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RML Blogs

Call for Applications Issued for the 2019 NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine

PSR News - Mon, 2018-04-30 18:00

In cooperation with the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences, the NLM is pleased to announce its call for applications for the 2019 NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine, which supports research in the historical collections of the National Library of Medicine including but not limited to NLM’s collection of Michael E. DeBakey papers, which encompass the diverse areas in which DeBakey made a lasting impact, such as surgery, medical education, and health care policy, and includes material from the early 1900s to 2009. Overall, the NLM collections span ten centuries, encompass a variety of digital and physical formats, and originate from nearly every part of the globe. The Fellowship was established in 2016 and is supported by a generous gift from The DeBakey Medical Foundation.

Fellowships of up to $10,000 will be awarded to individual applicants, not to institutions, to help offset the costs associated with visiting and using the NLM collections, but may not be used for institutional costs or overhead (e.g. clerical costs, supplies, or other attendant project expenses). Applications are welcome from anyone over the age of eighteen, of any academic discipline and status. Non-U.S. citizens may apply. To submit an application, visit the online application portal, which is maintained by FAES in cooperation with the NLM. Details about the application process and required documents are available from the Fellowship website mentioned above. To receive consideration, all required materials must be submitted to FAES, via the online application portal, by midnight EDT, September 28, 2018. NLM will announce awards by the end of the calendar year.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Reflections on Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles

GMR News - Mon, 2018-04-30 09:22

In the NNLM Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles course, we asked participants, as they progressed through the course to consider the following questions: Do you think health sciences librarians should get involved with big data in healthcare? Where should librarians get involved, if you think they should? If you think they should not, explain why. You may also combine a “should/should not” approach if you would like to argue both sides. NNLM will feature responses from different participants over the coming weeks.

Written by: Patricia L. Smith, Impact and Dissemination Librarian at Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

Big data in healthcare is a booming area with many facets and ample opportunities for library involvement. The question is not should librarians get involved, but how can librarians get involved? Librarians are natural stewards for big data—we have unique skills that we can leverage to assist researchers, particularly in citing data, data management, information ethics, and data visualization.

The most natural, and perhaps easiest, segue into big data for librarians is in the area of data citation. Researchers are expected to cite their sources—but what about data sets? Data sets are informing practice and are integral parts of the research process, but it is not yet standard practice to cite data. Due to this gap, it is very difficult to trace the use of this data, which hinders the overall research process. Librarians are already embedded in citation support. We teach classes on EndNote, RefWorks, and other bibliographic management software, and answer questions about citation styles and bibliographies. We are already poised to start conversations about the importance of citing data. Librarians can take the initiative create guides, classes, and other promotional material about how to cite data and why it is important. Furthermore, promoting the citation of data would help us track metrics and provide invaluable information about the impact, resonance, and reach of our researchers’ work. This is also an opportunity to promote depositing data sets in institutional repositories when appropriate. Finally, we also have relationships with vendors/publishers—this could open up additional conversations about indexing data sets in various databases.

Another area in which librarians are increasingly getting involved is in the area of research data management. Metadata librarians, electronic resources librarians, and data librarians are uniquely positioned to collect and appraise data, manage data collections and add appropriate metadata, and preserve data. We can help researchers with best practices for data structure, vocabularies, formats, and more.

Big data is not without controversy when it comes to privacy and ethics. Librarians have a history of exhibiting passion in the area of information ethics, so this seems like a natural partnership! Librarians can take the initiative to start conversations with the public about big data—what it is, what it is not, and why it could raise the proverbial ethical eyebrows. On the flip side, librarians can also have conversations with researchers about the public’s concerns surrounding big data. Researchers probably have the best intentions when it comes to using big data, but they need to be aware of why people might have concerns with privacy. Some hold the belief that “patients have a moral obligation to contribute to the common purpose of improving the quality and value of clinical care in the system.”[1] While I concur that participation in healthcare is crucial to moving the science forward, the phrase “moral obligation” might not be the best choice of words, especially from the perspective of skeptical patients, patients concerned with privacy, or patients from racial or ethnic groups that have historically been mistreated by the medical community. Librarians might be able to liaise between the public and researchers to help strengthen these partnerships, and help researchers communicate in the most effective ways.

