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RML Blogs

February Citizen Science Event

PSR Newsletter - Fri, 2021-02-12 17:54

SciStarter has teamed up with the Network of the National Library of Medicine and the All of Us Research Program to host a webinar series in January, February, and March, called “Lend Citizen Science Project Scientists a Hand. Then, Discuss the Results!” This series is highlighting a different citizen science project each month, showing you how to get involved in the project, and creating a space for you to share your experiences and questions with the project scientists! February’s featured project is Eterna.

Eterna is an online puzzle game citizen scientists can play to help project scientists understand complex RNA molecules and develop new medical treatments for global diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, or even COVID-19. Players design and solve puzzles, and can compete in challenges specifically created to solve some of science’s most pressing questions. Puzzle solutions that receive the most votes in the game are actually built and tested in labs at Stanford, so that scientists can learn more about how RNA molecules work.

Eterna RNA molecule model

Since the game’s launch in 2011, Stanford has built and tested thousands of molecules designed by players. Additionally, 25 scientific papers on RNA structure and design have been published using data from Eterna, some of which citizen scientist Eterna players helped to write! Not only did Eterna help forge this revolutionary new role for non-experts in science, it also represented the very first use of the massive open laboratory’ model in a published biology paper. This model of experimental design and data collection, characterized by a huge number of people coming together to analyze science experiments, is an exciting possibility that could be used widely in the future to help strengthen the integrity of the scientific method. Beyond paving the way for new experimental methods, Eterna players have helped bioengineers learn new rules for RNA structure design, so that they can create increasingly accurate machine learning algorithms that perform well in experiments. Eterna’s gamers can help fight disease too. The OpenTB Challenge launched in 2018 recruited players to design a molecule that could be used to create a cost-effective diagnostic test for tuberculosis. More recently, Eterna has challenged players with an “Eterna-Corona Puzzle of the Day,” with the goal of better understanding the RNA biology of coronaviruses, RNA-based tests and treatments, and mRNA vaccines. Eterna is currently being used to help develop a refrigerator-stable COVID-19 vaccine that could be used all around the world.

The successes of crowdsourcing scientific data through Eterna’s massive open laboratory model really jibe with the All of Us program’s vision of diversity in research. People of all backgrounds should be involved in research so we can find solutions that work well for everyone around the world. Furthermore, the more minds we have working on important scientific questions, the faster we’ll be able to find the answers the world needs. Eterna’s developers are dedicated to making the game increasingly accessible to all kinds of people. Groundbreaking ideas can come from anyone, anywhere!

Join the Eterna webinar event live on Thursday, February 18 at 2:00 pm PST. For more information visit the event page at SciStarter.

 

Post by NNLM PSR intern Elisa Borgsdorf, edited by Amy Reyes

The post February Citizen Science Event first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – February 12, 2021

SEA News - Fri, 2021-02-12 13:07

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars February 16 – February 23

Webinars February 23 – March 2

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – February 12, 2021 first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2021-02-12 07:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://covid19.nih.gov/

Gaming to Advance Medical Research: As part of continued programming with the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program, SciStarter is hosting an event series to help you get started in one of three citizen science projects that advance real world research. Then, share your experiences with the scientists you helped and ask them anything! February’s featured project is Eterna, which allows you to help scientists develop RNA-based medicines by solving puzzles. Tune in on February 18 at 6 PM to discuss the project’s goals and tasks with the Project Scientist. Registration is now open.

Health Career Exploration: NNLM MAR recently funded the Catskill Hudson Area Health Education Center (AHEC) in New York State to develop virtual K-8 programs designed to help students gain valuable insights about health-related topics by introducing them to health screenings, health professions, healthcare terminology, health procedures, and healthcare settings, all while having fun! This web-based program, entitled Health Career Exploration K-8 is a series of short, sub-curriculum activities comprised of 12 age-appropriate videos and PowerPoint presentations that are free for public viewing on Catskill Hudson AHEC’s website. Health Career Exploration K-8 is designed as extracurricular activities that can be used in the classroom, in a virtual learning setting, group activity, and/or for individual student use. (Note: Support for this program was provided by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH) under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012342 with the University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Library System. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.)

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

Translating Health Information Materials for Healthier Communities – MCR News

NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network Member Survey – SEA Currents

Love Data Week 2021: Spotlight on “Open”– 23 Things About Open Data – SEA Currents

Common Questions and Answers About the COVID-19 Vaccines – MCR News

Happy National Handwriting Day 2021! – NER Update

Proposals for the NNLM COVID-19 Infodemic Symposium: NNLM invites proposals for a virtual symposium: Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic, on April 8th-9th, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority, and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities, and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19. The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to engage with NNLM Network Members to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic, and efforts to combat it. You can find more details here and submit an application here. The deadline to submit is February 26 at 11:59 PM ET.

