National Network of Libraries of Medicine
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Hindi Japanese Korean Persian Portuguese Russian Spanish

RML Blogs

Meet Me Monday: Kimberly Yee, National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region

SCR News - Mon, 2018-12-03 04:00

Kimberly Yee is the Social Media Assistant at the National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region(SCR) at the UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth, TX. She currently assists in the NNLM SCR’s web and social media presence and does photography as well.

Kimberly is currently pursuing her Bachelors of Business Administration in Marketing and Management at the University of Texas at Arlington. She has previously held two back-to-back media internships with the City of Arlington Office of Communications.

Contact Kimberly at kimberly.yee@unthsc.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM PSR Sponsors MLA’s “Using Stories” Webinar

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2018-12-03 01:00

NNLM PSR sponsored seven sites for the MLA webinar, Who Doesn’t Love a Good Story? Using Stories in Academic and Community-Based Health Education. Discussion focused on narrative storytelling and how it can be used to support academic health sciences instruction and community-based education initiatives. Several site hosts commented positively about the content and interactive teaching aspect of the webinar (the benefits and challenges of using stories were debated, and relevant applications were shared).

We have a limited number of surplus codes to access a recording of the webinar. Please complete this brief survey if you are interested in viewing the recording. Once your request has been approved, you will receive a code that will provide access to resources, an evaluation, and a certificate to claim 1.5 MLA CE contact hours.

The following sites hosted the live webcast:

Arizona

Central Arizona Biomedical Libraries
Host: Adrienne Brodie

California

University of California, San Francisco
Host: Min-Lin Fang

Kaiser Permanente
Host: Ana Macias

San Diego State University
Host: Margaret Henderson

Santa Clara Valley Health and Human Services
Host: Judith Mills

Hawaii

Hawaii State Hospital
Host: Lisa Anne Matsumoto

Nevada

University of Nevada, Reno
Host: Mary Schultz

Thank you to all of our hosts! Please subscribe to the PSR-News email list for announcements about 2019 sponsorships.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

MEDLINE Data Changes for 2019

PSR News - Fri, 2018-11-30 19:07

NLM has announced the notable data changes made to MEDLINE during the annual maintenance known as Year-End Processing (YEP) for 2019. Highlights include:

  • For 2019, 73 MeSH headings were either changed or deleted and replaced with more up-to-date terminology.
  • 402 new MeSH Headings, plus 20 new Publication Types, were added to MeSH in 2019. A complete list is available in PDF format, New Headings with Scope Notes, Annotations and Tree Locations.
  • Twenty new publication types are available for 2019; 16 will be used only by NLM Cataloging and four will be used for MEDLINE indexing.
  • For 2019, NLM has continued its project of reviewing subheadings in order to improve indexing consistency and efficiency and to make MEDLINE searching easier and more straightforward. The new MeSH heading Workforce was created to replace /manpower.

For a complete list of updates, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Introduces “Exhibitions Connect,” a New Opportunity for Institutions Hosting NLM Traveling Exhibitions!

PSR Newsletter - Fri, 2018-11-30 19:06

The National Library of Medicine has announced a new opportunity to enhance dissemination of and engagement with NLM health information resources, better serving libraries and cultural institutions that host NLM traveling exhibitions. Exhibitions Connect, an NLM Exhibition Program opportunity, provides curated collections of informative and promotional materials related to the topics explored in NLM exhibitions and tailored to host venues. Additionally, it promotes collaboration with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM). The first project of this opportunity kicks off in April 2019, with the launch of Surviving and Thriving: AIDS, Politics, and Culture/Sobrevivir y Prosperar: SIDA, Política y Cultura, a 12-banner, bilingual traveling exhibition exploring the rise of HIV/AIDS in the early 1980’s and the evolving response to the epidemic up to the present day.

12 banner displays of the surviving and thriving exhibition

Surviving and Thriving: AIDS, Politics, and Culture/Sobrevivir y Prosperar: SIDA, Política y Cultura, a 12-banner traveling exhibition

The year-long initial project will send two copies of Surviving and Thriving/Sobrevivir y Prosperar to nine NNLM member libraries identified by the NLM traveling exhibition services team, in cooperation with the Network. These libraries will work with NNLM staff to disseminate and utilize NLM health information resources. The NLM will provide each host venue with a selection of English- and Spanish-language health information resources related to HIV/AIDS and tailored to the needs of academic, health sciences, and public libraries, including printed materials; links to webinars, databases, and consumer health information; and sample social media posts. Among the participating libraries are Florida International University in Miami; Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, CA; Akron-Summit County Public Library in Akron, OH; and Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY.

NLM anticipates announcing a second project as part of Exhibitions Connect in June 2019, featuring the upcoming traveling exhibition Rashes to Research: Scientists and Parents Confront the 1964 Rubella Epidemic, which explores how experts and parents tried to limit Rubella’s impact in the years before an effective vaccine nearly eliminated the disease from the United States. Alongside Exhibitions Connect, the NLM will maintain its regular schedule of traveling exhibition services, with 41 copies of 21 banner exhibitions touring libraries and cultural institutions throughout North America and Europe.

For more information about Exhibitions Connect and NLM traveling banner exhibitions, contact NLMTravelingExhibits@mail.nih.gov or join the LISTSERV, Making Exhibition Connections.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 30, 2018

SEA News - Fri, 2018-11-30 09:58

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunity

Webinars December 4 – 5

Webinars December 6 – December 11

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians

SEA News - Fri, 2018-11-30 08:56

Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate as students or mentors in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management. This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity and include practice in using Jupyter notebooks. Mentors will assume the role of a researcher with a dataset seeking data services support and will scope research questions to form the basis for mentee projects.

