consumer health information resources, technologies and services.

In addition to earning your CHIS, NNLM will cover the CHIS application fee (a $75 value) for level 1 or level 2 and renewals.

To learn more about how you can obtain your CHIS certification, visit mla.org or go to nnlm.gov to see the free courses taught by NNLM to work toward your CHIS.

The post Provide Health Information Like an Expert first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2020-11-20 12:22

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

Funding Opportunity: The Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) is now accepting applications for Rapid Response Virtual Professional Development. This award enables individuals in the Middle Atlantic Region to expand professional knowledge and experience in data science or health information access/delivery through virtual professionals. You must submit your application at least 5 business days before the course/training and no later than March 1, 2021. Continuous reviews will take place for this award. The opportunity will close when funds are expended so early application is strongly encouraged.

Learn about Borderline Diabetes with My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can learn about borderline diabetes, quitting smoke, GERD, and more! Subscribe to receive My MedlinePlus via email.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections – MCR News

Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind – MCR News

UCSF Receives NNLM PSR Subaward: “The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic: Digitizing and Providing Universal Access to Historical AIDS Records” – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Getting the Most from NNLM: Public Health Part 3 – NER Update

NLM/NIH News

Dr. Isaac Kohane: Making Our Data Work for Us!NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Airborne Infection Control in 20-Century Peace and WarCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Mini-Lungs in a Lab Dish Mimic Early COVID-19 InfectionNIH Director’s Blog

Why is it important to know my family medical history? – MedlinePlus

National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program: NLM is now recruiting for 2021-2022 Associate Fellows. The Associate Fellowship Program (AFP) provides opportunities for recent library/information science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship. The program combines curriculum and project efforts at the NLM on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. Applications and additional information are available on the Web at Associate Fellowship Program: How to Apply. The deadline to apply is January 28, 2021.

RFI Seeking Input on NIH-wide COVID-19 Strategic PlanNIH has issued an RFI inviting comments and suggestions on the NIH-wide strategic plan for COVID-19 research. A Request For Information released this week seeks public feedback on the current plan (NOT-OD-21-018). You or your organization can submit ideas here by December 7, 2020.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced that a new (CORE) Problem List Subset of SNOMED CT is available for download.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

November 2020

DNA to Z: Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing – November 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

December 2020

NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions – December 2, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Rise, Serve, Lead! America’s Women Physicians – December 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

All of Us Research Program’s Virtual Face-to-Face – December 7-9, 12:00-3:30 PM ET

DOCLINE for Health Sciences Libraries – December 8, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Better On The Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self-Care For Incarcerated Persons – December 9, 10:00-11:00 AM ET

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives – December 9, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

How to “Speak Data”: Librarians as Public Data Ambassadors – December 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuff – December 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Citizen Science & Libraries: Help Develop RNA-based Medicines Online Presentation and Q&A – December 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET

Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources – December 17, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

January 2021

Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications – January 4-April 9

Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks and Benefits – January 14, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Trauma Informed Approach in Libraries – January 21, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

PubMed Tips for Expert Searchers – January 27, 1:00-3:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

From Historical Sources to Datasets: A Preview of DataScribe – Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM)

Explore Your Identity to Improve Your Practice: An Introduction to Critical Health Sciences Librarianship – November 24, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Covid-19 Comorbidities and Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases in Adults and Children – December 2, 1:00-2:15 PM ET – Sponsored by the Skin of Color Society Foundation, NEJM Group, and VisualDx

Grey (Literature) Matters: Searching for Preprint Sources – December 10, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 20, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-11-20 10:06

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars December 2 – December 9

Webinars December 10 – December 15

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – November 20, 2020 first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections

MCR News - Thu, 2020-11-19 13:22

Two libraries in the Salt Lake City area hired library staff with special connections to diverse communities as part of a project funded this year by the NNLM MidContinental Region.

These “community wellness liaisons,” aided members of their communities in accessing library services and programs, with a special emphasis on health-related information. They were hired to work for nearly a year at the main branch of the Salt Lake City Public Library and at the West Valley branch of the Salt Lake County Library.

Five individuals were selected with the input of the Community Faces of Utah (CFU) collaborative. CFU members include Calvary Baptist Church representing African Americans in Salt Lake City, the National Tongan American Society representing Pacific Islanders and Native Hawaiians, the Hispanic Health Care Task Force representing Spanish-speaking populations, the Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake representing indigenous Americans, and Best of Africa representing African refugees and immigrants. CFU also includes the Community Collaboration and Engagement Team at the University of Utah’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCET) which coordinated the project, and the Utah Department of Health.

