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PubMed Commons to be Discontinued

NTO News - Mon, 2018-02-05 01:30

From the NCBI Insights Blog:

PubMed Commons has been a valuable experiment in supporting discussion of published scientific literature. The service was first introduced as a pilot project in the fall of 2013 and was reviewed in 2015. Despite low levels of use at that time, NIH decided to extend the effort for another year or two in hopes that participation would increase. Unfortunately, usage has remained minimal, with comments submitted on only 6,000 of the 28 million articles indexed in PubMed.

While many worthwhile comments were made through the service during its 4 years of operation, NIH has decided that the low level of participation does not warrant continued investment in the project, particularly given the availability of other commenting venues.

The discontinuation plan is as follows:

New comments will be accepted through February 15, 2018.

Comments will continue to be visible on the PubMed and PubMed Commons websites through March 2, 2018.
Users wishing to access the comments after March 2, 2018, will be able to download them from NCBI’s website.

Many thanks to all of you who participated in this experimental effort to enhance the opportunities for interaction about published biomedical literature.

Categories: RML Blogs

February 2018 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Fri, 2018-02-02 16:06
Illustration of woman looking at goldfish

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Health Capsule: How to Find a Cancer Doctor
    Cancer changes your life and the lives of those around you. Finding the right cancer doctor (called an oncologist) and treatment facility is an important step to getting the treatment and support you need.
  • Featured Website: Bullying Prevention
    Bullying is any unwanted aggressive behavior among peers where there is power imbalance. Find out how to spot the signs and respond to bullying and cyberbullying.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2018-02-02 10:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

All NNLM MAR funding opportunities are currently closed. In March, we will announce opportunities to apply for projects starting May 15, 2018. Now is the perfect time to start meeting with potential partners and consulting with NNLM MAR staff on health information outreach ideas. Contact us to set up a consultation.

Dr. Matthew Lin, Director of the Office of Minority Health, announced earlier this week the 2018 theme for National Minority Health Month: Partnering for Health Equity. Stay tuned for more details about how you can get involved in #NMHM18!

It’s National Wear Red Day®! Did your organization participate by wearing red, or offer a program to raise awareness about heart disease being the number 1 killer of women? Tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach projects and activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is partnering with the Public Library Association (PLA) to present a full-day preconference in conjunction with PLA 2018 in Philadelphia, PA. This preconference will review core competencies of providing health and wellness services, coach you through understanding your community’s needs, and explore how to create fun and informative health-related programming for different age groups and special populations. Details.

Promoting Healthy Communities: as part of our joint consumer health initiative with the Public Library Association, we are encouraging network members to submit a brief write-up about their health and wellness programs to ALA’s Programming Librarian website, so that others may benefit from your success! Learn more about this opportunity.

Renew your membership today! If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, see our recent blog post about the benefits of renewal and NNLM Membership. Are you having trouble creating an NNLM account? If you have received an error message such as, “email address already in use,” contact us for assistance.

DataFlash: Electronic Lab Notebooks – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day — February 7, 2018 – SEA Currents

New on YouTube: Moving from Data to Health Equity Action: County Health Rankings and Roadmaps, January 10, 2018

NLM/NIH News

All of Us Research Program Seeking “Use Cases” Describing Research Questions: the All of Us Research Program is reaching out to prospective researchers, community organizations, and citizen scientists for ideas on research questions that the program could help answer. Submit your ideas to provide information for the All of Us Research Priorities Workshop, coming up on March 21–23, 2018.

Connecting Computing Research with National PrioritiesNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Want to do more with PubMed?NLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

New ‘Liquid Biopsy’ Shows Early Promise in Detecting CancerNIH Director’s Blog

Collecting Data about Tuberculosis, ca. 1900Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NLM Classification 2018 Winter Edition Now AvailableNLM Technical Bulletin, Your Source for the Latest Searching Information

PubMed Commons to be DiscontinuedNCBI Insights, Providing Insights into NCBI Resources and the Science Behind Them

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

All are webinars, unless noted. Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

Space is limited! Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles – February 5-March 30, 2018 – This semi self-paced online course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. On top of information gained, being a part of the big data in clinical care dialog, and earning 9 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association, students may earn an IBM Open Badge program from the Big Data University.

Learning to Liaise with Health Professions – February 7, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Health professions programs are growing rapidly and in numerous disciplines, each with their own distinct standards and cultures of practice. Sponsored by MAR, this webinar will explore various health professions and educational environments, such as community colleges, hospitals, universities, and more. Next, the course will focus on how educational standards for health professions inform library instruction, research support, and collection services. The instructors will share best practices for working with health professions from the literature and personal experience; participants will also be able to provide feedback and share their experiences.

Managerial Perspectives on the Role of Public Libraries in Disaster Response – February 8, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – Michal Linder Zarankin, PhD, adjunct faculty at Virginia Tech, will discuss managers’ perceptions of how their public service organizations can support their communities in disaster response. For this webinar, she will focus on public libraries. Participants are eligible for 1 MLA CE.