 

The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and leadership. The course will run February 20 – April 12, 2019.

 

Both student and mentor applications are due January 4, 2019.

Additional details and online applications are available at https://wp.me/p8Qzkf-2La.

For questions, please contact the NTO at nto@utah.edu or Shirley Zhao at shirley.zhao@utah.edu.

Categories: RML Blogs

The National Guidelines Clearinghouse Is Reborn as the ECRI Guidelines Trust!

PSR Newsletter - Thu, 2018-11-29 17:17

On November 19, ECRI launched a new version of the National Guidelines Clearinghouse (NGC), now redeveloped into the ECRI Guidelines Trust. The NGC was previously funded and maintained by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and was a well respected single aggregated point of access to medical practice association developed evidence-based guidelines for medical and health practices. It was freely available to all users. In the summer of 2017, the AHRQ’s budget was reduced and support for maintaining and hosting the Clearinghouse ended. Shortly afterward, the non-profit ECRI Institute promised to work with AHRQ to take up and continue this project. The ECRI Institute became involved because they actually built and maintained the database on ARHQ’s behalf and had been the sole contractor involved for the 20 years or so of its existence as a government utility.

The new site is easy to use and is freely available. It does require registration, but allows the choice of “medical librarian” as a profession in the registration screen. After running an initial search, results can be refined by a number of different filters, including whether it was scored for quality of evidence using their detailed TRUST algorithm. Some listed guidelines are not scored; either they do not meet all standards for inclusion despite respectable sources, or their developers denied permission. It’s easy to tell whether they are scored or not, but this might be confusing for people who don’t realize that some findable guidelines do not actually meet their standards for full inclusion. It’s also very easy to find information about their process and standards, but you do have to know enough to want to look for the information.

The return of this well-used resource is very welcome, but ECRI will need resources to be able to continue its production. Users at institutions that can afford to pay large amounts of money often have access to these guidelines through resources like ClinicalKey, but other users have had to spend a great deal of time and effort seeking them out and evaluating them individually from a wide variety of sources. The Clearinghouse’s users include many who are unable to pay a large subscription fee for a resource like this.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

FORCE11 and UCLA Library Partner to Host 2019 FSCI Summer Institute on Open Research August 5-9!

PSR Newsletter - Thu, 2018-11-29 14:53

FORCE11 has announced that the third annual FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI) will take place at UCLA from August 5 to 9, 2019. With this move, FORCE11 begins a long-term collaboration with the UCLA Library to plan and present FSCI, and improve understanding and engagement with the fast-changing world of research communication on campuses everywhere. FSCI started in 2017 as a partnership between FORCE11 and the University of California at San Diego. Now setting down roots in Los Angeles, FSCI is a week-long summer school in open research for researchers, librarians, publishers, university administrators, funders, students and post-docs that incorporates intensive coursework, seminars, group activities, lectures and hands-on training. Participants learn from leading experts, have the chance to discuss the latest trends and to gain expertise in new technologies. FSCI is transdisciplinary and relevant across the sciences, social sciences and humanities.

“Working together with the academic community to explore frontiers in research communications is key to changing practices,” said Ginny Steel, UCLA Norman and Armena Powell University Librarian. “The UCLA Library has been actively involved in efforts to enhance and expand scholarly discourse through openness, and the summer institute will be a valuable forum for us to consider the opportunities and challenges in concert with the international research community. We look forward to welcoming everyone in August.”

FSCI courses explore changing practice in data-sharing, authorship, peer review, research assessment, publishing and more. There are courses for those who know very little about current trends and technologies and courses for those ready to pursue advanced topics. FSCI covers scholarly communication from a variety of disciplinary, regional and international perspectives. Course information and registration will be available in the spring. To stay updated on details as they emerge, sign up to receive email updates, join the Facebook page, follow @force11rescomm on Twitter, or visit FSCI2019@UCLA online.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Fall 2018 Issue Available Online!

PSR News - Thu, 2018-11-29 14:30

soprano renee fleming on the cover of nih medlineplus magazine

The Fall 2018 issue of NIH MedlinePlus Magazine is now available! Featured in the issue is soprano Renée Fleming, who teams with NIH to explore sound, health, and the power of music. The issue also features articles on new treatment for deep vein thrombosis, research updates on polycystic ovary syndrome and fighting fibromyalgia with complementary health.

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is the free, trusted consumer guide to the vast array of authoritative online health and medical information in MedlinePlus. Published four times a year, the magazine showcases the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) latest medical research and healthcare information. To receive a print version, use the order form to have the magazine delivered to your home or office. It ships four times a year and is free.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Job Opportunity: Data and Evaluation Coordinator, NNLM SEA, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland, Baltimore

SEA News - Thu, 2018-11-29 08:29

Data and Evaluation Coordinator
National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA)
Health Sciences and Human Services Library
University of Maryland, Baltimore

 The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Regional Medical Library (NNLM, SEA, RML), housed within the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL), seeks a librarian to oversee the development and implementation of data science, technology, and evaluation programs to improve information access to health professionals and health consumers in the region.

