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Kindling Health Topics through Kindles

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2019-08-15 11:14

Today’s guest post is from one of the NNLM PNR Mini Outreach awardees. Pam Thompson, Branch Manager of the Calispel Valley Library, in Cusick, Washington, reports about their project where Kindles were purchased and loaded with books and information on relevant health topics to their community.

Our Mini Outreach award was entitled; Health Topics on Kindles. We purchased three Kindles, with pre-loaded titles each one featuring a different topic.  Fruits and Vegetables and Alzheimer’s disease and titles from the NNLM Book Club were the three subjects we chose.

To get the word out about the availability of these Kindles, we planned two programs, one on site at the library and one off site. We also had articles in the paper and a feature on our web page and Facebook. The library displayed flyers at all of the branches, as well as the local post offices, hospital and medical clinic.

On May 1, 2019 we had our onsite library program. Health Day at the Library was staffed by two library staff members and a staff member from the SNAP – Ed, a nutrition awareness service. We had several stations set up for patrons to circulate. A Virtual Reality machine on loan from the State Library was loaded with a program on the human body and was put in use by the participants. The SNAP-ED staff brought healthy snacks and also led people in chair yoga exercises. Our 3D machine was on display, demonstrating its use. We also had a digital microscope hooked up to a laptop and people could experiment with this. We handed out book bags and brochures and exhibited the use of the Kindles. One benefit of the program was a new collaboration with SNAP-ED and we were able to continue our partnership in a later program we had in the spring. We had over 20 visitors which is about 10 percent of the town’s population.

The second program, on May 7th was a visit to the local food bank. Our partner was the Senior Citizen Specialist from our local Rural Resources agency. We had tables set up outside the building of the food bank and had our program a half hour before the food bank officially opened. This was in order that people could peruse the information and talk to us without the distraction of trying to get their food supplies at the same time. Book bags, brochures and information about health coverage was handed out, the Kindles were exhibited, and I talked about the program, the grant, and resources available through our library. Our partner had a great deal of information about health programs and resources available through Rural Resources. Literally every person that visited the food bank that day also visited out table.

The Rural Resources specialist and I made plans to continue this outreach program several times a year. Moreover, we collaborated on a program that is taking place this summer at the library, a Tai JI Quan class for balance, targeting senior citizens and those who have problems with mobility.

My recommendations for anyone who would be interested in having health topics available on Kindles is to be sure you are in an area where there is interest in having E-readers. Also to consider is how to display the Kindles. This means not only the packaging, but also where you are going to house them in the library. Since the Kindles are expensive, it is not something that can be far from the watchful eye of a staff member.

One idea is to make an empty dummy of the Kindle, with bright colors and shelve it along with other books on the subject. When patrons bring up the dummy, we would then be able to procure the actual Kindle for check out. So far our circulation of the Kindles has only reached eleven check outs, but we expect that to increase as we move the devices for circulation among our other branches and experiment with displaying it with the books as previously described.

Overall the Health Topics on Kindles grant has been a great experience. It has made opportunities available to have health programs in the library and off site. It has brought us valuable partners in the community with common goals and has furthered one of our district’s missions, to promote health communities. With a little bit of tweaking, the use of the Kindles will gain traction and I’m grateful to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for making this project possible.

Categories: RML Blogs

Member Highlights: Upstate Health Sciences Library, Syracuse, NY

MAR News - Wed, 2019-08-14 08:00

NNLM MAR is pleased to share successes of health outreach projects and activities in our region. Learn what your amazing colleagues are doing to increase access to quality health information for the communities they serve.

Inspire Upstate

The Clinical Outreach team at Upstate Medical University, Health Sciences Library sought to expand their community programming to include youth-focused education. The team contacted existing partner PEACE, Inc. PEACE is Onondaga County’s federally designated Community Action Agency. The team has a successful programming history with PEACE, including: PEACE staff education days, a health expert speaker series focused on health concerns, and adult health literacy education sessions. When it came time to select community partners, the success of popular ongoing education programs with PEACE made them an ideal choice. In February of 2018 PEACE leaders met with the Upstate team to discuss population specific needs, concerns, and aspirations. With the feedback from PEACE, the team developed a three-day summer program for Syracuse City School District with the purpose of increasing their knowledge of hospital-based professions, and developing their interest in pursuing a healthcare career. They call this program Inspire Upstate.

Inspire Upstate Clinical Outreach Team and participantsInspire Upstate Goals: The first Inspire Upstate camp was held in July 2018, and again in July 2019. It is a three-day summer program for Syracuse City School District middle-school aged youth. This unique camp combines health literacy education; hands on sessions with clinical and academic teams; and tours of hospital spaces. Inspire Upstate has four goals:

  1. Locate and identify quality health information on the internet
  2. Increase knowledge of hospital-based professions
  3. Inspire the next generation of Syracuse residents to pursue a hospital career
  4. Begin a positive relationship and gain familiarity with different people you may encounter at the hospital

Health Literacy: The cornerstone of the program is daily health literacy education provided by Medical Librarians. Librarians followed the National Health Education Standards for 6-8th graders when creating the learning outcomes for their section of the program. In the first session, Librarians focus on what separates quality health literature from questionable health information. The next day, youth are encouraged to select a health topic interesting to them, and find quality health literature on their topic. They create ‘zines to share information on their topic with friends and family on the last day of the program. One remarkable youth indicated her interest in puberty on her intake survey. She pursued the topic and completed her ‘zine on pads and tampons. It was a big hit with many of the others!

Inspire Upstate participant learning CPRHands on experience: Inspire Upstate is filled with movement and interactive activities. Youth put on clean suits for a tour of the Upstate Stroke Center, they are shaken by a mucus-loosening respiratory vest, they sing “Baby Shark” while learning about compression timing in CPR, and use stethoscopes to listen to each other’s heartbeat.

Healthcare Connection: The last goal of Inspire Upstate is to give the youth a sense of familiarity with how the hospital works, and who they may encounter on their next hospital visit. The camp accomplishes that goal by featuring Upstate healthcare providers, and other hospital workers each day. Upstate staff discuss what they do on a day to day basis, why they picked the field, and what education they needed for their role. In the past two sessions, presentations were done by Physical Therapists, Music Therapists, Respirational Therapists, Art Therapist, Nurses, Doctors, Environmental Service staff, Security Officers, and Admissions Professionals. Every camp ends with an Upstate student panel so that youth can ask questions, and get a better understanding of healthcare education.