In-person opportunity! PubMed and Beyond: Clinical Resources from the National Library of Medicine – February 12, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – Taught by an experienced medical librarian, this in-person class at Lincoln University (PA) will introduce free bedside information resources for the busy clinician. Resources presented will include Clinical Queries in PubMed/MEDLINE and free drug, patient education, and evidence-based information. Participants are eligible for 3 MLA CE.

Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed – February 13, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Join NLM for this introductory webinar designed to teach you more powerful and flexible ways of accessing NLM data, starting with the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for PubMed and other NCBI databases. This class will start with the very basics of APIs, before showing you how to get started using the E-utilities API to search and retrieve records from PubMed. The class will also showcase some specific tools and utilities that information specialists can use to work with E-utilities, helping to prepare you for subsequent Insider’s Guide classes. Participants will finish by looking at some practical examples of E-utilities in the real world.

Shared Decision Making: Patient Empowerment – February 28, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by MAR, this presentation will address patient empowerment by introducing attendees to consumer shared decision making (SDM) tools, including the historical background of SDM, examples of various types of decision support tools, and their functionality. Learn about free, easy-to-read, health information resources and SDM tools, and tips and techniques for implementing this workflow in your organization.

Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed – March 5-22, 2018 – This series of interactive workshops from NLM will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of five 90-minute sessions (plus an optional “office hours”), students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

Improving the Health, Safety and Well-being of LGBT Populations: Part 1 – March 7, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – LGBT individuals face many barriers in accessing healthcare, including discrimination, lack of access, misunderstanding, and fear. Join MAR for this webinar that will help participants gain a better understanding of the health information needs of the LGBT community. This class will examine the benefits of LGBT-focused cultural competency for the health care team, identify electronic, print, and other resources for building quality LGBT collections and reference materials, offer ideas for outreach strategies to the LGBT community, and identify inter-professional opportunities for librarians.

Other Items of Interest

HSLS Receives Funding Under National Partnership With the NIH All of Us Research ProgramLibrary Insider, University of Pittsburgh’s University Times

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – February 2, 2018

SEA News - Fri, 2018-02-02 07:15

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events. 

Top Items of Interest

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Online Asynchronous Moodle Course

Webinars: February 5-9

Webinars: February 12-16

Webinars: February 19-23

On-Demand Asynchronous Online Moodle Courses

In addition to the webinars listed, the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office provides webinars for subscribers to the Digital Library. Visit the NPHCO Calendar for training opportunities available.

Recordings Available on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Focus on Data

Focus on Precision Medicine

Focus on Substance Use Disorder

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed below are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM accountprior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunitiesto register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guideto understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

New NNLM PSR Library Director Profile: Keir Reavie, City of Hope, Lee Graff Medical & Scientific Library

PSR Newsletter - Thu, 2018-02-01 18:23

by Keir Reavie, MLIS, Director, Library Services
Lee Graff Medical and Scientific Library
City of Hope
Duarte, CA

I’m happy to be back in California, in the Pacific Southwest Region (PSR), and working in a health sciences environment as Director, Library Services, Lee Graff Medical and Scientific Library, City of Hope. I’ve been in Southern California for four months and it was great seeing colleagues at the first Joint Meeting I’ve attended since 2011, when I was living in Northern California and a member of the Northern California and Nevada Medical Library Group (NCNMLG). I had been living in New York City since early 2011, where I worked as the Associate Director of the Dana Library, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, and on the John Torrey Papers digitization project at the Mertz Library of the New York Botanical Garden. Those of you interested in the history of science or botany in America, or the history of nineteenth-century America, should check out the John Torrey Papers. To get more intimate with Torrey’s correspondence, you can also help transcribe the papers, so historians and other researchers can more easily search and retrieve information from the documents.

I received my MLIS from the University of Western Ontario and took my first position as a health sciences librarian in the Medical Library at the University of Manitoba. I then worked at the Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, Detroit. While at Wayne State I was active in the Greater Midwest Region of the NNLM, as a member of the Advisory Board and chair of the Education Committee. I moved to California in 2000, to take a position in the Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). At UCSF I worked closely with the School of Medicine to integrate information literacy into the evidence-based medicine curriculum, and later managed the library’s education and information services. In 2006 I went on to work at the University of California, Davis (UCD), where I managed the health sciences libraries and the biological, agricultural, and environmental sciences departments of the UCD Libraries. As a member of NCNMLG, I served as president in 2007/2008, and member of the planning committees for Joint Meetings in 2008 and 2011. I worked closely with the NNLM PSR, and was always happy to assist at NLM exhibits at health sciences conferences in the San Francisco Bay Area, to help promote NLM resources.

