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RML Blogs

DataFlash: NIH Requests Public Comment on a Draft Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

PNR Dragonfly - Fri, 2019-11-08 15:08

On November 6th, 2019, NIH released a Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and supplemental draft guidance for public comment. The purpose of this draft policy and supplemental draft guidance is to promote effective and efficient data management and sharing that furthers NIH’s commitment to making the results and accomplishments of the research it funds and conducts available to the public. Complete information about the draft Policy and draft supplemental guidance can be found on the NIH OSP website.

Stakeholder feedback is essential to ensure that any future policy maximizes responsible data sharing, minimizes burden on researchers, and protects the privacy of research participants.  Stakeholders are invited to comment on any aspect of the draft policy, the supplemental draft guidance, or any other considerations relevant to NIH’s data management and sharing policy efforts that NIH should consider.

To facilitate commenting, NIH has established a web portal that can be accessed here. To ensure consideration, comments must be received no later than January 10, 2020.

For additional details about NIH’s thinking on this issue, please see Dr. Carrie Wolinetz’ latest Under the Poliscope blog:

NIH’s DRAFT Data Management and Sharing Policy: We Need to Hear From You!

NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the draft policy in the near future. Please stay tuned for details.

Questions may be sent to SciencePolicy@mail.nih.gov.

Categories: RML Blogs

Report on the Association of Vision Sciences Librarians Turning 50!

PSR Newsletter - Fri, 2019-11-08 13:56

by Debbie Jan, MLIS, AHIP
Optometry and Health Sciences Librarian
Fong Optometry and Health Sciences Library
University of California, Berkeley

cake decorated with white icing and balloons signed happy anniversary avslWith the assistance of an NNLM PSR Professional Development Award, I was able to attend the 2019 Association of Vision Sciences Librarians (AVSL) Annual Meeting, held in conjunction with the American Academy of Optometry (Academy) and 3rd World Congress of Optometry in Orlando, FL, on October 23-28, 2019. This year was a special meeting for AVSL as it is its 50th anniversary. AVSL is a Medical Library Association (MLA) Special Interest Group and Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) Special Interest Group. Meeting twice a year with a mid-year meeting at MLA and an annual meeting at Academy, AVSL is an active, international group of vision science librarians. It provides many resources (e.g. Standards for Vision Science Libraries, Opening Day List, Whitelist for Vision Science Journals) for anyone interested or working in vision sciences. Membership is free.

At the AVSL meeting, I met with other vision science librarians and learned about recent federal vision funding activities, new eye and vision-related MeSH terms, what’s happening with the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group, and much more. During our Boards Review discussion, I shared information about the Berkeley Study Guide for the National Board of Examiners in Optometry Exam. And from Rudy Barreras’ “Evidence Based Eye Care at WesternU” presentation, I noticed some techniques to incorporate into my evidence-based optometry instruction. At Western University of Health Sciences, Rudy and a faculty member created a spiral bound workbook, where students take notes and do all of their assignments. Students work individually and in groups during the course to learn how to Ask, Acquire, Appraise, and Apply evidence-based information. In my presentation, “UC and Transformative Publishing Models: A Journey,” I shared highlights of the University of California’s transition to transformative publishing agreements that incorporate open access with subscriptions.

exhibit backdrop for the 3rd world congress of optometryOne presentation I attended was “I Have What in My Eyes? Sexually Transmitted Diseases and the Eye.” STDs can manifest in one’s eyes without the patient ever knowing. It’s possible to have chlamydial conjunctivitis without simultaneously having genital chlamydia. And, of course, who knew there were 3 kinds of lice or that lice could live on your eyelashes? Another presentation was “Painless Shingles and the Zoster of Tomorrow,” where I found out herpes zoster ophthalmicus can present without any pain. From these University of California, Berkeley (UCB) presentations and others on diabetic retinopathy and restrictive strabismus, I gained insights into my faculty’s research and what publications are important to them. They use a wider range of journal publications than I had realized and I will keep these in mind if further journal reductions happen in the future. I also attended other non-UCB presentations such as “From the Smart Phone to the Smart Home: A Case Based Review of Low Vision Technology” where I discovered how smartphone features and apps (e.g. Siri, Aira, Color ID, BARD Mobile) and common existing technology (e.g. video door bells, smart light bulbs, smart refrigerators, talking scales) can be used to assist patients with low vision. This made me start thinking how I could best support our Low Vision Clinic. On my last day, I attended the Global Summit on Optometric Education where I sat at table with optometric educators from around the world to discuss how to support optometry as a profession, professional development for optometric educators, curriculum development across nations, and equipment needs.

In the Exhibit Hall I encountered many of our Optometry students and joined them in the Hoop It Up 20/20 Challenge, a virtual basketball competition between optometry schools. Alas, UCB only came in 3rd but the goal of having 2,020 games played was achieved and the Alcon Foundation donated $25,000 to the American Academy of Optometry Foundation.

The final highlight was when I attended a faculty presentation and my faculty member told me her presentation would not have been possible without my assistance in getting her the information she needed for the presentation!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-11-08 11:53

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Read the MAReport: This quarter, learn about using Graphic Medicine as a more accessible way to approach complex health topics from Health Programming Coordinator Michael Balkenhol.

Save the Date: The All of Us Research Program and AARP Create the Good will be streaming a talk with Dr. Suzana Petanceska of NIH’s National Institute on Aging and All of Us Participant Ambassador Dr. Randee Bloom about Alzheimer’s disease, precision medicine, and how All of Us may help change health research. RSVP and tune in on November 12 at 1:00 PM ET.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Request for Information (RFI): The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement (UG4) that operates on a five-year cycle. As we prepare for the start of the next cycle (in May 2021), we are seeking input and feedback from the public on ways to ensure that the NNLM can continue to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The deadline to respond is December 2, 2019.

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote American Indian Heritage or Family Health History? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

Clinical eCompanion: We’d like your feedback on the point of care tool, Clinical eCompanion! This feedback will help us to determine the future of this website. To let us know what you think, visit the Clinical eCompanion site and select the highlighted link on the homepage.

