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Shake, Rattle, and Roll! by Don Pearson, 2017 NNLM GMR Professional Development Awardee

GMR News - Tue, 2017-11-07 11:06

Donald PearsonEvent planning is hard, especially when unexpected things happen.  It is also fun and rewarding when things go right.  Either way it is definitely worth all the work because it is still, even in our iGeneration, the best way to learn, connect with colleagues, and have fun.

One of the main purposes for me to attend #MidwestMHSLA17 was to observe the details of planning a professional conference.  I am on the Planning Committee for the next Midwest MLA Conference in Cleveland in October 2018.  I am a member of the Publicity Committee, and the Webmaster for the conference site.  The Publicity Committee is responsible for getting the word out to the Midwest MLA membership about the conference and promoting the host city and state. We have already been working hard since the spring and the 2017 meeting was our first big milestone in planning.  Besides observing and meeting our counterparts at the 2017 meeting, the 2018 Planning Committee sponsored a table with promotional materials, and announced the conference at the MHSLA Business Meeting and the Midwest Chapter Business Meeting.

The 2018 Publicity Committee (consisting of Margaret Hoogland, Theresa Kline, and me) planned out our table and decided to give out buckeyes (chocolate and peanut butter truffles for those non-Ohioans), Cleveland pins, and chances to win a $50 coupon towards the registration cost of the next meeting. We made a banner and decorated our table with rock-n-roll paraphernalia.  We encouraged visitors to take selfies and tag them with the official meeting hasthtag, #MidwestMLA18.  We benefited from the 2017 Special Karaoke Event which got people thinking in a rock-and-roll mode.  The video featuring our 2018 conference chairs Mary Pat Harnegie and Mary Schleicher, and the music of real life rock star librarian Cathy Murch put an exclamation point on our marketing efforts.  In a happy coincidence, the NLM in Focus blog has been focusing on “rock-star” medical librarians all month – a gift of free marketing for us!

Don Pearson and Jacqueline Leskovec singing "I Got You Babe". Jacqueline was Sonny, Don was Cher.

Don Pearson & Jacqueline Leskovec singing “I Got You Babe” at the Karaoke Event. Jacqueline was Sonny, Don was Cher.

I am sure that all the 2018 Conference Planning Committee members were watching carefully and learning from the 2017 meeting.  Stephanie Swanberg, the chair of the 2017 Publicity Committee, met with us and shared some pointers and volunteered to be available for questions.  I spoke with Emily Ginier, the chair of the CE committee, when my CE instructor suddenly cancelled.  Probably the most important thing I learned from observing this meeting is how to land on one’s feet when that inevitable something doesn’t go as planned. Switching gracefully to Plan B is a conference planner’s biggest challenge.  But the 2017 conference planning committee did an excellent job of moving forward and rolling with the stormy waves.  I told Emily that I actually enjoyed the substituted CE class very much as it ended up giving me a full day crash course on Research Data Management. Although I was disappointed at not getting to hear Curt Guyette speak, I did not mind the gap in the schedule as things just moved on gracefully.

In reflecting on my 2017 conference experience, I am very thankful for this opportunity.  I am thankful to have received an NNLM GMR Professional Development Award to attend the conference.  I had hoped to take some CEs, and learn from the vendors, paper and poster presenters, and the keynote speaker, but what I learned most is how important personal interaction still is and how valuable physical attendance at a conference is.  Even the “fun” sessions like the welcome party, karaoke night, and down-time are not just icing on the cake, but opportunities to really build relationships among colleagues, have some great discussions, and even establish some mentor and mentee relationships.

All in all I was very pleased with my conference experience – and that is the goal, after all, isn’t it?  I realized that a tight schedule is important, but that just being with and learning from one’s peers is what is most important about conferences.  If I want to learn about a topic I can just search for an article, or watch a video online.  But there is no replacement for meeting people in person.  Even with scheduling snafus, an annual conference still provides that in-person networking and fellowship time that is growing increasingly rare in our society.  I will take this realization back to my 2018 planning work.  I want to keep in mind that building collegial relationships is the most important thing in a conference, not the production of a perfectly smooth, clockwork event.  In that spirit, we can almost guarantee that the Cleveland conference next year will Shake, Rattle, and Roll!!

Donald Pearson, MBA/MIS, MLIS, AHIP
Library Technology Specialist, Mount Carmel Health Sciences Library
Columbus, Ohio
dpearson@mchs.com | library.mchs.com

 

Posted on behalf of Don Pearson, by Helen Spielbauer

Categories: RML Blogs

Showing Value at MCMLA (cont.)

MCR News - Tue, 2017-11-07 10:51

Several staff members from the NNLM MidContinental Region attended the 2017 MCMLA conference in Columbia, Missouri. On the final day, we hosted a “Show Me Value” session to gave participants an opportunity to use their creativity, eloquence, tech know-how and energy. Working in small groups, with a 20 minute time limit and a table full of art supplies, they developed a message that could get library stakeholders to think about the value of libraries and librarians. This week, we are showcasing a draft and completed object created for this session that illustrate the statement: Because dis-information is just a click away.