The Data and Evaluation Coordinator is one of a team of five librarian-coordinators who work together facilitating resource sharing, training, and cooperative projects in AL, DC, FL, GA, MD, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN, USVI, VA, and WV. This position requires seasonal travel within the region to support the education and exhibits programs. For more information about NNLM SEA, visit http://nnlm.gov/sea.

Reporting to the Executive Director of SEA, this is a full-time, grant funded, non-tenure, and non-permanent status track faculty position at a rank of Librarian I or II. Previous professional library experience is welcome, but not required.

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES:

 Identifies, develops, and teaches classes and workshops in a variety of formats addressing and promoting aspects of data science, technology, evaluation, and access to biomedical information to health professionals, librarians, and the public.

  • Tracks and monitors data science and technology trends and policy developments improving access to biomedical information by SEA members, healthcare and health information professionals, and the public.
  • Assists SEA members, health and health information professionals, and health consumers with data, technology, and evaluation questions and questions related to to NLM and NNLM products and services.
  • Assists in the planning, promotion, and coordination of data science and technology projects and awareness programs in the region.
  • Develops and reviews content on data science, technology, and evaluation for inclusion on the NNLM and SEA web sites, social media, and the regional electronic newsletter, SEA Currents.
  • Presents information about NLM and NNLM programs in training sessions, demonstrations, meetings, exhibits, and other events. Works with other coordinators to exhibit NLM resources at national, regional, and state meetings of health professionals, information professionals, and the public.
  • Serves as a liaison to recipients of data science and technology awards and advise on evaluation of outreach initiatives for the region.
  • Supports initiatives as determined by the NNLM Research Data Management and Evaluation Working Groups and communicates information back to SEA staff and the region as necessary.
  • Develops educational materials for inclusion on the NNLM and SEA websites focused on effective evaluation techniques, data science, and technology to improve access to quality health information for health professionals and the public.
  • Cooperates with other Regional Medical Libraries and Offices to produce national programming and participates in national NNLM initiatives as appropriate.
  • Maintains accountability for NLM deliverables, including workshops, exhibiting, presentations, newsletter contributions, web and social media content

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Master of Library Science or equivalent advanced degree from ALA-accredited program
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • Excellent interpersonal skills
  • Strong service orientation and ability to work effectively with colleagues, health professionals, and consumers in a diverse, multi-cultural community
  • Knowledge of PubMed, MedlinePlus, and other NLM resources
  • Willingness to travel; valid driver’s license at the time of employment
  • Ability to work independently and as a member of a team

 PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Demonstrated teaching and training experience
  • Instructional design and course development experience, including evaluation
  • Project management, strategic planning, and team leadership skills
  • Knowledge of or experience with data science
  • Demonstrated knowledge of assessment and evaluation methods
  • Experience with health information education and the ability to develop, plan, and conduct workshops and training, interacting confidently with audiences
  • Knowledge of or experience in medical librarianship
  • Evidence of professional and scholarly activities
  • Ability to communicate vision and motivate others; willingness to assume leadership roles as needed
  • Demonstrated ability to obtain results from initiating and participating in team efforts
  • Effectiveness in promoting ideas while exhibiting tact and sensitivity; initiating interaction with others; and soliciting feedback from partners
  • Comfort with change, flexibility and the ability to react quickly to program alterations and task modifications
  • xperience with Moodle LMS and WebEx technologies

APPLICATIONS:

Application materials must include a CV/resume; cover letter which includes the source of advertisement; 3 references including names, addresses, and phone numbers; and a separate signed/dated affidavit page (stating “I verify that my CV is current and accurate” – does not need to be notarized). Applications will be accepted until the position is filled, but full consideration will be given to complete applications received by January 4, 2019. Interested applicants should apply using the following link: http://bit.ly/DataEvalLib.

MINIMUM SALARY: $55,000, commensurate with experience

BENEFITS:

Generous benefits include choice of retirement, medical, and dental plans; 22 days of annual leave; 15 days of sick leave; 3 personal days and 14 holidays. Regular employees, as well as their spouses and dependent children, may receive tuition remission for most programs at many campuses of the University System of Maryland.

 ENVIRONMENT:

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) campus is located in downtown Baltimore, blocks from Orioles Park at Camden Yards, Raven’s Stadium, and the Inner Harbor, a recreational waterfront destination. Forty-five miles north of Washington DC, Baltimore City and the surrounding metropolitan area are noted for high quality-of-life indicators offering historic parks, great neighborhoods, and world-famous art collections, museums, theaters, and symphony orchestras. The city has easy access to public transportation systems, superior health care systems, and renowned university and educational resources.

The HS/HSL is one of the largest health sciences libraries in the United States with a track-record of user-centered innovative services and programs.  Fifty-five FTE employees including 25 faculty librarians staff the library.  Our attractive and vibrant facility, which opened in 1998, serves as a hub for collaboration and learning with resources, programs and tools that promote discovery, creativity, and innovation.  The HS/HSL has 45 group study rooms, three computer classrooms, an Innovation Space, a presentation and production studio, an art gallery, and multiple technology-enhanced meeting spaces. Through the HS/HSL’s website (www.hshsl.umaryland.edu), the UMB community has access to a full range of resources and services.   The HS/HSL serves the schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Social Work, and the Graduate School.  The HS/HSL also serves as the headquarters for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s Southeastern/Atlantic Region.