NLM/NIH News

Progress Towards a Modernized ClinicalTrials.govNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Mapping Which Coronavirus Variants Will Resist Antibody TreatmentsNIH Director’s Blog

The Young at HeartCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Making a World of Difference: Stories About Global HealthCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue shares details about the new MEDLINE website and policy updates.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

February 2021

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation – February 12, 12:00-1:00 PM ET

Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles – February 15-March 26

Effective Health Communication and Health Literacy: Understanding the Connection – February 16, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Serving Library Users with Mental Illness: A Crash Course on Controlling Clashes – February 17, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

ClinicalTrials.gov Modernization Webinar – February 18, 3:00 PM ET

Getting Started with Creating RNA-based Medicines by Solving Puzzles – February 18, 6:00 PM ET

Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information – February 22-March 22

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community – February 23, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Ethics and Bias Mitigation – February 23, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

NLM’s History of Medicine Division: A Research Collection of Rare Medical Materials – February 24, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizen Scientists – February 25. 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Ask Questions About Creating RNA-based Medicines by Solving Puzzles – February 25, 6:00 PM ET

March 2021

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – March 1-26

Understanding Vaccine Hesitancy and Social Media’s Role in Spreading Vaccine Misinformation – March 1, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Digital Partnership: Academic Health Science Libraries as Partners in the Future of Telehealth – March 2, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – March 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

2021 National Nursing Research Roundtable – March 4-5

How PubMed® Works: Introduction – March 4, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Learning from American Indian and Alaska Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic – March 10, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: Selection – March 11, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman – March 11, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Wikipedia + Libraries: NNLM – March 15-April 9

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library – March 16, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Improve Mental Health and Dementia Research By Playing Games on Your Phone – March 18, 11:00 AM ET

How PubMed® Works: MeSH – March 18, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: ATM – March 25, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Introduction to Evaluating Public Datasets using FAIR Data Principles – February 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Black Mental Health: A Time During COVID-19 and Civil Uprising – February 18, 6:30-7:30 PM ET – Sponsored by The University of Chicago Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice and the African American Alumni Committee

Thinking in 3D: An Introduction to Medical Imaging and 3D-printing – March 4 & 11, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

2021 Virtual Forum for Migrant and Community Health – March 22-26, 2021 – Sponsored by the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH), North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA), and Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA)

SOPHE 2021dX Annual Conference – April 6-9, 2021 – Sponsored by SOPHE

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

Taking Science to the Streets: Community Science and Participatory Approaches to Improve Environment, Health, and Quality of Life in Urban Areas

SEA News - Thu, 2021-02-11 10:49

Please join NNLM SEA for the webinar, Taking Science to the Streets: Community Science and Participatory Approaches to Improve Environment, Health, and Quality of Life in Urban Areas. 

Date & Time: March 3, 2021, 1:00PM EST

Description: Environmental justice communities are those which are disproportionately affected by and exposed to multiple environmental, socioeconomic and cultural stressors that may heighten their health risks in comparison to other communities. The availability of fine-grained, community-level data is limited to support appeals from these communities for public health practice, planning, and policy changes.

This presentation will describe local community-driven research, advocacy, and public health practice in an environmentally degraded urban community, Northwest Atlanta’s Proctor Creek Watershed. Community residents (watershed researchers), academics, and non-profit organizations leverage local, community knowledge; community science methods; and participatory approaches to identify, document, and analyze the impacts of local environmental hazards and quality of life stressors.

This highly collaborative and interdisciplinary work has helped to improve municipal services and community-municipality collaboration. It has also demonstrated that the democratization of science can help fill critical data gaps about local conditions and pollution sources, advance environmental justice, and impact changes in the implementation of urban policies and practice that influence community health.

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Define community science
  • Apply a conceptual framework for urban health to urban environmental health challenges
  • Identify a range of community engaged and participatory research approaches; and
  • Articulate how these approaches can be used to improve environmental quality, health, and community engagement in research and public health practice.

About the Speaker: Dr. Na’Taki Osborne Jelks is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental and Health Sciences Program at Spelman College in Atlanta, GA.  Dr. Jelks investigates urban environmental health disparities; the role that place, race, and social factors play in influencing health; cumulative risk assessment; the impact of climate change on vulnerable populations, and the connection between urban watersheds, pollution, the built environment, and health.  She also develops, implements, and evaluates community-based initiatives that set the conditions that are conducive for low-income and communities of color to empower themselves to reduce exposure to environmental health hazards and improve health and quality of life. Dr. Jelks is particularly interested in approaches that engage vulnerable communities in community-driven citizen science/community science activities to monitor local environmental conditions, reduce existence of and exposure to environmental hazards, and develop effective community-based interventions that revitalize toxic, degraded spaces into healthy places.