It’s an exciting time to be working at the City of Hope. It is a non-profit organization that is growing rapidly, and was recently re-accredited as one of 49 NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the nation. It will be a challenge to develop and maintain the library’s central role as a place of learning for faculty, students, physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals as the organization grows. The Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope is a leader in research to understand how biology affects diseases like cancer, HIV/AIDS, and diabetes. City of Hope has recently acquired a precision medicine research group, the Translation Genomics Research Institute, located in Phoenix, AZ. Translational science is a high priority for the organization. The Graduate School is applying to start a new Master’s program in translational science. In addition, City of Hope has extensive education programs, including the renowned nursing research and clinical investigation training programs. City of Hope has also developed a comprehensive strategy to cure type I diabetes.

To support the growing enterprise, the Library plans to add additional staff and rethink the use of library space, to create collaborative environments for researchers, pharmacists, nurses, and clinicians; support translational science; and help expand educational programs in the City of Hope. The Library recently started reporting to the Chief Informatics Officer, so we will also be closely linked to City of Hope’s informatics strategy, particularly the centralization of informatics and bioinformatics educational programs. Again, I’m glad to rejoin the NNLM PSR and look forward to working closely with professional librarians throughout the region, and hopefully take some time to explore Los Angeles and Southern California!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

PubMed Commons to Be Discontinued

PSR News - Thu, 2018-02-01 18:19

PubMed Commons has been a valuable experiment in supporting discussion of published scientific literature. The service was first introduced as a pilot project in the fall of 2013 and was reviewed in 2015. Despite low levels of use at that time, NIH decided to extend the effort for another year or two in hopes that participation would increase. Unfortunately, usage has remained minimal, with comments submitted on only 6,000 of the 28 million articles indexed in PubMed.

While many worthwhile comments were made through the service during its 4 years of operation, NIH has decided that the low level of participation does not warrant continued investment in the project, particularly given the availability of other commenting venues. The discontinuation plan is as follows:

  • New comments will be accepted through February 15, 2018.
  • Comments will continue to be visible on the PubMed and PubMed Commons websites through March 2, 2018.
  • Users wishing to access the comments after March 2, 2018, will be able to download them from NCBI’s website.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day — February 7, 2018

SEA News - Thu, 2018-02-01 15:22

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is observed each year on February 7 to emphasize the continuing disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) on the U.S. black/African American (black) population.

In 2014, non-Hispanic blacks represented 12% of the U.S. population (1), and the estimated 471,500 blacks living with diagnosed and undiagnosed HIV infection accounted for 43% of all persons living with diagnosed and undiagnosed HIV (2). In 2016, blacks represented 12% of the U.S. population (1), and blacks with new HIV diagnoses accounted for 44% of all new HIV diagnoses (https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-report-2016-vol-28.pdf)

In 2014, among blacks living with diagnosed HIV infection, in 38 jurisdictions with complete reporting of CD4 and viral load data, 69.8% received HIV medical care, and 51.5% were virally suppressed (viral load test of <200 copies of HIV RNA/mL) (2). A study reported in this issue of MMWR found racial and ethnic disparities in viral suppression and transmission risk (3).

CDC supports a range of efforts to reduce the risk for acquiring or transmitting HIV infection among blacks. Additional information is available at https://www.cdc.gov/features/BlackHIVAIDSAwareness.

National Library of Medicine Resources

References

  1. US Census Bureau. Population and Housing Unit Estimates Datasets 2016. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau; 2016. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/data-sets.2016.html
  2. CDC. Diagnosis of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2016. HIV surveillance report, 2016, vol. 28. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-report-2016-vol-28.pdf
  3. Crepaz N, Dong X, Wang X, Hernandez AL, Hall HI. Racial and ethnic disparities in sustained viral suppression and transmission risk potential among persons receiving HIV care—United States, 2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67:113–8.

Source

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day — February 7, 2018. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67:113. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6704a1

 

Categories: RML Blogs

National Wear Red Day

SCR News - Thu, 2018-02-01 09:04

“Painted red.” by Tim Marshall via Unsplash, July 26, 2016, CCO.

Tomorrow is National Wear Red Day.  Everyone is encouraged to wear red to raise awareness about the #1 killer of women…. heart disease.

In 2003, the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute took action against a disease that was claiming the lives of nearly 500,000 American women each year – a disease that women weren’t paying attention to. Stemming from that action, National Wear Red Day was born. It’s held on the first Friday in February every year to raise awareness about heart disease being the No. 1 killer of women.  2018 marks the 15th year that this day of awareness has taken place.

Medlineplus.gov lists two types of heart disease that affect women more than men:

  • Coronary microvascular disease (MVD) – a problem that affects the heart’s tiny arteries
  • Broken heart syndrome – extreme emotional stress leading to severe but often short-term heart muscle failure

Although symptoms of heart disease may vary, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have a list of signs and symptoms for reference.  Any signs or symptoms should be discussed with your doctor immediately.

For tips on how to be heart healthy, visit fda.gov to learn more about heart health for women!

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Categories: RML Blogs

All of Us Research Program: Share Your Ideas

PNR News - Wed, 2018-01-31 19:11

The All of Us Research Program is seeking input from the public that will help identify key research priorities and requirements (such as data types and methods) for future versions of the All of Us protocol. The program aims to build one of the largest, most diverse datasets of its kind for health research, with one million or more volunteers nationwide, who will sign up to share their information over time. Researchers will be able to access participants’ de-identified information for a variety of studies to learn more about the biological, behavioral, and environmental factors that influence health and disease. Their findings may lead to more individualized health care approaches in the future.

