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RML Blogs

A Resilient New Year!

NER News - Fri, 2021-01-08 08:34

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! first appeared on NER Update.

Categories: RML Blogs

A Resilient New Year! NNLM Reading Club

GMR News - Thu, 2021-01-07 12:27

 

A Resilient New Year!

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

January Reading Club Titles

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! NNLM Reading Club first appeared on Midwest Matters.

Categories: RML Blogs

A Resilient New Year!

SEA News - Thu, 2021-01-07 11:33

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

NNLM Reading Club selections for January 2021

Resilient by Dr. Rick Hanson | The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook by Dr. Anneliese A. Singh | The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health by Dr. Rheeda Walker

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

Minds Matter NOLA Event – Guest Blog Post by Porcha Grigsby

SCR News - Thu, 2021-01-07 04:00

This week’s guest blog post comes from Porcha Grigsby, Executive Directory of Black Girl Health Foundation. She tells us a little bit about what her organization is doing to improve health outcomes in New Orleans’ Louisiana and beyond. Please note that portions of the original post have been edited for clarity.

Description of Minds Matter Nola Event

Black Girl Health Foundation’s Minds Matter Mental Health Campaign is a partnership with libraries across the country to promote mental health awareness. BGHF partnered with the National Network of Library of Medicine South Central Region to implement MINDS MATTER NOLA!

On October 24th BGHF worked with our local library partner, New Orleans Public Library, to conduct 6 virtual workshops. The virtual workshops were live-streamed through the software called stream-yard. This software allowed us to live stream the workshop series on BGHF Facebook page, while the public library conducted a watch party to livestream on their Facebook page. The event was executed in a symposium format where all workshops occurred on the same day as part of a one (1) day long event. The workshop series was well received by residents and the workshops were engaging and informative. In fact, 656 people watched our event LIVE; we received 4 out of 4 stars among those who completed our feedback form.

Our workshops included the following:

  • Yoga Retreat focused on mental healing through exercise.
  • Moms Suffering In Silence was a panel discussion that focused on postpartum depression, maternal mortality, single mom anxiety.
  • Healing past mental abuse focused on restoring mental stability after domestic violence.
  • Black Lives Matter was a panel that focused on health disparities and racial trauma.
  • Free your mind and the weigh will follow focused on how foods affect your mental health.
  • Beating depression naturally focused on natural ways to reduce anxiety and depression.

During each virtual workshop we had 5-minute commercial breaks in which we were able to promote NLM resources and get NNLM SCR staff involved in our event. SCR staff used MedlinePlus and other valuable NLM/NNLM resources to develop six (6) short informative videos as part of a series entitled Meet Chloe. This series follows Chloe as she highlights a range of mental health subject areas that particularly affect our communities, including Senior Mental Health, PTSD, and Perinatal Depression among others; these videos were streamed between workshop sessions. In addition, we were able to get local organizations involved as their videos were included in the commercial breaks during the event and focused on how they are serving the community.

If you would like to see a promotional video for this even, please click here.

Executive Director Bio

Porcha Grigsby has 13 years of television media experience and 6 years of health advocacy experience. She is a health advocate whose strength is in motivating women to live healthier lifestyles. Her strong background in television news has helped her connect with women and girls all around the country through black girl health. Porcha founded Black Girl Health, LLC also known as BGH in 2014. The digital outreach organization’s number #1 service is its BGH membership which is a sisterhood of women who are living health lifestyles. The company also creates social media campaigns and video platforms that help companies connect with minority women and promote health awareness. In 2019, Porcha expanded the Black Girl Health brand by starting the Black Girl Health Foundation, INC which is a non-profit organization that creates pathways to educate, engage, and empower women and girls to reduce health disparities and improve health literacy. The foundation connects with women from around the country doing community outreach through its College Ambassador program and its Moms health program called “The Superwoman Project. Porcha Serves as the Executive Director of BGHF, which her passion is to help black women women thrive by taking control of their health.

Thank you to Porcha Grigsby for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post. Porcha’s contact information is available below.

Porcha Grigsby, Executive Director of Black Girl Health Foundation, Inc

Website: www.blackgirlhealthfoundation.org

Email: porcha@blackgirlhealthfoundation.org

Remember to like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

The post Minds Matter NOLA Event - Guest Blog Post by Porcha Grigsby first appeared on Blogadillo.

