National Network of Libraries of Medicine
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Hindi Japanese Korean Persian Portuguese Russian Spanish

RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Health Reference

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2020-03-19 05:47

Unless you are a consumer health librarian you may not be as familiar with addressing health reference questions. It’s OK if you don’t feel comfortable and a little uncertain how to answer questions regarding medication, a health condition, or a specific diet. You don’t have to know the answers. Like many of the topics your patrons ask of you, you probably aren’t an expert and neither are you a health professional (most likely).  But what you can provide is information from authoritative resources. Unsure what those are? NNLM (National Network of Libraries of Medicine) offers consumer health classes to help you increase your knowledge about health information and increase your confidence in providing your patrons with quality health information so they can be better informed about their own health as well as their families. NNLM has developed a new class specifically about health reference.

Introduction to Health Reference: Ethics and Best Practices
Health reference has some unique factors to consider. Take this on-demand class to learn how to conduct a health reference interview confidently and ethically. It is currently available and is self-paced and interactive. By the end you will learn:

  • What is a health reference interview
  • How the library can protect patrons’ health privacy and confidentiality using ethical guidelines from library associations
  • Effective communication strategies to identify the health information needs of patrons
  • Simple methods for evaluating online health information that can be easily explained to patrons

Register to take the class and you’ll be well on your way to conducting health reference with greater confidence.

Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: 2020 RDAP

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2020-03-18 18:21

This past March 2020 RDAP was hosted in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  Unfortunately, I was not able to attend in person, but I was able to catch the conference virtually.  The keynote speaker was incredibly informative and knowledgeable and of course, very articulate and engaging.  For me, the highlight of the Summit was the keynote speaker.  The conference keynote was Michele Suina, PhD (Cochiti Pueblo), Program Director, Albuquerque Area Southwest Tribal Epidemiology Center (AASTEC).

Michele talked about her work with the Global Indigenous Data Alliance (GIDA) which is a great organization that prides themselves on “promoting indigenous control of indigenous data” around the world.  Their data motto is “Be FAIR and CARE” which is a play on the popular data acronym FAIR (i.e. fair, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) and GIDA’s acronym for data CARE.

CARE is an acronym that reminds us that right because data is shared and open doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s tension-free for all people especially vulnerable populations like indigenous ones.  Let’s take a closer look at what CARE means.  The “C” in CARE stands for “Collective benefit” which means that data should be used in ways that empower Indigenous People so that they can derive maximum benefit from the data’s use.  The “A” in CARE stands for “Authority to control” which means we must recognize the rights and interests of Indigenous Peoples and their rights and interests over their data; in other words, we must respect their authority to control their own data. The “R” in CARE stands for “Responsibility” which means that we are responsible and accountable for how the data is being used to foster positive relationships with the Indigenous Peoples and that they derive the maximum benefit from their data. The “E” in CARE stand for “Ethics” which means that the wellbeing of the Indigenous Peoples should always be at the heart of the data life cycle and across data ecosystems.

As data enthusiasts we must remember that to be “FAIR”, we must also “CARE” especially with vulnerable populations like indigenous ones.

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Disaster Resource Planning for Public Libraries: Mobile Computer Lab to Augment Capabilities

SEA News - Wed, 2020-03-18 10:43

Guest Post By: Catherine Graham, Humanity Road

During a training at the Virginia Halifax County-South Boston Public Library Crystal Chavis demonstrates the Chromebooks being offered under the mobile augmentation laboratory to librarians from surrounding counties. (Photo Credit: Humanity Road)

The Mobile Communications and Computer Augmentation Laboratory supports local libraries with training and enhanced communications and technology. The project was designed by Humanity Road to improve community access to information. It enables communities to make informed decisions about their health preparedness and recovery planning. The training and equipment being provided under this program augments rural community capabilities.

Just in Time Information

Humanity Road conducted the training and provided the technology under the National Library of Medicine Technology grant program. “We view the libraries as serving in a unique and qualified role in preparing for and responding to disaster with just in time information” says Cat Graham, Chief Operations Officer for Humanity Road. “The rural communities of Virginia do not always have access to computers or Wi-Fi. The program enables Humanity Road to partner with communities to augment their current technology and assist them in improving their personal readiness plans.”