Another way librarians can get involved in big data is by learning more about data visualization. Not all librarians have to learn R, or Python, or JavaScript, but having a basic knowledge of programming and speaking the language of data scientists will only help our position. There are many free resources to learn about data visualization, e.g. Sci2, Tableau Public, VOSviewer, and more. Presenting data in a visual format is a valued skill, and librarians can learn some basic skills to get a seat at the table.

Overall, there are many ways librarians can and should get involved in big data in healthcare. We must be confident about the skills we already possess and how they can translate to big data, and we must be proactive in marketing our knowledge.

References

  1. Longhurst CA, Harrington RA, Shah NH. A ‘green button’ for using aggregate patient data at the point of care. Health Aff [Internet]. 2014;33(7):1229-35.
Categories: RML Blogs

Everett Haitian Community Center hosts Panel Discussion

NER News - Sat, 2018-04-28 10:01

On a rainy Sunday afternoon, I pulled my rolly luggage into a church basement on the Everett/Chelsea line in Massachusetts. I had MedlinePlus materials, printouts from HealthReach, laptop, iPhone and my National Library of Medicine table cover. I heard the congregation singing in the chapel upstairs. Our Lady of Grace celebrates Mass in Haitian Creole on Sundays at 12:30pm. On this day, the Everett Haitian Community Center (EHCC) hosted a panel discussion on legal rights and responsibilities for those with Temporary Protected Status, and the impacts of stress on mental and physical health. All members of the panel focused on telling the congregation where they could access free, reliable assistance. An interpreter translated all comments into Haitian Creole.

People seated at a table in a church basement.

Panel Discussion at Our Lady of Grace Church

The discussion was moderated by EHCC’s Reverend Myrlande DesRosiers and was interpreted by Kam Sylveste. Father James Barry welcomed us to Our Lady of Grace, and Everett City Councilor Michael McLaughlin reiterated Fr. Barry’s sentiment that we all are learning from each other at this event.  Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley spoke of her commitment to those living with uncertainty. Temporary Protective Status (TPS) ends for Haitians on July 22, 2019.

Sabrineh Ardalan, Professor at Harvard Law School, warned the congregation about immigration scams. She urged everyone to contact the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program for referrals to reliable immigration lawyers. Alex Prie, Coordinator of Somerville’s Immigrant Providers Group, spoke about available health care services. He acknowledged the impacts of stress on mental and physical health. I spoke about accessing health information in English, French and Haitian Creole from MedlinePlus. I demonstrated how to use MedlinePlus on a laptop and a phone. MedlinePlus draws most of its multilingual materials from HealthReach. In addition, I talked about the role of public libraries in assisting those without computer or internet access.

After the panel discussion, I distributed bilingual stress-related health information. I located these topics in HealthReach: violence in the home, suicide prevention, asthma triggers, diabetes management, and the benefits of exercise and mindfulness meditation.

HealthReach

The website MedlinePlus.gov is available in English and Spanish. For other languages, MedlinePlus taps into HealthReach. Developed by the National Library of Medicine, HealthReach collects print and video resources from U.S. Federal and state government agencies, as well as from major national organizations such as the World Health Organization. HealthReach works to identify materials created by hospitals, clinics, community health centers, and voluntary organizations who serve people with limited English proficiency. Many of the materials are bilingual. The English-language versions are easy-to-read.

Community-based organizations and health care centers might be interested in submitting translated health print materials and/or videos. HealthReach will want to know the copyright status, type of resource and contact information. Please email HealthReach with any questions about submission.

HealthReach will be discontinuing the “Provider Information” materials due to low usage.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar on NNLM All of Us National Program – Get Involved!

SEA News - Fri, 2018-04-27 13:13

Description: NNLM All of Us National Program Launches May 6 – Get Involved!

Join us to learn about the NNLM All of Us National Program. The NNLM has teamed up with the NIH All of Us Research Program to raise awareness about the new organization and we want you to be a part of the action! The NIH All of Us Research Program is a historic effort to gather data from one million people living in the United States to accelerate research and improve health and is officially launching on May 6! In this webinar we will cover ways you can participate in the launch and other opportunities to get involved. This is the “first call” for NNLM members to get involved with the NNLM All of Us National Program.  Find more information here.