Registration: You may register in advance for this webinar at https://umaryland.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0GPEJgImQ6ynGzcH4vXwtw

For questions, please contact April Wright at adwright@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

The post Taking Science to the Streets: Community Science and Participatory Approaches to Improve Environment, Health, and Quality of Life in Urban Areas first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Call for Proposals to Present at the NNLM COVID-19 Infodemic Symposium April 8-9, 2021

MCR News - Wed, 2021-02-10 19:18

Call for proposals graphic

The Network of the National Library of Medicine invites proposals for a virtual symposium: Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic, on April 8th-9th, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority, and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities, and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19. The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to engage with NNLM Network Members to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic, and efforts to combat it. Symposium attendees can expect to come away from this experience with a better understanding of COVID-19 and share strategies and programs to engage with your community.

After attending the symposium, participants will be able to:

  • Identify key issues that impact medically underserved populations in accessing accurate health information related to COVID-19 and vaccines, including health literacy and medical mistrust.
  • Learn strategies, outcomes, and lessons learned from presenters to adapt and apply within own communities
  • Design an outreach and education program to specific served populations

We are currently seeking proposals for presentations and panel discussions related to COVID-19 misinformation and disinformation, including, but not limited to:

  • Health Equity across a variety of demographic factors (race, gender, geography, socioeconomic status, etc.)
  • Vaccination
  • Emergency preparedness and response
  • Public health
  • Communication
  • Community outreach and programming
  • Education

Presentation Formats:

  • 15 minute Paper/Oral Presentations: You will have 10 minutes to present and have 5 minutes for questions.
  • 1 hour Panel discussions: You will be grouped with other panelists to respond to questions related to a similar topic

Proposals will be due by 11:59PM, February 26th, 2021. Decisions will be made and presenters/panelists will be notified of their acceptance by mid-March.

To submit, please fill out the following form by February 26th: https://umaryland.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_02Rij6t1NdjxxKm

For any questions, concerns or submission issues, please email Sarah Levin-Lederer (Sarah.LevinLederer AT umassmed.edu) and Sharon Han (shan4 AT library.ucla.edu). Thank you, and we look forward to your proposals!

The post Call for Proposals to Present at the NNLM COVID-19 Infodemic Symposium April 8-9, 2021 first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Translating Health Information Materials for Healthier Communities

MCR News - Wed, 2021-02-10 18:40

Kiara Comfort, Education and Outreach Coordinator, for Mid Continental Region in Nebraska worked with the Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition’s clinic to create a way to promote health literacy to its patients. We discussed the need to have materials available in multiple languages to serve its diverse community and what those materials may be. NUIHC provided materials that would be beneficial if translated to other languages for the clinic’s patients. The materials were translated into Arabic, Kurdish and Spanish. By offering these materials to the clinic’s patients they are able to proactively take charge of their health. 

NNLM provides materials in multiple languages. One resource is MedlinePlus, a consumer health information tool that allows users to find reliable health information. MedlinePlus covers a wide range of topics that are available in over 50 languages. The website and its magazine NIH MedlinePlus Magazine are available in Spanish and English. 

To learn more about how your Regional Medical Library can partner with your organization visit https://nnlm.gov/. 

The post Translating Health Information Materials for Healthier Communities first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network Member Survey

SEA News - Wed, 2021-02-10 15:28

The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is inviting members to complete a survey about the All of Us Community Engagement Network (CEN). The purpose of the survey is to learn about your experiences participating in the CEN and how we can improve our services to support your organization to be a trusted health resource in your community.

The survey will take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Completing the survey is voluntary.

Participants will be eligible to enter a random drawing for one of ten $25 Target gift cards. Only one person from each NNLM member organization is eligible to win a gift card.

Select here to access the survey: NNLM CEN Survey

Or, copy and paste the following URL: https://nnlm.gov/ZbW

Please respond to the survey by February 26, 2021.

If you have any questions about the survey, please contact Asih Asikin-Garmager at asih-asikin@uiowa.edu.

The post NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network Member Survey first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Love Data Week 2021: Spotlight on “Open”– 23 Things About Open Data

NER News - Tue, 2021-02-09 15:42

This year, the NNLM is celebrating Love Data Week with a speaker series and panel discussion with four data practitioners. If you’d like to dive a little deeper into the world of open data, these 23 Things are a starting point for learning more.

1. Learn the “why, what, and how” of open data with the Open Data Handbook.

2. Browse a list of hundreds of different data file formats and then learn the best ones to use for open, accessible data.

3. Learn about data sharing and publishing with NNLM’s Research Data Management On-Demand module.

4. Catch up on the NNLM Research Data Management webinar series with our YouTube playlist.

5. Access and learn about the New York Times’s COVID-19 data.

6. Search for local government datasets on data.gov.

7. Explore the Google Dataset Search.

8. Explore health-related open datasets made available through Kaggle, including the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset Challenge (CORD-19) medical literature text-mining dataset.

9. Filter, visualize and export datasets from National Library of Medicine resources from Data Discovery at NLM.

10. Compare the open data efforts of 30 different national governments with the Open Data Barometer, a report from the World Wide Web foundation.