DOCLINE WILL BE UNAVAILABLE… 11:00am Wednesday, November 13 – DOCLINE Talkline

New on YouTube:

NLM/NIH News

Marking an Anniversary – Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan describes how after three years, Musings has become a powerful tool for advancing the work of our colleagues at NLM. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Seeking Leek Island: A Place of Healing – Across the globe, World War I took millions of lives and left hundreds of thousands more with a variety of physical and psychological disabilities. However, despite all the chaos, violence, and death brought forth during wartime, there were a few areas of peace that could be found thanks to generous individuals of the day, and one of these places was the Leek Island Military Hospital. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted several new features that have been added to the new PubMed.

NIH’s DRAFT Data Management and Sharing Policy: We Need to Hear From You!NIH Office of Science Policy

NIH News in Health: The November 2019 issue is now available, featuring, “Medical Scans Explained: A Look Inside the Body,” and, “Yoga for Health: Positioning Your Body and Mind.” Other topics include the long-term results of peanut allergy therapy, healthy eating, and taking control of your mental health.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

November 2019

Working Across Difference: Making Better Connections – November 13, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and guest speaker Jessica Pettitt for the next installment in this webinar series about Diversity, Equity and Inclusion! We communicate across difference in passing, on purpose, and can even arrange a virtual conversation where everyone can see everyone easily even though we are potentially thousands of miles apart. While we “know” our co-workers, we often struggle to understand the cultural nuances of dealing with people of different cultural backgrounds, religions, languages, sexual orientations, gender expressions, socioeconomic variety, and more. This webinar will help participants understand what is required to work with people who are “not the same” as they are.

PubMed for Librarians: Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) – November 15, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the NNLM Training Office (NTO), attend this webinar to learn about the National Library of Medicine’s Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database. This class will talk about the 4 different types of MeSH terms and how searchers can benefit from using MesH to build a search. Participants will investigate the structure of the MeSH database and look at the components of a MeSH record.

Consumer Health Information Justice: Identifying and addressing information-related factors that contribute to health disparities – November 15, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Southeastern Atlantic Region (SEA), this class will discuss many of the different types of information-related factors that can diminish an individual’s capability to live a long and healthy life, such as an inability to recognize and articulate one’s information needs; unawareness of and/or insufficient access to sources of relevant, comprehensible, and credible health information; limited health literacy (including inadequate digital health literacy skills); and an inability to act on information. The conclusion of the webinar will focus on some of the many ways in which information professionals are helping to shape these information-related factors so as to optimize every individual’s capability to not only live a long and healthy life, but also to flourish.

Thinking Outside the PubMed Box – November 18, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Do you develop or support wellness programming at your library or help patrons find health information? Do you support health sciences instructors or students at a school, college, or university? Are you familiar with PubMed, but curious if there are other resources out there that might be better suited to your patron audience? Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will introduce you to a range of trustworthy and freely available online health information resources developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Awareness of these resources will help you “think outside the PubMed box” when assisting patrons or developing programming, allowing you to better tailor your resource usage and recommendations to particular contexts.

Celebrate Native American Heritage Month: What’s New Since 1492? – November 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) in observing Native American Heritage Month with a presentation by Eugene Fracek, member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota and a cultural ambassador who teaches people of all ages about American Indian Tribes. In this one-hour webinar, Mr. Fracek will present an overview and perspective of the history, cultural values and behaviors, and legal issues impacting American Indian Tribes and members of those Tribes.

The New PubMed – November 20, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join the New England Region (NER) for the next installment of NNLM Resource Picks, our collaborative, bimonthly, webcast series featuring the National Library of Medicine resources. This session will preview the new, modern PubMed with its updated features including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You’ll also learn about the reasons for the change and how this new improved Pub Med will make mobile searching easier.

How Public Health Can Learn From and Inform the Precision Medicine All of Us Research Program – November 21, 9:00-10:30 AM ET – The National Institute of Health (NIH)-led All of Us research program aims to enroll over one million people in the U.S. in a research cohort to improve understanding of how individual differences in lifestyle, socioeconomics, environment, and biology affect health outcomes. Recruiting a diverse research cohort is key to ensuring that findings will be broadly applicable, and All of Us strives to include participants from groups historically underrepresented in biomedical research. Join the Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Office of Science, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for this presentation to learn more about the All of Us research program, better understand how the approaches used to recruit All of Us participants can inform future public health efforts to address diversity, and share your expertise in increasing diverse participation in your own public health work.

From the Mountains to the Sea: Rural Health Issues and Resources – November 21, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from higher incidence of chronic illness, they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. Sponsored by the New England Region (NER), this session will describe hallmarks of rural America, identifying access challenges of living in rural communities and equipping participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities. After completing an assignment, participants are eligible for 2 MLA CE.

PubMed for Librarians: Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) – November 22, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – Attend this webinar with the NNLM Training Office (NTO) to learn how PubMed uses ATM to map your keyword searches to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn how ATM lets you search PubMed effectively with keywords. This class will also look at the automatic explosion feature, what is and isn’t included in Search Details, and explore how to search for phrases in PubMed.

December 2019

Astronaut Health: Health Information Resources to Support Science Education – December 5, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Public and school libraries throughout the nation have been celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing this year with the reading theme “A Universe of Stories”. Join the South Central Region (SCR) for this class that will walk through various resources from NLM, NIH, and NASA, as well as wonderful communities of practice that are ready to help you continue to incorporate science and health programming into the library. Learn about partnerships and programs that took place this year for the Summer of Space, and get ready to explore where space and health resources collide!

Engaging Parents and Caregivers in Substance Use Disorder Prevention and Recovery – December 5, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Join this webinar with the New England Region (NER) and guest presenter Fred Muench, PhD, President of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. Fred will present on family-based interventions to engage parents and caregivers, as well as data on the resources the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids offers for families addressing every aspect of substance use and addiction, from prevention to recovery.