To contribute research ideas, see IdeaScale website. Responses are being accepted until February 23, 2018. IdeaScale gives the opportunity to see what others are adding, and to vote on your favorite ideas. Your input will be considered at a Research Priorities Workshop in March 2018 and ultimately help us build out the All of Us research platform with the tools needed to answer those questions. This is a unique opportunity to share research ideas with the All of Us Research Program. NLM appreciates your contributions.

Categories: RML Blogs

Request for Information: Submit Research Questions to Inform Development of the NIH All of Us Research Program!

PSR Newsletter - Wed, 2018-01-31 15:57

The National Institutes of Health has issued a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit public input to inform future updates to the All of Us Research Program that would be of most benefit to participants, researchers, and the broader community. The information provided will help identify key research priorities and requirements (such as data types and methods) for future versions of the All of Us protocol. All responses must be submitted online by February 23 through the program’s IdeaScale website. The RFI solicits “use cases,” or input on health problems or research questions of interest that All of Us could potentially help address.

The All of Us Research Program will make all responses available on the website as a searchable reference and as a principal database of use cases and requirements for informing future plans for All of Us. An advantage of using Ideascale is that it provides the opportunity to see what others have added as research ideas. Over 250 have already been submitted! Another feature is the ability to vote on your favorite ideas or comment on submissions. Commenting is a great way to start a dialogue with other submitters. All responses will be considered at the All of Us Research Priorities Workshop, scheduled for March 21–23 in Bethesda, MD.

The mission of the All of Us Research Program is to advance the science of precision medicine and ensure everyone shares in its benefits. The overall objective of the program is to build an observational research resource that will provide the information needed to address a wide range of scientific questions, facilitating the exploration of biological, clinical, social, and environmental determinants of health and disease. It will be one of the larges, most diverse datasets of its kind for health research. The program will collect and curate health-related data and biospecimens from one million or more individuals who reflect the diversity in the United States and will sign up to share their information over time. These data and biospecimens will be made broadly available for research uses. Researchers will be able to access participants’ de-identified information for a variety of studies to learn more about the factors that influence health and disease. Their findings may lead to more individualized health care approaches in the future.

The program is currently in beta testing, with a national launch anticipated in spring 2018. Once enrollment opens nationally, volunteers over the age of 18 who live in the United States will be able to join All of Us, either directly through the website or through participating health care provider organizationsAll of Us aims to be open to all interested individuals, to reflect the rich diversity of America and to serve as a catalyst for innovative research programs and policies.

This is a unique opportunity to share your research ideas with the All of Us Research Program! Feel free to send any questions about this process to AoURPW@nih.gov.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Public Health Educational Opportunities in February

MAR News - Wed, 2018-01-31 14:18

Each month, check the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) training schedule for free professional development opportunities for public health professionals and librarians. During February 2018, NNLM is offering online classes and webinars about big data in healthcare, providing consumer health information at your library, acting as a liaison with health professionals, grants and proposal writing, and providing reliable health information to older adults:

  • Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles – February 5, 2018 to March 30, 2018- This course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area.
  • Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – February 6, 2018 to March 13, 2018 – This hands-on class will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will be equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites, e-patient resources and collection development core lists.
  • Learning to Liaise with Health Professions – February 7, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:30PM ET – Attendees will explore various health professions and educational environments, such as community colleges, hospitals, universities, and more. Next, the course will focus on how educational standards for health professions inform library instruction, research support, and collection services.
  • Grants and Proposal Writing – February 15, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM ET – Designed for beginning grant proposal writers, this class presents a general overview of the grant and funding processes as well as the level of detail required in a successful proposal.
  • Healthy Aging at Your Library: Connecting Older Adults to Health Information – February 22, 2018, 11:00AM – 1:00PM ET – This “train the trainer” class is designed to help librarians assist their older adult patrons find health information. Discover techniques for teaching older adults to use computers and to find health information on the Internet, learn what makes a website senior-friendly; plan library programs on senior health topics; and find out about some recommended health websites for older adults.
Categories: RML Blogs

Request for Information (RFI): Research Questions to Inform Development of the All of Us Research Program

SEA News - Wed, 2018-01-31 13:55

The All of Us Research Program is seeking input from the public that will help identify key research priorities and requirements (such as data types and methods) for future versions of the All of Us protocol. The current protocol can be found here: https://allofus.nih.gov/sites/default/files/allofus-initialprotocol-v1_0.pdf

All responses must be submitted online by February 23, 2018 through the program’s IdeaScale website.

One of the nice things about Ideascale is that it provides the opportunity to see what everyone else is adding as research ideas—there are already over 250 submitted! Another feature is the ability to vote on your favorite ideas or comment on submissions. Commenting is a great way to start a dialogue with other submitters!