Sign DrawingFinished Road Sign

/al

Categories: RML Blogs

Sixth New England Research Data Management Roundtable Notes 7.27.17

NER News - Tue, 2017-11-07 10:25

The sixth New England Research Data Management Roundtable was held July 27, 2017 at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, MA. Sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region, the NE RDM Roundtables provide opportunities for New England librarians to compare notes, ask questions, share lessons learned, explore new working models, acquire fresh ideas, and develop new partnerships.

The day focused on sharing data: first from the perspective of the researcher, followed by the view from WPI’s academic computing.

Below are the notes captured by all participants at the event during the roundtable discussion. We hope you can use the questions and insights from others to think about your own work or inspire more questions and investigations!

Topic 1: Challenges and successes working with researchers and sharing data.

  • Take a moment to reflect on the first talk – perspective of a researcher. What are your key take-aways?
      • How many people were involved to make a project work
      • How much data was created by one lab
      • Importance of creating a culture for Data Management
      • Eagerness to share
      • Even champions still need help with data management!
      • Importance and benefit of having a champion for data management at your organization
      • Importance of cross-training students
      • Clear that there was a great deal of time spent thinking about workflows and continuous improvement
      • Sometimes it takes a big problem for folks to realize they need help
      • Scale of work is changing — new interdisciplinary layers add to complexity
      • Need for repetition in RDM training
  • Do you consider yourself an advocate for data sharing, a facilitator of the process, an educator, something else?
      • Trying to get a foot in the door!
      • Facilitator — trying to help others be able to do their work
      • Mixed advocate and educator role
      • Advocacy needs to be done with care
      • Helping folks think about data management proactively
      • Helping connect folks to the resources they need – break down barriers in communication, departments, centers, organizations
      • Helping folks get answers — not scolding into compliance. Librarians as part of the solution, but maybe not the leaders
      • Importance of having a champion
      • Educating others so that they can become advocates — in their departments, elsewhere
      • Advocating can help you hear the pushback/feedback from others, and can itself be extremely informative
      • Justifying librarian involvement can be the hardest part.
  • Can you talk about some of the challenges you have had communicating with researchers re: sharing data? What about successes?
      • Challenges:
        • Scientists not viewing librarians as reputable sources of guidance because librarians “are not scientists”
        • Discouragement from administration, who may advocate for open but also push for protecting information — not necessarily balanced
        • Scaling resources — how do we scale up from what is currently provided?
        • Language and how we explain topics so all can understand
        • Explaining how to use a tool
        • Getting information from researchers about their wants and needs
        • Tools don’t fix all the problems or make them more organized
        • Cultural barricades
        • Librarians not very good at sharing their own data — not good at practicing what we teach.
        • Librarians need to become part of the research ecosystem — not just an observer
        • Researchers don’t know what they don’t know – hard to know where to begin the conversation
        • Metadata — sharing is not just putting data out there, it needs to be useful. Researchers often don’t realize they need to submit metadata.
        • Time consuming to figure out solutions to unique problems — and librarians can’t always provide the unique solutions to each problem
        • Can be intimidating if librarians don’t have training in same discipline — but often researchers just want help
        • Perception that no one wants or needs their data.
      • Successes:
        • Motivated PIs
        • Grassroots awareness with students to raise PI awareness — like naming schemes; or — asking PIs “do you know what your graduate students are doing?”
        • Working with compliance office
        • Good PR from other presentations, faculty
        • Reminder that many folks are already doing aspects of data management
        • Meeting with researcher after DMP is implemented
        • Researchers often just want help — so don’t need to have same background or training as researcher
  • What are some of the ways that you talk about benefits to sharing data responsibly? How do you address concerns of sharing data or the additional work involved?
    • Important to focus on framing this in a positive way
    • Focus on “good” practices — may feel more achievable than “best” practices
    • Reinforcing practices related to publishing — you write papers so others can reproduce your work, you cite papers so others can find it — similar principles apply to data!
    • Incentivizing data sharing — increasing in practice, and getting credit is of great importance. Talk about citing data to make that an important point.
    • Finding the failure points
    • Using the term gatekeeper — don’t use overly-restrictive language
    • Diving deeper into knee-jerk reactions to sharing data — many claim funding obligations but might be a deeper discussion
    • “Stand on the shoulders of giants” — you want to be those shoulders
    • “You never know how useful your data may be”
    • Making it personal — how to be a good scholar, good colleague, reminding researchers of other work they have built off of, and how challenging that might have been. Avoid finger wagging
  • How do you educate researchers and their staff on sharing data responsibly and best practices/sharing?
    • Getting into workflows and trainings that already exist
    • Creating workshops for different audiences
    • Disguise workshops – “loving your research data”
    • Reach out to graduate students
    • Find a PI advocate
    • Recognizing subject specific idiosyncrasies
    • Get metadata and other specialists involved early — and know who your resources are

Topic 2: Storing data at our institutions, options for long-term access, and interactions with researchers.