Using the mobile laboratory tools, Crystal Chavis conducts the tabletop exercise for the South Boston, VA library. Humanity Road also leveraged a special deck of cards for role playing during the simulated disaster. (Photo credit: Humanity Road)

In January and February, Humanity Road delivered the disaster resource training to library staff from eight Virginia counties including Halifax, Pittsylvania, Nottaway, Prince Edward, Franklin, Henry, Martinsville and Meherrin.

“When disasters strike, the community often turns to libraries for access to information” says Becky Walker from Meherrin Library. “The training was excellent and timely, especially in light of Coronavirus. It’s reassuring that we can serve as a resource to the public, ensuring they have the right information needed in the face of disaster.” Ms. Walker serves as Director for the Meherrin Regional Library System in Lawrenceville, VA.

Crystal Chavis, Chief Data Analyst and Business Continuity Lead for Humanity Road conducted the business continuity training for the class and spoke with the students about the 2018 National Level Exercise (NLE). In the NLE for 2018, Humanity Road conducted a business continuity field exercise and simulated launching a community emergency response center at the local Mecklenburg library in Boydton, VA. Libraries have an opportunity to help ensure essential services continue when disaster strikes their community.

It wasn’t long before the training was being leveraged. Chris Baker, the Library Branch Manager in South Boston, VA attended the training in January. “A few days after the training, an earthquake struck Jamaica. A local citizen here in South Boston, VA came in and said ‘I’ve been able to get a hold of some family but not all of them’. Our library team went into action”. Said Chris, “We started to confirm ways to reach out and connect them. We were using social media and the Jamaica XM radio DJ and it worked. It was really cool because since then we’ve been able to keep up with his family. It was very rewarding to reconnect them.”

Lessons Learned

The project team walked away with several lessons learned. The original mobile lab kit included ten laptops but after performing a pilot test on one laptop and one Chromebook we changed the kit to chrome books. The chrome books were less expensive, easier to maintain, lighter, and with fewer programs to power, they had a longer battery life. It dramatically reduced the equipment expense for our project which enabled us to fill more training seats.

Another critical discovery was that more librarians wanted access to the training. In many cases, they were interested in attending the class but did not have the ability to attend in person due to schedule conflicts. We also received some really great feedback from the students. While asking for feedback and recommendations, some library staff asked if we could conduct the training for county administrators who are responsible for setting the disaster response policies for their libraries.

“We consider the program a great success” shares Chris Thompson, President of Humanity Road. “If we can shorten the recovery period for the local communities by providing a resource center sooner, then we have accomplished a great thing.” Libraries in Virginia interested in the training or booking the computer lab can contact Humanity Road via email team@humanityroad.org

About Humanity Road

Humanity Road, located in Boydton, VA is an award winning top rated 501c3 nonprofit. They were recognized at the White House by the Department of Homeland Security for its contribution to disaster response and by the United Nations as one of the top 100 innovative humanitarian aid organizations in the world. Volunteers interested in supporting their work can learn more at https://www.humanityroad.org/get-involved.

Categories: RML Blogs

Boston Public Library at PLA

NER News - Wed, 2020-03-18 08:43

This is a guest blog post from Elissa C. Cadillic, the Training Coordinator at Boston Public Library. Elissa received a professional development award to attend the Public Library Association (PLA) Meeting in Nashville, TN February 25-29, 2020.

Thanks to a professional development grant from NNLM, I was able to attend PLA 2020. While I’ve been to ALA, this was my first PLA conference and I enjoyed the experience.  My first workshop focused on Cultural Humility, learning what it is and how it varies from Cultural Competence.  I’ve been looking for different ways to provide quality and effective training opportunities on diversity and this workshop gave me a good starting point.  Understanding that normal for one person may not be for another opens up lines of communication and hopefully leads to acceptance.   One of my favorite parts was listening to a conversation with Stacy Abrams.  So inspiring! The rest of the week I attended various workshops on Opioids in Libraries, Onboarding, Customer Service, the Changing Role of the MLS, and in a look ahead to Dudley’s kitchen space, a program on Culinary Workforce Development.  In my opinion I think the best exhibitor was from Edible Education who demonstrated a fully working interactive kitchen cart and has a nutrition-based education guide including recipes and a hydroponics unit, “Little Farm”.  I did get to spend some time wandering around Nashville listening to some great bands and visiting the full-size replica of the Parthenon and the Tennessee Woman Suffrage Monument in Centennial Park.   I’m looking forward to using the knowledge and experiences and applying them in my work.

