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Call for NNLM RD3 Website Advisory Board Members

MCR News - Wed, 2020-05-06 16:14

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Resources for Data Driven Discovery (RD3) web portal fosters learning and collaboration in data science and data management.

The Research Data Management Workgroup of the NNLM is recruiting Advisory Board members to be part of a committee that reviews and suggests resources for the RD3 web portal. If you are interested in being part of the RD3 Content Advisory Board send your name to Mary Piorun at mary.piorun@umassmed.edu by July 1st with a brief narrative (less than 300 words) explaining your interest.

Meetings will be monthly until all current resources have been reviewed, and quarterly thereafter.

Categories: RML Blogs

Coming up soon! MCR monthly webinar on Data Literacy Education

MCR News - Tue, 2020-05-05 18:10
What: Data Literacy: What It Is, Why It’s Important, and How to Bring It into The Classroom

Presenter:
Shannon Sheridan, Data Management Librarian at the University of Wyoming

When: 
May 20, 2020 at  1PM – 2PM (Pacific)| 2PM – 3 PM (Mountain) | 3PM – 4PM (Central) | 4PM – 5PM (Eastern)

Data touches all of our lives, yet it is a vital skills that is often left out of formal education. So how can we make sure students are prepared to deal with the data they inevitably will encounter in their work and lives? This presentation aims to answer that question. The presentation will provide an overview of what data literacy is and explain why it is an important component of students education. We also will discuss how instructors can bring data literacy, in both small and large ways, in to their classroom, and provide some concrete examples.

For more information and to register for this webinar go to the Webinar Session Webpage.

Contact donna.ziegenfuss@utah.edu for additional information.

Hope to see you online!

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: May 5, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-05-05 11:37

Welcome to the new format of the PNR Weekly Digest. The Weekly Digest is a compilation of news and information from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, professional development opportunities, and other items of interest for the Pacific Northwest Region. We hope you find the information useful for you and those you serve.

The Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) offers regional programs, funding, and training to improve access to health information, increase community engagement about health, expand professional knowledge, and support outreach. The NNLM PNR invites you to participate in a regional needs assessment via this survey. The insights you provide in our survey will help to shape NNLM PNR programs going forward. 

 

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Read All About It: May is Mental Health Month
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought widespread stress and uncertainty which may take a toll on our mental health. What an appropriate time to recognize May as Mental Health Month. The NNLM Reading Club features three books to spark a book club discussion on different facets of mental health…read the full post

Professional Development:

NNLM Educational Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

I am … Safe Zones: Sticks and Stones LGBTQA 101: What better sexual identities way to learn about than to list out social norms, stereotypes, media images, rumors, jokes, and slang! This is a safe space for any and all kinds of interactive discussions regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Heterosexual identities. Part 7 of the ” Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt” webinar series. May 13 at 9:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Braving the Elements: PubChem Resources to Weather any Situation: PubChem is the world’s largest collection of freely accessible chemical information. You can use PubChem to search chemicals by name, molecular formula, structure, and other identifiers. And, you can use PubChem to find chemical and physical properties, biological activities, safety and toxicity information, patents, literature citations and more. Join this session of the NNLM Resource Picks on May 27 at 12:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Health and Wellness @ the Library: The Essentials of Providing Consumer Health Services: Centered around eight core competencies, this interactive 4-week online course provides a rich learning experience to build all the essential skills for providing consumer health information services. Obtain the MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) by taking this class. August 3 – 28. (12 MLA CE) Register

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-based public health for CHES CECH: This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. This is a registration page for Certified Health Education Specialists to receive continuing education credit for viewing the recording of the NNLM class From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-based public health, which took place on February 26, 2020. This recording will be available for CHES CECH through August 26, 2020. After registering, you will receive an enrollment code via e-mail and a link to the recording. After viewing the course recording, you will be asked to complete a quiz based on the course content. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Overview of COVID-19 and CDC’s Response to the Pandemic with a Highlight of Federal COVID-19 Resources: This FDLP Academy webinar will provide information on the CDC’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic. May 5 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

Navigating Benefits.gov: A Resource for Community Advocates: During this FDLP Academy  webinar, attendees will learn how to navigate Benefits.gov and its many resources. Representatives from Benefits.gov will provide a tutorial of the Benefit Finder questionnaire, the newsroom, help center, and continuously developing COVID-19 resources. May 11 at 10:00 a.m. PT. Register

New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians 2020: New England Science Bootcamp for Librarians will host a free virtual conference on June 11, 2020, from 6:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. PT. Topics may include, depending on speaker availability:

  • Vaccine research & manufacture
  • Virology
  • Making Health Devices in non-industrial settings
  • IRB and human subjects research in the shifting landscape

Learn more and register for this conference

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. 

Check out the May issue of NIH News in Health with articles covering concussions, vaping, social isolation and more

*“Rising to the COVID-19 Challenge: Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx)”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*NIH mobilizes national innovation initiative for COVID-19 diagnostics

*NIH clinical trial shows Remdesivir accelerates recovery from advanced COVID-19

* Honoring Health — What Your Community Needs To Know About COVID-19 — April 2020

Learn about over-the-counter hearing aids, which will be available soon

New study links severe sleep apnea to higher blood glucose levels in African Americans

NIDA launches drug education booklet series for middle school students

*Shareable Resources on Coping with COVID-19

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

FYI:

*Resources: COVID-19:

Telehealth: Health Care from the Safety of our Homes
The HHS Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is encouraging healthcare practitioners to integrate telemedicine into their practice. As part of this effort, HRSA has launched telehealth.hhs.gov as a resource for both healthcare providers and patients. It provides helpful information about telemedicine and links to tools and resources for practitioners.

*53% of Americans Say the Internet Has Been Essential During the COVID-19 Outbreak
The coronavirus outbreak has driven many commercial and social activities online and for some the internet has become an ever more crucial link to those they love and the things they need. As Americans turn to the internet for critical purposes, there are rekindled debates about how the digital divide – that is, the gap between those who do or do not have access to technology – may hinder people’s ability to complete everyday tasks or even schoolwork. Learn more about this new Pew Research Center survey conducted in early April

*Helpful Questions and Answers about Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Your Pets
FDA offers some helpful questions and answers about keeping your pets safe during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

National Prevention Week May 10 – 16, 2020
SAMHSA’s National Prevention Week (NPW) is a public education platform that promotes prevention year-round through providing ideas, capacity-building, tools, and resources to help individuals and communities make substance use prevention happen every day. NPW culminates in May by recognizing the important work that communities have done throughout the year to inspire action and prevent substance use and mental disorders. Each day this week, SAMHSA will focus on a specific health theme related to prevention. SAMHSA provides free publications, tip sheets, and resource centers for each of the 2020 daily themes to educate and discuss in your community. Check out the Planning Toolkit (available in English and Spanish) for templates, tools, and support for organizing your own prevention events and activities.