More Than a Bandage: Health Information Resources for K-12 Professionals – December 10, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course is an introduction to free health information and educational resources for K-12 professionals provided by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other trusted organizations. Participants will learn about consumer health sites with an emphasis on MedlinePlus, covering general health resources, drug information, multi-cultural and multi-language resources, career/professional resources, and youth heath issues.

Online Privacy 101 – December 18, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) for an introduction to online privacy in the digital age. We live in an era of data breaches and constant surveillance. Learn how to keep your data safe, consider the risks versus rewards of common internet browsing behavior, and navigate best practices for public computer labs, mobile phones, and personal browsing.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Maize Day: The day after Thanksgiving is recognized annually as Maize Day and celebrates the traditional role of corn in Native American cultures. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, corn is low in phosphorus which can help protect your bones and blood vessels. After the holidays, incorporate some corn and other ingredients to help you and your family get back on track to living active and healthy. Try vegetables such as squash, beans, mushrooms, persimmons, and asparagus. For more ways to enjoy corn, visit the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website.

Marketplace Open Enrollment lasts until December 15. Now is the time to visit HealthCare.gov to get ready for this year’s Open Enrollment and review your 2020 health plan options.

Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Communities – As the impact of the opioid epidemic is felt in communities across the US, public libraries are choosing to be part of the community response. With funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, (project number LG-00-18-0298-18), and in partnership with the Public Library Association (PLA), OCLC is sharing knowledge and resources that will help public libraries and their community partners develop effective strategies to address the opioid epidemic in America.

SAMSHA Launches FindTreatment.gov – The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) launched a newly designed website that will help connect those who are looking for substance abuse treatment with approximately 13,000 locations across the United States. Visitors can enter a ZIP Code to find nearby locations of state-licensed facilities, treatment options, payment and insurance information, and what to expect on the first call.

The Influence of Clothing and Other Textiles on Your Exposure to Indoor Air Pollutants – November 14, 1:00-2:30 PM ET – Textiles can have a very large capacity to accumulate indoor pollutants. As such, textiles can act as a major source, but they also can act as a sink that can lower exposure depending on their history. Given clothing’s close proximity to the skin, it can be a particularly influential exposure mediator. Laboratory and human studies now show how important textiles can be in controlling exposure and also provide data allowing for the testing of new exposure models. Extrapolation from these models shows just how much clothing influences population exposure to indoor pollutants, but also suggests ways to use textiles to control exposure. Join this webinar with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to learn more about the influence of textiles on your exposure to indoor air pollutants.

Beyond PRISMA– Health Research Reporting Guidelines: Your new secret weapon! – November 18, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – How often have you been asked for guidance from a medical student or resident who wants to submit a case study to a journal? Maybe a systematic review team member has asked for help with a data extraction form? Or you’ve been asked to lead journal club—now what? Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) with support from the NNLM South Central Region (SCR), this webinar will take you beyond PRISMA by introducing you to the family of health research reporting guidelines, and discuss the ways in which they can be used for more than just reporting. This class will also examine study execution assessment tools.

Developing Health Literacy Skills in Youth: A Workshop – Presented by the National Academy of Sciences, the Roundtable on Health Literacy will convene on November 19 for a public workshop to discuss the necessity of developing health literacy skills in youth, examine the research on developmentally appropriate health literacy milestones and transitions and measuring health literacy in youth, learn from programs and policies that represent best practices for developing health literacy skills in youth, and explore potential collaborations across disciplines for developing health literacy skills in youth. Register to attend this event in person or via live webcast!

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship – The Medical Library Association (MLA) is now accepting applications for The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. The purpose of this fellowship is to fund research aimed at expanding the research knowledge base, linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and advances in biomedical research. The endowment will provide a grant of up to $10,000. It is awarded by MLA through a competitive grant process, to a qualified health sciences librarian, health professional, researcher, educator, or health administrator. The deadline to apply is November 15, 2019.

Hospital Libraries Section (HLS)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Professional Development Grant – Whether you are in the middle of your career, new to it all, or have worked for many years, the HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant is an opportunity for an amazing professional journey into education or research. The grant is open to librarians working in a hospital, health system or similar clinical settings. Grant funds can be used for professional development through MEDLIB-ED or to help attend the MLA Annual Meeting or CE courses. It may also be used to support reimbursement for expenses incurred in conducting research such as a statistician to help with survey design, analyses etc. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2019.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 8, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-11-08 10:40

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars November 13 – November 15

Webinars November 18 – November 20

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

An Overhauled Grants and Proposal Writing On-Demand Class is Now Live

SEA News - Thu, 2019-11-07 15:39

Jarrod Irwin, Consumer Health Coordinator of NNLM SEA

We are excited to announce an updated version of our Grants and Proposal Writing On Demand course! The updates went live in Moodle on Monday, September 30.

The course content has been overhauled to make it more current, relevant, and useful to as many grant-seekers as possible. In particular, it now includes material about grants for projects with intended audiences of marginalized or vulnerable populations.

The lessons are interspersed with questions and brainstorming activities that allow you to reinforce and apply what you are learning. The course includes five short assignments, a mix of discussions with classmates and practice with certain aspects of planning a project and writing a grant proposal to fund it.

The course is also reorganized for easier use as a guide for the process of applying for grants. We hope this will make it a useful reference after you have completed the class itself. The class is organized into four sections: Envisioning Your Grant Project, Choosing a Funding Source, Preparing to Write a Proposal, and Writing the Proposal.

As before, the course is self-paced. You can enroll at any time and work on it whenever you like. Check out the course page for further information.

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH Requests Public Comment on a Draft Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

SEA News - Thu, 2019-11-07 10:23

Yesterday, NIH released a Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and supplemental draft guidance for public comment. The purpose of this draft policy and supplemental draft guidance is to promote effective and efficient data management and sharing that furthers NIH’s commitment to making the results and accomplishments of the research it funds and conducts available to the public. Complete information about the draft Policy and draft supplemental guidance can be found on the NIH OSP website.

Stakeholder feedback is essential to ensure that any future policy maximizes responsible data sharing, minimizes burden on researchers, and protects the privacy of research participants.  Stakeholders are invited to comment on any aspect of the draft policy, the supplemental draft guidance, or any other considerations relevant to NIH’s data management and sharing policy efforts that NIH should consider.