Did it work? Inspire Upstate met the four goals it set out to accomplish! Youth are able to separate quality from questionable health literature after three days of Librarian-led discussion. Success was also determined by survey instruments completed throughout the program. Surveys showed participants could identify a greater number of healthcare professions at the close of camp, each adding an average of 2-3 to their original list. Doctors, Nurses, and Janitorial staff were the three types of professions youth were most familiar with before the camp. After camp, surveys included Librarians, Respiratory Therapist, Physical Therapists and even Phlebotomists! One in three participants switched their perspective and became interested in a future career in healthcare after meeting with clinical and academic staff. Those who knew they were interested in a healthcare career before camp began expressing more specific ideas about what type of job they would pursue. The written responses to open ended survey questions also gave the team insight into what makes the program work. “When I heard ‘summer camp’ I thought of woods, cabins, and spending the night. This was WAY better,” one student reflected. Other youth indicated that they were surprised they had so much fun, and expected that the program was going to be boring. Plans have begun for expanding the program from one to three camps in summer 2020.

Inspire Upstate participants in mesh gowns and hair caps

Want to learn more about Inspire Upstate? Read about it in a featured article on the library’s website, “Inspire Upstate, a health professions camp, spotlights health careers, education for city youth,” or contact Olivia Tsistinas, Clinical Outreach Coordinator, via email: tsistijo@upstate.edu or telephone: (315) 464-7200.

Categories: RML Blogs

August NIH News in Health newsletter now online

MCR News - Tue, 2019-08-13 16:41

Check out the August 2019 edition of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. Download a PDF version for printing.

Period Problemsillustration of a woman talking with her doctor.

Fibroids, Endometriosis, and Other Issues

Getting your period is a fact of life for most women. But every woman’s period is different. How do you know if yours is causing problems that it shouldn’t?

Bulging Veins

What to Do About Varicose Veins

Do you have bluish-purple or red veins popping out on your legs or face? Varicose veins aren’t just a cosmetic issue. If they aren’t treated, they can also cause health problems.

Health Capusules

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Webinar on September 4: Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship

PSR News - Tue, 2019-08-13 13:52

A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information. Bioinformatics research advances in such areas as gene therapy, personalized medicine, drug discovery, the inherited basis of complex diseases influenced by multiple gene/environmental interactions, and the identification of the molecular targets for environmental mutagens and carcinogens have wide ranging implications for the medical and consumer health sectors (Rein, 2006). Register for this one-hour webinar on Wednesday, September 4, 11:00AM – 12:00PM PDT, presented by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and the National Center for Biotechnology Information to hear reflections on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support.

Facilitator:

Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine.

Guest Speakers:

Kumru E. Kastro, MS, MI is the Liaison Librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, and first-year Engineering at Drexel University. Kumru is responsible for building library collections and teaching information and research skills to faculty and students.

Elliott Smith, MLIS is the Emerging Technologies & Bioinformatics Librarian at UC Berkeley, where he currently supports the students and faculty of the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Integrative Biology. He received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Master of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University.

Jean-Paul Courneya, MS, is a bioinformationist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Health Sciences and Human Services Library. JP is the information resource specialist for biotechnology, bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, next-gen sequencing, molecular and cell biology bench research, and data management for research.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM Webinar: Are You Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources for Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe

MCR News - Tue, 2019-08-13 12:49

When: Wednesday, August 28, 2-3pm eastern (1-2pm central/noon-1pm mountain/11am-noon pacific)

Description:

Get ready for September and National Preparedness Month with NLM disaster health information and other emergency preparedness resources for community educators, families, friends and caregivers. Resources for special populations and those with special needs are highlighted.

Continuing Education Credits: 1 (including Consumer Health and Disaster Information Specializations)

Objectives:
Participants will be able to:

  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness information for consumers/public
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness for special populations
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness for those with disabilities
  • Locate disaster and emergency preparedness mobile Apps for consumers/public

For full details and to register: https://nnlm.gov/class/are-you-ready-essential-disaster-health-information-resources-keeping-your-loved-ones-safe-2

For questions, please contact Sarah Levin-Lederer (sarah.levinlederer@umassmed.edu)

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming Webinar: Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship

SEA News - Tue, 2019-08-13 10:32

Date: Sep 4, 2019, 2:00PM – 3:00PM ET

Continuing Education: 1 CE from the Medical Library Association

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/reflections-bioinformatics-librarianship/16768

Description: A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information.  Bioinformatics research advances in such areas as gene therapy, personalized medicine, drug discovery, the inherited basis of complex diseases influenced by multiple gene/environmental interactions, and the identification of the molecular targets for environmental mutagens and carcinogens have wide ranging implications for the medical and consumer health sectors (Rein, 2006). In this one-hour Webinar, librarians reflect on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support. Dr. Bonnie Maidak of the National Center for Biotechnology Information facilitates.

Facilitator:

Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine.

Guest Speakers:

Kumru E. Kastro, MS, MI is the Liaison Librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, and first-year Engineering at Drexel University. Kumru is responsible for building library collections and teaching information and research skills to faculty and students.

Elliott Smith, MLIS is the Emerging Technologies & Bioinformatics Librarian at UC Berkeley, where he is currently supports the students and faculty of the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Integrative Biology. He received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Master of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University. When he’s not thinking about science he rereads Jane Austen.

Jean-Paul (JP) Courneya, MS , is a bioinformationist at the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library. JP is the information resource specialist for biotechnology, bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, next-gen sequencing, molecular and cell biology bench research, and data management for research.

For More Information: contact the NNLM Training Office, nto@utah.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar: Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship

MCR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 20:49

Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship
Date: Sep 4, 2019, 1:00PM – 2:00PM CT
Location: WebEx
Continuing Education: 1 CE from the Medical Library Association
Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/reflections-bioinformatics-librarianship/16768

A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information.  Bioinformatics research advances in such areas as gene therapy, personalized medicine, drug discovery, the inherited basis of complex diseases influenced by multiple gene/environmental interactions, and the identification of the molecular targets for environmental mutagens and carcinogens have wide ranging implications for the medical and consumer health sectors (Rein, 2006). In this one-hour Webinar, librarians reflect on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support. Dr. Bonnie Maidak of the National Center for Biotechnology Information facilitates.

Facilitator:

Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine.

Guest Speakers:

Kumru E. Kastro, MS, MI is the Liaison Librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, and first-year Engineering at Drexel University. Kumru is responsible for building library collections and teaching information and research skills to faculty and students.