11. Visualize “the issues that will shape the future of New York City” with this interactive civic data exhibit.

12. See how All In: Data for Community Health is working to improve community health outcomes through data-sharing partnerships to identify needs and inform policy.

13. Check out the Civic Switchboard project to see how library workers can get involved in civic data initiatives.

14. Analyze Census data in Microsoft Excel with a tutorial from Census Academy.

15. Make a map using QGIS – a free GIS (Geographic Information System) program – with step-by-step exercises from the Community Health Maps program.

16. Build data analysis, visualization, and programming skills with the self-guided lessons from The Carpentries. Start with Library Carpentry for lessons tailored specifically for librarians.

17. Foster a “data culture” within your organization with engaging learning activities from the Data Culture Project.

18. Build community data literacy with Data 101 workshop toolkit from the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center, and attend our Tuesday, Feb 9th “coffee chat” to hear more from WPRDC project director Bob Gradeck.

19. Make research data and code more findable with these 10 quick tips and come to the Monday, Feb 8th “coffee chat” to hear more from article co-author Ibraheem Ali, PhD.

20. Support open, equitable, and inclusive scholarly communications with this guide from the Association of College and Research Libraries and come to the Wednesday, Feb 10th “coffee chat” to hear more from co-author Yasmeen Shorish.

21. Learn about common data elements for clinical data collection and management with this presentation from the National Library of Medicine, and then learn how to use the NIH Common Data Element (CDE) repository.

22. Familiarize yourself with upcoming expansions to NIH policies on data management and data sharing for NIH-funded researchers.

23. Join the conversation: get involved with a community of data practitioners through the Research Data Access and Preservation (RDAP) Association or learn about the work of the Academic Data Science Alliance.

The post Love Data Week 2021: Spotlight on “Open”– 23 Things About Open Data first appeared on NER Update.
Categories: RML Blogs

Strengthen Your Heart Health Knowledge with the NNLM Reading Club

SEA News - Tue, 2021-02-09 15:05

The reason we have cancer and heart disease is the same reason you can’t get rid of the wear and tear on your tires on your car: as soon as you use them, you are wearing them away. You can’t make eternal tires, and it’s the same with the human body.

– S. Jay Olshansky, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions.

NNLM Reading Club February Selections

When the Words Suddenly Stopped by Vivian L. King | Being Empowered for a Health Heart by Dr. Phoebe Chi | Restart Your Heart by Dr. Aseem Desai

 

In Being Empowered for a Healthy Heart: A Personal Guide to Taking Control of Your Health While Living with Chronic Conditions, Dr. Phoebe Chi seeks to empower those with chronic diseases of all types, including heart disease and high blood pressure, in the self-management of their conditions. The internal medicine and public health physician does so with practical exercises and tools in each chapter to address symptoms, even throwing some poetry into the mix.

Restart Your Heart: The Playbook for Thriving with AFib by cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. Aseem Desai clears up some of the confusion surrounding atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can interfere with blood flow. In addition to providing knowledge about AFib, Desai discusses how to deal with the diagnosis from a mental and emotional perspective.

Finally, in When the Words Suddenly Stopped, former television broadcast journalist Vivian King describes her experience recovering from a stroke that took away her voice, sharing how determination bolstered by a reliance on faith, family and friends allowed her to recover.

Strengthening your heart knowledge can help strengthen your heart. We hope these books will provide you an opportunity to do both. Visit the NNLM Reading Club for discussion guides to these titles and other useful information.

The post Strengthen Your Heart Health Knowledge with the NNLM Reading Club first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: February 9, 2021

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-02-09 11:03

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th)
Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”…learn more about how to attend these data events on the blog 

Care for Your Heart with the NNLM Reading Club
Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions…read the post to see the selected books 

Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition
Guest Contributor Karen Yother, Community Library Network, Idaho
Anyone who has worked with teens will tell you that they are quite the unique audience. What is trendy one day is out of favor the next. They eagerly develop their own personalities and interests, continually seeking ways to express their ideas in a variety of formats. But today’s teens also are under an intense amount of pressure at home, at school, from friends, the community and – unlike their earlier counterparts — in the virtual world…read more about this NNLM funded teen project on the blog

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account 

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation: Join us for a 1-hour moderated panel discussion featuring the NNLM Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” sessions four guest speakers who will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more. February 12 from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Serving Library Users with Mental Illness: A Crash Course on Controlling Clashes: This webinar increases your understanding of mental illness, teaches effective methods of communicating with mentally-ill patrons who are creating a disturbance in the library, helps you protect staff and patrons in rare instances of possible violence, and shows you how to locate resources you can lean on when necessary. February 17 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library: This hands-on class will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will leave equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites. We will discuss creative ideas for health information outreach. March 1 – 26. (4 MLA CE) Register

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health: Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention.  The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour. March 3 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated. 