Elissa C. Cadillic

Categories: RML Blogs

ICYMI Webinar Recap: Are you Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources

SCR News - Wed, 2020-03-18 05:20

Over the next several weeks, we will be recapping some of the exceptional webinars that the NNLM SCR has hosted over the course of 2019 and early 2020. If you would like to access an archived version of this webinar and the others we have hosted, please click here.

In January of this year, our Executive Director Brian Leaf presented a webinar entitled “Are you Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources”. After viewing this recording, the learner will be able to:

  • Describe trends and terms used in disaster preparedness
  • Describe factors that impact different audiences and their ability to respond to disasters
  • Brainstorm programming and potential interventions to better educate and prepare older adults for disaster response
  • Identify NLM databases, resources, and apps that can help provide disaster health information to older adults during all parts of the disaster cycle.

Brian begins by introducing and discussing project partnerships, such as a “Stop the Bleeding” event and the SCR CONNECTions emergency management webinar by Bill Inenogle in 2018. Brian also mentioned that funding of $15,000 is available as the Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Award.

It’s vital that communities recognize the very important role that libraries play in times of disaster. FEMA has recognized libraries as essential resources for relocation funding in the event that facilities become unusable. Brian cites the functions libraries have served in t he wake of hurricanes in the past, becoming places of physical shelter and resources for research, bilingual staff, and communication with youth. To help support this role, the NLM and MLA have partnered to offer a Disaster Information Specialization; further information on this is available from both the NLM and MLA.

Diving into the meat of his presentation, Brian outlines and defines the four phases of disaster management:

  1. Mitigation
  2. Preparedness
  3. Response
  4. Recovery

He also goes over some examples of disaster types, both manmade and natural, from terrorism to fires to radiation emergencies. The disaster management cycle is presented in graphic form, which is included in this column.

Where we get our information can make or break our complete understanding of any event or subject. Brian discusses the difference between resources for “scholarly information” and “grey information”, and offers examples and merits of both. He presents an article that discusses how we search for medical advice online and how these habits translate to understanding reputable resources for disaster management information. In addition to being diligent in our search for reliable information, we should also prepare specific plans for ourselves, our families, our groups, or our organizations in the event that a disaster should strike; Brian discusses strategies for this, taking variables such as communication, supplies, contingency plans, and even pets into consideration. It should also be noted that, because our life expectancy is growing, we must  take special measures to ensure the safety of our older populations, including emphasis on physical fitness as an important factor in disaster preparedness. A resource is presented that offers fitness motivation and support for people 55 and older, but Brian emphasizes that this site contains excellent information for any adults looking to become healthier.

The rest of this webinar focuses on valuable resources for information and training on this subject, most of which are listed below. 

Resources for disaster preparedness information:

This webinar is available to watch on YouTube.

Look out for blog posts in the coming weeks which will recap more NNLM SCR webinars.

Remember to follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM MCR Update

MCR News - Tue, 2020-03-17 16:49

Dear NNLM MCR members

As of March 16, 2020, NNLM MCR staff will be largely working from home until further notice.

We will not be conducting in-person visits or trainings at this time.

We have a many of online trainings scheduled and many others available on YouTube.

Current awardees are encouraged to contact us to discuss what our/your options are for completing award activities. Detailed guidance from NLM will be available in the next several days.

The best way to contact us is through email available on our staff directory.

For information about COVID-19, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases websites to receive the latest updates on the virus, what you should know, what you can do to prevent the spread of the disease and more. You can also sign up for the CDC’s newsletter to receive weekly updates about COVID-19.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. John

John Bramble
Associate Director
National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region
Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
john.bramble@utah.edu
801 585 9646 (office)

Categories: RML Blogs

A Message from GMR Interim Associate Director, Derek Johnson

GMR News - Tue, 2020-03-17 15:44

To our GMR Community Members,

As we all adjust to the changes that the coronavirus pandemic is bringing to our work and personal lives, I want to update you on some of the changes that will take place in our office.