  • What storage practices and related software are you able to recommend to researchers, based on the infrastructure and technical expertise available at your organization?
    • Box, LabArchives, Open Science Framework
    • Open source — avoid things that aren’t backward compatible
    • Encourage folks to use local IT solutions
    • Sometimes moved to faculty senate decisions
    • Sometimes troubles with infrastructure that is dated or unclear
    • Troubles with administration
    • Larger issues with data security and privacy — education around these areas
  • Do you collaborate with other units/people on campus, such as IRB, research integrity, tech transfer office, IT? What are some of the challenges and opportunities partnering with other units around data sharing and long-term access?
    • Research Office, Compliance Office, IRB, Tech transfer office
    • Challenging to make inroads, know who to talk to
    • Establishing relationships takes extensive time
    • Present solutions, not problems
    • Encouraging faculty and researchers to not keep their hard drive ‘under their desk’
    • Communication continues to be a challenge
    • Payment — faculty member viewed any service they didn’t have to pay for as not a service
    • If there is an increase in cost, transparency will be important — people want to know where their money is going
    • Important to have conversations with administration
  • Do you have a data repository, IR that accepts data, or other long-term storage solution at your campus?
    • DataVerse, FigShare, bePress, Hydra, DSpace, Fedora
    • In-house is often not the best option — recommend folks to outside/other solutions
    • Creating a data catalog — record in IR that points to data wherever it lives.
    • IR is not a good home for all types of data
    • Access repository v preservation repository
    • No long-term storage option — passed back and forth between stakeholders
    • Some slower uptake for IRs early on
    • Challenges of terminology between groups
  • How do we help researchers make appropriate decisions about third-party data repositories?
      • Used to trust government repositories — now not so sure
      • Give researchers a checklist for data repository quality
      • DataVerse as a model of good policies
      • Tables/charts/other decision-making guides — on a libguide, elsewhere
      • Use publisher suggestions
      • Value the discipline-specific knowledge
      • Embargo and privacy issues should be considered
  • All projects come to an end. How do we prepare researchers for end-of-project data disposition years after the project ends?
    • Start way sooner — need to plan for five years or more after deposit
    • Conversations often happen at a time of crisis
    • Would be ideal to follow up with researchers after a project — but can’t always be done
    • Importance of metadata to cut through the noise, really help make work reusable into the future
    • Good guidance from DCC:
      • Sunset planning needs to be part of a data management plan
      • If I can’t read it in five years, why should I keep it in five years
    • File transformation guidance: Brown Dog from NSF; Stata and R
    • File naming conventions
    • Partner with archivists on preservation, appraisal, and deaccessioning
    • Should get our own house in order

For more information about this roundtable or upcoming events, please contact the NER office at NNLM-NER – nnlm-ner@umassmed.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

Reflections on: Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles

SEA News - Tue, 2017-11-07 09:13

In the NNLM Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles course, we asked participants, as they progressed through the course to consider the following questions: Do you think health sciences librarians should get involved with big data in healthcare? Where should librarians get involved, if you think they should? If you think they should not, explain why. You may also combine a “should/should not” approach if you would like to argue both sides. NNLM will feature responses from different participants over the coming weeks.

Reflections on: Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles

Written by: Meaghan Muir, MLIS, Manager, Library Services, Boston Children’s Hospital

“Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles” has been a valuable introduction to discovering how physicians, nurses, researchers, and librarians are using big data and data science. It has been interesting to explore the different ways in which big data is being used, especially in our day-to-day lives, such as how Netflix and online retailers are using big data to interact with their customers. Data of all kinds is being created every second of the day, and the exponential growth is overwhelming and difficult to comprehend.

Data science is multidisciplinary, and there absolutely is a role for health sciences libraries. However, we cannot assume that all health sciences libraries, and especially all health sciences librarians, can readily become involved. There are clear opportunities, but there are also significant barriers to offering library-based support of data science activities. Hospital libraries, may have unique challenges and opportunities. Some challenges that have been discussed in this course that are specific to hospital libraries/librarians include:

  • Lack of competencies to use data science tools.
  • No dedicated library staff/position for data science.
  • Lack of knowledge about researchers work and data life cycle.
  • Getting buy in from stakeholders/partners
  • Lack of experience, have never worked with a big data project.
  • Lack of time resources to implement data science support services.

The good news for hospital librarians is that there are plenty of opportunities and various ways to engage with clinicians and researchers working with big data. Librarians already possess skills to assist clinicians and researchers. We are accustomed to educating user populations on how to use resources such as databases and other library-related programs. Taking literature searches a step further by not only searching for published literature, but also searching directly in the associated data set (if applicable) is a possible role for health sciences librarians. Librarians are also well-versed in advising on open access/information sharing policies which can be translated to helping researchers comply with data sharing policies. This includes talking to researchers about mandates to share their data and helping them prepare it in a shareable form as well as educating others on existing hospital specific data management policies. Focusing on specific populations that are engaging in big data projects is an opportunity. For example, nurses will often turn to a hospital library as their sole resource because they might not be connected to an academic library. Libraries working with nurses who are involved or getting involved with big data endeavors is an obvious partnership seeing as the library is already their go to for help with various projects. Libraries can help people who are new to big data by teaching them about how big data is generated and collected. It’s also a natural fit for librarians to help others learn how to organize information of all types, including big data.  

Getting started is somewhat daunting.  The JMLA article (Read KB, Surkis A, Larson C, McCrillis A, Graff A, Nicholson J, Xu J. Starting the data conversation: informing data services at an academic health sciences library. J Med Libr Assoc. 2015 Jul;103(3):131-5) is one way to approach this. Simply, librarians can start a conversation with groups within the hospital that might be potential partners. Ideally a conversation would be started with a clinical research and a basic science research group, as the JMLA article discussed. This conversation ideally would assess current practices and potential needs, and introduce to the stakeholders what a librarian might bring to the table. Keeping in mind what Dr. Brenner said about not needing to be data scientists to do data science. It is unlikely that the typical hospital library will have a data science librarian on staff (as of this moment in time) but as described above there are many ways in which health sciences librarians can complement activities of clinicians and researchers engaging in data science efforts. It is rather encouraging to see that the number of opportunities discussed far outnumbers the challenges.