Going Black in Time: A Story of HIV: The University of Cincinnati’s Libraries is hosting a virtual workshop that will be held on February 10th, from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PT. Going Black in Time: A Story of HIV will present the timeline of the HIV epidemic and its impact on African Americans. The workshop will discuss heroes, advocates, and how prevention methods can alter the future of African Americans for the better. Learn more and register

You Are Your Own Best Heart Health Advocate: Women and Heart Disease: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences’ Women’s Health Awareness Virtual Series “RealTalk With the Experts”, this session addresses early warning signs of heart disease and prevention of heart disease in women. Thursday, February 11 from 3:30 – 4:45 p.m. PT. Registration deadline is February 10 

*COVID-19 Vaccination Policies: What to consider? (Indiana State Library): Are you wondering what to consider in forming your library’s policy on COVID-19 vaccinations? This webinar addresses the legality of mandatory vaccine policies during a pandemic and examines the pros and cons of such policies to help you determine which type of COVID-19 vaccine policy to propose to your board. February 18 at 7:00 a.m. PT. Check the calendar for a link to register

*Black Mental Health: A Time During COVID-19 and Civil Uprising: The COVID-19 virus has disrupted the world at an unprecedented scale. And over the past several months, Black Americans have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19 compared with their white counterparts. This has only been compounded by widespread civil uprising in protest of racial discrimination and police brutality. In these times, the African American Alumni Committee seeks to highlight the impact that these events have on the mental health of affected individuals, and to discuss and explore ways of coping and recovery. February 18 at 3:30 p.m. PT. Deadline to register is February 16

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

*“A Journey to Spur Innovation and Discovery”, from the NLM Director’s blog

Air Pollution is a Human Problem: Mary Catterall’s Campaign for a Livable Leeds

NLM Launches a New Online Exhibition – Making a World of Difference: Stories About Global Health

*“Mapping Which Coronavirus Variants Will Resist Antibody Treatments”, from the NIH Director’s blog

Show your heart a little love this American Heart month with self-care

Computerized adaptive screener may help identify youth at risk for suicide

NIH networks to advance emotional well-being research

Rare Disease Day at NIH, virtual conference March 1

*One Health: a holistic approach to improving the health of people, animals and the environment

Summary Now Available – “Genomic Response to the Social Environment: Implications for Health Outcomes”

* NIH launches database to track neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19

Research Highlight: NIH Initiative Expands Access to Resources for Early Psychosis Treatment and Research

FYI:

*Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) invites proposals for a virtual symposium
Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic, on April 8th-9th, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority, and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities, and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19. The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to engage with NNLM Network Members to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic, and efforts to combat it. Learn more and submit an application. The deadline to submit is February 26 at 8:59 p.m. PT.

*COVID-19 Resources

  • The Black Coalition Against COVID-19 has a collection of recorded webinars and town halls that offer information on the COVID-19 vaccine and the African American community.
  • The National Medical Association has made its COVID-19 Webinar Series available online. The series covers the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on African American health professionals and the communities they serve, including a presentation on Climate Change and COVID-19.
  • Together Against COVID is a campaign from the Multicultural Health Foundation and Live Well San Diego that targets the African American community. The campaign provides facts, videos, information on COVID-19 vaccines and more.
  • The HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) has launched the COVID-19 Monoclonal Antibody Therapeutics Digital Toolkit. Monoclonal antibody therapeutic products may prevent eligible high-risk adults and children (ages 12-17) from requiring hospitalization. Use the ASPR toolkit to educate high-risk patients with mild to moderate symptoms and encourage them to take action.

February is Black History Month
This month HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is celebrating the achievements of African Americans and honoring the significant role and impact they have made on all facets of life and society throughout U.S. history. During this Black History Month, OMH will partner with fellow Offices of Minority Health at HHS and healthcare professionals around the nation to focus on highlighting the impacts COVID-19 has on African Americans with underlining health issues such as uncontrolled hypertension. Visit the OMH website to learn more and download the Black History Month Toolkit

Cancer Facts and Figures for African Americans
February 4 is World Cancer Day. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), African Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival of any racial and ethnic group in the U.S. for most cancers. The ACS’s Cancer Facts and Figures for African Americans, 2019-2021 provides the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, survival, screening and risk factors. Learn More Download the Publication 

* Vaccine Hesitancy in Rural America
The COVID-19 pandemic’s impact has been felt in communities across the U.S., from the largest urban centers to the smallest rural communities. As previous research has demonstrated, rural communities face unique challenges in responding to the pandemic due to medical workforce shortages, fewer hospital beds per capita, limited access to telehealth, and populations that are at elevated risk for COVID-19 related deaths due to age or chronic disease prevalence. In addition, a previous KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation) analysis found non-metro counties experienced a faster growth rate in the spread of the virus and more recent data confirms that this is still the case. In late 2020, there were countless stories of the most rural communities being impacted by the coronavirus including remote Alaska villages and Texas ranches, and an analysis from Pew Research Center found that sparsely populated rural areas were accounting for twice the number of coronavirus-related deaths as urban areas…read more

Racism as a Public Health Crisis: Three Responses
The American Public Health Association (APHA) has declared, “Racism is an ongoing public health crisis that needs our attention now.” States, counties, and cities across the country are answering the call by declaring racism as a public health crisis or emergency, which is an important first step in the movement to advance racial equity and justice. We have collected stories from some of these communities to lift up why they took this bold step, and how they plan to hold themselves accountable to action. Read the responses of Minneapolis (city response), Milwaukee County, WI (county response), and Nevada (state response) in this County Health Rankings report.