The Library supports the 6300 students, and over 7200 faculty and staff members on UMB’s 71-acre research and technology complex consisting of 67 buildings including the University of Maryland BioPark, the University of Maryland Medical Center, and the VA Hospital. UMB’s professional and graduate schools comprise a dental school, graduate school, and schools of law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work. More details about the UMB can be found at http://www.umaryland.edu/.

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Library Outreach Student Award Recap: Amy Corder

SCR News - Thu, 2018-11-29 04:00

The annual meeting of the South Central Chapter of the Medical Library Association is one of our biggest events of the year. We hold our advisory board meetings, exhibit, and sometimes offer continuing education. One of the highlights for us is being able to bring our Library Outreach Student Award winners with us to show them the ropes. In this three-week series, we’ve asked some of them to reflect on their experiences.

Thanks to the NNLM SCR Library Outreach Student Award, I was able to attend SCC/MLA’s 45th annual conference in San Antonio, TX.

Although I work as an associate in a health sciences library, I had no idea what to expect from a medical library conference. Luckily, the NNLM Regional Medical Library staff explained everything about what to expect at the conference beforehand so that I wasn’t completely lost, and they answered all of my questions.

Attending committee meetings was unexpectedly my favorite part of SCC. Two of the committee meetings I attended were the Continuing Education and Research committees, where I was able to get a glimpse into how each committee plans for the following year and all of the work that goes into preparing for the conference each year.

However, the Outreach Committee meeting was the highlight of my time at the conference. I was interested to hear all of the different outreach activities among medical libraries in our region and how NNLM supports them in their endeavors. I had no idea of how varied outreach efforts were in the medical library community, from providing health information training to public librarians, to attending health fairs locally, and conducting webinars.

It was very interesting to see the research trends that are developing within medical libraries and how medical librarians can help to move forward medical research and evidence-based medicine. Not to mention, the social events were an extremely fun way to network with other health information professionals!

I had a great time at SCC and would encourage other Library and Information Science students to attend. I left the conference feeling motivated about my career path and connected to the larger community of health sciences librarians.

Like NNLM SCR Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Categories: RML Blogs

Apply by January 4 for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians!

PSR Newsletter - Wed, 2018-11-28 19:45

Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate as students or mentors in RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians, a rigorous NNLM online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians. The librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity will be threaded throughout the course, which will also include practice in using Jupyter notebooks through an open-source browser-based application (jupyterhub) that allows users to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations, and narrative text. The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions.

Applicants must have previous training or experience in research data management through the RDM 101 course or attest to these learning objectives. Applications are open to health science information professionals working in libraries located in the US; or with permission of the instructors, persons living outside the US with LIS training and wishing to obtain a position in a US based library. A letter of institutional support is required. Enrollment is limited to 40.

The online asynchronous component of the program is six weeks, running from February 20 – April 5, including a catch-up week, and then followed by a synchronous online session during the week of April 8. Participants can expect to spend about six hours each week on coursework and the project. There is no charge for participating in the program. MLA CE credit will be awarded (TBD). Mentors will assume the role of a researcher with a dataset seeking data services support. They will work with groups of 4-5 mentees. Mentors will be compensated $1,000 for their time and required to submit a W-9 and a contract with the University of Utah. For more details and knowledge requirements, consult the course description link at the beginning of this message. To apply, submit the online application form, and upload PDFs of a current CV and letter of institutional support by January 4, 2019. For questions, contact Shirley Zhao, RDM Project Lead and Training Development Specialist.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Assessment, Bias and Big Data

NER News - Wed, 2018-11-28 14:23

Assessment according to Merriam-Webster’s dictionary is defined as the action or an instance of making a judgement about something. There is a growing trend to use data for assessment purposes, as a way to come to a conclusion. However, this should be done with caution. Interpretation has bias. It depends on the circumstances and prior reference point of view of the interpreter giving the explanation. If interpreted by a human whatever that person learned in the past can color the present view. A computer can also have bias based in the programming of the language.

We are currently living in the age of big data. Vast amounts of data are collected on everyone, everyday. The data may come from the phone, tracking where you are in an effort to connect to the closest tower. It might be in the security cameras or the software used by a child writing a paper to a teacher for a class project. It is scary how much data is collected.

There was a recent article in the BBC titled, “The trouble with big data? It’s called the ‘recency bias.” The article did an excellent job of describing, ‘recency bias’, which is the tendency to assume that future events will closely resemble recent experience. As described from the article, “It’s the tendency to base your thinking disproportionately on whatever comes most easily to mind.” With the explosion of more and more data collected on each and every person with each new technology device the analysis becomes overwhelming. The moment you start looking backwards to analyze the bigger view, there is far too much recent data and far too little of the old to compare it to. Short-sightedness is built into the analysis structure, in the form of an overwhelming tendency to overestimate short-term trends at the expense of history and what has been accomplished in the past.

All this data makes research data management extremely crucial. It is a goal of the National Library of Medicine in the Strategic Plan to “accelerate discovery and advance health by providing the tools for data-driven research.” Many data sets, such as gene sequences and demographic data, are most useful when descriptions are complete. They need to be find-able, accessible and in a usable format. In an era of bigger and bigger data, we need to choose carefully. Just collecting the data without managing the data will overwhelm.  When overcome with so much information  we go back to out bias and what is easy – leading sometimes to selective amnesia. This brings us to the final point in the article,  “that what you choose not to know matters just as much as what you do.”