To facilitate commenting, NIH has established a web portal that can be accessed here. To ensure consideration, comments must be received no later than January 10, 2020.

For additional details about NIH’s thinking on this issue, please see Dr. Carrie Wolinetz’ latest Under the Poliscope blog:

NIH’s DRAFT Data Management and Sharing Policy: We Need to Hear From You!

NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the draft policy in the near future. Please stay tuned for details.

Questions may be sent to SciencePolicy@mail.nih.gov.

Categories: RML Blogs

Library Tools Support November Health Observances

MCR News - Wed, 2019-11-06 18:50

Libraries can now access free tools to support national health observances for the month of November. The entire month is dedicated to marking National American Indian Heritage Month and National Family Health History Month.

The available resources can be used to help libraries celebrate and bring awareness on the importance of family health history and American Indian heritage in their communities. These tools include health information resources, webinars, free materials, electronic bulletin slides, social media materials, a ready-to-use library program kit and an NNLM Reading Club book kit

You can access these resources at nnlm.gov or by clicking on the links below.

 

National American Indian Heritage Month

National Family Health History Month

 

The materials are part of NNLM’s campaign to supply libraries with materials and programming ideas based on the national health observances. The selection of available materials will be updated monthly as new health observances approach. If you would like to be informed on upcoming health observances, go to https://nnlm.gov/all-of-us/national-health-observances#toc-3 or sign up for our CEN newsletter for monthly updates.

Categories: RML Blogs

NMLM Feature: Open House at SRHS Health Sciences Library

SEA News - Wed, 2019-11-06 11:56

Tonia Harris, Manager of Library Services, Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Health Sciences Library

The Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System’s Health Sciences Library, opened in 1961, is located on the system’s main campus and has moved two times in that time span. In our last location, we lost half the library space to build an auditorium next door. We moved to our current location in April 2019 to a space less than half the size we moved from. With the move to the new space, the entire print journal collection was recycled along with about half the book collection. While it is smaller, the new library space has more windows, bright LED lighting, vinyl tile flooring and is centrally located in the main building of the hospital. We were able to keep the same amount of computers which also includes an internet-only kiosk computer. I am the librarian and the only staff for this library serving this small, multi-hospital system.

To garner awareness and publicity along with celebrating National Medical Library Month, the SRHS Health Sciences Library held a four hour Open House Drop-In on October 17, 2019, which is also Get to Know Your Customer Day.  After posting messages to MEDLIB-L and HLS-List looking for ideas, I incorporated several suggestions into the event. I purchased a small helium tank to use for balloons taped to cardstock fliers that were placed throughout the hospital the morning of the event. Chocolate chip cookies with napkins and a bowl of snack size chocolate candy were provided. To simplify procedures and circumvent utilizing hospital catering, drinks were not included. As a door prize to draw people in, I purchased three $10 Chick-Fil-A gift cards for a drawing to be held a week after the event. People who dropped by filled out a library related word-find puzzle game to be entered into the drawing. They were able to complete the form on the spot, drop it off later, send it by interoffice mail, fax it, or scan and email it by the deadline. I found a website online to make the game. I wanted the words to include the location, my name, names of resources offered, names of items located in the library, etc., to help people ‘remember’ the library, staff and services it provides. One of the library’s vendors who provides databases and point of care resources sent pens, mechanical pencils and post-it-notes as ‘freebie gifts’. A handout with a bullet point list of all library services was provided along with handouts for individual electronic resources. I downloaded various items from the MLA website such as bookmarks and posters. The hospital’s copy center printed these on cardstock. MedlinePlus bookmarks were also provided. Marketing for the event consisted of three email blasts containing the event announcement to various hospital email departments beginning a week before the event. The event announcement was also sent to every hospital department via interoffice mail. The hospital’s intranet page has a news and events section and the event announcement was added there. The hospital’s marketing department also emailed the event announcement globally a little over a week before the event. While specific stats weren’t kept and a sign-in sheet was not used, I estimate 50-75 people stopped by. These included physicians, residents, nurses, VP of Nursing for hospital system, allied health personnel and also a president from one of the hospitals in the system.

I have received positive feedback regarding the event including the word-find puzzle game. People seemed impressed with the space although it is smaller than the previous library space. This is the first time such an event has been held in almost 30 years. It is undetermined if National Medical Library Month will be celebrated annually in the future. Perhaps in 2021, I will have a 60th anniversary library reception during National Medical Library Month. However for this year, the new library space and its services were showcased, the open house drop-in was an overwhelming success. If you’re interested in reading MEDLIB-L and HLS-List responses to my postings about the open house, please click here.

Categories: RML Blogs

Embracing Community: Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital’s Medical Library

NER News - Wed, 2019-11-06 07:16
community garden under blue skies

Community Garden at Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital

In August, I wrote about my trip to Copley Hospital shortly after librarian Stacy Wein was notified about the library’s closure. After my visit with Stacy, I drove 40 miles to what is known as the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. I wanted to learn more about the medical library at Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital (NVRH).

Betsy Merrill greeted me as I walked into the hospital. The Medical Library is located in the Main Lobby, and she spotted me through the glass walls. We commiserated over hospital library closures. We felt the powerlessness of Stacy’s situation. Small hospitals are struggling with their budgets, and librarians are anxious to prove their worth.

NVRH is a 25-bed critical access hospital with affiliated primary care clinics, specialty and surgical services, birthing center and emergency services. According to the 2018 Community Health Needs Assessment 2018, NVRH serves a population of roughly 30,000 people. The area has a population density 48.1 persons per square mile in Caledonia County, and only 9.5 persons per square mile in Essex County. Compare this with 529 persons per square mile in Worcester County, Massachusetts (where my office is located). The Implementation Plan includes actions for addressing transportation, food insecurity and safe housing.

The Medical Library embraces community outreach to assist NVRH in addressing social determinants of health. Betsy, with a staff of volunteers, provides consumer health information in a variety of formats–brochures, books, magazines and videos. The Library offers information on support groups, and provides a public access computer for searching health-related questions.