GMR staff will be working from home. As a result, NNLM Reading and Membership kits, along with orders for other informational materials will not be filled. In addition, you may find that our response times are slightly delayed or that one of our human or fur children appear audibly or visibly on our calls or meetings.

We will continue to work with our partners across the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to offer a range of scheduled webinars, online courses and self-paced courses. In addition, our archive of recorded trainings are always available on YouTube.

We encourage you to follow and share the guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to keep yourself and others informed and healthy!

Thank you,

Derek Johnson, MLIS
Interim Associate Director
National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Greater Midwest Region
derek-d-johnson@uiowa.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Resources for Kids and Families

NER News - Tue, 2020-03-17 10:49
A page from the kids' graphic medicine book El Deafo by Cece Bell.

El Deafo by Cece Bell from the NLM History of Medicine Exhibit, Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well-Drawn. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.

Whether it’s a snow day, summer vacation or kids are home sick, having educational materials ready can help keep the whole family busy.  Below are science and health resources to engage kids and help them continue to learn even when they’re not in the classroom.

  • NNLM Middle Atlantic Region has curated resources for K-12 students with topics ranging from genetics to environmental health to careers.
  • Visit the MedlinePlus Children’s Page to find links to kid friendly resources from the CDC, NIH and other trusted resources. Links also include online games.
  • Did you know that the NLM History of Medicine Exhibition Program has lesson plans for K-12 and college students for their traveling exhibits? Traveling Exhibit topics range from literature (including one on Harry Potter), to History and Social Studies, to Science and Technology.
  • Are you interested in learning about the scientific method and participating in real studies? NLM has partnered with SciStarter to curate citizen science projects that are have a health focus.

Other ideas for fun and educational activities include #ColorOurCollection free coloring pages from libraries and museums around the world, including this coloringbook from NLM, and musuem virtual tours.

While using resources online, it’s a good time to work on critical thinking skills to evaluate health information and resources online.  Teach kids to practice these skills with the checklist from Trust it or Trash.

Categories: RML Blogs

Citizen Science At Your Library

SEA News - Tue, 2020-03-17 10:46

Our partners at Arizona State University and SciStarter have asked we share the brief survey below. The goal is to have at least 100 libraries (of all types – academic, public, school, health sciences) state that they have interest in moving forward with more Citizen Science programs in a box/kits moving forward in 2021.

With support from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Arizona State University and SciStarter have spent the past 2+ years developing and field testing resources for libraries,to introduce citizen science and field-testing kits to their communities. Within the STEM realm, citizen science enables people from all walks of life to actively contribute to real scientific research.

Our pilot project has expanded throughout the state of AZ, thanks to mini grants offered by Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and we are eager to get a sense of the levels of interest and commitment from more libraries across the country!

Please complete the brief survey by March 20, 2020: https://forms.gle/3f9qsEMjM4E6NwKE9

We appreciate your interest and commitment to supporting public engagement in science and hope that we can work together in the near future!

Sincerely,

The ASU-SciStarter team

Categories: RML Blogs

Citizen Science Activities

MCR News - Mon, 2020-03-16 18:57
Please consider responding to the message below. It will impact decisions made regarding support for citizen science activities in 2021. The goal is to have at least 100 libraries (of all types – academic, public, school, health sciences) state that they have interest in moving forward with more Citizen Science programs in a box/kits moving forward in 2021.   ——- With support from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Arizona State University and SciStarter have spent the past 2+ years developing and field testing resources for libraries,to introduce citizen science and field-testing [SciStarter.org/library-kits]kits to their communities. Within the STEM realm, citizen science enables people from all walks of life to actively contribute to real scientific research.    Our pilot project has expanded throughout the state of AZ, thanks to mini grants offered by Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and we are eager to get a sense of the levels of interest and commitment from more libraries across the country!    Please complete the brief survey by March 20, 2020: https://forms.gle/3f9qsEMjM4E6NwKE9   We appreciate your interest and commitment to supporting public engagement in science and hope that we can work together in the near future!   Sincerely, The ASU-SciStarter team

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Survey Says….Citizen Science in the Pacific Northwest?