This is a unique opportunity for you to share your research ideas with the All of Us Research Program. You are encouraged to enter your ideas soon, bookmark the URL, and come back often to see what’s been added.

The complete RFI can be found here: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-18-127.html

If you have any questions please send them to AoURPW@nih.gov.

Categories: RML Blogs

Five NNLM Online Courses and Webinars Coming in February!

PSR News - Tue, 2018-01-30 13:43

Each month, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) offers free professional development opportunities. During February 2018, NNLM is offering online classes and webinars about big data in healthcare, providing consumer health information in libraries, acting as a liaison with health professionals, grants and proposal writing, and providing reliable health information to older adults:

  • Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles (February 5 to March 30): This course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area.
  • Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library (February 6 to March 13): This hands-on class will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will be equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites, e-patient resources and collection development core lists.
  • Learning to Liaise with Health Professions (February 7, 11:00AM – 12:30PM PST): Attendees will explore various health professions and educational environments, such as community colleges, hospitals, universities, and more. Next, the course will focus on how educational standards for health professions inform library instruction, research support, and collection services.
  • Grants and Proposal Writing (February 15, 11:00AM – 12:00PM PST): Designed for beginning grant proposal writers, this class presents a general overview of the grant and funding processes as well as the level of detail required in a successful proposal.
  • Healthy Aging at Your Library: Connecting Older Adults to Health Information (February 22, 8:00 – 10:00AM PST): This “train the trainer” class is designed to help librarians assist their older adult patrons find health information. Discover techniques for teaching older adults to use computers and to find health information on the Internet, learn what makes a website senior-friendly; plan library programs on senior health topics; and find out about some recommended health websites for older adults.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

My Impression of Texas and Librarians

SCR News - Tue, 2018-01-30 09:46

 

I recently had the pleasure to attend an outreach librarian training in Ft. Worth, Texas.   This was my first time at this type of training, first time in Texas, and first time meeting my co-workers at NNLM SCR in person.  With so many firsts, it is no surprise the trip made an impression.

The world of libraries and librarians is not one I have been exposed to in previous jobs, so I was excited to get firsthand experience immersing myself in this world.  I developed a greater understanding of the field and how librarians collaborate with so many other professions in ways that were unique, creative, and mutually beneficial.

The theme of the training was centered around drug use, particularly in teens which was fitting since last week was National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week.  The most fascinating moments for me involved the panel discussion with experts in the field.  It was interesting to listen to ideas on how social workers, counselors, and librarians could join forces to potentially impact such a devastating epidemic in our country.

 

Although I did have the chance to enjoy local cuisine and sights, by far the biggest takeaway was the knowledge that librarians do more than sit around and shush people!!   They are dedicated to putting accurate, relevant, and up-to-date information at the fingertips of those seeking it.

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Categories: RML Blogs

Public Library Spotlight: Glenna Godinsky, Life Enrichment Liaison, Gail Borden Public Library District, Elgin, IL

GMR News - Tue, 2018-01-30 09:18

photo of Glenna GodinskyName: Glenna Godinsky

Title: Life Enrichment Liaison, Gail Borden Public Library District, Elgin, IL

Education: B.A., University of Iowa, Certified Dementia Practitioner, National Council of Certified Dementia Practitioners

How did you become interested in focusing on Health and Wellness?

Like many, I was a caregiver as each of my parents faced different health struggles. My mom had Lewy Body Dementia and lived with my husband, our 2 teenage boys, our pre-teen daughter, and me during the last 4 years of her life. We became versed on bed alarms, door alarms, the concept of sundowning (when nights turn to days), the drive to wander, repeated questions and anxiety, hallucinations, and confusion – not only as a result of my mom’s disease, but also in ourselves, as caregivers who struggled to find a place to turn for support.

In applying for and accepting the professional role of Life Enrichment Liaison at Gail Borden Public Library District (GBPLD), I hoped to be able to make a difference in the lives of seniors living with dementia as well as their caregivers. Compassion for the situation followed by uplifting library programming that brings a level of normalcy and empowerment is my goal during each patron interaction.

Why is health literacy important in your community?

As 10,000 people turn age 65 each day, (www.thefiscalstimes.com) and with the knowledge that dementia is an age-related health issue (48% of those age 85+ showed some signs of dementia in the 2004 JAMA study by Langa, K.M, Foster, N.L. & Larson, E.B.) caregivers, as well as those living with dementia, need resources to help manage many of the everyday situations that had previously been so simple. How long is it safe for someone to drive? Is there an understanding customer service person to help when a customer becomes flustered or agitated? These are societal situations that have consequences for us all.

As library professionals, we have an opportunity and a responsibility to educate our residents by providing materials, virtual reference, services, and programs. The GBPLD is the largest library district in the State of Illinois for the population served.  Most of the library’s 150,000 patrons live in Elgin, a diverse ethnic and socio-economic population with many older adults below poverty level. The library’s 200+ staff work together with 600 volunteers and more than 200 community partners to deliver library services and programs.