Objectives: 

  • Learn about the NNLM All of Us National Program
  • Gain an understanding of the goals of the NIH All of UsNational Program
  • Learn about how NNLM network members can get involved!

To join the meeting:
Join from computer: https://uiowa.zoom.us/j/728129351

Or Telephone:
Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: +1 646 876 9923 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1 408 638 0968
Meeting ID: 728 129 351

This webinar will be held using Zoom web conferencing software, for more information about Zoom (and tutorials), please go to: https://its.uiowa.edu/webconferencing

View/Cancel your registration: https://nnlm.gov/registration/23464

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2018-04-27 10:24

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

All of Us Launch: The All of Us Research Program is ready launch nationally on May 6! The official launch will be held in Kansas City and seven communities throughout the United States. Join us or watch the broadcast live.

HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative: The deadline to participate in the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey (HSLANJ) Spring 2018 Group Licensing Offer is today, April 27. NNLM MAR members are eligible for this cost-saving opportunity!

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

An historical overview of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, 1985–2015 – Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA), April 2018

– MARquee News Highlights

Should Health Sciences Librarians be Involved with Big Data in Healthcare? – Midwest Matters, from GMR

– The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

Data Filters in PubMed and PMC – NTO News

New Free Materials: did you know that NNLM Network Members can order educational and print materials for free? The Middle Atlantic Region is proud to announce the availability of 9 new posters from the Libraries Transform campaign for Members in NY, NJ, PA and DE. Place your order today!

NLM/NIH News

What makes a data commons work?NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Genetics Home Reference turns 15!NLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

Remembering Vietnam—Donna Barbisch, Merle Snyder, Tom Berger, and Dale SmithCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Researchers: Now it’s easier to find the data you want in BioProject – NCBI Insights, Providing Insights into NCBI Resources and the Science Behind Them

NLM @ MLA – 2018NLM Technical Bulletin, Your Source for the Latest Searching Information

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is hosting a Twitter chat on teen depression in recognition of Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week. Use #NIMHChats on Thursday, May 3 from 3:00-4:00 PM ET to join the conversation!

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

All are webinars, unless noted. Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

Grab and Go: Expanding and Strengthening Senior Programming – April 27, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Participants in this GMR webinar will be introduced to creative and fun ways to expand and strengthen programming at senior facilities and at the library, especially for patrons living with dementia. Whether utilizing memory kits, travel and reading programs, and antique items to inspire memories and encourage conversations, or by incorporating painting, stuffed animals, therapy dogs, and music activities to stimulate the senses, participants can develop ideas that work for their library, community, and budget.

NNLM All of Us National Program Launches May 6 – Get Involved! – April 30, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Join the NNLM All of Us Coordinating Center to learn about the NNLM All of Us National Program. NIH’s All of Us Research Program is a historic effort to gather data from one million people living in the United States to accelerate research and improve health and is officially launching on May 6! This webinar will cover ways you can participate in the launch and other opportunities to get involved. This is the “first call” for NNLM members to get involved with the NNLM All of Us National Program.

EvalBasics 2: Planning Outcomes-Based Programs – April 30-June 4, 2018 – The logic model is a useful tool from planning projects that will help you drive toward your desired results. Participants in this asynchronous online course by NEO will learn how to identify desired outcomes, create an outcomes-based project plan using logic models, and then write objectives and evaluation plans based on those logic models. It provides an ideal framework for developing funding proposals, sets the stage for setting up a quality control system to make sure your project stays on track, and provide a structure for your final reports.

Using NCBI’s MedGen in Clinical Practice – May 2, 12:00-12:30 PM ET – MedGen, NCBI’s portal to clinical genetics, offers access to information on Mendelian disorders as well as pharmacological response phenotypes, complex diseases, and clinical features or findings. Through this NCBI webinar you will learn how to make the clinical process more efficient by finding information in MedGen on genetic phenotypes, getting a list of all clinical features of a disorder, and finding all disorders with particular features. You will also see how to retrieve actionable information such as practice guidelines for a particular condition and a list of available genetic tests in GTR. You will learn how to easily access relevant resources such as GeneReviews, OMIM and ClinicalTrials.gov as well as patient-focused resources such as the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) and Medline Plus.