Betsy handed me a list of Community Health Improvement projects that she participates in:

  • Healthy Choices publication: affordable community health resources
  • NVRH Community Gardens: free garden space and water access
  • AHEC MedQuest Program: high school students exploring health careers
  • Baby Cuddler Program: care for neonates withdrawing from exposure to narcotics

Betsy is involved with the hospital art gallery, Red Cross drives, and job shadowing program. She offers proctoring services for nursing and laboratory exams. She provides a monthly submission to the in-house newsletter, and serves on the Ethics Committee and Palliative Care Committee. Betsy handles these tasks in addition to her work supporting clinicians and hospital administrators.

Literature at the Heart of Medicine

Within the hospital community, Betsy organizes the Literature at the Heart of Medicine program. This facilitated reading and discussion group is coordinated through the Vermont Humanities Council. Literature at the Heart of Medicine meets monthly on the 3rd Thursday from 5:00-7:30pm.

The October read was Slow Medicine by Victoria Sweet. Kirkus Review observes that the author “highlights [moments] that revealed some aspect of what she calls Slow Medicine. Sometimes, it involves nurses and doctors showing calmness, confidence, expertise, and a personal touch; sometimes, it is patients whose treatments provide revelatory moments.” Sweet is very critical of Electronic Health Records as stealing time away from the doctor-patient encounter for the benefit of pharmaceutical companies.

Sounds like an interesting read.

Sweet, V. (2017). Slow Medicine: The Way to Health. New York, NY: Riverhead Books.

Categories: RML Blogs

UC Libraries and IT@UC Partner to Bring Renowned NLM Data Scientist to Campus

GMR News - Tue, 2019-11-05 16:18

By Melissa Previtera and Don Jason

On September 17th and 18th, Dr. Lisa Federer, Data and Open Science Librarian for the National Library of Medicine (NLM), visited the University of Cincinnati as part of the Data and Computational Science Series (DCS2).

During her visit, Dr. Federer shared her expertise in the field of biomedical research data and data visualization through a lecture, a hands-on workshop, and meetings with various data and informatics leaders.

Dr. Federer’s lecture “If You Share it, Will They Come? Quantifying and Characterizing Reuse of Biomedical Research Data” encouraged individuals to think about how they are not only sharing and reusing data but how patterns of reuse can influence curation and preservation. She presented her talk in the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Profession’s Stanley J. Lucas, MD Board Room. Dr. Federer hosted a luncheon at the same venue. During the luncheon, she answered questions about her lecture and had in-depth conversations with UC faculty and researchers.

Lisa Federer engaged with participant learning

After the luncheon, Dr. Federer taught a hands-on workshop titled “Endless Forms Most Beautiful: Creating Customized Data Visualization with ggplot2 in R.” The workshop was held in the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library’s Dr. Stanley B. Troup Learning Space. The workshop addressed the importance of clear communication, effective visualizations, and accessibility for colorblind individuals. Dr. Richard Johansen, Data Visualization Specialist, and Mark Chalmers, Science Librarian, served as teaching assistants for the workshop.

During Dr. Federer’s time in Cincinnati, she served as the keynote speaker for the Cincinnati Area Health Sciences Library Association’s (CAHSLA) annual meeting and served as a guest speaker at the UC Libraries Faculty Meeting. She presented a talk titled “Beyond the Data Management Plan: Expanding Roles for Librarians” to both audiences. This talk gave a synopsis of emerging data science competencies for the library workforce. The talk provided a roadmap of trainings, webinars and classes librarians could complete in order to gain these professional skills.

Dr. Federer’s visit was a huge success – bringing together attendees from a variety of academic disciplines and research interests. The DCS2 planning committee hopes Dr. Federer’s visit starts conversations, expands professional networks and is the catalyst for future collaborations.

Don Jason, Health Informationist, served as site coordinator for Dr. Federer’s visit. He received logistical support from Melissa Previtera, HSL/ Winkler Center Term Librarian, Assami Semde, HSL Circulation Desk Coordinator, and Lori Harris, Interim Director of the Health Sciences Library.

The DCS2 planning committee would like to thank Dr. Federer for sharing her extensive knowledge and skills with the UC community. The committee would also like to thank UC Libraries’ Research & Data Services, the UC Digital Scholarship Center, and the UC Institute for Interdisciplinary Data Science, for meeting with Dr. Federer during her visit. Finally, we would like to extend our sincerest gratitude to the Office of the Provost for funding the DCS2.

The DCS2 is a collaboration between UC Libraries and IT@UC. The series provides the UC research community with innovative workshops and distinguished speakers on advanced research data topics. Please visit the DCS2 Website to register for upcoming lectures and training sessions.
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The NNLM is grateful for the outreach and engagement work of our NNLM members. If you have a program or project to share, please email us at gmr-lib@uiowa.edu.

Categories: RML Blogs

Announcing the November 2019 NNLM Reading Club Book Selections

SEA News - Tue, 2019-11-05 09:50

Knowing your family’s health history paints a picture of potential health problems from one generation to the next. This knowledge is a powerful tool for early detection or prevention of diseases you may be at risk for. Want to learn how to find and share your family health history with your doctor? Let National Family Health History Day on Thanksgiving Day help get the conversation started this holiday season and throughout the year.

For November 2019, the NNLM Reading Club announces three new NNLM Reading club books. Visit Book Selections and Health Resources for Family Health History to download book discussion guides, promotional materials and corresponding family health history information… or to apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book Kit!

Categories: RML Blogs

NER Funded Grant – YWCA Women’s Breast and Cervical Health Educational Outreach Program

NER News - Mon, 2019-11-04 11:13

 

The following blog post was written by Alfee Westgroves. Alfee is the Women’s Health Specialist overseeing the 2019 NNLM NER Community Engagement grant awarded to the YWCA of Central Massachusetts. 