Categories: RML Blogs

WFH? NNLM Offers a Variety of Excellent Educational Opportunities

NER News - Mon, 2020-05-04 15:54

 

 

 

 

Has being able to work from home or being quarantined given you time to take advantage of some additional educational opportunities? The NNLM has many webinars and Moodle classes scheduled in the coming months. If you are a librarian or nurse you may eligible earn CE credits from the Medical Library Association (MLA)  for attending these upcoming training opportunities. Take a look at the schedule of classes.

Are you interested in learning more about substance use disorder (SUD)?

If you would like to know more about the topic of substance use disorder the NNLM NER has many excellent webinars presented by experts in the fields of addiction and behavioral health that have been archived. The link provided is to our medical school repository where you can listen to the recording and download the materials associated with each webinar.

SUD webinars are eligible for CE credit for medical librarians and nurses through the MLA. CE credit is available for 1 year after the webinar is presented. You must complete an evaluation at the end of each webinar to receive the CE Credit. The enrollment code needed to claim your CE credit is given at the end of each webinar.

The following are webinars that are still eligible for CE credit:

Substance Use Disorder Webinars That Are Eligible for CE Credits

Webinar Name & Description Original Date CE Expiration Date Recording Link Evaluation Link Strategies & Resources to Maintain Sobriety During COVID19 4.9.2020 4.9.2021 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/83 https://bit.ly/2UT29kS Substance Use Disorder and Heredity: It’s a Family Disease

  12.10.2019 12.10.2021 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/81 http://bit.ly/341TcXS Engaging Parents and Caregivers in SUD Prevention and Recovery

  12.5.2019 12.5.2020 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/79/ http://bit.ly/2pdEkar A Myth-Shattering Look at Addiction, Prevention and Treatment, Based on Research

  10.9.2019 10.9.2020 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/74/ http://bit.ly/2IuNRAh Family Focused Addiction Support Training: Getting Your Life Back

  9.17.2019 9.17.2020 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/73/ http://bit.ly/2m5wgX9 How the Trauma-Informed Approach Can Help Treat SUD 6.26,2019 6.26.2020 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/69/ http://bit.ly/2Rx0Swp

How to Claim your CE credits from MLA

https://nnlm.gov/sites/default/files/nto/Claim_MLA_CE_handout.pdf

 

The following are SUD webinars that are NOT eligible for continuing education credit but are still worthwhile if you are looking to learn more about SUD.

Substance Use Disorder Webinar Recording Links NOT Eligible for CE Credit

Webinar Name and Description Webinar Date Recording Link Misperceptions and Misused Language of Addiction: Words Matter

  Aug 2017 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/48/ Connecting Resources to a Community in Need: Worcester Police Addiction (WPAR) Program

  Sept 2017 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/50/ Treating Opioid Use Disorder and Co-occurring Disorders Oct 2017 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/51/ Individual Treatment and Understanding Non-Pharmacologic Components That are Part of Recovery

  Jan 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/53/ Using Data to Guide and Evaluate Responses to the Opioid Crisis: Rhode Island’s Drug Overdose Dashboard Mar 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/54/ Addressing a By-Product of the Opioid Addiction Crisis: Commercial Sexual Exploitation

  Apr 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/55/ EMPOWER: A Community-Based Approach to Improve Care for Women and Newborns Affected by Perinatal SUD

  May 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/56/ Just Talk About It: Using Mental Health Education to Prevent and Treat SUD

  June 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/57/ How to Save a Life: Administering Naloxone 101

  Sept 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/58/ Using Recovery Coaches in SUD Treatment

  Oct 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/60 Understanding Grief After an Overdose Death Nov 2018 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/61/ Drug Courts: A Bridge to Recovery

  Jan 2019 https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ner/62/

 

Earn CE Credits for Other NNLM Recorded Webinars Too!

Listen to the recordings of many other webinars that have been presented in the past year. To find these webinar recordings look at these past classes. If the recording is from a webinar within the past year, and is eligible for CE credit, contact the webinar host for the evaluation URL.

Categories: RML Blogs

May & June CE Opportunities for CHES

MAR News - Mon, 2020-05-04 11:24
Upcoming CHES Eligible Webinars

Join us in June! Select the hyperlink in each course title to register on the NNLM website for these free, live webinars.

From Beyond our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information (one-hour version) – June 2, 2020, 2:00-3:00 PM EST – This class is designed to assist librarians and others who work with diverse populations in locating health information. The resources presented are selected for their emphasis on providing culturally relevant information in the preferred language of the population. Background information on refugees and immigrants in the U.S. and their unique health issues will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several Internet resources.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current landscape of refugees, immigrants, and migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the United States
  2. Explain the difference between cultural competence and humility and how they influence workplace environments
  3. Identify reliable websites that provide quality health information in multiple languages

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – June 24, 2020, 2:00-3:00 PM EST – Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define and describe evidence-based public health
  2. Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question
  3. Locate and search applicable literature and resources
On-demand CHES Eligible Courses

Learn on your own time! Select the hyperlink in each course title to register on the NNLM website for these free, on-demand courses.

Online Resources to Support Evidence-Based Practice on Population Health: An Introduction to MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj – The course is designed to teach public health professionals and librarians to use MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj to find reliable health information and data related to population health and Healthy People 2020. This asynchronous course is offered through Moodle using Storyline Articulate software. Please note that the content in the course is for basic/beginner users of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss population health and its relation to Healthy People 2020
  2. Describe the purpose of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj databases
  3. Identify when to use each database based on the information need
  4. Perform advanced searching techniques to identify more accurate results

Serving Diverse Communities: Accessing Health Information in Multiple Languages -This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with some basic statistics on individuals with limited English proficiency in the United States and demonstrate how to use resources from the National Library of Medicine to access reliable health information in multiple languages. Attendees will learn about data from the American Community Survey and U.S. Census Bureau, and then receive demonstrations on how to access reliable health information in multiple languages through the National Library of Medicine’s HealthReach and MedlinePlus databases.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current population of non-native English speakers in the United States
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health information in multiple languages
  3. Analyze resources to access reliable health information in multiple languages

Serving Diverse Communities: Building Cultural Competence and Humility into the Workplace – This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with an introduction to the concepts of culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility. Participants will learn about some of the current critiques to using cultural competence principles and how cultural humility can be supplemented to create a more accepting, welcoming, and reflective working environment. Short demos of Think Cultural Health, PubMed, and Project Implicit are included to showcase three external resources that can be used to further explore this topic.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility;
  2. Describe the differences between cultural competence and humility; and
  3. Utilize three online resources to help build a more culturally competent and humble workplace.