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2020-03-16 17:05

NNLM’s partner, SciStarter, has asked us to share this brief survey with you!

With support from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Arizona State University and SciStarter have spent the past 2+ years developing and field testing resources for libraries,to introduce citizen science and field-testing kits to their communities. Within the STEM realm, citizen science enables people from all walks of life to actively contribute to real scientific research. 

 

Our pilot project has expanded throughout the state of AZ, thanks to mini grants offered by Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and we are eager to get a sense of the levels of interest and commitment from more libraries across the country!

  

Please complete the brief survey by March 20, 2020: https://forms.gle/3f9qsEMjM4E6NwKE9

 

We appreciate your interest and commitment to supporting public engagement in science and hope that we can work together in the near future!

 

Sincerely,

The ASU-SciStarter team

Categories: RML Blogs

Update: New PubMed Features

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2020-03-16 15:57

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) continues to develop features in the new PubMed site, which will replace the legacy PubMed in late spring 2020. Several features have been recently added or updated in the new PubMed:

  • Summary display includes the full author list and other citation details
  • Send to: Citation manager is available
  • RIS format is replaced by PubMed format
  • Search details include individual term translations
  • Citations in the Clipboard have been added to History as search number #0.

The summary display format has been updated to include more citation details, such as the full author list. Labels indicating retractions and other important updates to the original publication are included, as well as labels for free articles when a link to the free full-text article is available. Also, you can now download citations in PubMed format, which matches the MEDLINE format from the legacy site. The PubMed format uses Unicode UTF-8 character encoding; diacritics such as accent marks will now be preserved in your exported file. Citations can be saved in PubMed format as a text (.txt) file or an .nbib file for use with citation management software. See Save citations as a text file and Cite an article in the PubMed User Guide for more information.

The RIS file format has been removed and replaced with PubMed format. The PubMed format provides the complete bibliographic data—including PubMed specific fields—requested by many users, which the RIS format could not accommodate. See PubMed format in the PubMed User Guide for more information about the data included in PubMed format.

Send to: Citation manager is available with the same functionality as in the legacy PubMed. Use Send to: Citation Manager to export citations in PubMed format as an .nbib file, which can be used by many citation management programs. See Export citations into citation management software in the PubMed User Guide. Individual term translations are included with the search details in History, available on the Advanced Search page. Translations show how each term was processed using PubMed’s search rules and syntax. For example, PubMed may modify or add terms to a search to optimize retrieval, such as: MeSH terms, British/American spellings, singular/plural word forms, and other synonyms. See How PubMed works: Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) in the PubMed User Guide.

Citations in the Clipboard are represented in your History by the search number #0, which may be used in Boolean search statements. For example, to limit the citations you have collected in the Clipboard to English language articles, use the following search: #0 AND english [la]. This does not affect or replace the Clipboard contents. See Save citations temporarily using the Clipboard and History in the PubMed User Guide for more information.

For further details, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM SEA COVID-19 Regional Awareness and Information Sharing

SEA News - Mon, 2020-03-16 13:13

Like many libraries and organizations across the country, NNLM SEA has transitioned to telework in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Though we are not currently working in our offices at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, we strive to continue providing our region and members with the same high level of service and support. 

As we all consider how to continue providing the best possible support to our patrons, we would like to hear from you. Please consider sharing in the comments section of this post.  

  • What steps has your library or organization taken thus far in response to COVID-19?
  • Has your library or organization created a resource guide for your community?  

For information about COVID-19, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases websites to receive the latest updates on the virus, what you should know, what you can do to prevent the spread of the disease and more. You can also sign up for the CDC’s newsletter to receive weekly updates about COVID-19.

 NNLM encourages following and retweeting the following handles:

Categories: RML Blogs

A Special Message to Our Members

MAR News - Mon, 2020-03-16 12:15

Dear National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region members:

At the beginning of last week, I was planning on publishing an article about NNLM MAR’s annual report to our funding agency, the National Library of Medicine. NNLM MAR staff, subawardees and members have accomplished great things in the past year.