Harnessing Human Power for Health: Medical Librarians & Citizen Science – May 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – With the plethora of diseases and medical conditions people face and environmental health issues encountered around the world, medical researchers and governmental regulators can’t tackle them on their own. This is where citizen science comes into play: where legions of people who often have no medical or scientific background contribute to and participate in research projects. Sponsored by SEA, this webinar will provide an overview of citizen science, as well as its variants such as volunteered geographic information, crowdsourcing and patient-led research. Health-focused librarians from a variety of settings will discover how they can support already-existing citizen science projects and gain tips on creating their own.

EMPOWER: A Community-Based Approach to Improve Care for Women with Newborns Affected by Perinatal Substance Use Disorder – May 15, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Sponsored by NER, this webinar will describe how one rural community collaborated to create a screening, referral and support program called EMPOWER (Engaging Mothers for Positive Outcomes with Early Referrals). Learn how this innovative approach helps support women and improves outcomes by identifying and addressing barriers to care for patients, health care providers and their community.

NNLM Resource Picks: Healthy Aging – Promoting Healthy Living in Older Adults through Quality Health Information – May 30, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join PSR for this next installment of NNLM Resource Picks, our collaborative, bimonthly, webcast series. This session will focus on seniors’ use and access to quality health information, highlighting resources from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and MedlinePlus.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Introduction to Software Carpentry for Librarians – May 24, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM ET – Join the ACRL University Libraries Section for an introduction to Software Carpentry for Librarians by Cam Macdonell and Clara Llebot Lorente. The rise of carpentry workshops in academic libraries comes out of scientists long standing need to effectively adopt and apply computing skills to their research practices. Assistant Professor Cam Macdonell will orient participants to the rise of carpentry education, how librarians can get involved, and carpentry communities’ future directions. Data Management Specialist Clara Llebot Lorente will discuss how she applies carpentry in her credit graduate course, during professional consultations, and in projects with university partners.

A Better You in 2018: Shaping Elizabeth Community Health Initiative – using the Elizabeth Public Library, the Shaping Elizabeth coalition premiered “A Better You in 2018,” an event that is not just a “Health Fair”, but a larger community forum. – New Jersey Health Initiatives

Grace and Harold Sewell Memorial Fund Stipends – Librarians who serve colleges of pharmacy are invited to apply for a travel stipend to Pharmacy Education 2018, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) annual meeting. The meeting will be July 21-25 in Boston, Massachusetts. The deadline for application is May 11, 2018.

Researchers search for disease markers linked to diverse populations – HHS Blog

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – April 27, 2018

SEA News - Fri, 2018-04-27 08:05

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

Top Items of Interest

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

Webinars: April 30 – May 4

Webinars: May 7 – 11

Webinars: May 14-18

On-Demand Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

In addition to the webinars listed, the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office provides webinars for subscribers to the Digital Library. Visit the NPHCO Calendar for training opportunities available.

Past Webinars Available on YouTube** 

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Focus on Data

Focus on Precision Medicine/NIH All of Us Initiative

Focus on Substance Misuse

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM accountprior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunitiesto register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guideto understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that recordings from NNLM available on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Do You Think Health Sciences Librarians Should Get Involved with Big Data in Healthcare?

PNR News - Fri, 2018-04-27 05:00

In the NNLM Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles course, we asked participants, as they progressed through the course to consider the following questions: Do you think health sciences librarians should get involved with big data in healthcare? Where should librarians get involved, if you think they should? If you think they should not, explain why. You may also combine a “should/should not” approach if you would like to argue both sides. NNLM will feature responses from different participants over the coming weeks.

Written by Sara Pimental, Senior Consultant, Kaiser Permanente, San Francisco, CA

My answer to this question is a qualified yes. However, librarians don’t HAVE to get involved to be successful. I think people panic when they think if they don’t get involved in every aspect of new trends in librarianship they will become obsolete. There are many ways to evolve; big data is just one of them.

Since I am involved in one aspect of utilizing Big Data, I would have to say yes, librarians who have the interest, should get their hands dirty. I can see skills that all librarians possess being useful in all aspects of BIG Data. For those more technically inclined, they should go all the way and become data scientists. Many us use have learned programing languages and other similar tasks and could do very well in this area.