What’s the impact that you hope to make in your community?

The role of the library has changed in the last 15 years. One of the facets libraries provide in our democratic country is a safe space for open discourse. We hope to take the lead in creating conversations on how we can best create a dementia-friendly community. We hope to lead by example by providing sustainable, quality library programs based in literacy, offering multiple forms of expression, for those living with dementia and for their caregivers. One of the GBPLD’s strategic plan priorities is the “Community Table: partnerships are forged to foster a healthy and democratic citizenry” with an objective, “Residents will be connected with community resources to promote physical, intellectual, and emotional wellbeing.”

What is your favorite health-related program or outreach that you’ve done? 

The GBPLD serves patrons in 20 locations throughout our 65-square mile district of over 150,000 patrons. On a monthly basis, teams of volunteers and staff present the Library Ladies programs which are theme-based and incorporate use of the arts – such as music, hands-on visual art projects, singing, and interactions involving the 5 senses –  to revisit popularly shared memories such as “The State Fair”, “Take Me to A Ball Game”, “Art History”, and “Cruise Ships to Subway Trips: Transportation in America”, to name a few.

Our Volunteers and staff also present, on a bi-monthly basis, the nationally-recognized, award-winning Tales and Travel Memories program where patrons “visit” a foreign country through books featuring colorful photography, informative captions and plenty of white space on the pages to alleviate confusion. In addition to reading aloud the 5 facts about the country, patrons also take turns reading paragraphs from a folktale. They pass around and discuss souvenirs such as dolls dressed in native attire, tactile refrigerator magnets of landmark buildings in the country, and the national flag. In November 2017, Tales and Travel Memories was among 15 organizations recognized by the Library of Congress and awarded for their implementation of best practices in literacy promotion and evidence-based research.

The results of such library programming have been proven to improve mood, increase social interaction and decrease the stigma of dementia. Participating in Library Ladies and Tales and Travel programs can be empowering to those who face dementia, and this is uplifting for their caregivers.

Glenna will be participating in our February Webinar: Tales & Travel Memories: Literacy-focused Programming for People with Dementia, a Kernel of Knowledge Webinar

Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: Electronic Lab Notebooks

PNR News - Tue, 2018-01-30 07:00

I recently had the opportunity to listen to a webinar about electronic lab notebooks called, “Using electronic laboratory notebooks in the academic life sciences: a group leader’s experience on how they can make research teams more efficient.” Not having used electronic laboratory notebooks (eLN) myself, I was curious about their functionality, whether librarians are involved in their adoption, and whether they contribute to better data management. Paper-based laboratory note books have been used by researchers for centuries as a way to document their observations, experiments and procedures. A perfect example is Alexander Graham Bell’s lab notebook documenting the discovery of the first working telephone.

Photo of Alexander Graham Bell's lab notebook describing the first workable telephone.

Alexander Graham Bell’s Lab Notebook (Image is in public domain)

And many researchers still use paper-based products to document their work. Within the last decade, however, a wide range of electronic lab notebooks have become available. While some researchers choose to use simple, and inexpensive tools like Microsoft Word, Microsoft OneNote, or Evernote, there are products specifically designed for the research laboratory. Some of the more highly rated eLNs suitable for all scientific fields include Labfolder, SciNote, and LabArchives. Other products are designed to meet the requirements of a particular area of research. For example, LabGuru is designed for the life sciences while BIOVIA was developed for chemistry. Prices range from free and open source to proprietary and very costly, and choosing the right tool for the job can be quite challenging.

Fortunately, there are resources available to help researchers select the best eLN for their research team. Two recent articles on the topic include Ulrich Dirnagl, et al’s, “A pocket guide to electronic laboratory notebooks in the academic life sciences,” and Kanza, et al’s, “Electronic lab notebooks: can they replace paper?”. Franklin Sayre, Pharmacy Librarian at University of Minnesota Health Sciences Library is just one example of a librarian who is using his expertise to help researchers evaluate the features of eLNs. A number of LibGuides also exist on the topic, notably Purdue Libraries, University of Rochester Libraries, and the University of Utah Libraries.

Do eLNs lead to better data management? While most products include similar bells and whistles, including the ability to handle a wide variety of data formats, search images and text, audit records, time stamp entries, collaborate with others while controlling user permissions, back up and archive data, and comply with regulatory requirements, they all have one potential flaw. The user. While some of the issues differ—the cat can’t eat your eLN—many remain the same. The old saying, “garbage in, garbage out,” applies to both paper and electronic formats. File naming conventions, non-proprietary file formats, back up schedules, and other data management best practices still apply. Do you know which eLNs the researchers in your university or hospital are using? Asking them. Your conversation may lead to further collaboration.

Categories: RML Blogs

Continuing the Graphic Medicine Initiative and a Farewell from Matthew Noe

NER News - Mon, 2018-01-29 16:35

Hello New England,

In light of the buzz around the launch of NLM’s new exhibit, Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived & Well-Drawn, it seems like a good time to revisit our own Graphic Medicine Initiative here in the NER! Note that the traveling portion of the exhibit will make its way to our region this year, first from July 16th to August 25th in White River Junction, VT and second from September 10th to October 20th in Worcester, MA.