References:
https://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/plan/lrp17/NLM_StrategicReport2017_2027.pdf 
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20160605-the-trouble-with-big-data-its-called-the-recency-bias?ocid=ww.social.link.email

Categories: RML Blogs

Public Comment Period for Healthy People 2030 Opens December 3!

PSR News - Wed, 2018-11-28 14:00

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is soliciting written comments regarding the Healthy People 2030 objectives. The public comment period will be open from December 3, 2018 through January 17, 2019. Previous public comments on the proposed Healthy People 2030 framework helped shape the vision, mission, foundational principles, plan of action, and overarching goals for Healthy People 2030. In this public comment period, input is needed on the proposed Core, Developmental, and Research objectives. Please read the objective selection criteria, which will be available by December 3, prior to reviewing and commenting on the proposed objectives.

Healthy People 2030 will have 3 types of objectives: Core, Developmental, and Research. You may comment on individual Core objectives and on the set of Developmental and Research objectives for each topic area. Proposed objectives are organized by Healthy People 2020 topic areas—except for objectives related to opioids, which can be found in the new Opioids topic area. The final objectives may be organized differently in Healthy People 2030.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Wed, 2018-11-28 11:29

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Only Three Days Left to Apply! Call for Applications to the MLA Research Training Institute (RTI) – Apply by December 1 for this week-long residential workshop that provides librarians and library information professionals with the opportunity to work intensively on research design and planning to conduct research that improves practice and adds to the professional knowledgebase. The workshop will be held in Chicago from July 15–19, 2019.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

The MAR offices will be closed November 29-30 for staff training and our yearly planning retreat. Have you ever wondered how MAR approaches professional development, or planning for training and outreach? Follow #NNLMMARretreat18 tomorrow and Friday to see updates on our activities!

Thanksgiving (was) National Family Health History Day – Midwest Matters, from GMR

Saturday (12/1) is World AIDS Day 2018 – Blogadillo, News from SCR

NLM/NIH News

NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Revealing Data: Close Reading and Textual Analysis as Historical MethodsCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

A Tradition of Gratitude: NLM Staff Express ThanksNLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

Apply for the 2019-2020 NLM Associate Fellowship Program – The National Library of Medicine is currently accepting applications for their Associate Fellowship Program, a one-year residency program for recent library science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship. The program combines curriculum and project work and is located at the National Library of Medicine on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Learn more about this opportunity and submit your application before January 25, 2019.

ToxMystery, a game about chemicals in the household, will be retired on December 31, 2018. The game was built in the Adobe Flash, a format not supported on tablets, most Web browsers, and other educational devices. For learning activities about chemicals and environmental health, visit the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Kids’ Pages and the Environmental Protection Agency’s Learning and Teaching portal.

NLM Digital Collections Homepage Redesign: Check out the National Library of Medicine’s newly redesigned Digital Collections homepage! Digital Collections is NLM’s free, online repository of biomedical resources including books, still images, videos, and maps. All the content in Digital Collections is freely available worldwide and, unless otherwise indicated, in the public domain. The new design includes simplified search and browse options, recently digitized items, a rotating banner of featured items from the Digital Collections, information about each collection in Digital Collections, and links to related projects.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

All are webinars, unless noted. Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

Don’t do it alone! Starting, sustaining, and assessing partnership-driven health programming at your library, Kernel of Knowledge – December 4, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – The U.S Institute of Museum and Library Services recently “challenged museums and libraries to transform how they collaborate with their communities.” Sponsored by GMR, this webinar will focus on how pubic libraries answer this call to action by partnering with institutions, groups, and individuals in their communities to offer high-impact health programming. Based on research conducted as part of Let’s Move in Libraries, his ongoing blog series published by the ALA Public Programs Office on partnership-driven health programming, and as part of a new project focused on how libraries contribute to food justice, Dr. Noah Lenstra will provide on overview of strategies and tactics libraries use to start, sustain, and assess partnership-driven health programming.

Health and Nutrition Literacy: The Social Determinants of Health, Healing & Patient Safety – December 4, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Healthy People 2020 recognizes that, “Health starts in our homes, schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, and communities.” We know that taking care of ourselves by eating well and staying active, avoiding smoking & nicotine, getting immunizations and screening tests, adequate sleep and having access to healthcare when we are sick all influence our health. These factors are called the Social Determinants of Health and play out in our overall health and wellness. The ability to understand these factors and how they interact with, “the resources and supports available in our homes, neighborhoods, and communities; the quality of our schooling; the safety of our workplaces; the cleanliness and quality of our water, food, and air; and the nature of our social interactions and relationships” plays a key role in our health healing & ultimately reflects in our recovery response to healthcare services. Sponsored by SCR, this presentation will not only explain these intersections of life, health literacy and society but also offer community-based and programmatic solutions.

Health Issues in the Headlines: Learning to Read Between the Lines – December 4, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Dark chocolate, red wine, and stem cells – what do these have in common? All have been reported in the news as having health benefits. Often the first place your patrons will hear about health issues is in the media. This interactive, hands-on course with GMR will introduce participants to the environment of health reporting. Participants will learn about how health is reported in the news as well as how to evaluate the accuracy and validity of science and health stories. The impact of celebrity illness will also be discussed. By the end of this course, participants will be better equipped to help their patrons look more critically at health issues that are being reported in the news media. Actual news articles and research reports will be included for critique.