For those of us who have no desire to become so technical but have a curious fondness for metadata there are many niches for that type of person. This is where I have landed. I assist not just with taxonomy and metadata for my website but also with linking structured data from the EHR with clinical information available on the website and soon with subscribed third party. I could envision a librarian’s talents also being useful with unstructured data such as the notes in the EHR.

In conclusion, there are a myriad of ways a librarian can get involved with Big Data. In this class we have learned about quite a few of them. I remember when I attended the opening reception at NLM’s Biomedical Informatics Course at Woods Hole, Dr. Lindberg told us we were change agents. I hope some of the participants of this class become just as inspired.

Categories: RML Blogs

Moodle Course Open for Registration – EvalBasics 2: Planning Outcomes-Based Programs – April 30 – June 4, 2018

SEA News - Thu, 2018-04-26 12:03

The NNLM Evaluation Office is offering a 5-week workshop on outcomes-based program planning. In the words of the immortal Yogi Berra, “if you don’t know where you’re going, you might not get there.” Participants will learn how to identify desired outcomes, create an outcomes-based project plan using logic models, and then write objectives and evaluation plans based on those logic models. It provides an ideal framework for developing funding proposals, sets the stage for setting up a quality control system to make sure your project stays on track, and provide a structure for your final reports.

This workshop is approved for 8 hours of MLA Continuing Education credit. It will take place through the Moodle platform.  It is a 5-module workshop that will take place over 5 weeks. While it can be completed at one’s own pace, there is a lot of interaction between participants so participants are encouraged to complete it a week at a time.

EvalBasics 2: Planning Outcomes-Based Programs

April 30 – June 4, 2018

Register

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SCR Funding Opportunities

SCR News - Thu, 2018-04-26 10:38
Picture of a Library

“Knowing Keeps Us Going” by Neil Cooper via Unsplash, July 23, 2017, CCO.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region has several funding opportunities available.  Don’t miss your chance to apply!

Library Student Outreach Award

Amount:  Up to $2,000.00

Deadline:  9/5/2018

Description:  This award promotes the value of outreach to library school students interested in health sciences librarianship.

To learn more:  https://nnlm.gov/scr/funding/library-student-outreach-award

 

Emerging Leader Award

Amount:  Up to $4,000.00

Deadline:  8/31/2018

Description:  This award motivates and prepares a librarian for a position of leadership in an academic health sciences library.

To learn more:  https://nnlm.gov/scr/funding/emerging-leader-award

 

New funding opportunities are released periodically so check our website frequently to see if there is an award you are eligible for.  If you have questions about funding opportunities, please contact:

Bethany Livingston
Research Administrator
Phone: 817-735-2370
Email: Bethany.Livingston@unthsc.edu

Like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Categories: RML Blogs

Funding Awarded to UMN for Research Data Management Education

GMR News - Thu, 2018-04-26 09:33

The GMR is excited to announce that the Health Sciences Libraries at the University of Minnesota have been awarded a Research Data Management (RDM) Award to support research data management services! The project will expand RDM education not only within their institution but across the GMR as well!

Project Description

This project has two goals:

  1. Enable health science librarians at institutions throughout the GMR to build research data management knowledge and skills and develop actionable next steps to provide data services at their libraries
  2. Enable health science faculty and graduate/professional students at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) to better understand data management best practices, be better positioned to prepare more competitive grant proposals, and learn how to prepare datasets for preservation, sharing, and re-use

To address Goal 1, the University of Minnesota will fund up to twelve travel stipends for librarians across the GMR to travel to Minneapolis and attend a special MLA CE approved Data Management Course. Librarians will be selected through a competitive application process.

To accomplish Goal 2, a data management workshop will be hosted on the University of Minnesota Duluth campus for up to 40 faculty and students. In person consultations will also be offered following the workshop to offer more personalized training.

Congrats to UMN and be on the lookout in the coming months for information about applying to attend the Data Management Course in Minnesota!

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM’s Genetics Home Reference turns 15!