Categories: RML Blogs

New Resources for the Opioid Crisis

MAR News - Tue, 2017-11-07 07:00

Opiates are chemicals that come from the poppy flower. A synthetic form, opioids, are used in medications. On October 26, 2017, Acting Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Eric D. Hargan declared a public health emergency to address the national opioid crisis. A public health emergency declaration lasts for 90 days and can be extended. Recently the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis released a report that includes 56 recommendations for action.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has compiled a list of resources that provide authoritative information on the opioid crisis.

NLM resources:

Libraries and the opioid crisis:

Related event:

  • December 6 and 7, 2017, the HHS Office of the Chief Technology Officer (CTO) will host an Opioid Symposium and Code-a-Thon to promote and employ innovative ways to leverage technology and data to address the nationwide opioid epidemic.
Categories: RML Blogs

The NIH Data Science Releases a Case Study Underscoring the Value of Librarianship in the Patient Care Setting

SCR News - Tue, 2017-11-07 05:00
NLM

The National Library of Medicine

A NIH Data Science published a report titled A Case Study in NIH Data Science: Open Data and Understanding the Value of Libraries and Information Services in the Patient Care Setting.  In short, the NIH used other research studies to learn where and how clinicians reported using PubMed/MEDLINE as an information resource influencing clinical decision making.

Journals and PubMed/MEDLINE were the two resources most used by clinicians according to the NIH data analysis.  In addition, the NIH discovered that when clinicians use a greater number of information resources, the probability of changes to patient care were higher and so is the prevention of negative events.

According to the NIH, the advantage of using research that is already available saves time, money, increases collaboration, and extends the life of the original work.  This has direct implications for researchers and librarians, in particular.  Leveraging information service skills is an important part of affecting patient care.

Who best to provide that service than a librarian?

Remember to like the NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter to get the latest updates and health news!

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Rendezvous webinar, November 15

PNR News - Mon, 2017-11-06 21:38

The next PNR Rendezvous webinar for November is coming soon.

When: Wednesday, November 15 starting at Noon Alaska, 1:00pm PT, 2:00pm MT

Title: HRSA’s Resources and Initiatives for Native American Communities
Gary Gant, from the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Office of Regional Operations for Region 10, will share some of his office’s initiatives and activities within the Native American community as it pertains to behavioral health, chronic disease, education, human trafficking and substance abuse.

Eligible for 1 Medical Library Association (MLA) CE credit for attending the live session or viewing the recording.

Please join us for this wonderful opportunity to learn about the important work that HRSA provides.

For more information about this session and how to connect please visit the PNR Rendezvous webpage 

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM PNR Twitter Chat: Give us your input!

PNR News - Mon, 2017-11-06 21:01

It’s time for another PNR Twitter Chat. This time it’s PNR Day on Twitter. Using the hashtag #nnlmpnrchat, drop by at any time on Thursday, November 16, to give us your input. Include #nnlmpnrchat in your tweet. Unsure how this all works? See Twitter Chat 101 for more information. PNR staff will monitor the conversation and ask questions throughout the day, but we are interested in hearing from you on topics such as:

  • What interesting topics or trends would you like the PNR to explore?
  • How do you like to learn about health topics? Webinars, Moodle classes (asynchronous), tutorials?
  • Is MLA CE credit important to you?
  • How can we serve you better?
  • What is your preferred communication format? (e.g. blog posts, email, newsletters).

Remember, it’s fine to be a lurker. If you just want to see what it’s all about, sign up for a Twitter account and take a look. You don’t have to say anything, but you may find something you like. Twitter’s use as an educational tool is growing. Please join us on Twitter for a few minutes or longer, any time on November 16. Search for #nnlmpnrchat to see what we’re up to.

Our last Twitter chat, in March, featured PNR Research & Data Coordinators Ann Glusker and Ann Madhavan. For a transcript of that chat, see: https://news.nnlm.gov/pnr/nnlm-pnr-twitter-chat/

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Hyperdocs for Libraries

NTO News - Mon, 2017-11-06 17:52

What is the 21st century equivalent of a worksheet? Consider the hyperdoc.

A template for a hyperdoc

A template for a hyperdoc

I discovered hyperdocs through a recent MLA News article (subscription required). Hyperdocs are a “transformative, interactive Google Doc replacing the worksheet method of delivering instruction,“, according to the Hyperdoc Girls, a group of three teachers who coined the term after their schools adopted Google Apps for Education.

Hyperdocs take components of a worksheet, such as directions and links to more information, and add collaboration and reflection, creating a digital space for blended learning and interaction.  “A HyperDoc is a digital document where all components of a learning cycle have been pulled together into one central hub,”  writes Jennifer Gonzalez of the blog Cult of Pedagogy. She provides a good example of a how hyperdocs work using a ‘digital roadtrip’ geography lesson.