Our work in this exciting area began in late Fall 2016 by bringing me on as the Graphic Medicine Specialist and with outreach to other libraries doing work with comics and medicine, which continues to this day. This outreach led to the hosting of our Introduction to Graphic Medicine webinar, which provides a much needed introduction to the field and why it matters to use as librarians. More than 100 people from around the US attended live and it has been viewed more than 300 times as a recording since.

The webinar also served as a launch point for our highly successful Graphic Medicine Book Club Kit program. These kits are designed as a full-program – just add facilitator – that can be used in any environment, from public library to medical school classroom. Each kit includes six copies of a graphic novel on a particular medical topic, such as Sobriety: A Graphic Novel by Daniel Maurer, a discussion guide with adaptable questions, an explainer-comic on just what graphic novels are, and a selection of relevant health information from MedlinePlus. As of this posting, nearly 40 kits have been requested since launching the program in March 2017. You can request yours at the link above!

Other parts of the initiative have included visiting Philadelphia to talk about the role graphic medicine can play in activism, organizing the Comics and Medicine Panel at MICE 2017, and hosting a listserv to facilitate keeping up-to-date on the field. In addition, we are currently partnering with local independent cartoonist Cathy Leamy to develop comics-based informational materials on precision medicine – keep a lookout for more on this, and other developments, soon!

I also want to take the time here to announce my departure from my role with the NNLM NER, with my final day being Friday, February 9th. Moving forward, the graphic medicine initiative will be headed by our Associate Director, Martha Meacham. Don’t hesitate to contact her – or any of the NER Staff!

I have been incredibly luck to work with the wonderful NER team and all of you throughout the region in building this innovative initiative. I’ll be joining the Harvard Medical School, Countway Library as a Collection Outreach Librarian. I’ll be working with the community at Harvard Medical to evaluate, promote, and shape the future of the library’s collections – which will, of course, include innovative directions like graphic medicine.

I won’t be going far, so do keep in touch! My new contact information will be found on the Countway Library website soon and I’m easily found on Twitter (@NoetheMatt) and LinkedIn.

All the best!

Matthew Noe

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming Funding Opportunities – Get Ready for Spring!

GMR News - Mon, 2018-01-29 13:42

The GMR funded a number of health information projects this year, awarding over $450,000 to public libraries, academic institutions, public health agencies, health sciences library organizations, and community health organizations across the ten-state region. While our funding is exhausted for this year, it’s time to start thinking about applying for our next funding cycle! Using feedback from our advisory groups, our office is making changes to our awards coming out in the spring. These changes include:

  • A new funding level of $20,001 – $50,000 for large health information outreach projects, with a deadline for applications of April 1, 2018 for these projects. We are able to fund up to three projects at this level, and will evaluate applications following the April 1, 2018 deadline.
  • Opening up eligibility of Professional Development awards to include more members in our region; previously, this was restricted to health sciences librarians.
  • Offering more Professional Development awards in anticipation of more applications! The awards will be offered quarterly with an application deadline for each quarter to maintain funding throughout the year.
  • Consolidation to fewer types of awards, namely Health Information Outreach, Research Data, and Professional Development awards.

Spring garden

We’ll be updating our funding opportunities page with applications and detailed information as soon as these are approved by our sponsoring agency. For now, here are some dates to keep in mind as you plan your projects:

  • Deadline for $20,001 – $50,000 funding category is April 1, 2018
  • Professional Development Award deadlines: May, August, November & February
  • Applications for all other awards will be accepted beginning April 1, 2018, and will be made on an ongoing basis until funds are spent.

 

If you have a project in mind and would like to consult with staff at the GMR office, please contact us at gmr-lib@uiowa.edu.

Categories: RML Blogs

Online Course Announcement: EDirect for PubMed, part of the Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data, starts March 5

NTO News - Mon, 2018-01-29 04:37

This newly expanded series of interactive workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of five 90-minute sessions (plus an optional “office hours”), students will learn how to use EDirect commands to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. EDirect requires access to a Unix environment but we will send easy installation instructions for Windows and Mac computers before the class starts. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

This series of classes involves hands-on demonstrations and exercises, as well as homework exercises between sessions. Due to the nature of this class, registration will be limited to 100 students per offering.

Each session begins at 1 PM ET and runs approximately 90 minutes.

Session 1: Monday, March 5

Session 2: Thursday, March 8

Session 3: Monday, March 12

Session 4: Thursday, March 15

Session 5: Monday, March 19

Office Hours: Thursday, March 22

Students are expected to attend all of the first five sessions (the “office hours” are optional, but encouraged).

Seven (7) hours of MLA CE credit are available for students who attend the first five sessions and complete the homework assignments, and complete the open-book exam no later than Monday, March 26.