Elliott Smith, MLIS is the Emerging Technologies & Bioinformatics Librarian at UC Berkeley, where he is currently supports the students and faculty of the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Integrative Biology. He received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Master of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University. When he’s not thinking about science he rereads Jane Austen.

Jean-Paul (JP) Courneya, MS , is a bioinformationist at the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library. JP is the information resource specialist for biotechnology, bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, next-gen sequencing, molecular and cell biology bench research, and data management for research.

 For more information contact the NNLM Training Office, nto@utah.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Webinars: New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals

MCR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 20:43

Get ready for a new PubMed!

In this webinar for librarians and other information professionals, you will preview the new and modern PubMed with updated features including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You will also learn about features that are still under development and find out how to give us your feedback on the new system. The new PubMed, currently available at PubMed Labs for testing, will be the default PubMed system in early 2020.

This webinar will be repeated for several sessions so that we can answer your questions. Please sign up for only ONE session.

Date and time: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm EDT

Register for your preferred session at: https://nnlm.gov/classes/new-pubmed-highlights-information-professionals

 

Need a quick tour of Labs? See also the NCBI Minute “A new PubMed is on its way!”

Date and time: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 at 11:00 am – 11:45 am EDT

To register, go to: https://bit.ly/2Tbk3gk.

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Webinar, “New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals”

PSR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 19:51

Get ready for a new PubMed!

Register for this webinar on Tuesday, September 17, 8:00 – 9:00am PDT, designed for librarians and other information professionals, to see a preview of the new and modern PubMed with updated features, including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You will also learn about features that are still under development and find out how to give feedback on the new system. The new PubMed, currently available at PubMed Labs for testing, will be the default PubMed system in early 2020. This webinar will be repeated for several sessions so that all questions are answered. You only need to sign up for one session.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Musings of an Aspiring Science Librarian By Amanda Doughty

NER News - Mon, 2019-08-12 17:38

This is the third blog post in a series authored by several individuals who received scholarships to attend the and the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians. In this installment, a scholarship recipient, Amanda Doughty, a library student describes the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians.  For more information about upcoming research data management classes, webinars and events please visit the NNLM Data Driven Discovery Website and the  NNLM NER website.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Musings of an Aspiring Science Librarian

By Amanda Doughty

          The 11th Annual Science Boot Camp for Librarians initially seemed like a chance to learn some new information, network a bit and enjoy the beautiful host campus of the University of New Hampshire. The fact that I also was honored to receive a scholarship to attend was an unexpected bonus! I never would have imagined though, the value and immense amount of knowledge, insight and connections I would gain from those few days in Durham, NH.

         I should preface this by stating that I am not (officially) a librarian. I just completed my 1st year as an MLIS student at Simmons University. Truth be told, I think I may have been the only library student attending boot camp this year! However, from the moment I walked on campus and joined the Ocean Engineering Lab tour with other boot campers, I felt a sense of belonging. In fact, that is one of many things that I quickly realized about this profession: Science Librarians are INCLUSIVE. Making others feel safe and comfortable, both in a library or information setting, and in daily living, is at the heart of these librarians and what they do. And this was echoed again and again starting with when I arrived to check-in, my name badge had a space for preferred pronouns. When the first session began, the Librarians Code of Conduct was reviewed. This code included laying out of expected behaviors by attendees, bystander intervention, the reporting process and support information. Additionally, those on the planning committee with blue “Code of Conduct” pins were always open and available to discuss concerns or incidents one might have witnessed or experienced. The topics on Social Justice also echoed the Science Librarians’ obligation and responsibility for inclusion on all fronts. Sofia Lemons demonstrated that social justice is critical in promoting equity, empowering those who have been historically excluded, and dismantling and replacing systems of privilege and oppression. Sofia also specified the means in which artificial intelligence and computers can, in fact, be biased and what one can do to combat this. One of the resources discussed was the Algorithmic Justice League (www.ajlunited.org), which aims to advocate for a world with more inclusive and ethical AI. As Science Librarians, Sofia encouraged all of us to start making changes in our own lives, personally and professionally, and to push for accountability when social justice is lost. Creating and enforcing codes of conduct (such as the one outlined at Boot Camp) are helpful tools for fostering inclusion and change.

         Science Librarians are also immensely SUPPORTIVE. The quantity and variety of patrons in which those in the profession assist is incredible! From students to scholars to communities and more. I was hopeful that this Boot Camp would help pinpoint and shed more light on the everyday tasks of a Science Librarian, but what I quickly learned is that this list would probably be too long to even measure! During the Remote Sensing session, Michael Palace defined remote sensing as the act of looking at things without touching them. Some examples of this would be drones (AKA unpersonned aerial systems) or satellites. With the amount of information created from one of these remote sensing tools, the data flow can be overwhelming. The scientists have a goal for the use of this information, and the science librarian can assist with data storage and sharing (creative commons), as well as DOI (Digital Object Identification). Librarians also aid in finding data sources and help with metadata for the project. In this same Remote Sensing session, Philip Browne and Barry Rock described their trickle-down concept in which data is collected and analyzed using science, which is peer-reviewed to produce information, which is shared with the public (cue the Science Librarian!) to ensure survival, ultimately leading to a sustainable human civilization in a natural world. In addition, this session gave me a bunch of interesting, inspiring and free tools and websites for future use, such as Google Earth Pro (https://www.google.com/earth/versions/#earth-pro), Journeys In Film (https://journeysinfilm.org/), the Wayback Machine (https://archive.org/web/) and the Trillion Trees campaign (https://www.trilliontreecampaign.org/).

         One of my favorite parts of the boot camp was the second Social Justice session presented by Elena Long. This session was very hands on and proved to me another characteristic of science librarians: They are INGENIOUS! The very definition of such a person is to be clever, original, and inventive, and that is exactly what was challenged of us. Elena was needing our help addressing the publication name change dilemma. As it stands now, there is no great answer to update a person’s name once something has been published. There is no way to easily change an author’s published name without referencing a past one. The issue is particularly challenging for transgender people who have transitioned, because linking to a previous name may leave that person at risk for exclusion by others. As a group, we did come up with some ideas. The first of which involves using ORCID (www.orcid.org) to publish everything in the future, in which case the author is assigned a unique number and not a name at all. The second really involves establishing a culture change – connecting, organizing and advocating for change. The hope is if we, as science librarians, can be accepting and inclusive of everyone, this will have a ripple effect and impact others around us. When that day comes, the publication name change will not even be an issue!