Hyperdoc Example

Hyperdoc Example from Cult of Pedagogy

Hyperdocs are gaining popularity in K-12 settings, including school libraries. School Library Journal covered the trend in April 2017, while Our Lovely Library presents a “before” and “after” perspective on using hyperdocs for a research project lesson.

What other uses could hyperdocs have in libraries? A couple ideas: a student-built resource guide,  a hub for flipped classroom materials, or a self-paced guided tutorial for primary source documents.

Hyperdoc Library Example

Hyperdoc Example from Our Lovely Library

Personally, I think hyperdocs have potential as a tool for teaching information literacy skills. There’s a seems to be a congruence between the hyperdoc learning experience and the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy. Perhaps this is a tool to help cross the threshold? If you’re interested in learning more, try starting with this pre-built Hyperdoc template in Google Drive or browse this directory of K-12 hyperdocs for inspiration.

Happy hyperdoc-ing! (I couldn’t resist.)

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

October 2017 Midday at the Oasis Webinar Recording Now Available!

PSR News - Mon, 2017-11-06 16:29

On October 18, NNLM PSR presented How Librarians and Information Professionals can make a difference in combating Predatory Publishers for the Midday at the Oasis monthly webinar. In the webinar, the speakers, Dr. Mark Langdorf, Editor-In-Chief, Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health and Linda Murphy, Health Science Librarian, discussed the growing concerns of open access publishing and what actions librarians and information professionals can take in combating predatory publishers. You can view the webinar by visiting our Midday at the Oasis page or by clicking on the YouTube video player below.

screen capture of Youtube controls with full screen icon encircled
Note: To switch to full screen, click on the full screen icon in the bottom corner of the video player. To exit the full screen, press Esc on your keyboard or click on the Full screen icon again. If you have problems viewing full screen videos, make sure you have the most up-to-date version of Adobe Flash Player.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

15-40 Connection: Age-specific Information Outreach

NER News - Mon, 2017-11-06 14:39

This post is part of a series on NNLM NER’s funded projects.

business card and button from 15-40.org

15-40 Connection Swag

For several funding cycles, 15-40 Connection, an organization dedicated to improving cancer detection skills, has received support from NNLM NER. This unique organization targets people between the ages of 15-40, considered to be in their prime, asserting that “[s]ince 1975, improvements in cancer survival rates for 15 to 40 year-olds have continuously lagged behind all other age groups. Delayed diagnosis is a major culprit of this shocking statistic.”

In an effort to raise cancer detection rates, 15-40 Connection promotes self-empowerment in three steps. First, identify what your “great” is. When you are at your best, what are your eating, sleeping, and bathroom habits? What is your skin like? Is your weight steady? Your energy? Second, if you notice a change that lasts more that two weeks, consult your health care provider. Fatigue dragging you down too long? Injury not healing properly? 15-40 Connection wants to you to risk the embarrassment that your concerns are not warranted. Get checked out. Third, communicate openly with your health care provider. Here’s where 15-40 Connection is ready to lend a hand. This organization builds educational resources and outreach activities around self-empowerment.

MedlinePlus Supports Self-Empowerment

As an Education and Outreach Coordinator, I was curious to see how 15-40 Connection promotes the National Library of Medicine. I am impressed with how they weave MedlinePlus into their storytelling. In this blog post, featuring Holy Cross student Henry Carr, the bone cancer hyperlink goes directly to MedlinePlus. That is just one example. The website routinely links to MedlinePlus. And, 15-40 Connection swag includes the promotion of MedlinePlus.

An early detection advocate and cancer survivor, Henry Carr made a huge impact on the staff at 15-40 Connection. They dedicated the 2016 Crusaders Against Cancer 5K fundraiser to him. Sadly, Henry died in June after a recurrence of his cancer.

On October 28, I headed over to Holy Cross for this year’s Crusaders Against Cancer fundraiser. Once again, the run was dedicated to Henry. Many runners wore gray HC for HC t-shirts. Others wore Crusader purple. The day was crisp and clear. And the message of self-empowerment was clear as well.

15-40 Connection Lawn Sign

15-40 Connection Lawn Sign

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Interlibrary Loan Service: Changes for the New Year

MAR News - Mon, 2017-11-06 11:55

In addition to using the National Library of Medicine (NLM) DOCLINE system, libraries can soon send interlibrary loan (ILL) requests to NLM via Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), saving libraries already using OCLC time and effort by integrating these requests into their existing workflows. The change, beginning January 2018, gives libraries wanting to borrow materials from NLM three possible avenues for placing requests: DOCLINE, OCLC, and the NLM ILL Request Portal. DOCLINE, which has served medical libraries in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine since 1985, efficiently routed more than one million ILL requests in Fiscal Year 2017. As a national library, NLM will continue to serve as a library of last resort for ILL, meaning that libraries should first try to fill requests from local or regional libraries before submitting them to NLM.

In addition, NLM will raise the fee for filling an interlibrary loan request from $9.00 to $12.00. The long overdue price increase will help keep the NLM ILL service a national leader and ensure that NLM can continue to deliver efficient service and maintain a fast turnaround time to complete incoming requests.

FAQ

Will NLM lending in OCLC have any effect on DOCLINE?

No. NLM does not anticipate any impact on DOCLINE and will continue to develop and maintain the system.

If my library belongs to OCLC and DOCLINE, must I use one or the other?