We know that women of color may be most comfortable exclusively in each other’s presence, particularly when confronting their own vulnerability. We also know that the pressures and stressors on women of color are impactful and unique, from those of white women. We further know that health disparities, namely that of breast cancer, include startling mortality rates. The NNLM made curated statistical information on health disparities easily accessible from the: CDC, NIH: National Cancer Institute, DHHS: Office of Minority Health…and all from one search engine.

The YWCA of Central MA, with support from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine- New England Region, will sponsor an on-going support group for women of color who have been diagnosed with reproductive cancers (i.e., breast, cervical, ovarian, uterine). WOC & the (Big) C, or “Woc-C”, will strive to create safe space for women of color to share their stories, resources and support of each other. The group will meet for coffee and tea twice a month and is free and open to the community with pre-registration. There will also be a closed group chat for participants to utilize for immediate physical or emotional support needs. Woc-C will kick off before the end of the year.

To help reach the special population of black women in the community and build relationships, The YWCA of Central MA co-hosted a tea at summer’s end for women who serve as ministers and first ladies of local black churches. NNLM sponsored educator and cancer survivor, Dr. Joyce McNickles, PhD., to present on the topic of black women’s breast health and the importance of screening and early detection. We went to NNLM resources to easily find trusted and supporting fact sheets for tea attendees on topics such as, NIH’s “Dense Breasts: Answers to Commonly Asked Questions”- a factor in black women’s breast health. Connections such as these helped inform the developing WOC cancer support group, as well as help educate, raise awareness and strengthen our caring community.

In addition to the cancer support group for women of color, the YWCA of Central MA aims to enhance our current cancer support programming. A free workshop series will commence in December and continue into the spring to help educate survivors on developing and using available resources to support themselves and others during and after cancer. The first workshop, “Reclaiming your Optimal Health Naturally, during and after Cancer Treatment”, is scheduled for December 2nd and will feature an acupuncturist/Chinese medicine practitioner. The NNLM as a resource will be highlighted with an interactive portion, where participants may use tablet stations to browse the libraries. The stations will promote supporting information on integrative/complementary/holistic medicine via MedlinePlus, to feed the newly acquired knowledge, curiosities and interest of workshop participants.

During Breast Cancer Awareness month, we jumped into fall with an interactive breast cancer presentation at Abby’s House- shelter, housing and advocacy program for women in our community of Worcester, MA. At Abby’s House, we were able to help women engage with the health information being presented, answer questions on the vital issue and share resources to empower them as their own best health advocates. As with all of our efforts, we aim to move toward better health outcomes, with earlier cancer detection and treatment as the key.

Categories: RML Blogs

Graphic Medicine: Using Comics to Understand Health

MAR News - Mon, 2019-11-04 07:00
Michael Balkenhol

Michael Balkenhol

Graphic Medicine is a growing genre that combines comics or graphic novels to capture and tell health stories. Sometimes Graphic Medicine refers to informational materials like comics being used in patient handouts, but most often Graphic Medicine are memoirs or semi-autobiographical novels.

Dr. Ian Williams describes Graphic Medicine as “the intersection of the medium of comics and the discourse of healthcare.” His book, The Bad Doctor, is about a young doctor balancing the stresses of life, his responsibilities and the doubts he feels while making major decisions about the lives of others. It was one of the first titles I picked up and an interesting glimpse into the pressures of practicing medicine.

Benefits to using comics in medicine are wide and varied. For medical professionals, Graphic Medicine can build empathy and help establish understanding around what it means to be a patient. For patients and the families of patients, a well selected Graphic Medicine title can help readers work through the social isolation and stigma around sickness and disease. Graphic Medicine can be a more accessible way to approach a complex health topic.

Graphic Medicine can also be an asset to collections in public libraries. Nonfiction collections about health and wellness are often costly and quickly become obsolete. Graphic Medicine titles on addiction, cancer, veterans’ health, HIV/AIDS, and mental health can fill important gaps in health and wellness collections. Additionally, if you have a medical encyclopedia and other old health reference books available, libraries can use that space to promote graphic medicine and direct health information questions to MedlinePlus! You can also order MedlinePlus brochures from NNLM MAR at no cost.

To learn more about Graphic Medicine, check out these resources!

Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well-Drawn! The National Library of Medicine produces traveling exhibitions, which are made available free of charge to public, university, and medical libraries, as well as cultural centers across the country. Though there is a shipping fee, contact your NNLM Regional Medical Library to inquire about funding sources. In additional to the traveling exhibition, check out the related education resources for lesson plans and learning modules.

From NLM, “Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well-Drawn! explores an increasingly popular, yet little-known literary field that presents personal illness narratives and health information through the medium of comics. The exhibition showcases items from the NLM’s growing collection of graphic memoirs depicting people’s experiences with an array of health issues, including breast cancer, deafness, mental illness, HIV/AIDS, and more.”

GraphicMedicine.org – GraphicMedicine.org is a site that explores the interaction between the medium of comics and the discourse of healthcare. This website is home to a community of academics, health careers, authors, artists, and fans of comics and medicine. A Spanish language sister website, medicina gráfica, is also available.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region’s Graphic Medicine Initiative – The NNLM NER Graphic Medicine initiative seeks to provide training and tools, to inform and encourage growth in the use of comics in libraries and health care settings. Check out this resources for book lists, webinar recordings, and book club programming information.

What is a Graphic Novel? – If you are thinking about incorporating graphic medicine into your teaching or programming, check out graphic novel educational tools like slides and infographics from cartoonist Jessica Abel.

NNLM All of Us Graphic Medicine and Health Storytelling program guide coverNNLM All of Us Programming (see graphic medicine) – The NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network has programming resources that includes a program kit on doing health programming with Graphic Medicine & Health Storytelling. This program guide offers ideas for activities and information about using Graphic Medicine as a funded project to raise awareness of the NIH All of Us Research Program.

NNLM Reading Club – A few months ago, I wrote about the NNLM Reading Club which provides titles and program guides at no cost to NNLM Members. A stand out graphic medicine title – Rachel Lindsay’s Rx – is available for order.

Additional Reading:

For Watching:

Happy Reading!