         At the end of my few days of the Boot Camp, I was exhausted mentally and emotionally from all I had learned and everyone I met in such a short period of time. Now that I have had the chance to reflect on my experience, I am even more inspired to become an inclusive, supportive, and ingenious Science Librarian myself! I am so thankful to have had this opportunity and look forward to becoming a part of this amazing community.

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For more about data science or other upcoming events, please visit the NNLM Data Driven Discovery Website and the  NNLM NER website, or contact anyone in the NNLM NER office.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

New NNLM PSR Office Manager: Keisha Williams!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-08-12 16:14

Hello Everyone! I’m Keisha Williams, the new Office Manager for the NNLM PSR. I’ll be coordinating the office workflow for the region.

Keisha Williams

My background is in the fast-paced travel healthcare industry where I worked in the housing capacity as a team lead and in credentialing as a specialist. In my housing role I oversaw the daily functions of the housing specialist team, ensuring that our travel healthcare professionals had housing established in various and often remote locations all over the country. We serviced all of their travel and housing needs so the only concern for the travelers was to pack a suitcase, travel and arrive at work without the daunting tasks of relocating. After working in housing for several years, I moved into the credentialing side of travel healthcare. I worked very closely with the travel healthcare professionals to ensure all the facility and state credential requirements were met prior to their start.

More recently I worked within the entertainment industry for a talent agency in the contract administration department. I performed client data management and contract administration ensuring that buyers were meeting their contractual obligations to the clients. Working in this capacity I participated in several volunteer outreach opportunities and realized I wanted to do work that was more in service to the public and meaningful to me personally, as healthcare education very much is.

I’m very excited for my new role as Office Manager with NNLM Pacific Southwest Region. As I am new to the UC system my main focuses are to master the various systems, learn the UCLA policies and procedures, support the training and outreach team, and take care of the office’s accounting and operational needs. Additional fun tidbits about me include a BA in Cinema and Television Arts. I love the art of storytelling, visually and written. I’m currently all in to The Handmaids Tale; that’s my must-watch TV! My creative outlet is writing. I’m a mom to two daughters whom I adore. I’m originally from San Diego so authentic Mexican food is my vice and fills my soul with comfort.

I look forward to working with you all and learning even more about the NNLM and how I can support the organization. Please feel free to reach out and give me a shout!

Ciao for now!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Sign-up to Host the All of Us Journey Exhibition

MCR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 10:58

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine invites public libraries and community organizations to host the All of Us Journey during its visit in the MidContinental Region. The All of Us Journey is a hands-on experience to engage and build awareness about the All of Us Research Program.

The All of Us Research Program aims to sign up a million or more participants to share their health data in the interest of expanding biomedical research. The nationwide effort is designed to accelerate research and improve health by considering each individual’s lifestyle, surrounding environment and biology that can impact their health differently than others.

The Journey can make visits to events and venues within 2-3 hours of the area at each stop. The two Journey units are scheduled to stop in the following areas:

Education and Awareness Exhibit

  • Omaha, NE

September 1st-7th

  • Omaha, NE

September 8th-14th

  • Kansas City, KS

September 15th-21st

  • Kansas City, KS

September 29th-October 5th

 

Education, Awareness and Enrollment Center

  • Salt Lake City, UT

September 1st-7th

  • Lincoln, NE

September 8th-14th

  • Louis, MO

September 15th-21st

 

If you or an organization you know is interested in hosting the Journey or you know of any events where the Journey could participate, please contact George Strawley at george.strawley@utah.edu or (801) 581-5242.

Categories: RML Blogs

In the Region

MAR News - Mon, 2019-08-12 08:00

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) staff are always working on something new! Whether we’re developing and teaching classes, exhibiting or presenting at conferences, visiting our Members and Partners, or spending time in the office, our work focuses on advancing the progress of medicine and improving public health through access to health information. Read about some of our more recent activities, highlighted below, to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania.

Michael Balkenhol, Professional Development: I attended the American Library Association Annual Conference in Washington D.C. on June 20-25. It was my first time attending and I’ve never seen so many librarians in one place. I attended interested sessions on health programming, food rescue and nutrition, and citizen science that I plan to incorporate into upcoming webinars and classes in the fall and spring. It was also really fun to meet a few NNLM MAR members while I was at the NNLM exhibit booth!

Michelle Burda, Site Visit: I had the opportunity to visit Brody Family Medical Library, part of the Lehigh Valley Health Network, in Allentown PA on June 30. This library was awarded NNLM MAR funding to support programming and promotion of the NLM exhibit, Every Necessary Care & Attention: George Washington & Medicine. The exhibit is open to the staff of the hospital and the community. Additional handouts and posters of relevant historical facts about the area and George Washington were created by a work study student, and a bookmark with a QR code to the exhibit’s website was designed and given to exhibit attendees along with MedlinePlus trifolds. Having a NLM exhibit at the Lehigh Valley Medical Library gave the hospital staff an opportunity to learn more about NLM activities and resources, and the library. It was also an opportunity for the public to visit the medical library and learn about its presence, and the value it brings to not only the hospital but the community. 65 people attended the scheduled program the day I was there. The guest speaker brought 2 documents signed by George Washington that have only been on display twice in the time the speaker has owned them. The presenter was excellent and I would recommend him as a speaker at other places where the exhibit is planned. Please contact me for additional information mburda@pitt.edu.

Erin Seger, Reaching New Audiences: Over the last year, MAR has been able to teach three classes that offered continuing education credit for Certified Health Education Specialists. This is exciting for me because I am a Health Educator myself. I have been certified as a Health Education Specialist (CHES) since 2009, and worked as a Health Coach and Health Educator prior to my role here at NNLM. I think there is a natural connection between the field of Health Education, the mission of NNLM, and the purpose of NLM resources. Today the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC), who certifies Health Education Specialists, posted an infographic that described one of the roles of a Certified Health Education Specialist as “inspiring priority populations to make the best decisions they can about their health”. Here at NNLM we can support this through our regularly scheduled national classes, and offering CHES continuing education can ensure that these professionals get the information they need from our classes. I’m excited that as of July 1, 2019, MAR was approved as a provider of CHES CE for the next 2 years. This means that our region and the others across NNLM will be able to more widely offer continuing education for these professionals. If you are a CHES or know someone who is, reach out to me at ers166@pitt.edu to be added to our CHES email list, where you will learn about the next round of CHES CE opportunities.