Libraries can choose the borrowing method that best suits their ILL processes, taking into consideration the different billing methods associated with each system, as well as different statistical reporting options.

Will NLM still offer its portal?

Yes. If libraries and other institutions are unable to submit requests through DOCLINE or OCLC, NLM’s preferred methods for ILL, the portal will still be available for submitting and checking on the status of interlibrary loan requests.

Why did the price of an ILL increase?

The price increase was necessary due to the increases in the costs of delivering the service.  The fee had not increased in over two decades.

What methods exist for requesting an ILL from NLM?

After January 1, 2018, there will be three possible avenues for placing ILL requests: DOCLINE, OCLC, and the NLM ILL Request Portal.  NLM encourages requesting institutions to utilize either DOCLINE or OCLC before the NLM ILL Request Portal.

What is the impact to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s regarding NLM’s decision to use OCLC?

NLM does not anticipate any impact on the quality and timeliness of services it provides to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.  DOCLINE continues to be the recommended requesting mechanism for libraries with health-science missions that are part of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, however NLM will also accept requests submitted via OCLC.  Libraries can choose the borrowing method that best suits their ILL processes, taking into consideration the different billing methods associated with each system, as well as different statistical reporting options.

Is the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s Resource Sharing Plan changed/changing due to NLM’s decision to use OCLC?

The Network Resource Sharing Plan will not change due to NLM’s decision to use OCLC.

Categories: RML Blogs

ClinicalTrials.gov Beta Version Available for Public Testing

MCR News - Mon, 2017-11-06 11:38

The National Library of Medicine has released a new beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov for public testing. The test site can be accessed from a link on the page banner or directly at clinicaltrials.gov/beta/.   For instructions on offering feedback see the Nov-Dec Technical Bulletin article. Key features of this beta version include:

  • updated search for the “Recruiting and not yet recruiting” studies feature on the homepage
  • new location search option enables you to limit your search based on the distance (number of miles radius) from a specified location
  • updated “Search Results” page design that brings the list of studies found closer to the top of page
  • updated “Glossary” design provides term definitions while continuing to view the page containing the terms

/ch

Categories: RML Blogs

New ClinicalTrials.gov Beta Version Available for Public Testing!

PSR News - Fri, 2017-11-03 18:41

A new beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov is now available for public testing. Key features of this beta version include:

  • updated search for the “Recruiting and not yet recruiting” studies feature on the homepage
  • new location search option enables you to limit your search based on the distance (number of miles radius) from a specified location
  • updated “Search Results” page design that brings the list of studies found closer to the top of page
  • updated “Glossary” design provides term definitions while continuing to view the page containing the terms

screenshot of the new beta version of clinicaltrials.gov

This beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov is the latest component in a series of changes that started earlier this year to enhance users’ ability to search, display, and review information about clinical research studies (see ClinicalTrials.gov: First in a Series of Changes to Improve Usability for Stakeholders). Another set of ClinicalTrials.gov updates was released in September.

The National of Library of Medicine welcomes comments, questions, and suggestions on this new beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov. There are two methods to provide feedback:

  • Respond to the online survey by clicking on the “Give us feedback” link at the top of the beta site.
  • Click on “Customer Support” in the footer of both the ClinicalTrials.gov Web site and the beta version of the Web site to link to the NLM Customer Support page. Then click on Contact NLM at the top of the NLM Customer Support page.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Interlibrary Loan Service: Two Changes Effective January 1, 2018!

PSR Newsletter - Fri, 2017-11-03 18:31

In addition to using the National Library of Medicine (NLM) DOCLINE system, effective with the new year libraries can send interlibrary loan (ILL) requests to NLM via the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), saving libraries already using OCLC time and effort by integrating these requests into their existing workflows. The change gives libraries wanting to borrow materials from NLM three possible avenues for placing requests: DOCLINE, OCLC, and the NLM ILL Request Portal. DOCLINE, which has served medical libraries in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine since 1985, efficiently routed more than one million ILL requests in Fiscal Year 2017. As a national library, NLM will continue to serve as a library of last resort for ILL, meaning that libraries should first try to fill requests from local or regional libraries before submitting them to NLM.

In addition, NLM will raise the fee for filling an interlibrary loan request from $9.00 to $12.00. The price increase will help keep the NLM ILL service a national leader and ensure that NLM can continue to deliver efficient service and maintain a fast turnaround time to complete incoming requests.

Frequently Asked Questions:

  1. Will NLM lending in OCLC have any effect on DOCLINE?

    No. NLM does not anticipate any impact on DOCLINE and will continue to develop and maintain the system.

  2. If my library belongs to OCLC and DOCLINE, must I use one or the other?

    Libraries can choose the borrowing method that best suits their ILL processes, taking into consideration the different billing methods associated with each system, as well as different statistical reporting options.

  3. Will NLM still offer its portal?

    Yes. If libraries and other institutions are unable to submit requests through DOCLINE or OCLC, NLM’s preferred methods for ILL, the portal will still be available for submitting and checking on the status of interlibrary loan requests.

  4. Why did the price of an ILL increase?

    The price increase was necessary due to the increases in the costs of delivering the service. The fee had not increased in over two decades.

  5. What methods exist for requesting an ILL from NLM?

    After January 1, 2018, there will be three possible avenues for placing ILL requests: DOCLINE, OCLC, and the NLM ILL Request Portal. NLM encourages requesting institutions to utilize either DOCLINE or OCLC before the NLM ILL Request Portal.