Between May 1, 2019 and February 1, 2020, NNLM MAR staff and subawardees provided 264 outreach activities for 10,222 participants. 54% of NNLM MAR’s 1148 member organizations were actively engaged in the work of the Network. You: ordered program kits and informational materials; applied for funding; updated your records; participated in resource sharing programs, such as NNLM Delivery; hosted us for site visits and trainings; and asked us questions about New PubMed.

As of March 16, 2020, NNLM MAR staff will be largely working from home until further notice. For now, orders of NNLM Reading Kits and informational materials will not be filled. We also will not be conducting in-person visits or trainings. I want to assure you that we are still available to our members. We have a slate of online trainings scheduled and many others available on YouTube. We will be extending the deadline for 2020-2021 funding applications to April 30. After that, we will review applications on a rolling basis until available funds are expended. Current awardees: We need a bit of time to look at what our/your options are for completing award activities. I will be sending some guidance to all by the end of this week or early next week.

For now, the best way to contact us is through email. You can email individual staff members directly or write to nnlmmar@pitt.edu to be connected.

For information about COVID-19, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases websites to receive the latest updates on the virus, what you should know, what you can do to prevent the spread of the disease and more. You can also sign up for the CDC’s newsletter to receive weekly updates about COVID-19.

We look forward to seeing you all again in-person soon. In the meantime, I wish the best of health to you all.

Kate

Categories: RML Blogs

Creating a Diverse Archive: Lessons in Community Engagement from StoryCorps

PNR Dragonfly - Sun, 2020-03-15 21:00

NNLM is partnering with the Public Library Association (PLA) to offer the free webinar “Creating a Diverse Archive: Lessons in Community Engagement from StoryCorps.”

When: Wednesday, March 25  11:00 AM-12:00 PM (Pacific) 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Mountain) 1:00 PM-2:00 PM (Central) 2:00 PM-3:00 PM (Eastern)

Join StoryCorps, the national oral history project, for an in-depth look at how to engage your community and local stakeholders through storytelling. Each year, StoryCorps collaborates with hundreds of community partners in order to record and preserve diverse voices from across the U.S. In this webinar, we’ll share insights from our partnership model, discuss StoryCorps’ efforts to create a representative archive, and provide best practices and case studies for engaging your library community through storytelling. Sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine/All of Us Community Engagement Network.

For more information and to register, please visit: http://www.ala.org/pla/education/onlinelearning/webinars/storycorps

Categories: RML Blogs

COVID-19 Resources for Libraries and Their Patrons

MCR News - Fri, 2020-03-13 18:00

With the global spread of COVID-19, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine is pointing libraries to these resources with accurate and quality information that they can deliver to their patrons.

For information about COVID-19, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases websites to receive the latest updates on the virus, what you should know, what you can do to prevent the spread of the disease and more. You can also sign up for the CDC’s newsletter to receive weekly updates about COVID-19.

NNLM encourages following and retweeting the following handles:

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar: Creating a Diverse Archive: Lessons in Community Engagement from StoryCorps

MCR News - Fri, 2020-03-13 16:08

Wednesday, March 25

2:00 PM-3:00 PM (Eastern)
1:00 PM-2:00 PM (Central)
12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Mountain)
11:00 AM-12:00 PM (Pacific)

Join StoryCorps, the national oral history project, for an in-depth look at how to engage your community and local stakeholders through storytelling. Each year, StoryCorps collaborates with hundreds of community partners in order to record and preserve diverse voices from across the U.S. In this webinar, we’ll share insights from our partnership model, discuss StoryCorps’ efforts to create a representative archive, and provide best practices and case studies for engaging your library community through storytelling. Sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine/All of Us Community Engagement Network.

http://www.ala.org/pla/education/onlinelearning/webinars/storycorps

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – March 13, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-03-13 10:49

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars March 17 – March 19

Webinars March 24 – April 2

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: Citizen Science Month (April 2020) and the PNR!