Categories: RML Blogs

Announcing the November 2019 NNLM Reading Club Book Selections

MCR News - Fri, 2019-11-01 18:50

Knowing your family’s health history paints a picture of potential health problems from one generation to the next. This knowledge is a powerful tool for early detection or prevention of diseases you may be at risk for. Want to learn how to find and share your family health history with your doctor? Let National Family Health History Day on Thanksgiving Day help get the conversation started this holiday season and throughout the year.

For November 2019, the NNLM Reading Club announces three new NNLM Reading club books. Visit Book Selections and Health Resources for Family Health History to download book discussion guides, promotional materials and corresponding family health history information… or to apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book Kit!

Categories: RML Blogs

November 2019 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Fri, 2019-11-01 18:44

Illustration of a person getting an MRICheck out the November issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-11-01 11:18

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Read the MAReport: Meet the Middle Atlantic Region’s new Community Engagement Coordinator, Tess Wilson!

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Request for Information (RFI): The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement (UG4) that operates on a five-year cycle. As we prepare for the start of the next cycle (in May 2021), we are seeking input and feedback from the public on ways to ensure that the NNLM can continue to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The deadline to respond is December 2, 2019.

Clinical eCompanion: We’d like your feedback on the point of care tool, Clinical eCompanion! This feedback will help us to determine the future of this website. To let us know what you think, visit the Clinical eCompanion site and select the highlighted link on the homepage.

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote American Indian Heritage or Family Health History? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

Save the Date for the next NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, coming up on November 20, 2019! Check out our new Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science resource guide for information on how to participate, and follow #CiteNLM to get the latest details as they become available.

Join a Focus Group at the APHA Annual Meeting! The National Networks of Libraries of Medicine, Prevention Research Centers, Public Library Association, and the Midwestern Public Health Training Center are seeking Public Health practitioners to participate in focus groups to learn more about partnerships between public libraries and public health.

DOCLINE 6.2.2 released – includes “Contact Library” – DOCLINE Talkline

NLM/NIH News

Thanks News Outlets for Getting the PubMed Central Word Out! – Some people access NLM’s vast bibliographic resources through the NLM website. Others arrive after a Google search or through platforms such as Ovid MEDLINE. But recently [Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan] was reminded that news outlets help people find articles in PubMed Central, too. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

The Truth about Black Cats – Superstitions about black cats are common even today and are reinforced especially during Halloween. For instance, folklore tells us that if a black cat crosses your path, bad luck is sure to follow. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Dare to Dream: The Long Road to Targeted Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis – When your world has been touched by a life-threatening disease, it’s hard to spend a lot of time dreaming about the future. But that’s exactly what Jenny, an 8-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis (CF), did 30 years ago upon hearing the news that [Dr Francis Collins] and colleagues in Ann Arbor and Toronto had discovered the gene for CF [1,2]. – NIH Director’s Blog

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted several new features that have been added to the new PubMed.

New PubMed Recap: Did you miss A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals? A recording, a list of key points and an FAQ page are now available from the webinar.

NLM Resource Highlight: Looking for resources to learn about environmental health for middle school students? Explore ToxTown’s Science Classroom to find lesson plans/activities, interactive games and activities, hands on activities, videos, informational websites and more.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

November 2019

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – November 5, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. In addition to 1 MLA CE, this program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour.

PubMed for Librarians: Introduction to PubMed – November 8, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the NNLM Training Office (NTO), PubMed for Librarians is made up of five 90-minute classes presented via WebEx that include hands-on exercises. In this first webinar, participants will learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a basic PubMed search, assess your search results, analyze search details, customize PubMed with My NCBI, search for a known citation; plus, brief introductions to MeSH, automatic term mapping, search tags and subheadings. This class will be demonstrated in the new PubMed interface.

Working Across Difference: Making Better Connections – November 13, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and guest speaker Jessica Pettitt for the next installment in this webinar series about Diversity, Equity and Inclusion! We communicate across difference in passing, on purpose, and can even arrange a virtual conversation where everyone can see everyone easily even though we are potentially thousands of miles apart. While we “know” our co-workers, we often struggle to understand the cultural nuances of dealing with people of different cultural backgrounds, religions, languages, sexual orientations, gender expressions, socioeconomic variety, and more. This webinar will help participants understand what is required to work with people who are “not the same” as they are.

PubMed for Librarians: Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) – November 15, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the NNLM Training Office (NTO), attend this webinar to learn about the National Library of Medicine’s Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database. This class will talk about the 4 different types of MeSH terms and how searchers can benefit from using MesH to build a search. Participants will investigate the structure of the MeSH database and look at the components of a MeSH record.

Consumer Health Information Justice: Identifying and addressing information-related factors that contribute to health disparities – November 15, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Southeastern Atlantic Region (SEA), this class will discuss many of the different types of information-related factors that can diminish an individual’s capability to live a long and healthy life, such as an inability to recognize and articulate one’s information needs; unawareness of and/or insufficient access to sources of relevant, comprehensible, and credible health information; limited health literacy (including inadequate digital health literacy skills); and an inability to act on information. The conclusion of the webinar will focus on some of the many ways in which information professionals are helping to shape these information-related factors so as to optimize every individual’s capability to not only live a long and healthy life, but also to flourish.

Thinking Outside the PubMed Box – November 18, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Do you develop or support wellness programming at your library or help patrons find health information? Do you support health sciences instructors or students at a school, college, or university? Are you familiar with PubMed, but curious if there are other resources out there that might be better suited to your patron audience? Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will introduce you to a range of trustworthy and freely available online health information resources developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Awareness of these resources will help you “think outside the PubMed box” when assisting patrons or developing programming, allowing you to better tailor your resource usage and recommendations to particular contexts.

Celebrate Native American Heritage Month: What’s New Since 1492? – November 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) in observing Native American Heritage Month with a presentation by Eugene Fracek, member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota and a cultural ambassador who teaches people of all ages about American Indian Tribes. In this one-hour webinar, Mr. Fracek will present an overview and perspective of the history, cultural values and behaviors, and legal issues impacting American Indian Tribes and members of those Tribes.