Serving Diverse Communities: Finding Data on Health Disparities– This course is designed to introduce attendees to health disparities and how the social determinants of health contribute to an inequity in health. Participants will be shown demonstrations on how to utilize tools from the National Library of Medicine, the Office of Minority Health, and HealthyPeople.gov to locate data on health disparities.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss health disparities in public health
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health disparity data
  3. Analyze resources to access data on health disparities
Recorded Webinars Available for CHES CECH

Did you miss a live class? Three recorded webinars from February and March are now available for CHES CECH. Select the hyperlink in each course title to register on the NNLM website for these free, recorded webinars.

What Works for Health? Using County Health Rankings and Roadmaps in Grant WritingRecording available for CHES CECH until 8/19/2020 – This session will provide an overview of What Works for Health, a resource from County Health Rankings and Roadmaps (CHRR), a program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. What Works for Health rates the evidence of a broad range of strategies (i.e., policies, programs, systems & environmental changes) that can affect health through changes to: health behaviors; clinical care; social and environmental factors; and the physical environment. Our Guest speaker from the National Network of Public Health Institutes, Toni Lewis will discuss how those preparing funding applications can use What Works for Health when writing their evidence of need. NNLM MAR Health Professions Coordinator, Erin Seger will also provide examples of past funded NNLM projects that align with strategies Toni highlights. The audience will learn a practical way to use countyhealthrankings.org as it relates to applying for NNLM funding or other funding opportunities.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 1

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe how to use What Works for Health when writing a grant proposal
  2. Define the evidence ratings in County Health Rankings What Works for Health
  3. Describe at least three examples of past NNLM-funded projects that relate to the evidence categories in What Works for Health

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health Recording available for CHES CECH until 8/26/2020 – Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define and describe evidence-based public health
  2. Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question
  3. Locate and search applicable literature and resources

Health Statistics on the Web – Recording available for CHES CECH until 9/5/2020 – This course focuses on the location, selection, and effective use of statistics relevant to health on the local, state, national, and international levels. The importance and relevance of health statistics in various contexts will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several statistics Internet resources through the use of numerous exercises.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Identify selected key websites for use in the location of data sets and statistics for use at the local, state and national level, including PHPartners and MedlinePlus.
  2. Discuss of the types of data sets and statistics available on the Internet.
  3. Define the 4-step process used to successfully locate relevant health statistics for a particular circumstance or issue.
  4. Describe where to locate additional health statistics training through the National Information Center on Health Services Research & Health Care Technology (NICHSR)

Sponsored by The National Network of Libraries of Medicine- Middle Atlantic Region, a designated provider of contact hours (CECH) in health education credentialing by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc., these programs are designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour. Advanced level CECH is indicated on a course by course basis above.

Reach out to Erin Seger, MPH, CHES at ers166@pitt.edu with any questions about receiving CECH for these courses.

If you want to learn more about the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in your area, find your region on our website.

Categories: RML Blogs

Puerto Rico Hit by 5.4 Magnitude Earthquake

SEA News - Mon, 2020-05-04 09:35

The U.S. Geological Survey reported a 5.4 magnitude earthquake off the southern coast of Puerto Rico early Saturday morning. 

At a Glance

  • The initial quake was recorded at 7:13 a.m. EST on May 2, 2020.
  • The epicenter was located approximately 80 miles south of San Juan. 
  • About 50 families were displaced from their homes.
  • The earthquake caused extensive damage to buildings on the island, including a museum and other historical buildings in Ponce, Puerto Rico.

State and Territory Resources

Visit the NNLM SEA Page for additional Federal and State Emergency Management Contact Resources.

Puerto Rico

NLM Disaster Information Management Resource Center (DIMRC)

We encourage you to visit the following pages from the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). You can embed the content from both of these pages on your own Website by accessing the Health and Human Services (HHS) Content Syndication Storefront. When we update any of these pages, your pages will be automatically updated as well.

MedlinePlus

Reliable Resources for Tornado Preparedness & Response

Mobile Apps

NNLM SEA Resources

Categories: RML Blogs

May 2020 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Fri, 2020-05-01 18:31

illustration of a father and son putting on bike helmetsCheck out the May issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – May 1, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-05-01 11:29

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars May 6 – May 11

Webinars May 13 – May 19

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2020-05-01 06:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

Read the MAReport: This quarter, Kelsey Cowles and Tess Wilson wrote about MisinfoCon 7.0 in their article, “Attending MisinfoCon 7.0: A Summit on Misinformation in Health Communication.” The article highlights the origins of the event and their top 10 takeways from attending.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Stephen Sherry, PhD, Named Acting Director of NLM’s National Center for Biotechnology Information – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Victory 3D Printing for Health Care Personnel – SEA Currents

Citizen Science & Alzheimer’s Disease – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

ICYMI: 2020 ONC Annual Meeting on Bringing the EHR to the Patient – NER Update

National Health Observance: Looking for tools and materials to promote Mental Health Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

New on YouTube: Health Programming for Summer Reading & Virtual Engagement, April 7, 2020

NLM/NIH News

Virtual Learning Resources for Scientists at All Career Stages and of All Ages – During this unprecedented time in our lives, we know that many of you are trying to teach or learn from home. To help meet your biomedical research training and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education needs, I invite you to explore some of the virtual education and training resources supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) at the National Institutes of Health. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

NLM Exhibitions and Epidemics – The Exhibition Program has produced three exhibitions about the history of epidemics: the yellow fever epidemic of 1793, the 1964 rubella epidemic, and the AIDS epidemic during the 1980s. While I still find the topic of epidemics to be grim, there are aspects of these exhibitions that continue to resonate with me. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Rising to the COVID-19 Challenge: Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) – Step into any major medical center, and you will see the amazing power of technology at work. From X-rays to functional MRIs, blood typing to DNA sequencing, heart-lung machines to robotic surgery, the progress that biomedical technology has made over the past century or so stands as a testament to human ingenuity—and its ability to rise to the all-important challenge of saving lives and improving health. – NIH Director’s Blog

NLM Resource Update: The new PubMed will become the default site on or after May 18, 2020. A new, yellow banner has been added to legacy PubMed to notify users of the timing.