PSR News - Wed, 2018-04-25 17:38
Genetics Home Reference celebrating 15 years

The Genetics Home Reference website was first launched on April 25, 2003, at NLM’s Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications. The creation of Genetics Home Reference coincided with the completion of the Human Genome Project, a 13-year international effort to map the entire human genome. Genetics Home Reference was designed to provide a bridge between the public’s interest in human genetics and the rich technical data that has emerged from the Human Genome Project and subsequent genomic research. The site began with 19 health condition summaries and 16 gene summaries. Fifteen years later, it offers summaries of more than 1,200 genetic conditions, 1,450 genes, all of the human chromosomes, and mitochondrial DNA. The information is written by NLM staff and reviewed by experts in the field.

In 2016, the website was redesigned with a more modern look and feel, better navigation, and more educational images. Usability was also improved for mobile and tablet users. Genetics Home Reference continues to be an important and useful source of health information, with an average of 1.8 million users and 3.5 million page views per month. New information and updates are added regularly. Recent and upcoming content includes:

  • New pages on a variety of health conditions, particularly common, complex diseases with a genetic component (such as diabetes, mental illnesses, and hair loss)
  • Q&As about the genetics of normal traits, such as longevity and athletic ability
  • User-friendly explanations of complex genetics concepts, including secondary findings in genetic testing and genome editing (CRISPR)
  • A guide to navigating direct-to-consumer genetic testing (such as 23andMe and Ancestry.com)
  • Images of individuals with specific genetic diseases, through a partnership with the Genetic Alliance
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Technical Bulletin Discontinues “Print This Issue” Feature

PSR News - Wed, 2018-04-25 17:30

Effective with the March – April 2018 issue of the NLM Technical Bulletin, the “Print this issue” feature will be removed from the issue cover homepage. NLM will continue to produce the HTML version of the NLM Technical Bulletin but will no longer produce a PDF file of each closed issue. PDF files for May 1969 through January-February 2018 will still be available on the Previous Issues page.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NCBI Webinar on May 2: Using NCBI’s MedGen in Clinical Practice

PSR News - Wed, 2018-04-25 17:19

On Wednesday, May 2, join National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) staff for a Webinar on MedGen, the NCBI portal to clinical genetics. It will cover how to find information in MedGen on genetic phenotypes, clinical features of disorders, and more. You will also learn how to retrieve actionable information such as practice guidelines for a condition, get a list of available genetic tests in GTR (Genetic Test Registry), and easily access resources such as GeneReviews, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), ClinicalTrials.gov, the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, and MedlinePlus.

Date and time: Wednesday, May 2, 2018, 9:00—9:30 AM PDT

Register here

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the Webinar. After the live presentation, the Webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. You can learn about future Webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Pediatric Palliative Care Resources from the National Institute of Nursing Research

MAR News - Wed, 2018-04-25 16:24

Now available on HealthReach, The NINR Palliative Care: Conversations Matter® campaign offers evidence-based materials in English and Spanish for health care providers and for parents and families of children living with serious illnesses:

NINR also provides complimentary copies of their printed materials. Please visit the Palliative Care: Conversations Matter® Brochures and Fact Sheets page for more information.

HealthReach offers easy access to free, quality, multilingual, multicultural health information for those working with or providing care to individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP). Find culturally relevant information in multiple languages and formats about health conditions and wellness topics.

HealthReach is also easy to use on tablets and mobile devices. Locate resources at point of need, everywhere with streamlined search features and results pages. All content is created or reviewed by medical professionals for quality and accuracy. Detailed abstracts, date of most recent medical review, and translation methods are provided for every resource.

Categories: RML Blogs

Public Library Spotlight: David J. Kelsey, Outreach Services Librarian, St. Charles Public Library, IL

GMR News - Wed, 2018-04-25 11:54

photo of David Kelsey in a suit with a green tieName: David J. Kelsey

Title: Outreach Services Librarian

Education: Master of Library and Information Studies, University of Rhode Island

About the St. Charles Public Library and the Outreach Services Department:

The St. Charles Public Library is located in St. Charles, Illinois, which is 35 miles west of the city of Chicago. The Library serves a population of 55,000 residents. The Outreach Services Department of the St. Charles Public Library (consisting of David Kelsey, Dana Hintz, Lynda Spraner, and Christine Steck) provides library materials, programming, and engagement activities to nine senior facilities, three home care facilities, and fifteen homebound patrons a month. Outreach Services presents weekly, biweekly, and monthly programming at seven senior facilities, presenting over 25 programs a month that engage over 250 seniors. The Outreach team also facilitates fifteen community book and magazine exchanges including at our local hospital, homeless shelter, judicial center, Salvation Army, and clinics that provide free counseling, medical, and dental services to individuals living below the poverty line.