Wikidata, Librarians and Research Data Management -December 7, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join PNR for the next segment in the NNLM Research Data Management (RDM) series, a collaborative, bimonthly offering intended to increase awareness of RDM topics and resources. This session will host Wikidata expert and librarian Katie Mika, who will introduce the WikiCite initiative to build a database of open citations to support free and computational access to bibliographic metadata and will identify simple, high impact ways for to get involved. As experts in the intersection of bibliographic metadata, information discovery, and interdisciplinary research, librarians are a tremendous resource for this community.

From the Mountains to the Sea: Rural Health Issues and Resources – December 11, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from higher incidence of chronic illness, they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. Sponsored by NER, this session will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify other access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities.

Cultural Competence and Its Effect on Healthcare: Notes from the Field – December 12, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – As a health care provider, it is important to know your community and the culture of the community. How you respond to certain situations can impact the health of the community. While cultural competence is important within underserved communities, it is also important in providing care to mainstream communities as well. Join SCR for this webinar that will discuss the terms cultural competence and cultural humility and the implications of these terms. This session will also discuss how a person becomes culturally competent and the biggest indicator of cultural competence.

How to Bring Extensions to Your Library: Highlighting Programs from Penn State Extension – December 12, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Extension offices are trusted partners for libraries of all kinds! They are strong community resources, and in addition to providing practical, trusted information to communities, can offer incredible educational opportunities for libraries. Join MAR for this webinar to hear how Penn State Extension partners with libraries in Pennsylvania by offering programs like Dining with Diabetes, and Penn State Nutrition Links. Learn about these programs, and how programs like these could benefit your patrons.

Health News Review: Critically Analyzing Information in the News – December 13, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – The public is exposed to a tsunami of health information in the news on a daily basis, including much information which is contradictory or misleading. Sponsored by GMR, this session will introduce attendees to HealthNewsReview.org, an award winning resource designed to help the public critically analyze claims about health care interventions in the news. HealthNewsReview.org provides an objective, independent analysis of health care journalism, advertising, marketing, and public relations and provides criteria that consumers can use to evaluate these messages themselves.

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community (Emergency Preparedness) – December 13, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by NER, this session will provide an overview of ideas to conduct health outreach and create health programs for libraries and community/faith based organizations. Participants will learn how to integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies to introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways. The sample topic for this session is Emergency Preparedness to offer libraries and other organizations ideas for emergency preparedness programming for individuals, families and organizations.

Other Items of Interest

Job posting: Emerging Technologies Specialist, NIH Library, Bethesda, MD

Join NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator Veronica Milliner as one of the panelists for the ALSC webinar: Leadership in Youth Services Part 2: Leadership in Action on December 11 at 2pm EST. Working with children in a library setting provides vast opportunities to create and hone leadership skills if you know where to find them. By cultivating these skills in yourselves and others, you will elevate your profession and your community by creating and implementing beneficial programs and services. This webinar will provide you with the tools you need to recognize these skills within yourself and within your role in the children’s department. This is a free webinar, preregistration is highly suggested.

Enrollment is still open for the 2019 Marketplace health plan. Sign up by December 15 for coverage starting January 1.

Your Family’s Health Is Your Health – The Office on Women’s Health Blog

Finding Data to Index: Data found in Supporting Information files – Data Catalog Collaboration Blog

Check out the ICIJ International Medical Devices Database. Compiled by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and 58 media partners in 36 countries, this publicly available, free research tool contains information on more than 70,000 Recalls, Safety Alerts and Field Safety Notices about medical devices distributed worldwide. this database was created in response to The Implant Files, an investigation by more than 250 journalists in 36 countries that tracks the global harm caused by medical devices that have been tested inadequately or not at all.

NACCHO Model Practices Awards Program – The National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO) is now accepting applications for the 2018–2019 Model Practices Program. The program honors and recognizes outstanding local health initiatives from across the nation, and shares and promotes these practices among local health departments through the Model Practice Database. The deadline for submission is December 12, 2018.

Funding Opportunity from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: The Health Data for Action: Leveraging Health Data for Actionable Insights (Data Access Award) (HD4A) program will support innovative research that uses the available data to answer important research questions. Applicants under this Call for Proposals (CFP) will write a proposal for a research study using data from one of the following four data providers: the Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI), OptumLabs, CareJourney, or athenahealth. The proposed studies should enable relevant, innovative, and actionable research that uses the available data to answer important, policy-relevant questions. Successful applicants will receive access to these data, which are described in greater detail in the CFP. The deadline to apply is December 14, 2018.

The Center for Global Health Studies (CGHS) at the Fogarty International Center at NIH is collecting case examples of health research in humanitarian crises, focusing on specific challenges and strategies for this type of research. Full details are available in the call for cases. This is a part of a broader project on Advancing Health Research in Humanitarian Crises and was also described in a recent blog post associated with Humanitarian Evidence Week and Evidence Aid. The call for case examples is written broadly, to include examples of health research conducted in armed conflict, forced displacement, natural disasters, and major disease outbreaks, in low, middle, and high-income country settings. The deadline for submission is January 21, 2019.

Environmental Justice Small Grants Program – Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Environmental Justice (EJ) Small Grants Program provides grants to support community-driven projects designed to engage, educate, and empower communities to better understand local environmental and public health issues and develop strategies for addressing those issues, building consensus in the community, and setting community priorities. The deadline to apply is February 15, 2019.

Urban Library Journal (ULJ) invites submissions for articles in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library. See the full author guidelines and ULJ’s latest issue to learn more about this opportunity.

Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Communities – WebJunction

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

Marketing Your Interlibrary Loan Service -webinar

PNR News - Wed, 2018-11-28 04:14

Our next PNR Rendezvous webinar is:

The Essentials of Marketing Your Interlibrary Loan Service

Marketing a new library service is expected. Marketing a service that no one is using is expected. But what about interlibrary loan, which is an existing service that, statistically, patrons are already using? Should a library waste money, resources, and staff time to market interlibrary loan? Yes! Marketing interlibrary loan can teach patrons how to use the service more effectively and can introduce new users to the service. But currently, there is very little literature on the subject. Marketing other library services is written about frequently but ILL, not so much. It becomes hard to know how to approach marketing ILL when there is not a lot of precedent for it. So how do you begin your own interlibrary loan marketing campaign? In this presentation you will learn what marketing really is, about libraries that have successfully marketed interlibrary loan, and lessons learned from those marketing endeavors.

It’s best to attend the live session but it will be recorded. Bring your questions and ideas.

Presenter: Adebola Fabiku, Head of Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery Services at the University of Washington

When: Wednesday, December 5 at 1:00pm PT, Noon Alaska, 2:00pm MT

How to join the webinar: Registration is encouraged but not required.

Go to current PNR Rendezvous session
Enter your name and email address.
Enter the session password: pacific
Click “Join Now”.
Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM MeSH Translation Management System to Retire on December 31

PSR News - Tue, 2018-11-27 19:14

The MeSH Translation Management System (MTMS), a service that allowed authorized groups to create a non-English translation of the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) Vocabulary, will be discontinued on December 14, 2018, and fully retired on December 31. The MTMS is based on legacy software that will not be updated and access mechanisms that no longer meet currently required standards. The MTMS will be retained through December 2018 to allow current translators the ability to create a translated version of the 2019 MeSH Vocabulary.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Upcoming Training Opportunities: December 2018

MAR News - Tue, 2018-11-27 14:41

Looking for professional development opportunities? The National Network of Libraries of Medicine offers a variety of online classes to learn about new resources and programs, and develop your professional skills. All of our classes are free, and many are eligible for continuing education credit from the Medical Library Association. Even if you will not be able to attend a live webinar, you can still register to receive a notification when the recording is available on the NNLM YouTube Channel. Check out some of our December 2018 offerings and register today!

Don’t do it alone! Starting, sustaining, and assessing partnership-driven health programming at your library, Kernel of Knowledge – December 4, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – The U.S Institute of Museum and Library Services recently “challenged museums and libraries to transform how they collaborate with their communities.” Sponsored by GMR, this webinar will focus on how pubic libraries answer this call to action by partnering with institutions, groups, and individuals in their communities to offer high-impact health programming. Based on research conducted as part of Let’s Move in Libraries, his ongoing blog series published by the ALA Public Programs Office on partnership-driven health programming, and as part of a new project focused on how libraries contribute to food justice, Dr. Noah Lenstra will provide on overview of strategies and tactics libraries use to start, sustain, and assess partnership-driven health programming.

Health and Nutrition Literacy: The Social Determinants of Health, Healing & Patient Safety – December 4, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Healthy People 2020 recognizes that, “Health starts in our homes, schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, and communities.” We know that taking care of ourselves by eating well and staying active, avoiding smoking & nicotine, getting immunizations and screening tests, adequate sleep and having access to healthcare when we are sick all influence our health. These factors are called the Social Determinants of Health and play out in our overall health and wellness. The ability to understand these factors and how they interact with, “the resources and supports available in our homes, neighborhoods, and communities; the quality of our schooling; the safety of our workplaces; the cleanliness and quality of our water, food, and air; and the nature of our social interactions and relationships” plays a key role in our health healing & ultimately reflects in our recovery response to healthcare services. Sponsored by SCR, this presentation will not only explain these intersections of life, health literacy and society but also offer community-based and programmatic solutions.

Health Issues in the Headlines: Learning to Read Between the Lines – December 4, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Dark chocolate, red wine, and stem cells – what do these have in common? All have been reported in the news as having health benefits. Often the first place your patrons will hear about health issues is in the media. This interactive, hands-on course with GMR will introduce participants to the environment of health reporting. Participants will learn about how health is reported in the news as well as how to evaluate the accuracy and validity of science and health stories. The impact of celebrity illness will also be discussed. By the end of this course, participants will be better equipped to help their patrons look more critically at health issues that are being reported in the news media. Actual news articles and research reports will be included for critique.

The Essentials of Marketing Your Interlibrary Loan Service – December 5, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Marketing a new library service is expected. Marketing a service that no one is using is expected. But what about interlibrary loan, which is an existing service that, statistically, patrons are already using? Should a library waste money, resources, and staff time to market interlibrary loan? Yes! Marketing interlibrary loan can teach patrons how to use the service more effectively and can introduce new users to the service. So how do you begin your own interlibrary loan marketing campaign? Join PNR for this presentation where you will learn what marketing really is, about libraries that have successfully marketed interlibrary loan, and lessons learned from those marketing endeavors.

Wikidata, Librarians and Research Data Management -December 7, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Join PNR for the next segment in the NNLM Research Data Management (RDM) series, a collaborative, bimonthly offering intended to increase awareness of RDM topics and resources. This session will host Wikidata expert and librarian Katie Mika, who will introduce the WikiCite initiative to build a database of open citations to support free and computational access to bibliographic metadata and will identify simple, high impact ways for to get involved. As experts in the intersection of bibliographic metadata, information discovery, and interdisciplinary research, librarians are a tremendous resource for this community.