My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can learn about lowering your blood pressure, using cleaning and disinfecting products safely, and explore over 100 healthy recipes!

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue shared that more MeSH supplementary concept records for COVID-19 were added in April.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

April 2020

Getting Started with Information Outreach in Your Community – April 30, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – This class will provide a background in cultural competence and outreach skills as librarians make outreach efforts to underserved, underrepresented minority populations in their community. Join the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) for this class to learn more about the following topics: locating community demographics, the importance of developing relationships, the basics of building and developing community-based partnerships, recognition and acceptance of cultural differences, and the importance of cultural competency. Some basic concepts of program planning and evaluation within a culturally diverse environment will be covered as well.

May 2020

Building Resilient Communities Online and In Person – May 1, 12:00-1:30 PM ET – In this webinar sponsored by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR), examine your library partnerships and community assets and learn how to empower your staff, your patrons and your community, online and in person, with tried and true tools that you can use to build a more resilient community. In this time of crisis, take an hour to pause, breathe, listen, participate and reflect along with staff at the Gail Borden Public Library District in Elgin, Illinois, an IMLS National Medal recipient.

Exploring Data Literacy Needs at Your Institution – May 6, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA), this webinar will discuss how data literacy initiatives can be integrated into different institutions. Join Theresa Burress and Emily Mann, Science Librarian and Student Success Librarian at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, respectively, as they discuss some of the successes and challenges they experienced as they co-led a faculty learning community at their institution to start a campus conversation about data literacy.

How PubMed Work: An Introduction – May 11, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Learn about what PubMed is and what’s included in it. Attendees will explore how to find the original research that is the basis for a news article and we’ll spend time searching for articles by a specific author and searching on a specific subject. Attendees will also do exercises to narrow results to a more specific set of results and, lastly, explore the Advanced Search Builder and search history. This class is part of the How PubMed Works series sponsored by our National Training Office (NTO).

I am…Safe Zones: Sticks and Stones LGBTQA 101 – May 13, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – What better ways to learn about sexual identities than to list out social norms, stereotypes, media images, rumors, jokes, and slang! Sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR), this is a safe space for any and all kinds of interactive discussions regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Heterosexual identities.

Virtual Programs for Preschoolers: How to Encourage Wellness, Movement & Creativity – May 14, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Are you interested in virtual storytimes, dance parties, and other wellness activities for ages 0-6? In this webinar sponsored by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR), attendees will be given tips & tricks for presenting digitally, partnering with community organizations, and igniting kid’s imagination with wellness-themed programs.

Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks and Benefits – May 19, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – This class is a basic introduction for anyone who wants to understand how to communicate health information that involves numeracy. The purpose of this class is to understand risk and benefits from a layman’s perspective and to understand that the communication of numbers must be clear and easy to understand. In this 1.5 hour class sponsored by the Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA), participants will also be introduced to several NLM and NIH tools that will help in the development of educational materials.

How PubMed Work: An Introduction – May 21, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Learn about what PubMed is and what’s included in it. Attendees will explore how to find the original research that is the basis for a news article and we’ll spend time searching for articles by a specific author and searching on a specific subject. Attendees will also do exercises to narrow results to a more specific set of results and, lastly, explore the Advanced Search Builder and search history. This class is part of the How PubMed Works series sponsored by our National Training Office (NTO).

Braving the Elements: PubChem Resources to Weather Any Situation – May 27, 3:00-4:00 PM ET –  Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and Rana Morris, PhD, NCBI Customer Experience team member and Team Lead for Educational Programs, for this webinar, which will provide an overview of PubChem’s key features.

How PubMed Work: ATM – May 28, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Attend this webinar to learn how PubMed uses Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) to map your keyword searches to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn how ATM lets you search PubMed effectively with keywords. Attendees will also look at the automatic explosion feature, what is and isn’t included in Search Details. Attendees will explore ways to search by author name and how to search for phrases in PubMed. This class is part of the How PubMed Works series sponsored by our National Training Office (NTO).

June 2020

From Beyond our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information – June 2, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join the Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA) for this one-hour webinar that will provide a basic introduction to foreign-born populations. The presentation will start with some background data about immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers. Then, it will briefly touch on concepts related to cultural competence and humility and how to integrate them into your work. Finally, attendees will review the CDC’s Refugee Health Profiles, HHS’s Office of Minority Health, and the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus and HealthReach.

New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians 2020 – June 11, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM ET – The New England Region (NER) is hosting a free virtual conference for librarians. Topics will probably include, depending on speaker availability: vaccine research & manufacture, virology, making Health Devices in non-industrial settings, IRB and human subjects research in the shifting landscape. More details will be available closer to the event date.

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out the classes below that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

On-demand webinars available from the Public Library Association (PLA) – On-demand webinars are archived recordings of previous PLA webinars available 24/7 for viewing at your convenience. Library staff who find themselves with extra time to learn during the COVID-19 crisis have reached out to PLA about educational opportunities. Whenever possible, PLA has provided resources at low or no cost to PLA members and others working in public libraries.

Coping and Caring in the Time of COVID-19 – Join the Medical Library Association for this series of free, live, online conversations! These weekly conversations for MLA members and the wider health information professional community are designed to help you address professional and personal pain points related to the current crisis. You can also share ideas for topics and presenters, or volunteer to present.

  • Supporting Oral Health in the Time of COVID-19 – May 5, 1:00-1:30 PM ET – Dental Caucus leadership members Amanda Nevius, Hirsh Health Sciences Library, Tufts University, Boston, MA; Nicole Theis-Mahon, AHIP, Health Sciences Libraries University of Minnesota–Minneapolis; and Nena Schvaneveldt, AHIP, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.
  • Critical Appraisal of COVID-19 Research – May 12, 1:00-1:30 PM ET – Marie Ascher, Health Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla; Abraham Wheeler, AHIP, MSU Libraries, Michigan State University–East Lansing; Rachel Pinotti, AHIP, Levy Library, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; and Amy Blevins, Ruth Lilly Medical Library, Indiana University School of Medicine–Indianapolis.

Overview of COVID-19 and CDC’s Response to the Pandemic with a Highlight of Federal COVID-19 Resources – May 5, 2:00-3:00 PM ET -This webinar will provide an overview of COVID-19 and the CDC’s public health emergency response. In addition, a highlight of Federal resources available on COVID-19 will be presented with emphasis on those resources that might be relevant to libraries and researchers. This webinar is free to attend.