Kate Flewelling, Goodbye and Hello! On July 23, I had the pleasure to speak at the PA Governor’s Council on Library Development at Penn State University. I presented on services for public and academic libraries to Glenn Miller, Deputy Secretary & Commissioner for Libraries, library directors, and other stakeholders. If you would like an NNLM MAR presentation to your group, please contact us.

This summer, we are saying farewell to All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator Veronica Leigh Milliner. Veronica was instrumental in developing the All of Us Community Engagement project not only in MAR, but throughout NNLM. The programs she developed and relationships she made will continue to bear fruit throughout the pilot program and beyond. I am sure you join me in wishing her well as she explores new opportunities. We have also welcomed two new staff members: Tessa Zindren, MAR Program and Outreach Assistant, is responsible for maintaining outreach materials, responding to member and staff requests, and reporting to internal and external stakeholders. Kelsey Cowles, Academic Coordinator, is our liaison to academic libraries, particularly at 2- and 4- year colleges. She will also be our liaison to NNLM’s Research Data Management Working Group and Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons. Watch for them to introduce themselves in the next MAReport.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-08-09 13:36

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Employment Opportunity: The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the position of Community Engagement Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). We are looking for an energetic, creative, innovative, and service-oriented individual interested in being part of a collaborative team that works together to improve access to and sharing of biomedical and health information resources, with an emphasis on resources produced by the National Library of Medicine.

Member Highlights: Ellenville Public Library & Museum, Ellenville, NY – learn about one public library’s quest to engage their patrons in weekly exercise and health programming!

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote National Immunization Awareness and Talk to Your Doctor Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

Why Wikipedia Matters for Health and Medical Information – The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is partnering with WebJunction to facilitate a 4-week online course for public librarians on Wikipedia health and medical information, to be offered this coming fall! Join us for a webinar on August 14 at 3:00 PM ET to learn more about the upcoming course, and the importance of improving health and medical information on Wikipedia.

Explore National Immunization Awareness Month with the NNLM Reading Club – MARquee News Highlights

World Breastfeeding Week – NER Update

New DOCLINE scripts for ILLiad 9.0.3 & 8.7.3 – DOCLINE Talkline

NLM/NIH News

On the Importance of Mentors (and Mentors Who Become Friends) – The best mentors not only provide a sounding board to try out new ideas and thoughts, they also give you the confidence to ride new waves of opportunity. But sometimes mentors become something more: They become your lifelong friends. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Meet the PubMed Central Team: Perfectionists with a Sense of Humor – PMC’s mission to provide the public with free access to medical literature, whether they are researchers, citizen scientists, or family members seeking medical information, is what drives the team. – NLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Lifting the “Residual Veil”: Biomicroscopy of the Eye – An intense light that seems to shine directly into your brain, the quelling of the strong impulse to pull away, a professional stranger breathing so close by. Anyone who has gone forehead-to-forehead with an ophthalmologist will have some familiarity with biomicroscopy. But few of us have much sense of what might be seen in the depths of our own eyes with that devastating beam. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

The Amazing Brain: Zooming Through the Globus Pallidus Externa – The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative continues to find new ways to visualize neurons interconnecting into the billions of circuits that control our thoughts, feelings, and movements. – NIH Director’s Blog

NIH researchers uncover role of repetitive DNA and protein sequences in tumor evolution – A team of researchers from the National Library of Medicine (NLM), part of the National Institutes of Health, and collaborating academic research institutions developed a method to measure a type of gene mutation involved in the evolution of cancer. This type of mutation, called “repeat instability,” may be useful in early cancer diagnosis. Findings were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted updates to PubMed Labs that allow users to narrow search results by article type, text availability, publication date, species, language, sex, subject, journal category, and age.

NIH News in Health: the August 2019 issue is now available, featuring, “Period Problems: Fibroids, Endometriosis, and Other Issue,” and, “Bulging Veins: What to Do About Varicose Veins.” Other topics include psoriatic arthritis, walking for better health, and urologic diseases.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

August 2019

NCBI Minute: A new PubMed is on its way! – August 14, 11:00-11:30 AM ET – In this webinar with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) you will experience PubMed Labs, a test site that will become the default PubMed early next year. You will get a preview of the new, modern interface, updated features including advanced search, clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “cite” button. You’ll also learn about features that are still under development and how to provide feedback on the new PubMed.

True North: Navigating Your Way to Freely Available Public Health Resources – August 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – This collaborative course covers concepts related to searching for freely available public health resources, reviewing resources for bias, and thinking outside-the-box for your search strategies. Join the National Public Health Coordinating Office (NPHCO) in this session for a review of pressing issues in public health.

Fostering Resilience in Older Adults – August 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – Resilience, the process of adapting well in the face of significant sources of distress, plays an increasingly important role in successful aging. Join this webinar with the South Central Region (SCR) to learn more about ways aging network providers and community partners can support older adults in problem solving, preparing for challenges and cultivating this essential component for well-being across the lifespan.

Collection Management for Healthy Communities – August 14, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Public library collections address many health-related needs and interests from which librarians and many others draw information in response to questions about disease, wellness, chronic conditions, prescription and non-prescription drugs, and therapies. To provide accurate and therefore valuable and correct support for these information needs, the print, media, and online collections on which your public library relies must be cultivated with new resources added and outdated ones weeded. This webinar with the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) will provide library staff with support in identifying appropriate health and wellness resources for both the reference and circulating collections, and maintaining the public library’s health-related resources so that they offer your community the highest quality resources they need.

What’s in a Data Story? Understanding the Basics of Data Storytelling – August 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Northwest and Pacific Southwest Regions (PNR/PSR) for this introductory webinar on the fundamentals of effective storytelling, using data collected and visualized by librarians, for librarians. Data without a story is just a pile of numbers. Data with an effective story becomes an everlasting narrative that people will remember for a long time and without much effort. This webinar will look at the basic structure of data storytelling and review exemplars both good and bad of data storytelling.

Understanding the Opioid Crisis: Where do I begin? – August 20, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – An estimated 1.9 million people in the U.S. have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder. This class with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) will help you to understand what addiction and opioids are, and where you can find authoritative information to understand this complex epidemic. The National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health provide resources for both the general public and health professionals to learn about opioid abuse and overdose prevention and treatment options.

Feeding the Whole Child: Full minds and full bellies, all free at the library – August 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – What does it take to get your library or non-profit involved in the Federal Summer Food Service Program and other food insecurity efforts? What are some strategies to help ensure the success of your program, and how can you get your community engaged? Get answers to these and more questions of your own in this informative and interactive session with the Greater Midwest Region (GMR).