Each liaison was a member one of the CFU communities. They worked for 20 hours a week for one of the two libraries, splitting their time between the library and community outreach. One liaison also spent part of their time at the Glendale branch of the City Library. In addition to working with library staff, the liaisons coordinated closely with leaders from their respective CFU organizations.

All liaisons received training in health-information skills from NNLM and completed level 1 of the Consumer Health Information Specialist training.

The liaisons worked with their libraries to conduct public programs and participated in virtual community outreach activities after the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closure of the libraries. Examples of programs and activities included a Kwanzaa celebration, discussions on trauma and mental wellness, in-library displays on health, and library resource lists on health topics of highest interest to each community.

 They and the CFU community leaders also conducted trainings for staff on such topics as diversity, inclusion and allyship. This helped to create a two-way conversation between communities and library.

The project initially arose from a discussion at a CFU meeting in which the community leaders discussed their perceptions that individuals from diverse communities did not feel welcome in local libraries, in part because of the lack of diversity among library staff. As a result, many individuals from diverse communities around the Salt Lake Valley did not use their local libraries and were unaware of library services and programs that could meet their needs.

Based on this discussion, CFU designed a research study that included community engagement sessions, similar to focus groups, which were conducted with each of the CFU communities. Each CFU community leader co-facilitated the session in their community along with a CCET staff member.

The participants in the engagement sessions suggested ideas for addressing the problem, such as having library staff from similar backgrounds as community members and making health information more accessible by bringing library resources and programs directly into the communities. The discussions involving community group members, library leaders and the researchers led to the pilot project that hired the CWLs.

Project organizers shared the results from the engagement sessions with a sixth group consisting of city and county librarians and library administrators. In a culminating workshop, CFU community leaders and representatives from the two library systems reviewed the research findings and developed a plan for the pilot project.

Funding for the project came from the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network, which helps public libraries in supporting the health information needs of their users by providing training to library staff, funding and other resources to support health programming and activities, and connections to medical libraries and other NNLM members in their area.

The CEN is part of the All of Us Research Program, which has a mission to accelerate health research and medical breakthroughs, enabling individualized prevention, treatment and care for all of us. The program aims to build one of the largest, most diverse datasets of its kind for health research, with one million or more volunteers nationwide who sill sign up to share their information over time.

The project wraps up in November. You can read more details about the three-part project in the reports for the project’s first stage and second stage.

The post Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind

MCR News - Wed, 2020-11-18 10:32

 

light at the end of the tunnel photoThe GOOD news on the vaccine front over the past few weeks related to the progress of the pharmaceutical companies may be an indicator that we are seeing the light at the end of this dark COVID-19 tunnel. Although no vaccine is 100% effective (WHO, 2020), numbers like 90 – 95% efficacy should bring us hope that the rising hospitalization numbers and death tolls will eventually decrease. However, we still need to be diligent in wearing masks and social distancing now more than ever because it will take time to implement a plan to vaccinate over 300 million people.

This good vaccine news made me think about some visualizations I saw in the past that were created to show just how effective vaccines can be. Before COVID, the Wall Street Journal in 2015 published a series of visualizations that depict the impact of several vaccines. This type of visualization is called a heat map and shows, through a range of color squares, how cases of disease have decreased across time and especially after the point where vaccines have been introduced. I hope to see the COVID-19 visualization get added to this list soon so that we can watch our states slowly move from red to blue. Not only is a heat map a compelling image that tells a story, it is also interactive and you can mouse over the color squares to see the data behind the square and explore the numbers in your own state.

Does this peak your interest to see more interesting visualizations? Here is a galley of visualizations created in Tableau Public, a free visualization software. In addition, The New York Times has a great website called “What’s Going On in This Graph?” that is being used to teach students about statistics.

Want to learn more about creating visualizations? NNLM has some great additional resources you can explore. This recorded webinar, Data Visualization: Theory to Practice provides an overview of data visualization and an introduction to some tools to create visualizations. This webinar recording, What’s in a Data Story? Understanding the Basics of Data Storytelling focuses on how storytelling and data visualizations are connected.

Sometimes a picture really is worth a thousand words!!

Photo source: Pickpik

The post Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

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