Drawn to Graphic Medicine: Bringing Comics into Medical Librarianship – May 20, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Graphic medicine, the intersection of health care and comics, has emerged over the last ten years as a growing field in the health sciences, particularly in relation to health humanities and education. Librarians can play a vital role in supporting graphic medicine by collecting and distributing graphic medicine materials and including graphic medicine in their work or instruction efforts. In this webinar, presenters will discuss where graphic medicine came from and why it is valuable, how you can start collecting graphic medicine at your library, and how you can integrate it into your work in the library. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Categories: RML Blogs

Take a Breather!

SCR News - Thu, 2020-04-30 22:05

 

 

There’s been a lot of hype around air pollution in recent years, and rightfully so; it affects all of us, every day, around the clock, starting from the exact moment we are born and continuing throughout our entire lives. It has become such a normalized topic that on the evening news, many meteorologists and weather reporters note information about the safety of the air around us. When summer approaches, this coverage only increases as pollutants react on a molecular level to the heat and are released into the atmosphere at an increased rate. We in the five-state South Central Region are especially susceptible to this accelerated release of ozone because of the seasonal heat. It’s a subject we all know a little bit about, but we think right now, before summer fully settles in, is a good time to brush up and even learn more about this vital subject so inextricably linked to us all.

Air pollution – the kind that comes from tailpipes, factories, chimneys, and manufacturing plants – seems like a relatively modern problem. It’s easy to imagine that the time before the Industrial Revolution was probably graced by beautiful, clear, oxygenated atmosphere; in reality, though, commentary on declining air quality has been documented for hundreds of years. In the year 1157 BCE, Queen Eleanor of Aquataine is said to have fled England’s Tutbury Castle because the air in her home was so heavily cloaked in wood smoke that she could no longer bear it. London in the 800s BCE was known for its nearly unbreathable air due in part to its increasing population and, as a result, increasing chimney use. Even dating long before that, there are accounts of Egyptian kings and Roman philosophers remarking on pollution increase. Hippocrates himself, frequently regarded as the father of modern medicine, often wrote about poor air quality, stating that Rome’s was “a situation…generally impure and unwholesome” in his book On Airs, Waters, and Places circa 400 BCE. As it turns out, declining air quality has been a concern for hundreds of years (at least) and, as in the countless generations before us, we must work to understand its effects in order to mitigate the damage it causes.

The week of May 4, 2020, we at the NNLM recognize Air Quality Awareness week as a time to examine and acknowledge the air we breathe and how it affects our health. Fortunately, unlike our ancestors, we have acutely-honed technology that measures and monitors our environment. As a result, there are several resources available to give us real-time updates on air pollution and quality. Visit these sources to learn more about what’s going on where you live:

The American Lung Association’s State of the Air program allows users to access air pollution report cards that outline recent ozone presence and affected populations. This report has been ongoing for more than two decades.

Via AirNow.gov, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers their now-ubiquitous AQI (Air Quality Index), most notable for its distinct green to red warning levels.

NLM’s ToxTown is home to robust information on environmental health, contaminants, and suggestions for community action.

Do you have young adults in your life? Check out the Air Pollution section of NLM’s Environmental Health Student Portal, designed specifically for middle school students (check out the succinct primer on ozone).

Of course, it’s hard to go wrong with tried and true MedlinePlus, which has tons of information on air pollution, accessible via this page.

We hope you will set aside a little time in the coming week to learn more about air pollution where you live. Becoming well-versed in the effects of atmospheric pollution may just be the breath of fresh air you’re looking for!

Remember to follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Read All About It: May is Mental Health Month

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2020-04-30 21:00

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought widespread stress and uncertainty which may take a toll on our mental health. What an appropriate time to recognize May as Mental Health Month. The NNLM Reading Club features three books to spark a book club discussion on different facets of mental health. On our Mental Health Resources page, you’ll find downloadable materials and program ideas to help educate and reduce the stigma often associated with mental health disorders. To learn more, visit the NNLM Reading Club. Choose a book, share the information, and start the conversation.

Little Panic by Amanda Stern l Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb l Hidden Valley Road by Robert Kolker

Categories: RML Blogs

Member Highlight: Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY

MAR News - Thu, 2020-04-30 14:26
Jessica Koos

Jessica Koos, Health Sciences Librarian at Stony Brook University

The most recent Research Data Access & Preservation (RDAP) Summit was held from March 11-13 at the Santa Fe Convention Center in the beautiful city of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Fortunately, the conference took place immediately before quarantining was implemented due to the recent COVID-19 outbreak. Several of the speakers and attendees cancelled their in-person attendance due to the outbreak, however the conference organizers diligently made the in-person presentations available to those attending remotely using Zoom. Several speakers also provided remote presentations.

The keynote speaker on the first day was Dr. Michele Suina, Program Director at the Albuquerque Area Southwest Tribal Epidemiology Center. Dr. Suina is a member of Cochiti Pueblo, and she related the cultural considerations of her people regarding data collection. She also spoke about Indigenous Data Sovereignty and its role in ensuring that indigenous populations have control over their own data.

The keynote speaker on the second day was Dr. Amber Budden, Director for Community Engagement and Outreach at DataONE, which is a large initiative made up of multiple collaborators designed to facilitate the sharing of environmental data. Dr. Budden’s presentation detailed the successes and future goals of DataONE.

The majority of the conference consisted of various panel presentations organized into themes, including Partnerships, Data Visualization, Consortia, and Data Privacy. Of particular interest was a panel presentation from Dr. David Fearon, Senior Data Management Consultant at Johns Hopkins University, entitled “Screening for Human Subject Disclosure Risk During Data Curation and RDM Service Connections.” The presentation described the efforts being undertaken by the university in providing various types of support to researchers in the health sciences in order to facilitate the sharing of health-related data.

Other conference activities included lightning rounds and the RDAP Business Meeting. Additionally, a poster session allowed for discussions among speakers and attendees. Opportunities for networking abounded over delicious conference-provided meals with a distinctly New Mexican flair.

Overall, this summit covered numerous aspects of data management as it relates to libraries and librarians. There was something for everyone, from the novice data management librarian to the data management specialist. I would encourage anyone with an interest in this topic to attend future events.

Jessica Koos

Jessica Koos at RDAP

If you’re interested in learning more about RDAP and the annual RDAP summit, please visit rdapassociation.org.

Written by Jessica Koos, Health Sciences Librarian at Stony Brook University.

Categories: RML Blogs

Technology Funding Spotlight: … Because there is so much more than Google!