Why is health literacy important in your community?

Alzheimer’s disease has personally affected millions of Americans and their families. The Alzheimer’s Association reports that more than five million Americans currently live with Alzheimer’s disease and that this number could boom as high as sixteen million in 2050.  Everyone has been touched by Alzheimer’s disease – whether having served as a caretaker, provided monetary support, or offered comfort and guidance to those in need. As outreach professionals, we meet people living with dementia each and every day. Our goal is to bring information, resources, materials, and programming to our senior population including those living with dementia and memory loss. We bring the library out to the senior community – to educate, to inspire memories, to provide engagement activities, and to make a difference in those we serve.

What’s the impact that you hope to make in your community?

Through our programming and engagement activities, I hope that our Outreach Services Department can make a positive and meaningful difference in the lives of our seniors. I hope that we can make a lasting impact in the community and those we serve. My belief is that Outreach is about impact. You might not realize you have reached an individual living with memory loss, but you have. They might not engage, but you are definitely reaching them.

What is your favorite health-related program or outreach that you’ve done? 

The St. Charles Public Library developed the “Attic” Memory Wagon which features vintage and antique items. These items inspire memories, engage patrons, and invigorate the senses. We feature new “Attic” programs every month revolving around three themes: fashion, household appliances and products, and travel in the USA. Recent “Attic” programs include Howard Johnson’s, Holiday Inn, Pan American Airlines, depression glassware, Fiesta pottery, Route 66, Texaco and Sinclair Oil, 1950’s fashion and jewelry trends, and national parks of the United States. We purchase items from antique and thrift stores, the flea market, and online at Etsy.

We developed informational handouts to accompany the programs that feature facts, trivia, and photographs. Favorite patron comments during “Attic” programs include, “This takes me to way back when,” “These bring back great memories,” and, “I used to wear something just like that.” A fond memory was when three ladies modeled a blue pillbox hat, a style made famous by First Lady Jackie Kenney in the 1960’s. We present “Attic” programs at six facilities each month which engage ninety seniors.

David and Lynda will be presenting about their outreach services in a webinar on Friday, April 27th, Grab and Go: Expanding and Strengthening Senior Programming

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Data Filters in PubMed and PMC

NTO News - Wed, 2018-04-25 05:30

Data. Data. Where’s the data? Are you looking for journal articles with associated data sets? New search filters in PubMed and PubMed Central (PMC) work to increase the discoverability of articles and citations with associated data information.

PubMed
Users can search on or append searches with data[filter] to find citations with related data links in either the Secondary Source ID field or the LinkOut – Other Literature Resources field (both located below the abstract). These data links may be to records in other NLM databases (e.g., GenBank) or external data repositories (e.g., figshare, Dryad).

Sample PubMed search using data[filter]

Sample PubMed search using data[filter]

PubMed Central
Users can now search on or append searches with filters to discover articles with specific types of associated data.

  1. Use has suppdata[filter] to find articles with associated supplementary material.
  2. Use has data avail[filter] to find articles that include a data availability or data accessibility statement.
  3. Use has data citations[filter] to find articles that include data citation(s).
  4. Use has associated data[filter] to find all articles with any type of data section described above.
PubMed Central Sample Search using has data citations[filter]

PubMed Central Sample Search

Original article can be found by clicking here.

Categories: RML Blogs

Data Filters in PMC and PubMed

PSR News - Tue, 2018-04-24 18:11

Are you looking for journal articles with associated data sets? New search filters in PubMed Central (PMC) and PubMed aim to increase the discoverability of articles and citations with associated data information.

PubMed Central
Users can now search on or append searches with filters to discover articles with specific types of associated data.