For more information, and to register, visit: https://goo.gl/hEa731

(Note: In order to register, you will need to create a free account on the National Network of Libraries of Medicine website.)

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2018-01-26 11:11

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

All NNLM MAR funding opportunities are currently closed. In February, we will announce opportunities to apply for projects starting May 15, 2018. Now is the perfect time to start meeting with potential partners and consulting with NNLM MAR staff on health information outreach ideas. Contact us to set up a consultation.

Did your organization host an event or offer programming for National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week®? Tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach projects and activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is partnering with the Public Library Association (PLA) to present a full-day preconference in conjunction with PLA 2018 in Philadelphia, PA. This preconference will review core competencies of providing health and wellness services, coach you through understanding your community’s needs, and explore how to create fun and informative health-related programming for different age groups and special populations. Details.

Promoting Healthy Communities: as part of our joint consumer health initiative with the Public Library Association, we are encouraging network members to submit a brief write-up about their health and wellness programs to ALA’s Programming Librarian website, so that others may benefit from your success! Learn more about this opportunity.

Renew your membership today! If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, see our recent blog post about the benefits of renewal and NNLM Membership. Are you having trouble creating an NNLM account? If you have received an error message such as, “email address already in use,” contact us for assistance.

Patients as Part of the Diagnostic Team – NER Update

Do You Know What to Do in the Case of a Radiation Emergency? – MARquee News Highlights

NLM/NIH News

ClinicalTrials.gov Moves Toward Increased TransparencyNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Ill-Conceived, Well Drawn-and Powerful: Graphic Medicine Exhibition Debuts at NLMNLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Snapshots of Life: The Birth of New NeuronsNIH Director’s Blog

The Evolution of Viral Networks: H1N1, Ebola, and ZikaCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

All are webinars, unless noted. Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

NNLM Resource Picks: Genetics Home Reference – January 31, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join SEA for the next session of Resource Picks, NNLM’s collaborative, bimonthly, webcast series featuring resources from the National Library of Medicine. Genetics Home Reference is the NLM website for consumer information about genetic conditions and the genes or chromosomes associated with those conditions. Browse the GHR website before the session and come ready with questions!

Space is limited! Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles – February 5-March 30, 2018 – This semi self-paced online course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. On top of information gained, being a part of the big data in clinical care dialog, and earning 9 continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association, students may earn an IBM Open Badge program from the Big Data University.

Learning to Liaise with Health Professions – February 7, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Health professions programs are growing rapidly and in numerous disciplines, each with their own distinct standards and cultures of practice. Sponsored by MAR, this webinar will explore various health professions and educational environments, such as community colleges, hospitals, universities, and more. Next, the course will focus on how educational standards for health professions inform library instruction, research support, and collection services. The instructors will share best practices for working with health professions from the literature and personal experience; participants will also be able to provide feedback and share their experiences.

Managerial Perspectives on the Role of Public Libraries in Disaster Response – February 8, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – Michal Linder Zarankin, PhD, adjunct faculty at Virginia Tech, will discuss managers’ perceptions of how their public service organizations can support their communities in disaster response. For this webinar, she will focus on public libraries. Participants are eligible for 1 MLA CE.

In-person opportunity! PubMed and Beyond: Clinical Resources from the National Library of Medicine – February 12, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – Taught by an experienced medical librarian, this in-person class at Lincoln University (PA) will introduce free bedside information resources for the busy clinician. Resources presented will include Clinical Queries in PubMed/MEDLINE and free drug, patient education, and evidence-based information. Participants are eligible for 3 MLA CE.

Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed – February 13, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Join NLM for this introductory webinar designed to teach you more powerful and flexible ways of accessing NLM data, starting with the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for PubMed and other NCBI databases. This class will start with the very basics of APIs, before showing you how to get started using the E-utilities API to search and retrieve records from PubMed. The class will also showcase some specific tools and utilities that information specialists can use to work with E-utilities, helping to prepare you for subsequent Insider’s Guide classes. Participants will finish by looking at some practical examples of E-utilities in the real world.

Shared Decision Making: Patient Empowerment – February 28, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by MAR, this presentation will address patient empowerment by introducing attendees to consumer shared decision making (SDM) tools, including the historical background of SDM, examples of various types of decision support tools, and their functionality. Learn about free, easy-to-read, health information resources and SDM tools, and tips and techniques for implementing this workflow in your organization.

Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed – March 5-22, 2018 – This series of interactive workshops from NLM will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of five 90-minute sessions (plus an optional “office hours”), students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

Improving the Health, Safety and Well-being of LGBT Populations: Part 1 – March 7, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – LGBT individuals face many barriers in accessing healthcare, including discrimination, lack of access, misunderstanding, and fear. Join MAR for this webinar that will help participants gain a better understanding of the health information needs of the LGBT community. This class will examine the benefits of LGBT-focused cultural competency for the health care team, identify electronic, print, and other resources for building quality LGBT collections and reference materials, offer ideas for outreach strategies to the LGBT community, and identify inter-professional opportunities for librarians.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

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