Unconscious Bias: Perceptions of Self & Others – August 21, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Our lived experiences are the tools we use to interpret the world around us. Join this webinar with the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and take some time to notice how you perceive yourself and others. This is the second installment in a series of webinars about diversity, equity, and inclusion for health sciences librarians.

Inclusive Graphic Medicine: Communication, Collections and Community – August 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – The emerging field of graphic medicine provides opportunities for health sciences librarian involvement at many levels. Collection development, health literacy, medical education, and promotion of resources for patient-provider communication are some of the relevant areas where librarians participate in the use of comics in healthcare and medical education. In this webinar with the MidContintental Region (MCR), three panelists will discuss their experiences with graphic medicine.

Libraries Connecting Communities to Vaccine Information & Resources – August 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – With vaccines being in the headlines recently, it is likely many of your library patrons are wondering if they, their children, or family members are up to date with immunizations. This webinar with the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) will provide practical information, resources, and tools for public library staff to help empower and inform their communities around vaccines. The presentation will also equip libraries to help their patrons speak with their pharmacist and other members of the care team about vaccines as well as additional health information needs.

Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-being of LGBTQ+ Populations – August 22, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – LGBTQ+ individuals face many barriers in accessing healthcare, including discrimination, lack of access, misunderstanding, and fear. As a consequence, many LGBTQ+ individuals do not regularly access appropriate and timely care. The more informed healthcare professionals are, LGBTQ+ patients and clients will become more comfortable in an environment that is often alienating, disrespectful, and traumatic. This class with the New England Region (NER) will discuss cultural competency, health information needs, and information resources for working with LGBTQ+ patrons.

Are You Ready? Essential Disaster Health Information Resources for Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe – August 28, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the New England Region (NER), get ready for September and National Preparedness Month with this webinar that highlights NLM disaster health information and other emergency preparedness resources for community educators, families, friends and caregivers. This class will also include resources for special populations and those with special needs.

September 2019

Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship – September 4, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information. In this one-hour webinar with the NNLM Training Office (NTO) and NLM Office of Engagement and Training (OET), librarians will reflect on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support.

Biomedical & Health Research Data Management for Librarians – September 9-November 15, 2019 – This collaborative online course offered by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons manage their research data. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend research data management services at your institution. The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to data issues and policies in support of developing and implementing or enhancing research data management training and services at your institution. The course topics include an overview of data management, choosing appropriate metadata descriptors or taxonomies for a dataset, addressing privacy and security issues with data, and creating data management plans. Participants are eligible for up to 32 MLA CE, dependent upon the number of modules completed.

“Seeing” your Search: Visualization Techniques for Exploring PubMed Search Results – September 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – In this webinar with the Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA) presenters will use visualization methods to explore the aggregate qualities of PubMed results. Techniques such as Venn diagrams and line charts can yield important insights into a search by giving us an overview of our results at a glance. You will also see how using these techniques in an interactive way can help guide the process of refining a search strategy.

A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals – September 17, 18, 20 & 24, 2019 – Sponsored by the National Library of Medicine, this webinar for librarians and other information professionals will preview the new, modern PubMed with updated features including advanced search tools, saving citations to a Clipboard, options for sharing results, and the new “Cite” button. You’ll also learn about features that are still under development, and find out how to give NLM your feedback on the new system. The new PubMed, currently available at PubMed Labs for testing, will be the default PubMed system in early 2020.

ECRI Guidelines Trust – September 18, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Medical librarians are one of the largest user groups of the ECRI Guidelines Trust. So why not take advantage of all the Trust has to offer in terms of evidence-based clinical practice guideline content? Join this webinar with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) to hear directly from the creators of the Trust and learn how this guideline repository can facilitate your searches for up-to-date clinical practice guidelines. They will take you on a tour of their site’s content and capabilities, and share latest search features and enhancements developed with a librarian audience in mind.

Cooking Classes without a Kitchen – September 24, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Cooking programs are a great way to provide nutritional and health information to patrons, as well as celebrate cuisines from different cultures. They’re also a lot of fun and very interactive opportunities where patrons can learn from each other. However, not every library is fortunate enough to have a kitchen programming space. This webinar with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) will explore some ideas for how a library without a kitchen can still provide great food programs for their patrons.

New classes on-demand! Looking for more self-paced learning opportunities? Check out MedlinePlus for Public Librarians. This aysnchronous, hands-on, narrated tutorial explains why MedlinePlus should be the first choice for public librarians when answering health information questions.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job postings:

HSRProj Back to School Webinar: How to Search, Communicate, and Disseminate Your Research – August 21, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by AcademyHealth through the HSRProj program, this introductory seminar explores effective search, communication, and dissemination strategies and provides an overview of resources publicly available through the National Library of Medicine for public health and health services and policy researchers to use in their work.

Troubleshooting Systematic Reviews: Refining the Search – September 5, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – How do you refine a systematic review search to make sure you are capturing articles that meet your eligibility criteria? How do you troubleshoot a search that is failing to retrieve known articles significant to your topic? How do you revise searches based on researcher feedback? How do you compare strategies for capturing additional articles? Join Margaret Foster and Sarah Jewell for the second of two webinars that address these and other troublesome questions that librarians interested in consulting on systematic reviews will want to answer. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

2020 Symposium on the Future of Libraries – The Center for the Future of Libraries is accepting session proposals for this three-day symposium exploring the near-term trends already inspiring innovation in academic, public, school, and special libraries, and the longer-term trends that will help us adapt to the needs of our communities. The Symposium on the Future of Libraries is included with full registration for the 2020 ALA Midwinter Meeting and Exhibits. First review of proposals will begin July 15 – priority placement will be given to those proposals received by the first review date. The call for proposals will close on August 15.

AJPH Call for Proposals: Special Issue about Health Misinformation on Social Media – The American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, intends to publish a special issue focusing on research that can help us better understand and address the proliferation of health misinformation on social media. If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send an extended proposal to Ms. Anna Gaysynsky, Assistant Guest Editor, at Anna.Gaysynsky@nih.gov by 11:59 PM ET on Friday, August 30.