*States Begin to Incorporate Children into their COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Plans
In a recent blog post, the National Academy for State Health Policy describes how states are beginning to incorporate children in their COVID-19 vaccine distribution plans in preparation for when a vaccine is authorized for children under age 16. The blog post was produced as part of HRSA’s cooperative agreement with National Organizations of State and Local Officials.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: February 9, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Love Data Week 2021: 23 Things About Open Data

SEA News - Mon, 2021-02-08 15:38

This year, the NNLM is celebrating Love Data Week with a speaker series and panel discussion with four data practitioners. If you’d like to dive a little deeper into the world of open data, these 23 Things are a starting point for learning more.

  1. Learn the “why, what, and how” of open data with the Open Data Handbook.
  2. Browse a list of hundreds of different data file formats and then learn the best ones to use for open, accessible data.
  3. Learn about data sharing and publishing with NNLM’s Research Data Management On-Demand module.
  4. Catch up on the NNLM Research Data Management webinar series with our YouTube playlist.
  5. Access and learn about the New York Times’s COVID-19 data.
  6. Search for local government datasets on data.gov.
  7. Explore the Google Dataset Search.
  8. Explore health-related open datasets made available through Kaggle, including the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset Challenge (CORD-19) medical literature text-mining dataset.
  9. Filter, visualize and export datasets from National Library of Medicine resources from Data Discovery at NLM.
  10. Compare the open data efforts of 30 different national governments with the Open Data Barometer, a report from the World Wide Web foundation.
  11. Visualize “the issues that will shape the future of New York City” with this interactive civic data exhibit.
  12. See how All In: Data for Community Health is working to improve community health outcomes through data-sharing partnerships to identify needs and inform policy.
  13. Check out the Civic Switchboard project to see how library workers can get involved in civic data initiatives.
  14. Analyze Census data in Microsoft Excel with a tutorial from Census Academy.
  15. Make a map using QGIS – a free GIS (Geographic Information System) program – with step-by-step exercises from the Community Health Maps program.
  16. Build data analysis, visualization, and programming skills with the self-guided lessons from The Carpentries. Start with Library Carpentry for lessons tailored specifically for librarians.
  17. Foster a “data culture” within your organization with engaging learning activities from the Data Culture Project.
  18. Build community data literacy with Data 101 workshop toolkit from the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center, and attend our Tuesday, Feb 9th “coffee chat” to hear more from WPRDC project director Bob Gradeck.
  19. Make research data and code more findable with these 10 quick tips and come to the Monday, Feb 8th “coffee chat” to hear more from article co-author Ibraheem Ali, PhD.
  20. Support open, equitable, and inclusive scholarly communications with this guide from the Association of College and Research Libraries and come to the Wednesday, Feb 10th “coffee chat” to hear more from co-author Yasmeen Shorish.
  21. Learn about common data elements for clinical data collection and management with this presentation from the National Library of Medicine, and then learn how to use the NIH Common Data Element (CDE) repository.
  22. Familiarize yourself with upcoming expansions to NIH policies on data management and data sharing for NIH-funded researchers.
  23. Join the conversation: get involved with a community of data practitioners through the Research Data Access and Preservation (RDAP) Association or learn about the work of the Academic Data Science Alliance.

Interested in downloading this list? Visit: https://nnlm.gov/Zbr

The post Love Data Week 2021: 23 Things About Open Data first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Common Questions and Answers About the COVID-19 Vaccines

MCR News - Mon, 2021-02-08 13:36

With the production and release of the COVID-19 vaccines, there have been many questions circulating from the public. What are the side effects?  Am I eligible to get vaccinated? Are there fees involved? And many more.

With these concerns, the State of Utah COVID-19 Response Team created a flyer to help answer these questions.

The flyer addresses the common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine, such as the side effects, eligibility, information privacy, accepted forms of identification, and cost. You can access the flyer here. The flyer will soon be available in multiple languages.

For more resources about COVID-19, visit coronavirus.utah.gov to access content and materials available in thirty different languages.

The post Common Questions and Answers About the COVID-19 Vaccines first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming NNLM Class Beginning February 15th: Big Data in Healthcare

SEA News - Mon, 2021-02-08 10:19

Description: This course will help health sciences librarians better understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area.