  6. What is the impact to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s regarding NLM’s decision to use OCLC?

    NLM does not anticipate any impact on the quality and timeliness of services it provides to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. DOCLINE continues to be the recommended requesting mechanism for libraries with health-science missions that are part of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, however NLM will also accept requests submitted via OCLC. Libraries can choose the borrowing method that best suits their ILL processes, taking into consideration the different billing methods associated with each system, as well as different statistical reporting options.

  7. Is the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s Resource Sharing Plan changed/changing due to NLM’s decision to use OCLC?
    The Network Resource Sharing Plan will not change due to NLM’s decision to use OCLC.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Beyond Anecdotes: Story Collection Methods for Program Evaluation

NEO News - Fri, 2017-11-03 15:18

Woodcut text stating "Share your story" with a cup of coffee beside it. Story telling concept

The promotora’s uncle was sick and decided it was his time to die. She was less convinced, so she researched his symptoms on MedlinePlus and found evidence that his condition probably was treatable. So she gathered the family together to persuade him to seek treatment. Not only did her uncle survive, he began teaching his friends to use MedlinePlus. This promotora (community health worker) was grateful for the class she had taken on MedlinePlus offered by a local health sciences librarian.

This is a true story, but it is one that will sound familiar to many who do health outreach, education, or other forms of community service. Those of us who coach, teach, mentor, or engage in outreach often hear anecdotes of the unexpected ways our participants benefit from engagement in our programs. It’s why many of us chafe at using metrics alone to evaluate our programs. Numbers usually fall short of capturing this inspiring evidence of our programs’ value.

The good news is that it isn’t difficult to turn anecdotes into evaluation data, as long as you approach the story (data) collection and analysis systematically. That usually means use of a standard question guide, particularly for those inexperienced in qualitative mythologies.

For easy story collection methods, check out the NEO tip sheet Qualitative Interview “Story” Methods. While there are many approaches to doing qualitative evaluation, this tip sheet focuses on methods that are ideal for those with limited budgets and experience in qualitative methods. Most of these story methods can be adapted for any phase of evaluation (needs assessment, formative, or outcomes). The interview guides for each method consist of 2-4 questions, so they can be used alone for short one-to-one interviews or incorporated into more involved interviews, such as focus groups. Every team member can be trained to collect and document stories, allowing you to compile a substantial bank of qualitative data in a relatively short period of time. For example, I used the Colonias Project Method for an outreach project in the Lower Rio Grande Valley and collected 150 stories by the end of this 18-month project. That allowed us to do a thematic analysis of how MedlinePlus en Español was used by the community members. Individual stories helped to illustrate our findings in a compelling way.

Do you believe a story is worth a thousand metrics? If so, check out the tip sheet and try your hand at your own qualitative evaluation project.

Note: The story above came from the project described in this article: Olney, Cynthia A. et al. “MedlinePlus and the Challenge of Low Health Literacy: Findings from the Colonias Project.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 95.1 (2007): 31–39. PMC free article.

Categories: RML Blogs

November 2017 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Fri, 2017-11-03 12:55
Illustration of a smiling heart

Check out the November issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Health Capsule: Out of Breath? Get Tested for COPD
    Many people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) don’t realize they have it. COPD is a serious lung disease that makes it hard to breathe. Shortness of breath, a constant cough, and wheezing can all be symptoms.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Interlibrary Loan Service: Two Changes Effective January 1, 2018

PSR News - Fri, 2017-11-03 12:37

In addition to using the National Library of Medicine (NLM) DOCLINE system, libraries can soon send interlibrary loan (ILL) requests to NLM via Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), saving libraries already using OCLC time and effort by integrating these requests into their existing workflows. The change gives libraries wanting to borrow materials from NLM three possible avenues for placing requests: DOCLINE, OCLC, and the NLM ILL Request Portal. DOCLINE, which has served medical libraries in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine since 1985, efficiently routed more than one million ILL requests in Fiscal Year 2017. As a national library, NLM will continue to serve as a library of last resort for ILL, meaning that libraries should first try to fill requests from local or regional libraries before submitting them to NLM.

In addition, NLM will raise the fee for filling an interlibrary loan request from $9.00 to $12.00. The long overdue price increase will help keep the NLM ILL service a national leader and ensure that NLM can continue to deliver efficient service and maintain a fast turnaround time to complete incoming requests.

Source: NLM Technical Bulletin, 2017 Nov-Dec; (419):e2

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2017-11-03 12:31

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is accepting applications for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today!

Apply Today! Health science librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online biomedical and health research data management training course, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). There is no charge for participating in the program, and participants will receive a stipend of up to $900 to cover travel costs to the Capstone Summit. Details.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Reflections on Librarianship and Big Data – MARquee News Highlights

Reflection: Should Health Science Librarians be Involved in Big Data? – SEA Currents

Potential Roles for Health Sciences Librarians in Big Data – Midwest Matters, from GMR

Welcome to Sunnydale – NEO Shop Talk

New! Continuing Education Credit for PubMed for Librarians Recordings – NTO News

New on YouTube: Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks and Benefits. Learning How to Communicate Health Statistics

The Fall 2017 offering for the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey (HSLANJ) Group Licensing Initiative (GLI) is now available. NNLM MAR members are eligible to participate! The deadline to apply for the Fall offer is Friday, November 17. Learn more.