OpenCon 2019 in Philadelphia, PA – Join Temple University on November 1 for OpenCon Philly, a free one-day series of panels and interactive workshops for idea exchange and learning around open access, open education, and open data. Connect with regional colleagues and find future collaborators as you share success stories, learn from each other’s failures, and discuss challenges in your work towards making research, educational materials, data, and government information more equitable and accessible to all. This event is free and open to all. RSVP to stay in the loop and be notified of the call for presentations! A registration form will be forthcoming closer to the event.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

Reflections on Bioinformatics Librarianship

MCR News - Thu, 2019-08-08 19:38

Date: Sep 4, 2019, 1:00PM – 2:00PM CT

Location: WebEx

Continuing Education: 1 CE from the Medical Library Association

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/reflections-bioinformatics-librarianship/16768

A growing number of librarians are filling a special niche in the information world: serving those who work with genetic and molecular biology information.  Bioinformatics research advances in such areas as gene therapy, personalized medicine, drug discovery, the inherited basis of complex diseases influenced by multiple gene/environmental interactions, and the identification of the molecular targets for environmental mutagens and carcinogens have wide ranging implications for the medical and consumer health sectors (Rein, 2006). In this one-hour Webinar, librarians reflect on the practice and future of this specialized and uniquely valuable role of the librarian providing bioinformatics support. Dr. Bonnie Maidak of the National Center for Biotechnology Information facilitates.

Facilitator:

Dr. Bonnie Maidak, PhD, MLS, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine.

Guest Speakers:

Kumru E. Kastro, MS, MI is the Liaison Librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, and first-year Engineering at Drexel University. Kumru is responsible for building library collections and teaching information and research skills to faculty and students.

Elliott Smith, MLIS is the Emerging Technologies & Bioinformatics Librarian at UC Berkeley, where he is currently supports the students and faculty of the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Integrative Biology. He received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Chicago and a Master of Library and Information Science from San Jose State University. When he’s not thinking about science he rereads Jane Austen.

Jean-Paul (JP) Courneya, MS , is a bioinformationist at the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library. JP is the information resource specialist for biotechnology, bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, next-gen sequencing, molecular and cell biology bench research, and data management for research.

For more information contact the NNLM Training Office, nto@utah.edu

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Featured Archive: UAMS Historical Research Center

SCR News - Thu, 2019-08-08 16:26

We’re pleased to present this guest post from Tim Nutt, Director of the Historical Research Center (HRC) at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. All photos are courtesy of the HRC. 

The Historical Research Center (HRC), a unit of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Library, is the state’s only repository exclusively dedicated to the preservation of Arkansas’ medical history. For over 40 years, the HRC has collected materials and artifacts of physicians, nurses, and other health professionals and organizations from around the state.

lady in cap and gown

Edith Irby Jones Graduation Photo

Currently, the HRC has about 500 linear feet of archival collections, including the professional papers of Dr. Edith Irby Jones who, when admitted to the University of Arkansas School of Medicine in 1948, became the first African American admitted to a Southern white medical school. We are also honored to be the repository for the collection of M. Joycelyn Elders, M.D., United States Surgeon General from 1993- 1994. Jones served as a mentor to Elders, and the HRC is especially proud to preserve the legacies and the professional relationship of these significant  physicians.

Another signature collection is that of Dr. Oliver Wenger, a U.S. Public Health Service official, who operated the government’s venereal disease clinic in Hot Springs, Arkansas in the 1920s, the time when the city was home to gambling, prostitution, and gangsters, including Al Capone. The collection, though, does not focus solely on individuals and organizations, such as the Pulaski County Medical Society (established 1866) and Arkansas State Nurses Association. The Historical Research Center also serves as the repository for the institutional archives of UAMS.

Baby Carrier

Baby Carrier

Papers, photographs, and other paper items are complemented by the HRC’s extensive artifact collection. Ranging from a Civil War-era medical toolset to a collection of historic dental instruments to a portable anesthesia machine and everything in-between, the artifact collection documents almost every facet of medical history. One of our favorite artifacts is a WWII-era baby carrier used to protect preemies. Looking more suited to carrying a cat than a baby, the carrier was equipped with a woolen blanket, a thermometer and room for a hot water bottle. For air circulation and to protect the baby from Arkansas insects, the carrier has screened vents. It is one of our prized artifacts and one that we show to visitors. Another favorite is a scrapbook of pathology specimens that shows the devastating effects of various diseases on intestines. The scrapbook was compiled by Dr. Edwin T. Bentley in 1864, in his capacity as a surgeon with the U.S. General Hospital in Alexandria, VA. Assigned to Little Rock after the Civil War, Dr. Bentley helped found the Arkansas Industrial University Medical Department (now UAMS) in 1879. Upon his death in 1917, the scrapbook was discovered among his estate. The specimens contained in the scrapbook correspond to cases presented in the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (Washington, 1870-1888).

ad with cartoon

Electra Vita Body Battery Belt Advertisement, 1910

One of the HRC’s collecting priorities is quack medicine. To that end, we actively seek out materials that document pseudo-medical practices. One of my favorite quack devices in our collection is the Electra Vita Body Battery Belt, which was sold in the early 1900s. Marketed toward men who were nervous, run, weak, or unambitious, the belt provided that much needed jolt of energy. The belt wrapped around one’s waist and provided continuous electrical pulses, courtesy of batteries (which kept a permanent charge) tucked inside the belt’s lining. The true medical benefits of the Electra Vita Body Battery Belt were non-existent, except for maybe a placebo effect. Who would not move around more (which would give the impression of more energy) if one was being constantly shocked?

In addition to the archival collections, the HRC also has a History of Medicine book collection. This general collection, acquired through donation and purchase, currently numbers around 6,000 volumes.

Many people do not realize that Arkansas has a rich medical history. To educate visitors about that history, the HRC installs exhibits around the UAMS campus. One recent exhibit highlighted rarely-seen artifacts from our holdings. This exhibit proved to be extremely popular as most people saw items for the first time or ones that brought back fond memories. One, in the latter category, was the 1980s-era “R.F. Ant” mascot head. R.F. Ant (the R.F. stands for Refuse) was the creation of a UAMS professor of pharmacy and visited schools to teach children about the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse. The red bulbous ant head sitting prominently in the glass case drew many to the exhibit.

We also publish digital exhibits so researchers and visitors who are not on the UAMS campus can utilize and enjoy our holdings. Issues from 1870-1922 of the Journal of the Arkansas Medical Society are viewable on our digital collections, as well as many of our photographs and artifacts. Currently, we are digitizing photographs from the M. Joycelyn Elders, M.D. collection to tell the story of this influential physician. The Historical Research Center’s digital collections are located at: https://hrcdigitalcollections.contentdm.oclc.org/.

archive boxes

HRC Archival Storage

In 2016, the Historical Research Center opened its new research room and archival storage on the fifth floor of the UAMS Library. Before this, the HRC’s public and work spaces were cramped and not inviting. Now, we have a welcoming atmosphere with room for researchers. This new space, combined with a higher visibility, has resulted in about 50 researchers a year.