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2020-03-12 16:36

I have some very exciting news to share with you all.  The PNR Citizen Science Team has planned a great  PNR Rendezvous webinar entitled “What’s All this Talk About Citizen Science?” on Wednesday, April 29th, 2020 at 1 P.M. PT | 2 P.M. MT | 4 P.M. ET | 10 A.M. Hawaii | 12 P.M. Alaska with three AMAZING guest speakers.

The first guest speaker will be SciStarter founder Darlene Cavalier who will give us a basic introduction to the world of Citizen Science and suggest new ways that we can get involved with virtual Citizen Science projects especially in the time of COVID-19.  Joining Darlene are two high school science teachers, Cheryl Rice and Pete Recksiek, of Dalles, Oregon, who will share their classroom Citizen Science experience using two different projects they selected from the SciStarter/NLM microsite. Cheryl will discuss facilitating Debris Tracker and Pete will discuss facilitating Stallcatchers with their high school science students. Each will share why they choose their project, what went well, and what they’d do differently next time. They will also describe the benefits of Citizen Science project participation and offer advice for others, especially library staff, who want to offer citizen science opportunities through programs such as STEM, library nature groups, and science book clubs. The good news is: anyone can be a citizen scientist – all that’s needed is a bit of curiosity!

Please stay tuned to the Dragonfly Blog for more Citizen Science things during the month of April 2020!

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Acquires the Papers of Louis W. Sullivan, MD

PSR News - Thu, 2020-03-12 15:16

The National Library of Medicine has announced the acquisition of the papers of Louis W. Sullivan, MD, former United States Secretary of Health and Human Services. This is the first collection of papers from a former HHS Secretary acquired by the NLM and will be part of the archival collections of the world’s largest medical library. Dr. Sullivan is an African American physician who served as secretary of HHS from 1989-1993 and as dean and president of Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) from 1975-1989 and from 1993-2002. The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities at NIH was first established as an Office under the NIH Director through Secretary Sullivan in 1990 and was elevated to an Institute in 2010.

The Louis W. Sullivan Papers consist of his HHS chronological correspondence, action/briefing files, daily calendars, speeches, news clippings, White House memorabilia, event photographs, and honorary degrees and awards. The collection documents Secretary Sullivan’s efforts to educate the public on the dangers of tobacco use, including stopping the introduction of Uptown, a cigarette designed for marketing to minority communities; introduce new and improved food labels; initiate a $100 million minority male health and injury prevention initiative; and increase the National Institutes of Health budget over $5 billion.

Dr. Sullivan earned his undergraduate degree from Morehouse College in 1954 and his medical degree in 1958 from Boston University School of Medicine. After holding positions at Harvard Medical School, Seton Hall College of Medicine, Boston University Medical Center, and Boston City Hospital, Dr. Sullivan returned to Morehouse College in 1975 to serve as dean and director of the Medical Education Program. Under his leadership, the Medical Education Program became independent from Morehouse College in 1981 and was renamed Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM). Dr. Sullivan served as president and dean of MSM prior to and following his tenure as secretary of HHS. He was also chair of the President’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities from 2002-2009 and was co-chair of the President’s Commission on HIV and AIDS from 2001-2006.

Dr. Sullivan is chairman of the Sullivan Alliance to Transform the Health Professions and is the founding president of the Association of Minority Health Professions Schools (AMHPS). He is the author of The Morehouse Mystique: Becoming a Doctor at the Nation’s Newest African American Medical School (with Marybeth Gasman, 2012, Johns Hopkins University Press) and his autobiography Breaking Ground: My Life in Medicine (with David Chanoff, 2014, University of Georgia Press).

The NLM History of Medicine Division houses the papers of prominent public health leaders, including other officials of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (and its predecessor the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare), including Faye Abdellah, Edward Brandt, Emery Johnson, and June Osborn; the papers of NIH Directors Harold Varmus, Bernadine Healy, Donald Fredrickson, James A. Shannon, Robert Marston; and the papers of Surgeons General Regina Benjamin, Jocelyn Elders, C. Everett Koop, Antonia Novello, Julius Richmond, and Luther Terry. Information about Dr. Sullivan’s papers and the hundreds of other manuscript collections held by the NLM History of Medicine Division is available through NLM’s online finding aids, detailed research guides to manuscript collections.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Pages