  1. Use has suppdata[filter] to find articles with associated supplementary material.
  2. Use has data avail[filter] to find articles that include a data availability or data accessibility statement.
  3. Use has data citations[filter] to find articles that include data citation(s).

Alternatively, use has associated data[filter] to find all articles with any type of data section described above.

PubMed
Users can search on or append searches with data[filter] to find citations with related data links in either the Secondary Source ID field or the LinkOut – Other Literature Resources field (both located below the abstract). These data links may be to records in other NLM databases (e.g., GenBank) or external data repositories (e.g., figshare, Dryad).

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

All of Us Launch Day – In Person and Online

MCR News - Tue, 2018-04-24 17:13

Kansas City All of Us Launch PromoThe All of Us Research Program is coming to Kansas City. Join us! 

The All of Us Research Program wants to speed up health research and medical breakthroughs. We’re asking one million people to help lead the way … and you are one in a million!

Grab your family and friends and join us to celebrate the exclusive event.

What: Kansas City Community Health Fair

When: Sunday, May 6  Noon – 5 pm

Where: Union Station – FREE PARKING during the event

30 West Pershing Road

Kansas City, MO 64108

Additional details.

Facebook Event.

Sponsored by National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, and Delta Research Education Foundation

 

Can’t make it to the in-person event?

Watch live on Sunday, May 6, 2018.

Speakers include:

Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D.
Dara Richardson-Heron, M.D.
Eric Dishman

You can also visit the website on launch day to take part in an interactive art experience in collaboration with artist Andrew Kuo. Together, we’ll create images that explore the impact of 1,000,000.

Categories: RML Blogs

Celebrate the 15th Anniversary of the Human Genome Project

PNR News - Tue, 2018-04-24 11:39

National DNA Day logoApril 25th marks the 15th anniversary of the completion of the Human Genome Project. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) is commemorating this milestone and other genomic advances by showcasing 15 ways that genomics has transformed our world. From April 5 through April 25 you can learn about a new milestone in genomics that has transformed our world such as:

  • When scientists agreed to use the one “reference” human genome sequence generated by the Human Genome Project, it became easier to determine differences among people’s genomes on a much larger scale. We have since learned that human genomes differ from one other in all sorts of ways: sometimes at a single base, and sometimes in chunks of thousands of bases.
  • The ability to read the human genome quickly and cheaply has led to substantial advances in discovering the causes of rare disorders. Many families have gone through years of “diagnostic odysseys,” going from one specialist to another trying to find the root cause for their family member’s rare disorder.
  • Genomics helps us understand the biology of organisms across the world: why are some faster or smarter than others? Why have some gone extinct, while others are resilient to environmental changes? What do their genomes teach us about our own?

Check out the ’15 for ’15 Celebration to read all 15 ways genomics has impacted our world as well as other DNA Day events.

Categories: RML Blogs

Dietary Herbs and Supplements: How do they Benefit Us?

SCR News - Tue, 2018-04-24 11:30
Picture of pills

“Colorful Medication.” by freestocks.org via Unsplash, August 22, 2016, CCO.

Dietary herbs and supplements are commonly recommended to me by friends and family for nearly any health complaint I have.  A recent bout of insomnia brought an onslaught of recommendations and during my research I found some great information and an invaluable resource.

The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) defines a dietary supplement as a product that is intended to supplement the diet.  The NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health adds:

  • Contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs or other botanicals, amino acids, and certain other substances) or their constituents
  • Is intended to be taken by mouth, in forms such as tablet, capsule, powder, softgel, gelcap, or liquid
  • Is labeled as being a dietary supplement.

A great resource to find out information about specific herbs and supplements is MedlinePlus.gov.  They have a complete list herbs and supplements and a wealth of information specific to each one.  All one has to do is click the name of the product they are interested in and the following information is available:
What is it?

  • How effective is it?
  • How does it work?
  • Are there safety concerns?
  • Are there interactions with medications?
  • Are there interactions with herbs and supplements?
  • Are there interactions with food?
  • What dose is used?
  • Other names
  • Methodology
  • References

The next time you are thinking about starting a new herb or supplement recommended to you, make sure to check out this website.  It’s also commonly recommended that you consult your primary care physician.

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Categories: RML Blogs

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