The Historical Research Center is fortunate to have an active friends’ group. The Society for the History of Medicine and the Health Professions (SHMHP) was established in 1982 with the mission of supporting the Center. The Society sponsors an annual grant program that ensures the HRC’s collections are used in historical research. SHMHP’s main activity is a yearly lecture and dinner. This event, co-sponsored by the Historical Research Center, attracts about 65 people and features a catered dinner and presentation on a medical history topic (usually related to Arkansas). The Society also co-sponsors many of the HRC’s events throughout the year, including an Open House in October (for American Archives Month and National Medical Librarians Month) and periodic lectures.

The Historical Research Center has a wonderful staff—we would not be able to do all that we do without Suzanne Easley (Assistant Director and Archivist), Calee Henderson (Digital Initiatives Librarian), and April Hughes (Administrative Analyst). Together, we make a good team in preserving and teaching about Arkansas’s medical history.

If you are in Little Rock, I encourage you to stop by and visit us. We look forward to seeing you!

Tim NuttAbout the author: Tim Nutt is currently employed as the Director of the Historical Research Center at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Previously, he was employed as the Head of Special Collections at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville and as founding Deputy Curator of the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies at the Central Arkansas Library System.  He also served as the founding Managing Editor and Staff Historian of the award-winning online Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture. Nutt received a B.A. in History from the University of Central Arkansas and a masters in Library Science, with an emphasis on archives, from the University of Oklahoma. He is a past president of the Arkansas Historical Association and a Certified Archivist.

Categories: RML Blogs

PubMed Labs Update: Search Filters Now Available

PSR News - Wed, 2019-08-07 14:29

Users can now use filters to narrow search results in PubMed Labs by article type, text availability, publication date, species, language, sex, subject, journal category, and age. The most popular filters are included on the sidebar by default. To apply a filter, run a search and click on the checkbox next to the filter name. A checkmark will appear next to the selected filters. To display additional filters, click on the “Additional filters” button near the bottom of the page. A pop-up menu will appear showing the available filters for each category: article type, species, language, sex, subject, journal, and age.

To add items to the Filters menu:

  1. Choose a category on the left (Article Type, Species, etc.).
  2. Within each category select the desired filters to add to your Filters menu.
  3. Click Apply to add the selected filters to the sidebar menu and close the pop-up.
  4. To apply a filter to your search, click on the filter name in the menu.

More information about filters:

  • When filters are selected, a “Filters applied” message will display above your results and on the Advanced Search page.
  • Click an applied filter to turn it off.
  • To turn off all applied filters, click the “Clear all” link or the “Reset all filters” button.
  • Citations may be excluded for some filter selections because they have not yet completed the MEDLINE indexing process. For example, the “Humans” filter will return results that have been indexed with the term Humans.

For illustrations of the various features, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Congratulations to Rachel Fenske – Recipient of the 2019 Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award!

SEA News - Wed, 2019-08-07 13:02

Rachel Fenske

Congratulations to Rachel Fenske – Recipient of the 2019 Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award!

Congratulations to Rachel Fenske, Information Services and Outreach Librarian, Assistant Librarian – Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama. She is the recipient of the 2019 Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award.

The Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award recognizes outstanding outreach librarians serving rural or underserved populations. Michael E. DeBakey established this award to recognize contributions to medical education and librarianship. The award honors a practicing health sciences librarian who works in the tradition of the incredible advances and medical innovations of Dr. DeBakey to provide valuable health information to underserved and rural populations.

The NNLM SEA first recognized Ms. Fenske for her work on the U.S. Virgin Islands where she conducted outreach with the Virgin Islands Department of Health, Virgin Islands Community AIDS Resource and Education, Lutheran Social Services. She provided health information education to the community in the Virgin Islands at community health fairs and other community events to minority populations. Ms. Fenske continued community health outreach while working at the University of South Alabama. Her outreach projects included work with seniors in Mobile, AL to locate free, reliable health information and work at the Children’s and Women’s Hospital to help parents and families locate reliable health information appropriate for their reading level. The NNLM SEA is thrilled that Rachel’s health information outreach will be recognized by the Friends of the National Library of Medicine.

Ms. Fenske will receive her award at the Friends of the National Library of Medicine 14th Annual Gala at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel in Washington D.C. on Tuesday, September 10, 2019.

Categories: RML Blogs

August 2019 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Wed, 2019-08-07 11:57

Illustration of a woman talking with her doctorCheck out the August issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Bulging Veins: What to Do About Vericose Veins?
    Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins that lie just underneath the skin’s surface. They aren’t just a cosmetic issue. If they aren’t treated, they can also cause health problems.
  • Health Capsule: More Steps for Better Health
    Walking is an easy way to exercise without needing a gym membership. It’s a popular way to burn calories, and research shows that walking is good for your health. A new study asked how many steps a day can lead to health benefits.
  • Health Capsule: What is Psoriatic Arthritis?
    You are more likely to get psoriatic arthritis if you have a family member with psoriasis or arthritis. Talking with a health care provider can help you find what treatment methods are best for you.
  • Featured Website: Urologic Diseases
    Urologic diseases and conditions include urinary tract infections, kidney stones, prostate problems, and more. Find out how urologic problems are detected and treated.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Explore National Immunization Awareness Month with the NNLM Reading Club

MAR News - Wed, 2019-08-07 10:43

August is National Immunization Awareness Month, a National Health Observance which provides a key opportunity to highlight the importance of getting recommended vaccines at all ages.

The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention reminds us that every year children and adults become seriously ill and are hospitalized because of diseases that vaccines can help prevent, like whooping cough, cancers caused by HPV and pneumonia. This year’s measles outbreaks are a key reminder of how quickly diseases can spread when people aren’t vaccinated.

Collage of National Immunization Awareness Month book covers

The NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network is pleased to announce its three book selections in support of National Immunization Awareness Month:

  • On Immunity by Eula Bliss
  • Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism by Peter Hotez
  • The Vaccine Race by Meredith Wadman

To learn more about each of these titles and to download book discussion guides, promotional materials and corresponding vaccine and immunization information, or to apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book kit, visit the Book Selections and Health Resources: Vaccine Health.

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