Categories: RML Blogs

A Resilient New Year!

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2021-01-06 20:00

The New Year is a celebration of new beginnings.  This may be especially true as we welcome 2021, which we hope will be a resilient New Year. Resilience sustains us through adversity by cultivating practices that help us cope … and 2020 was nothing if not full of adversity.

How can we practice resilience in the New Year? Psychologists define resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”1 This doesn’t mean we deny reality but instead we develop the strong coping skills needed to deal with harsh realities. Fortunately, resilience is something we can cultivate and grow. These featured books offer helpful tips for your resiliency garden.

Resilient by Dr. Rick Hanson I The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook by Dr. Anneliese A. Singh I The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health by Dr. Rheeda Walker

In Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness, New York Times bestselling author Dr. Rick Hanson provides a roadmap to develop resilience. In a society that is so often toxic and unwelcoming, Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Tulane University’s first Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and a prolific author, offers skills to gain resilience in The Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook. Noted Black mental health expert, Dr. Rheeda Walker, illuminates how to attain what she describes as “psychological fortitude” in The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health: Navigate an Unequal System, Learn Tools for Emotional Wellness, and Get the Help you Deserve.

Each of us can benefit from cultivating resilience, so let’s make 2021 a resilient New Year! To learn more about these books and their authors – and to find related helpful information from the National Library of Medicine and other authoritative sources – visit NNLM Reading Club’s Mental Health Resilience page.

1American Psychological Association. (2020, February 1). Building your resilience. http://www.apa.org/topics/resilience

The post A Resilient New Year! first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: New Dietary Guidelines

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2021-01-06 06:30

Many of your patrons and those you serve, follow the annual tradition of making New Year’s resolutions that may include diets, exercise or just leading a healthier life.

“Make Every Bite Count with the Dietary Guidelines!” is the newly released 2020-2025 edition of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Dietary Guidelines. Every five years these guidelines are provided to the public and health professionals with the most current science based evidence to help in the promotion of good health and reduce the risk of disease.

The Guidelines include four key recommendations to help support healthy eating throughout our life. These key recommendations are listed below.

  1. Follow a healthy dietary pattern at every life stage.
  2. Customize and enjoy nutrient-dense food and beverage choices to reflect personal preferences, cultural traditions, and budgetary considerations.
  3. Focus on meeting food group needs with nutrient-dense foods and beverages, and stay within calorie limits.
  4. Limit food and beverages higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, and limit alcoholic beverages.

You can provide your community with scientifically based information about healthy eating with brochures and informative downloadable graphics on the dietary guidelines website as well as links to MyPlate.gov for additional tools and tips for a healthier diet.

The post Consumer Health Minute: New Dietary Guidelines first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH HEAL Initiative Workshop on Myofascial Pain

NER News - Tue, 2021-01-05 16:21

logo for NIH HEALIn September 2020, the National Institutes of Health hosted a two-day workshop on the intersection of substance use disorder and the management of myofascial pain. You are able to view the VideoCast for Day One and Day Two. The workshop opened by recognizing that our current opioid crisis arose from the mishandling of chronic pain. Rebecca G. Baker, PhD, Director of the Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative, spoke eloquently about the need for scientific solutions to high levels of overdose deaths in our country. Dr. Baker talked in particular about the need for interdisciplinary research on understanding chronic pain.

Helene Langevin, MD, Director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, followed Dr. Baker’s talk with a review of our current understanding of myofascial pain syndrome. Unlike pain resulting from injury, the origins of myofascial pain are unknown. Healthcare practitioners can palpate “knots” of pain. Pressure or needling will make the area twitch and may offer temporary pain relief. Dr. Langevin invited researchers to explore objective measures of myofascial pain, and to develop better treatments. She is a proponent of acupuncture, manual therapy and physical therapy.

If you are pressed for time, I recommend jumping ahead to 1:13:44 on Day One. David Lesondak, Fascia Specialist at University of Pittsburg Medical Center, speaks from the perspective of a clinician who works with chronic pain patients. He provides manual therapy and guides patients through therapeutic movement. He spoke in detail about posture. At the end of his 12-minute presentation, I was delighted to hear him thank research librarian Heidi Patterson, MLIS. “Without her, I would not be so effective.”

The majority of the two-day workshop was a discussion of noninvasive techniques to measure tissue structure, as well as computational modeling to promote the understanding of myofascial pain. The Executive Summary of the workshop is located at this link.