SEA News - Thu, 2020-04-30 11:58

Guest Post By: Mary Pat Gage, Medical Librarian, Baptist Health South Florida

Patient/Family Resource Center & Medical Library

Patient/Family Resource Center & Medical Library

The Patient/Family Resource Center & Medical Library in the Baptist Health South Florida Miami Cancer Institute (MCI) is centrally located on the second floor and is part of a beautiful research and multi-disciplinary care outpatient facility. In addition to providing library services to our clinical staff, we invite patients and their families to use the library to request librarian-mediated searches, browse consumer health materials, use a computer, or simply enjoy a quiet place to wait between appointments.

The MCI Social Work Case Managers use the library for support group programming, and expressed interest in also offering consumer health library instruction. At the time, however, there was a major limitation: the library had a wall-mounted 60” television, but no AV equipment to present course materials on. We therefore applied for a technology grant to cover the costs of a minicomputer and wireless mouse/keyboard that, when connected to the television, would convert it to a monitor. We were delighted and appreciative to be awarded the grant, and as a result, now have the training infrastructure we need.

The plan was to hold 15 minute sessions as part of monthly support group meetings for 1 year, and in September 2019, we held the first session. It was attended by 10 patients/family members and I used a short PowerPoint presentation followed by a live demonstration about using the BHSF library page to find authoritative resources. Particular attention was placed on MedlinePLUS, the National Cancer Institute, and Clinical Trials.gov. This group was very interested in clinical trials information and took away MEDLINE Plus bookmarks.

Patient/Family Resource Center & Medical Library

While feedback from the social workers was positive, in February 2020, the support group facilitators reported that the consumer health instruction took too much time away from meeting the immediate needs of the patients and caregivers during their scheduled group appointments, and asked to put the program on hold.

We now use the equipment for digital signage filled with rotating images of library locations and services, NLM resources, databases, and event photos. Fortunately, the display is easily viewed from both inside and outside the library (thanks to a clear glass exterior wall). While the original requestors put the program on hold, we have been asked about scheduling in-library training with our nurse educators. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has delayed these efforts for now, but we plan to resume them upon our return, and appreciate having the equipment to provide it!

Categories: RML Blogs

Resource guide to CDC resources related to COVID-19 in Spanish

MCR News - Wed, 2020-04-29 20:01

Nora Franco, Consumer Health Librarian from the NNLM Pacific Southwest Region has created a COVID-19 CDC resource guide in Spanish.  The guide can be found here: https://nnlm.gov/psr/guides/covid19_espanol

The resources are listed in Spanish first, followed by English.  Please feel free to share the link to this guide and add it to your list of other COVID-19 related resources.

The description of the guide is as follows:

Esta guía de recursos está destinada a proporcionar recursos informativos de los CDC relacionados con COVID-19 en español.

This resource guide is intended to provide informational resources from the CDC related to COVID-19 in Spanish.

Categories: RML Blogs

Free Resources for Public Libraries: 

MCR News - Wed, 2020-04-29 19:53

The Public Library Association (PLA), National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program (All of Us) have partnered together to create free resources for library staff to support their community’s digital literacy needs. Resources include a curriculum guide for library staff to teach digital literacy by using health topics and a series of online modules designed to teach basic Internet skills. Available in English and Spanish, the modules are designed to help new internet users navigate the online world. Visit the digital health literacy page to access these resources and opportunities and more!

Categories: RML Blogs

Stephen Sherry, PhD, Named Acting Director of NLM’s National Center for Biotechnology Information

PSR Newsletter - Wed, 2020-04-29 17:13
man in suit and tie smiling at the camera

Stephen Sherry, PhD

National Library of Medicine Director Patti Brennan, RN, PhD, has named Stephen Sherry, PhD, Acting Director of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine effective March 31, 2020. As Acting Director of NCBI, Dr. Sherry oversees a large suite of online resources for biological information and data, including the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database and the PubMed database of citations and abstracts for published life science journals. He is also responsible for developing and operating all NCBI production services, with program areas spanning literature, sequences, chemistry, clinical research, and medical genetics.

Dr. Sherry also leads an NLM program to migrate NCBI’s largest resource, the Sequence Read Archive, into the cloud with the transfer and management of petabyte-scale sequence data on two commercial cloud platforms. He conducts research on the architecture of population genetic information to ensure human genetic information systems are both useful to researchers and respectful to the privacy of study participants.

Dr. Sherry earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology at the Pennsylvania State University in 1996, and post-doctorate at the Louisiana State University Medical Center prior to joining NLM in 1998.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Digital Literacy Resources from PLA and All of Us

SEA News - Wed, 2020-04-29 12:44

In a time where we rely so heavily on digital connectivity, how can we ensure that library communities have the support they need to stay connected?

The Public Library Association (PLA), National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program (All of Us) have partnered together to create free resources for library staff to support their community’s digital literacy needs. Resources include a curriculum guide for library staff to teach digital literacy by using health topics and a series of online modules designed to teach basic Internet skills. Available in English and Spanish, the modules are designed to help new internet users navigate the online world.

Learn more about why digital literacy is so important to health, participate in virtual trainings, access free resources to help your library support digital health literacy, and promote your digital literacy training sessions to individuals in your community in partnership with NNLM and All of Us.

Visit nnlm.gov/allofus/digitalhealthliteracy to access these resources and opportunities and more!

Looking for more ways to engage your community around digital literacy?

Try promoting citizen science as a way for your community to practice digital literacy skills, learn about factors that impact health, and contribute meaningful data to scientific research!

To get started, check out our online course “Introduction to Citizen Science,” a free, online class developed in partnership with SciStarter. This course is for any member of the public who is interested in learning about citizen science and how they can participate in citizen science activities both online and in-person.

Visit scistarter.org/nlm to access citizen science resources.

NNLM invites you to learn and share innovative ways to continue supporting the digital literacy needs of your communities with your colleagues in the NNLM network.

These opportunities have been brought to you in partnership with All of Us, a national research program seeking one million or more people from across the United States to help speed up medical research. Learn more about All of Us at joinallofus.org/internetskills.

Categories: RML Blogs

Victory 3D Printing for Health Care Personnel

SEA News - Tue, 2020-04-28 13:47

Guest Post By: Brian Zelip, Emerging Technologies Librarian, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland, Baltimore

Health care personnel the world over are facing the dangers of a critical shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) during the COVID-19 pandemic. PPE includes items such as isolation gowns, eye protection, face masks, N95 respirators, ventilators, and more. In response to the global supply crisis, agencies like the CDC and FDA are recommending the use of improvised PPE to fill the gap until official supplies are more readily available.