Renew your membership today! If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, see our recent blog post about the benefits of renewal and NNLM Membership. Are you having trouble creating an NNLM account? If you have received an error message such as, “email address already in use,” contact us for assistance.

National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health News

MedlinePlus now has lab test information! Learn why your doctor ordered a lab test, and what the results may mean.

NIH launches PregSource, a crowdsourcing project to better understand pregnancy – By offering a more comprehensive picture of the pregnancy experience — from normal pregnancies to those complicated by disease or other factors — PregSource promises to inform strategies for improving maternal care in the United States.

Mining for Treasure, Discovering MEDLINENLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

NLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

New API Keys for the E-utilitiesNCBI Insights, Providing Insights into NCBI Resources and the Science Behind Them

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

All are webinars, unless noted. Please note that we have a new class registration system which requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

New from DIMRC! Packing Your Digital Go-Bag: Essential Disaster Health Information on Your Mobile Device – This one-hour, self-paced, online course discusses key resources that responders and disaster/emergency preparedness professionals should consider installing on their mobile devices as part of their preparedness activities. This course fulfills one of the requirements of the Medical Library Association Disaster Information Specialization, Advanced Level. Participants are eligible for 1 MLA CE.

How the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Can Add Evidence to Your Mobile Health App – November 7, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Numerous systematic reviews of health-related mobile apps reveal they lack evidence based content. A major challenge to including evidence based content in apps is how to efficiently find accurate, credible, and vetted content. The National Library of Medicine houses the largest biomedical library in the world and provides numerous expert-developed online resources on disease and health education. This NER webinar will introduce attendees to those resources, give examples of how they can and have been used in mobile apps, and discuss funding opportunities offered by the NLM.

Working Together: Building a Library and Public Health Community Partnership For Patient Empowerment – November 14, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – How did Albany Medical College’s (AMC) Schaffer Library of Health Sciences (SLHS) and Division of Community Outreach and Medical Education (DivCOME) partner with each other as well as with community-based organizations and public libraries to empower patients and librarians through community and professional development workshops? Join MAR for this one-hour presentation on how existing relationships can be leveraged to build a successful outreach program.

Midday at the Oasis: Healthy Aging – Promoting Healthy Living in Older Adults through Quality Health Information – November 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Sponsored by PSR, this webinar focuses on seniors and their use and access to Quality Health Information. Resources from National Institute on Aging (NIA) and MedlinePlus will be highlighted. NIA offers a variety of health information for seniors including Go4Life.

Special opportunity! PubMed and Beyond: Clinical Resources from the National Library of Medicine – November 17, 9:00 AM-4:30 PM ET – The Ohio Health Sciences Library Association (OHSLA) Fall meeting, hosted at the Ohio University Lancaster Campus will include a special 4-hour presentation from NNLM MAR Executive Director, Kate Flewelling, to introduce free bedside information resources for the busy clinician. Resources presented will include Clinical Queries in PubMed/MEDLINE and free drug, patient education, and evidence-based information.

Designing Conference Posters in PowerPoint – November 28, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Sponsored by MAR, this session will present you with design strategies for professional looking posters, such as size specifications, good visual balance, and organizing content. You will see how PowerPoint’s extended menus and tools can be utilized to transform a blank slide to a ready-to-print poster.

Other Items of Interest

Job Posting: Drexel University Libraries seeks an innovative and entrepreneurial librarian with demonstrated knowledge of the sciences to serve as liaison librarian to three departments in the College of Arts & Sciences. This position provides an exciting opportunity to build partnerships and collaborations with teaching and research faculty as well as with undergraduate and graduate students.  This is a 25-hour per week, limited term position. Email libraryjobs@drexel.edu for more information about the Science Liaison Librarian position.

Upcoming: Local teens and the York Opioid Collaborative will hold a Teen Town Hall event at Martin Library on Saturday, November 11th.  Teens and adults are encouraged to attend this community conversation about the opioid crisis.  The event starts at 10 a.m. in the library’s Quiet Reading Room.  Local agencies working to help families and individuals impacted by this epidemic will also attend and have information available for those interested. Details.

PLA Opioid Webinar Recording Now Available Online – WebJunction and the Public Library Association invites libraries and their community partners to view the recording of this virtual town hall discussion about current library needs and possible responses to the nation’s opioid crisis.

Public Library Association Launches Program to Deliver Health Info – Associations Now

Taking a Closer Look—State-by-State—of Health Care Quality – AHRQ Views

Advancing the Practice of Pain Management Under the HHS Opioid Strategy – HHS Blog

NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach projects and activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware. Share your story with us to receive a special highlight on the MARquee!

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 3, 2017

SEA News - Fri, 2017-11-03 07:33

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.

Top Items of Interest

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Asynchronous Online Course – Moodle LMS

Webinars: November 6-10

Webinars: November 13-17

In addition to the webinars listed, the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office provides webinars for subscribers to the Digital Library. You can attend a Quick Starter Course or attend a Drop-In Session.

Recordings Available on YouTube

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Focus on Data

Focus on Precision Medicine

Focus on Substance Use Disorder

Funding Opportunities

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed below are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
Categories: RML Blogs

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