NIH HEAL Initiative

Twelve NIH Institutes and Centers are collaborating to develop “concrete strategies for rapid and long-lasting solutions to the opioid crisis.” Launched in 2018, the NIH HEAL Initiative sponsors research in pain management and improved treatment of opioid misuse and addiction. Addressing myofascial pain is just one of many initiatives.

 

 

The post NIH HEAL Initiative Workshop on Myofascial Pain first appeared on NER Update.

Categories: RML Blogs

Evaluation Pathways: A Webinar Series

MCR News - Tue, 2021-01-05 16:16

The pathways were developed to help NNLM members who are implementing projects with underserved communities, design and carry out effective evaluations that will help showcase all that you have achieved, while identifying ways that programming can improve. This series was developed to provide actionable resources to help you effectively design and implement an evaluation. This series does not provide MLA CE credits. Register for each individual session: 

  • K-12 Health: January 8 at 12:00 MT/ 1:00 CT Register
  • LGBTQIA+ Health: January 15 at 12:00 MT/ 1:00 CT Register
  • Race & Ethnicity: January 22 at 12:00 MT/ 1:00 CT Register
  • Rural Health: January 29 at 12:00 MT/ 1:00 CT Register

The post Evaluation Pathways: A Webinar Series first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Reading Club Presents…an afternoon with Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D.

MCR News - Tue, 2021-01-05 16:14

He’ll join our host, Edgar Gil Rico, National Alliance for Hispanic Health, to discuss his book, Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon. Dr. Q, as he is known, shares his journey from a child in a Mexican village to migrant farmworker in California to world-renown brain surgeon and researcher. Dr. Q will also answer audience questions. January 14 at 1:00 MT/2:00 CT

Learn more about how to attend

The post NNLM Reading Club Presents...an afternoon with Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D. first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

January NIH News in Health newsletter now online

MCR News - Tue, 2021-01-05 16:04
NIH News in Health banner Check out the January 2021 issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. Download a PDF version for printing.

Two people on a bed Feeling Stressed?

Ways to Improve Your Well-Being

These are stressful times. Learn ways to help you feel calmer and more relaxed.

Online extra: Dr. Richard Davidson on Reducing Stress

 

 

Image of bacteria Staying Safe From Sepsis

Preventing Infections and Improving Survival

Many infections can cause this dangerous condition. It’s important to know the symptoms and act fast.

 

Health Capsules

You can always find the latest issue on our home page: https://newsinhealth.nih.gov.

 

Visit our Facebook page. We’d like to hear from you! To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark https://www.nih.gov/health-information. For wellness toolkits, visit www.nih.gov/wellnesstoolkits.

Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-451-8224 for more information. If you’re an editor who wishes to reprint our stories, please see https://newsinhealth.nih.gov/about-us.

 

The post January NIH News in Health newsletter now online first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: January 5, 2021

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-01-05 10:53

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for clases and create a free account

Evaluation Pathways: A Webinar Series: The pathways were developed to help NNLM members who are implementing projects with underserved communities, design and carry out effective evaluations that will help showcase all that you have achieved, while identifying ways that programming can improve. This series was developed to provide actionable resources to help you effectively design and implement an evaluation. This series does not provide MLA CE credits. Register for each individual session: 

  • K-12 Health: January 8 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • LGBTQIA+ Health: January 15 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • Race & Ethnicity: January 22 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register
  • Rural Health: January 29 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

NNLM Reading Club Presents…an afternoon with Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, M.D.: He’ll join our host, Edgar Gil Rico, National Alliance for Hispanic Health, to discuss his book, Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon. Dr. Q, as he is known, shares his journey from a child in a Mexican village to migrant farmworker in California to world-renown brain surgeon and researcher. Dr. Q will also answer audience questions. January 14 at 12:00 p.m. PT. Learn more about how to attend

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Ethics and Bias Mitigation: The increasingly widespread use of Natural Language Processing (NLP) in AI applications must be continually monitored for biases and false associations, especially those surrounding protected or disadvantaged classes of people. This webinar will discuss methods used to mitigate such biases and their weak points, using real world examples in civilian agencies. January 22 at 8:00 a.m. PT. No MLA CE credit. Register

Substance Use Disorder Treatment in the Time of COVID: Primary care clinicians face many challenges when addressing the complex needs of patients with chronic pain, substance use disorders or both. Over the last 10 months, the SARS-CoVID-2 pandemic has both increased and changed the challenges that healthcare providers face. You will learn about how SARS-CoVID-2 pandemic has changed SUD treatment and prescribing protocols. January 28 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Supporting Urban Native Youth: Mental Wellness Series: This webinar series hosted by the National Council of Urban Indian Health. Register for both sessions and view the recording of the first session.