People all around the world are leveraging a wide range of tools and materials to make improvised PPE. Academic health sciences libraries with makerspaces are particularly suited to contribute to this effort. Not only are such libraries likely to have 3D printers and other fabrication tools, they are also likely to have a connection to the front lines of local responses to public health crises.

The University of Maryland Health Sciences & Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has been contributing 3D printed parts for various local PPE needs.

  • A Baltimore-wide effort to make durable improvised PPE available to health care providers by the case at minimal cost. The organizers solicit people with 3D printers and sewing machines to print face shield parts and sew face masks. Organizers then sanitize, assemble, and package them for distribution.
  • The Infectious Disease department at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Multiple PPE designs have been prototyped and reviewed for usage.
  • All 10,000+ personnel at the University of Maryland Medical Center. All hospital staff wear face masks for extended periods of times. It is causing broken skin and irritation behind their ears. 3D printed surgical mask tension release bands (“ear savers”) can alleviate this issue. See the “S” design and the various head size design.
3D Printed Personal Protective Equipment

A selection of the 3D printed personal protective equipment produced by the University of Maryland HS/HSL

The HS/HSL is not alone in this effort. Other academic health sciences libraries are involved in similar work, including but not limited to:

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: April 28, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-04-28 12:25

The NNLM PNR, in coordination with Washington School Research Associates (WSRA), is conducting a regional needs assessment via SurveyGizmo. Please consider taking our survey when you receive the survey link via email. The insights you provide will help to shape the nature of our partnerships and focus of our work going forward. The survey will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and must be completed in one sitting. Thank you for participating in this important process of ongoing improvement!

 

[Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *]

In the Dragonfly:

Citizen Science & Alzheimer’s Disease
Stall Catchers is an easy online game developed to help accelerate Alzheimer’s research. The game was created by the scientists at Cornell University to support their EyesOnAlz research project. Learn more about the game and how to participate in this project on the blog

DataFlash: New and Free Virtual Science Conference in June 2020
We are pleased to announce that New England Science Bootcamp for Librarians will host a FREE virtual conference on June 11, 2020, from 6 A.M. – 1 P.M. PT. Learn more about this event and how to attend on the blog post

 

Educational Opportunities:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

What’s All This Talk About Citizen Science?: Darlene Cavalier, founder of SciStarter, author of “The Field Guide to Citizen Science” and Principal Investigator (PI) of multiple programs catalyzing citizen science in libraries and around the globe, will guide you as you discover what citizen science is, who is and isn’t engaged, how libraries can be community hubs for citizen science, and where the field may go in the future. Her introduction will be followed by two high school teachers from The Dalles, Oregon, who will share their experience working with students on the SciStarter/NLM citizen science projects. Don’t miss out on a unique opportunity to learn about the buzz surrounding citizen science and how your library can facilitate citizen science in your community! April 29 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

How PubMed®Works: How PubMed Works is a series of four 90-minute classes presented via WebEx. The individual classes are:

  • How PubMed Works: Introduction
  • How PubMed Works: Selection
  • How PubMed Works: MeSH (Medical Subject Headings)
  • How PubMed Works: ATM (Automatic Term Mapping)

Classes are scheduled in May and June. Register for each separate session. (1.5 MLA CE for each session).

Dementia Awareness for Public Libraries: This interactive presentation will introduce library staff to the National Library of Medicine resources, enhance understanding of the public library’s role in supporting families living with dementia, and present an opportunity to contribute to our understanding of the disease by participating in the All of Us Research Program. April 29 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. PT. Register

Wellness in the Library Workplace: You’re a library worker. You’re already helping those in your community find health information. As a library worker, what are you doing to manage your own well-being? Join us to discover ways to improve your own personal well-being and create a healthy workplace. August 3 – 16. (4 MLA CE) Register

From Beyond our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information: This class is designed to assist librarians and others who work with diverse populations in locating health information. The resources presented are selected for their emphasis on providing culturally relevant information in the preferred language of the population. Background information on refugees and immigrants in the U.S. and their unique health issues will be presented. The class will be taught via Moodle and includes short readings, videos, and activities. August 28 – September 25. (4 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

COVID-19 and Health Equity: Exploring Disparities and Long-Term Health Impacts: The National Academy of Medicine and the American Public Health Association are exploring the state of the science surrounding the current outbreak of COVID-19 in the United States and globally, with a focus on the emerging evidence on how to best mitigate its impact through the webinar series, COVID-19 Conversations. The sixth COVID-19 Conversations webinar will explore the disproportionate impact COVID-19 is having on minority communities, what we can learn from past pandemics in how to provide equitable care to all, and what we can do now to ensure that all communities receive the care they need. April 29 from 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. PT. Register and view recordings of past webinars in this series

How Climate Changes Health and Why You Should Care: Join this live NIH webcast with speaker John Balbus, Director, NIEHS-WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Sciences on Wednesday, May 6 from 8:00 a.m. – Noon. Register

 

From the National Library of Medicine / National Institutes of Health:

“Profiles in Science: Exploring Stories of Scientific Discovery”, from the NLM Director’s blog

The World’s First Public Health Emergency of International Concern

The Public Library Association (PLA), National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program have partnered together to create free resources for library staff to support their community’s digital literacy needs.

*“The Challenge of Tracking COVID-19’s Stealthy Spread”, from the NIH Director’s blog

*Expert U.S. panel develops NIH treatment guidelines for COVID-19

*Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines

*NIH begins study to quantify undetected cases of coronavirus infection

Diet may help preserve cognitive function

*Digital Mental Health: Innovating in a Time of High Anxiety

Infant Temperament Predicts Personality More Than 20 Years Later

*Resources from the Disaster Information Management Research Center:

 

FYI:

*Resources: COVID-19

 *American Psychiatric Association (APA) Coronavirus Resources
To provide support in the response to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), APA is collecting authoritative and timely resources in this information hub. Included are resources for families, psychiatrists, community leaders and others.

Report: Healthy Eating Research Nutrition Guidelines for the Charitable Food System
This report, prepared by Healthy Eating Research, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, presents recommendations for evidence-based nutrition guidelines tailored to the unique needs and capacity of the charitable food system. The intent of these recommendations is to improve the quality of foods in food banks and pantries in order to increase access to and promote healthier food choices

Survey: National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health
The 2019 National Inventory of Data Sharing Collaborations for Health is a nationwide survey conducted by Data Across Sectors for Health on behalf of All In: Data for Community Health. The National Inventory is focused on better understanding the location and nature of multi-sector collaborations in the U.S., their capacity to systematically share data to improve community health outcomes and how these collaborations progress over time. Results from the survey will be summarized in a report and made available in an online directory and map.