Dates: This class will be taught in Moodle February 15, 2021 – March 26, 2021.

Course Expectations: To complete this course for 6 hours of MLA contact hours, participants are expected to:

  • Spend approximately 1 hour completing the work within each module.
  • Commit to complete all activities and articulate your views within each module.
  • Complete course requirements by the deadline established in each module.
  • Provide course feedback on the Online Course Evaluation Form

Objectives: Students who successfully complete the course will:

  • Explain the role big data plays in clinical patient outcomes.
  • Explain current/potential roles in which librarians are supporting big data initiatives
  • Illustrate the fundamentals of big data from a systems perspective
  • Articulate their views/options on the role health sciences sector librarians is in supporting big data initiatives

This is a Medical Library Association approved course that will earn students 6 contact hours.

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/big-data-healthcare-exploring-emerging-roles/28994

The post Upcoming NNLM Class Beginning February 15th: Big Data in Healthcare first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Love Data Week: 23 Things About Open Data

PSR Newsletter - Sun, 2021-02-07 18:09

This year, the NNLM is celebrating Love Data Week with a speaker series and panel discussion with four data practitioners. If you’d like to dive a little deeper into the world of open data, these 23 Things are a starting point for learning more.

  1. Learn the “why, what, and how” of open data with the Open Data Handbook.
  2. Browse a list of hundreds of different data file formats and then learn the best ones to use for open, accessible data.
  3. Learn about data sharing and publishing with NNLM’s Research Data Management On-Demand module.
  4. Catch up on the NNLM Research Data Management webinar series with our YouTube playlist.
  5. Access and learn about the New York Times’s COVID-19 data.
  6. Search for local government datasets on data.gov.
  7. Explore the Google Dataset Search.
  8. Explore health-related open datasets made available through Kaggle, including the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset Challenge (CORD-19) medical literature text-mining dataset.
  9. Filter, visualize and export datasets from National Library of Medicine resources from Data Discovery at NLM.
  10. Compare the open data efforts of 30 different national governments with the Open Data Barometer, a report from the World Wide Web foundation.
  11. Visualize “the issues that will shape the future of New York City” with this interactive civic data exhibit.
  12. See how All In: Data for Community Health is working to improve community health outcomes through data-sharing partnerships to identify needs and inform policy.
  13. Check out the Civic Switchboard project to see how library workers can get involved in civic data initiatives.
  14. Analyze Census data in Microsoft Excel with a tutorial from Census Academy.
  15. Make a map using QGIS – a free GIS (Geographic Information System) program – with step-by-step exercises from the Community Health Maps program.
  16. Build data analysis, visualization, and programming skills with the self-guided lessons from The Carpentries. Start with Library Carpentry for lessons tailored specifically for librarians.
  17. Foster a “data culture” within your organization with engaging learning activities from the Data Culture Project.
  18. Build community data literacy with Data 101 workshop toolkit from the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center, and attend our Tuesday, Feb 9th “coffee chat” to hear more from WPRDC project director Bob Gradeck.
  19. Make research data and code more findable with these 10 quick tips and come to the Monday, Feb 8th “coffee chat” to hear more from article co-author Ibraheem Ali, PhD.
  20. Support open, equitable, and inclusive scholarly communications with this guide from the Association of College and Research Libraries and come to the Wednesday, Feb 10th “coffee chat” to hear more from co-author Yasmeen Shorish.
  21. Learn about common data elements for clinical data collection and management with this presentation from the National Library of Medicine, and then learn how to use the NIH Common Data Element (CDE) repository.
  22. Familiarize yourself with upcoming expansions to NIH policies on data management and data sharing for NIH-funded researchers.
  23. Join the conversation: get involved with a community of data practitioners through the Research Data Access and Preservation (RDAP) Association or learn about the work of the Academic Data Science Alliance.
The post Love Data Week: 23 Things About Open Data first appeared on Latitudes.
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Happy National Handwriting Day 2021!

NER News - Fri, 2021-02-05 11:50

 

Workbooks published by the Art Cart to Address Micrographia

The following blog post was written by Saba Shahid, CSO (Chief Smiling Officer) of The Art Cart (https://smilethroughart.com/).

In 2018, The Art Cart was awarded a Community Engagement grant from the New England Region. The grant enabled The Art Cart to develop an online training program to address Micrographia, a condition commonly associated with Parkinson’s disease that features small, cramped handwriting. The training program has since been published as a workbook “Let’s Combat Micrographia, Edition 2.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 23, 2021 was National Handwriting Day! Fun fact — observing National Handwriting Day actually dates back to 1977. Handwriting is an art, it is something that is very personable and gives people confidence in their abilities. Many people have traded pen and paper for a keyboard and screen. Handwriting is a task that many take for granted however, it is a task that people living with Parkinson’s disease treasure.