  • Traditional Medicine, January 5 at 4:00 p.m. PT
  • LGBTQ2S+ Youth, January 27 at 10:00 a.m. PT. 1 pm PT

Differences Between the Influenza and COVID-19 Vaccine: This webinar will be hosted by the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) on January 6 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register 

PLA Leadership Lab: Embedding EDI in Library Leaders: Join this first-ever PLA Leadership Lab: Embedding EDI in Library Leaders, a virtual workshop that will explore transformational leadership through the lens of the current social crises, emphasizing equity, diversity, inclusion, and social justice (EDISJ) principles and approaches. Public library services have evolved with a constant mission to serve the public good but have demonstrated that equal access is not equitable for all. Embedding EDISJ in library leadership development requires a multi-pronged approach that relies on building trust internally with library staff and externally with community assets. This workshop consists of six live virtual classroom sessions that will take place Wednesday, 2/3/2021–Wednesday, 3/24/2021. Each 90-minute session will include open discussion, facilitated presentations, small group work, and Q&A. $400 for PLA members and $475 for non-members. Deadline to register is January 27.

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Above and Beyond”, from the NLM Director’s blog

The National Library of Medicine is recruiting early career librarians to join its Associate Fellowship Program. Applications for next year’s cohort are due January 28, 2021, 8:59 p.m. PT. Attend the webinar on Thursday, January 7 from 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. PT to learn about the program from current Associate Fellows Brianna Chatmon, Allison Cruise, Levi Dolan, and Amanda Sawyer.
National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program Overview:

Founding and Future: 50 Years of the NIAAA (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)

*Phase 3 trial of Novavax investigational COVID-19 vaccine opens

*NIH study uncovers blood vessel damage and inflammation in COVID-19 patients’ brains but no infection

*Peer-reviewed report on Moderna COVID-19 vaccine publishes

Tool Helps Children Cope with Painful Procedures

NIH and Alaska Native leaders identify how to achieve socially responsible genomics research

FYI:

Make Every Bite Count: USDA, HHS Release Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025
Jointly published by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS) every five years the guidelines provide science-based recommendations designed to foster healthy dietary patterns for Americans of all ages – from birth through older adults. Importantly, this edition expands the guidance, for the first time including recommended healthy dietary patterns for infants and toddlers. Steeped in scientific evidence, the key recommendations look similar to those of the past and address two topics that garnered much attention throughout the development of the guidelines – added sugars and alcoholic beverages. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025 carried forward the committee’s emphasis on limiting these dietary components, but did not include changes to quantitative recommendations, as there was not a preponderance of evidence in the material the committee reviewed to support specific changes, as required by law. As in previous editions, limited intake of these two food components is encouraged. Learn more about the new guidelines

Survey: The State of Telehealth Services in Indian Country
NIHB is asking for a tribal representative from each of the 574 federally-recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes to complete an online and anonymous survey on the state of primary, behavioral and other telehealth services and capacity in Indian Country. Survey responses will be analyzed into a list of themes and recommendations that will be shared with tribes and stakeholders to help advance efforts in securing resources for improvements to AI/AN telehealth. Deadline is January 16.

Hypertension Resources for Health Professionals
The HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed and compiled several hypertension resources for health professionals, including patient handouts, guidelines and recommendations, training programs and the Hypertension Communications Kit, which includes social media messages, graphics and more.

*COVID-19 Initiatives and Resources
The Office of Minority Health (OMH) has created a new COVID-19 Initiatives and Resources webpage, where you can find information on OMH and HHS initiatives and efforts to address the impact of the pandemic on racial and ethnic minority communities.