The New PubMed – November 20, 300-4:00 PM ET – Join the New England Region (NER) for the next installment of NNLM Resource Picks, our collaborative, bimonthly, webcast series featuring the National Library of Medicine resources. This session will preview the new, modern PubMed with its updated features including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You’ll also learn about the reasons for the change and how this new improved Pub Med will make mobile searching easier.

How Public Health Can Learn From and Inform the Precision Medicine All of Us Research Program – November 21, 9:00-10:30 AM ET – The National Institute of Health (NIH)-led All of Us research program aims to enroll over one million people in the U.S. in a research cohort to improve understanding of how individual differences in lifestyle, socioeconomics, environment, and biology affect health outcomes. Recruiting a diverse research cohort is key to ensuring that findings will be broadly applicable, and All of Us strives to include participants from groups historically underrepresented in biomedical research. Join the Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Office of Science, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for this presentation to learn more about the All of Us research program, better understand how the approaches used to recruit All of Us participants can inform future public health efforts to address diversity, and share your expertise in increasing diverse participation in your own public health work.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Posting: Assessment Librarian, Stony Brook University Libraries, Stony Brook, NY

Marketplace Open Enrollment begins today, November 1, and lasts until December 15. Now is the time to visit HealthCare.gov to get ready for this year’s Open Enrollment and review your 2020 health plan options.

Library Resources for Transgender Topics: The University of Minnesota Libraries created a guide called Library Resources for Transgender Topics that compiles resources to help researchers from all disciplines and affiliations identify credible and relevant information on people who identify as transgender. The guide features relevant resources and archives, database search strategies (hedges), funding sources, and networking opportunities.

Grey (Literature) Matters: Structuring Your Google Search – November 6, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Join Sarah Bonato for the second of a two-part series on grey (literature) matters. You’ll learn how to address the challenges of Google searches, adapt a database search, employ decision aids, set search limits, optimize data saturation, track search results, and select a search scope. You’ll also examine examples of published research projects that used Google and look at alternative search engines, such as DuckDuckGo, MillionShort, and WolframAlpha. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Beyond PRISMA– Health Research Reporting Guidelines: Your new secret weapon! – November 18, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – How often have you been asked for guidance from a medical student or resident who wants to submit a case study to a journal? Maybe a systematic review team member has asked for help with a data extraction form? Or you’ve been asked to lead journal club—now what? Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) with support from the NNLM South Central Region (SCR), this webinar will take you beyond PRISMA by introducing you to the family of health research reporting guidelines, and discuss the ways in which they can be used for more than just reporting. This class will also examine study execution assessment tools.

Developing Health Literacy Skills in Youth: A Workshop – Presented by the National Academy of Sciences, the Roundtable on Health Literacy will convene on November 19 for a public workshop to discuss the necessity of developing health literacy skills in youth, examine the research on developmentally appropriate health literacy milestones and transitions and measuring health literacy in youth, learn from programs and policies that represent best practices for developing health literacy skills in youth, and explore potential collaborations across disciplines for developing health literacy skills in youth. Register to attend this event in person or via live webcast!

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship – The Medical Library Association (MLA) is now accepting applications for The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. The purpose of this fellowship is to fund research aimed at expanding the research knowledge base, linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and advances in biomedical research. The endowment will provide a grant of up to $10,000. It is awarded by MLA through a competitive grant process, to a qualified health sciences librarian, health professional, researcher, educator, or health administrator. The deadline to apply is November 15, 2019.

Hospital Libraries Section (HLS)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Professional Development Grant – Whether you are in the middle of your career, new to it all, or have worked for many years, the HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant is an opportunity for an amazing professional journey into education or research. The grant is open to librarians working in a hospital, health system or similar clinical settings. Grant funds can be used for professional development through MEDLIB-ED or to help attend the MLA Annual Meeting or CE courses. It may also be used to support reimbursement for expenses incurred in conducting research such as a statistician to help with survey design, analyses etc. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2019.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 1, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-11-01 10:41

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars November 5 – November 13

Webinars November 15 – November 18

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Announcing the November 2019 NNLM Reading Club Book Selections

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2019-10-31 21:00

 

Knowing your family’s health history paints a picture of potential health problems from one generation to the next. This knowledge is a powerful tool for early detection or prevention of diseases you may be at risk for. Want to learn how to find and share your family health history with your doctor? Let National Family Health History Day on Thanksgiving Day help get the conversation started this holiday season and throughout the year.

For November 2019, the NNLM Reading Club announces three new NNLM Reading club books. Visit Book Selections and Health Resources for Family Health History to download book discussion guides, promotional materials and corresponding family health history information… or to apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book Kit!

 

Categories: RML Blogs

New NNLM Center for HIV/AIDS Outreach!

PSR News - Thu, 2019-10-31 15:10

The new NNLM HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Coordination Center (NACC) has been established at the NNLM New England Region office. Its goal is to enhance communication with current, past, and potential HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Project (ACIOP) awardees and Community Based Organizations working on HIV initiatives to improve access to trusted NIH and NLM HIV/AIDS information resources. The web site includes a blog with two initial posts. More are on the way! You can also subscribe for email summaries of the blog posts and/or subscribe to the NACC listserv. The NACC Twitter handle is @NLM_HIV.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Recording for the Midday at the Oasis Webinar on Health Information Needs of Immigrant Populations Now Available!

PSR News - Thu, 2019-10-31 12:36

On October 16, NNLM PSR hosted Health Information Needs of Immigrant Populations for the Midday at the Oasis webinar series. In this session, Carli Zegers, PhD, APRN-NP, FNP-BC, Assistant Professor, University of Missouri-Kansas School of Nursing and Health Studies; Edwin Rodarte, Senior Librarian, Emerging Technologies & Collections, Los Angeles Public Library; and Nora Franco, NNLM PSR Consumer Health Librarian, address the health issues, public health implications, and health literacy needs of immigrant populations. To view the webinar, visit the Midday at the Oasis page or click on the YouTube video player below.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

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