From the Mountains to the Sea: Rural Health Issues and Resources – December 11, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from higher incidence of chronic illness, they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. Sponsored by NER, this session will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify other access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities.

Cultural Competence and Its Effect on Healthcare: Notes from the Field – December 12, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – As a health care provider, it is important to know your community and the culture of the community. How you respond to certain situations can impact the health of the community. While cultural competence is important within underserved communities, it is also important in providing care to mainstream communities as well. Join SCR for this webinar that will discuss the terms cultural competence and cultural humility and the implications of these terms. This session will also discuss how a person becomes culturally competent and the biggest indicator of cultural competence.

How to Bring Extensions to Your Library: Highlighting Programs from Penn State Extension – December 12, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Extension offices are trusted partners for libraries of all kinds! They are strong community resources, and in addition to providing practical, trusted information to communities, can offer incredible educational opportunities for libraries. Join MAR for this webinar to hear how Penn State Extension partners with libraries in Pennsylvania by offering programs like Dining with Diabetes, and Penn State Nutrition Links. Learn about these programs, and how programs like these could benefit your patrons.

Health News Review: Critically Analyzing Information in the News – December 13, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – The public is exposed to a tsunami of health information in the news on a daily basis, including much information which is contradictory or misleading. Sponsored by GMR, this session will introduce attendees to HealthNewsReview.org, an award winning resource designed to help the public critically analyze claims about health care interventions in the news. HealthNewsReview.org provides an objective, independent analysis of health care journalism, advertising, marketing, and public relations and provides criteria that consumers can use to evaluate these messages themselves.

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community (Emergency Preparedness) – December 13, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by NER, this session will provide an overview of ideas to conduct health outreach and create health programs for libraries and community/faith based organizations. Participants will learn how to integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies to introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways. The sample topic for this session is Emergency Preparedness to offer libraries and other organizations ideas for emergency preparedness programming for individuals, families and organizations.

Looking for even more upcoming webinars, or opportunities for asynchronous learning? Browse our training schedule to see on-demand classes and scheduled offerings for 2019.

Categories: RML Blogs

This Saturday (12/1) is World AIDS Day 2018

SCR News - Tue, 2018-11-27 04:00

HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, harms the immune system by destroying the white blood cells that fight infections. It’s most often spread through unprotected sex, but it is also spread through sharing needles or coming into contact with blood of an infected person.

While annual HIV infections and diagnoses are declining, progress has been uneven, and in some populations, increasing according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). World AIDS Day is observed to unite people worldwide in the fight against AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency virus – the final stage of HIV infection), show support for those living with HIV, and remember people who have died from an AIDS-related illness. It is the first ever global health day.

In the South Central Region, at least one of our states as a particular high rate of HIV diagnoses per 100,000 people according to a 2016 CDC report:

  • Arkansas – 12.7
  • Louisiana – 29.7
  • New Mexico – 7.2
  • Oklahoma – 9.1
  • Texas – 19.8

While there is no cure, there are many medicines that can fight infection. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is given to those at a very high risk for HIV. It can reduce risk from sex by more than 90% and risk from needs by over 70%.

Learn more about going to the World AIDS Day website or the CDC World AIDS Day page.

Categories: RML Blogs

Library Carpentry – Scholarship Recipient Post 2

NER News - Mon, 2018-11-26 16:15

This is the second blog post in a series authored by 7 individuals who received scholarships from the New England Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM NER) to attend the Library Carpentry Training held at Brown University on October 22nd and October 23, 2018. In this installment, a scholarship recipient describes  the tools introduced in the Library Carpentry Training.  Please watch for more posts about resources from this event and views from scholarship recipients in the upcoming weeks.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Library Carpentry–A Useful and Fun Conference Opportunity

By Irene McGarrity, MA, MSIS, MFA

 

The range of professional development opportunities available to academic librarians can be overwhelming, particularly in this digital age, full of webinars, MOOCs, and List Servs.  We have limited budgets, and even those of us who are lucky enough to receive professional development funds have to make tough choices.  One national conference per year–ACRL or ALA, usually–is all it takes to wipe out our funds.

 

When I saw the announcement about Library Carpentry, I was intrigued.  First, the concept of developing skills around software and coding piqued my interest.  I began to build these skills in my MSIS program, but hadn’t done anything beyond surface-level HTML coding and basic command line programming.  I was excited to go a little deeper.  Also, the announcement specifically mentioned finding ways of being more efficient, and automating repetitive boring tasks.  I really value conferences and professional development opportunities that offer concrete takeaways, and things I can implement right away once I get back to work.  This sounded like that kind of opportunity.

 

The conference itself was exactly as I hoped it would be.  The facilitators were all friendly and competent.  They also seemed passionate about what they were teaching.  Each skill or tool had an accompanying lesson, like this one on OpenRefine.  It was great to be able to follow along with the facilitator and now, when I actually use these tools, I have these amazing resources to refer back to.

 

When I returned to work after the conference, I immediately began using the tools and skills presented in the workshop.  I am excited to continue learning more, so I’ll be keeping my eyes out for another Library Carpentry workshop, perhaps a level two for those of us looking to go a step further.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more about Library Carpentry or other upcoming events, please visit the NNLM NER website, or contact anyone in the NNLM NER office.

Categories: RML Blogs

Pages