*Report: Ten Action Steps to Enhance the Health and Quality of Life of Communities of Color
The Black AIDS Institute, the San Francisco Community Health Center and the Latino Commission on AIDS have published the Final Report of the COVID-19 Virtual Think Tank: Ten Action Steps to Enhance the Health and Quality of Life of Communities of Color across the U.S., which addresses COVID-19, the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative, viral hepatitis and STIs in communities of color.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: January 5, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Library of Medicine – webinar on the Associate Fellowship Program

MCR News - Mon, 2021-01-04 16:56

The National Library of Medicine is recruiting early career librarians to join its Associate Fellowship Program. Attend the webinar on Thursday, January 7, 2021, 1pm – 2pm EST to learn about the program from current Associate Fellows Brianna Chatmon, Allison Cruise, Levi Dolan, and Amanda Sawyer.

Applications for next year’s cohort are due January 28, 2021, 11:59pm EST.

National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program Overview
Thursday, January 7, 2021 11:00 MT/ 12:00 CT
https://nih.webex.com/nih/onstage/g.php?MTID=eafcf38c6a506786a817c66b1a929d6d3

Event number (access code): 126 519 8347
Event password: nlmafp2021
Captioning link: http://livewrite-ncc.appspot.com/attend?event=cit001

For further questions/inquiries, please contact:Join the audio conference only:
1-650-479-3208 Call-in toll number (US/Canada)
1-877-668-4493 Call-in toll-free number (US/Canada)

Kathel Dunn, PhD
Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator
National Library of Medicine
Kathel.dunn@nih.gov

The post National Library of Medicine - webinar on the Associate Fellowship Program first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

Instructor Training from The Carpentries and NNLM

NTO News - Mon, 2021-01-04 13:50

The NTO invites applications to participate in online Instructor Training from Library Carpentries. This highly-sought after training is the first step in becoming a certified instructor for The Carpentries. Instructors organize and teach Carpentry workshops to spread data literacy and programmatic skills both locally and globally. Members of The Carpentries Instructor community work together to actively grow their instructional and technical skills. Becoming an Instructor is a great step to leveling-up your own technical skills and helps you to become a more effective technical communicator.

Dates: Workshops will be held online March 2-5, 2021 9 am – 1 pm Pacific / 12 noon – 4 pm Eastern. You must plan to attend all sessions.

Eligibility:

  • From an NNLM-Member organization (If your organization is not a member, it can become one).
  • You have completed a workshop from The Carpentries.
  • Priority given to US Residents or US Citizen residing elsewhere

Timeline:

  • January 29: Applications due
  • February 8: Applicants will be notified of acceptance/waitlist
  • March 2-5: Carpentries Instructor Training

To apply: Please complete the Instructor Training Application. In the Application Type, select pre-approved registration and enter NNLM2021 as the registration code.

For questions, please contact nto@utah.edu

The post Instructor Training from The Carpentries and NNLM first appeared on National Training Office.

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Advancing Science Through Citizen Science Games

MCR News - Mon, 2021-01-04 03:42

Citizen Science is people from all walks of life getting together with scientists to advance scientific research.  There are many ways to get involved but one of the most popular ways is by playing citizen science games!

Through technology and gaming, citizen scientists can help collect and analyze data, be part of solving complex problems, and help make scientific breakthroughs. And best of all participants have fun, make an impact in scientific research, learn about science and the research process, and develop new skills!

No matter what your passion, the environment, health and wellness, or space and the cosmos, there is a citizen science project game for you.  Citizen Science Games is a website dedicated to sharing the latest news, game lists, articles, publications and interviews about the latest citizen science projects.  The Games List provide interested citizen scientists with all types of gaming opportunities.  The list includes the title, goal of the game, type of player, field of science, platform needed to play, launch date, and current status.  There is also a dropdown menu for games to be played on a computer, mobile device, outdoors and games in the development stage.

Here are a few of the fun and engaging games a citizen scientist can play found on the Citizen Science Games List:

Cancer CrusadeDesign treatments and help cancer research

MalariaSpotMalariaSpot is a game developed by researchers who have gamified the process of diagnosing malaria.

Colony B – contribute to research on the human microbiome

EyeWire – map 3D structure of neurons to help map the brain

Sea Hero Quest – Mobile game dedicated to helping global research into dementia

Need more ideas for projects?  NNLM and SciStarter are partners for change.  Go to https://scistarter.org/nlm for more ideas.  Mark your calendar for April 2021.  Plans are being made for Global Citizen Science Month!  Check the Scistarter website for more information.  Follow #CitSciMonth, @SciStarter and @NLM_NIH on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram for upcoming events.

Margie Sheppard – Technology Coordinator/Kansas

The post Advancing Science Through Citizen Science Games first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

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