Categories: RML Blogs

Attending MisinfoCon 7.0: A Summit on Misinformation in Health Communication

MAR News - Mon, 2020-04-27 12:00

Already familiar with MisinfoCon? Skip ahead to read our top 10 takeaways from MisinfoCon 7.0.

Kelsey Cowles

Kelsey Cowles

In a digital world where information spreads around the world in seconds, the ongoing issue of misinformation deserves serious attention – especially since false, misleading, or unfounded information sometimes spreads more quickly and easily than reliable information. In 2017, three groups – The First Draft Coalition, The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard and Hacks/Hackers – joined forces to address misinformation at a summit. MisinfoCon: A Summit on Misinformation took place on the MIT campus and included lectures, interactive workshops, and facilitated conversations. The event sought to “bring together ambassadors from technology platforms, news organizations, as well as experts in social science, media literacy, policy, advocacy, cybersecurity…software developers, designers, librarians, academics and actual, honest-to-goodness ‘real people’ that are impacted by misinformation” (Brooks). Uniquely, this event also included a “Creative Studio,” which featured live demos of relevant media tools, town hall meetings discussing approaches to misinformation, and other interactive platforms

Tess Wilson

Tess Wilson

Building on the success of this summit, several similar events have taken place around the world. The most recent iteration, MisinfoCon 7.0 in Washington, D.C., was hosted by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics (NASEM) and featured a diverse group of attendees including academic researchers, corporate and nonprofit representatives, government employees, and information professionals, all brought together by a shared interest in combating the particularly concerning problem of online health misinformation. This event also featured a version of the Creative Studio in the form of a Wikipedia edit-a-thon.

The NNLM MAR staff was particularly excited about MisinfoCon 7.0’s focus on health misinformation. We were eager to learn what more we can do to help counter health misinformation and grateful for the opportunity to participate in important conversations about its origins, spread, and repercussions. Many of the experts at this conference focused on three major areas of health misinformation: climate change, vaccine skepticism, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Kelsey Cowles, Academic Coordinator, and Tess Wilson, Community Engagement Coordinator, were able to attend this interactive event, and put together a list of takeaways for our members.

Top 10 Takeaways:
  1. NASEM has published a number of reports and proceedings on health literacy and science communication. NASEM also runs Based on Science, a website that answers common questions about science and health.
    Learn more by watching Kara Laney, NASEM
  2. In a digital world where information spreads around the world in seconds, the ongoing issue of misinformation deserves serious attention – especially since false, misleading, or unfounded information sometimes spreads more quickly and easily than reliable information. In the academic sphere, incorporating current events discussion into the classroom can create a bridge between the subject matter and its related media environment, increasing students’ connection to the material.
    Learn more by watching Kristy Carver Roschke, Arizona State University
  3. While much advice about effective science communication focuses on the need to create easily understandable and exciting media, research has shown that communications that are clear and simple can increase confidence more than they increase actual knowledge, while more nuanced (or even confusing) presentations of the same material can increase knowledge more than confidence. It is therefore important to find balance between engaging and informing the audience.
    Learn more by watching Adam Cole, freelance science journalist
  4. We know a number of things about misinformation on social media:
    • social networks easily become echo chambers
    • falsehoods spread easily and quickly, particularly when an information vacuum exists, they feel parsimonious, and they do not conflict with pre-existing beliefs
    • credible information is often complex, nuanced, and uncertain, which can make it less palatable
    • disinformation campaigns often begin by constructing a false equivalency between credible and unreliable information sources or giving the impression that the truth is unknown
      Learn more by watching Wen-Ying Chou, National Cancer Institute
  5. While social media is often a source of misinformation, it can also be a source of credible information and correction. “Observational correction,” or seeing someone else be corrected when they post misinformation, can be effective. “Social correction” (for example, commenting on a misleading post with a link to credible information disputing the post) are similar in effectiveness to “platform-based correction” (for example, related links to credible information that automatically display below a post).
    Learn more by watching Leticia Bode, Georgetown University
  6. When beliefs that tend to be particularly deeply ingrained are involved, like vaccine skepticism, even discussing misinformation with the intent of refuting it can actually contribute to its spread. These beliefs can be tied up with social identity and heavily influenced by celebrities, family, and friends. Thinking more about the role of personal storytelling and connections in combating this type of misinformation may be more effective than focusing on numbers and expertise.
    Learn more by watching Linda Fu, Children’s National Hospital
  7. It is important for journalists to debunk myths directly in headlines rather than doing so only in an article – this lesson can also be applied to science communication in general. Being transparent about how conclusions are reached is also important.
    Learn more by watching Laura Helmuth, Washington Post
  8. Wikipedia is one of the most widely used online sources of health information. While its accuracy is typically considered on par with other encyclopedias, hoax articles and misinformation do exist on Wikipedia. Humans are not particularly good at identifying hoax articles, but artificial intelligence (AI) shows great promise in identifying this type of misinformation. Information professionals also have a role to play in quality control on Wikipedia, particularly in the realm of ensuring reliability of sources.
    Learn more by watching Srijan Kumar, Georgia Tech; Lane Rasberry, University of Virginia
  9. Humans are social creatures and rumor can be an extraordinarily effective method of communication. However, especially in situations where communities have limited access to reliable health information, rumor can contribute to anxiety and stress as well as the spread of misinformation. By using tools specifically tailored to capture the anecdotes that spread throughout communities, experts can collect valuable evidence to inform the way accurate health information is disseminated.
    Learn more by watching Alison Campbell, Internews
  10. Addressing media literacy in school curricula is one way educators can equip their students to enter a world inundated with misinformation. Integrating these concepts into primary and secondary education – and using real-life articles and case studies to do so – encourages students to think critically about the media they consume and make informed judgments about its validity.
    Learn more by watching Christi Hofland, IREX; Matt Venderwerff, IREX

Interested in helping NNLM combat misinformation? Join the April 2020 #CiteNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon!

Sources: Brooks, Jeanne, James Geary, Burt Herman, Jenny 8. Lee, Phillip Smith, and Claire Wardle. “MisinfoCon, A Summit on Misinformation, Feb 24–26, at MIT Media Lab & The Nieman Foundation for Journalism.” MisinfoCon, 25 Jan. 2017, https://misinfocon.com/misinfocon-a-summit-on-misinformation-feb-24-26-at-mit-media-lab-the-nieman-foundation-for-232507bd08a6

Written by Kelsey Cowles, Academic Coordinator, and Tess Wilson, Community Engagement Coordinator, for the Spring 2020 edition of The MAReport quarterly newsletter.

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