Benefits of Handwriting

  1. Stimulates the Brain:  Handwriting involves rich mind-body experience that helps stimulate the brain. When you are writing you are working on creating letters, joining those letters to other letters, then creating words, and ultimately forming sentences. This requires lots of brain power!
  2. Develops Fine Motor Skills:  Handwriting exercises a complex cognitive process involving neuro-sensory experiences and fine motor skills. The ability to hold a tiny pen or pencil requires strength and coordination. Continuing to write as well as doing hand stretches will continue to help develop fine motor skill.
  3. Develops Sensory Skills: By feeling the writing surface, holding the writing instrument, and directing precise movement with thought, your senses come to life and give your brain a full workout!
  4. Increases Focus:  Writing increases focus because we are forced to slow down, think about forming letters into words, and then into sentences. Our brain is working extra hard to string all the pieces together.
  5. Helps Improve Memory:  Handwriting may also improve a person’s memory for new information as the act of writing requires more focus and allows you to visualize what is in front of you.
  6. Encourages Creativity:  Writing can lead to journaling which can then lead to doodling and more. Anytime you use a writing instrument you’re allowing your creative brain to come to life!

What Can Someone with Parkinson’s Do TODAY to Start Improving Handwriting?

Frustration, lack of confidence in using a writing instrument, poor coordination between mind and body, as well as tremors are only some of the challenges that a person with Parkinson’s disease faces. The good news is, that these challenges can be combated through diligent practice keeping in mind the goal of improving handwriting.

Since 2014, The Art Cart through their Let’s Combat Micrographia® program has been devoted to people’s success in improving handwriting. In 2018, our work was recognized by the United States National Institute of Health’s, Network of the National Libraries of Medicine. Today, we are the only internationally recognized research-based program available to help people with Parkinson’s improve their handwriting. The Art Cart would like to share a few no cost resources you can use to get started with improving your handwriting regardless of where you live in the world!

Handwriting comparisons after using the Let's Combat Micrographia curriculum

Our Resources for YOU:

  1. Let’s Combat Micrographia Introduction Workshops: Visit Let’s Combat Micrographia Introduction to tell you more about our course. The introduction is free and can be accessed by  using the link https://letscombatmicrographia.thinkific.com/courses/let-s-combat-micrographia
  2. Let’s Combat Micrographia Live Workshops:  This is our live (delivered via Zoom) 7-week workshop series that people are able to join. These workshops are free and include materials. The next Live Workshop will be starting February 2021. Add yourself to the waitlist by completing this form: https://forms.gle/YDevQcRQy8wZAbyP7 or visit https://letscombatmicrographia.com/live-workshops
  3. Let’s Combat MicrographiaOrganization Sponsored Workshop Series: Typically, these series are sponsored in partnership with other organizations we work with. So, if you are leading a group of people with Parkinson’s disease and would like to bring our programming to your community, please contact us at smilethroughart@gmail.com.

 

 

The post Happy National Handwriting Day 2021! first appeared on NER Update.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – February 5, 2021

SEA News - Fri, 2021-02-05 10:27

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars February 9 – February 17

Webinars February 23 – February 25

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – February 5, 2021 first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2021-02-05 07:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://covid19.nih.gov/

Love Data Week: This February 8-12, in celebration of International Love Data Week, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.” The event will feature four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions with guest speakers throughout the week and a moderated panel discussion with all speakers on Friday. Registration is now open for each session.

National Health Observances (NHOs): Looking for tools and materials to promote February NHOs? This month, the HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) offer toolkits with information, downloadable materials, events and health resources for Black History and Heart Health Month.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

NNLM Reading Club February Selections Focus on Heart Health: Like tires, the heart does not run forever but can last longer if the driver makes smart choices. NNLM Reading Club’s February selections focus on the heart with three books that provide valuable information for people dealing with heart conditions. Strengthening your heart knowledge can help strengthen your heart. We hope these books will provide you an opportunity to do both. Visit the NNLM Reading Club for discussion guides to these titles and other useful information.

Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference – Blogadillo, News from SCR

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference – SEA Currents

Self-Learning Source: AHA’s Interactive Cardiovascular Library – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

BLOSSOM: Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness – MCR News

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference – Midwest Matters, from GMR

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference – MARquee News Highlights

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference – MCR News

Scholarship Recipients Reflect on the Association of Bookmobile and Outreach Services Conference – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Proposals for the NNLM COVID-19 Infodemic Symposium: NNLM invites proposals for a virtual symposium: Responding to the COVID-19 Infodemic, on April 8th-9th, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the disparities of underserved, minority, and underrepresented communities. This includes ensuring equal understanding of accurate health information, education in hard hit communities, and valuing inclusion in clinical research to overcome COVID-19. The NNLM Virtual Symposium is an opportunity to engage with NNLM Network Members to address misinformation and mistrust, raise awareness about the pandemic, and efforts to combat it. You can find more details here and submit an application here. The deadline to submit is February 26 at 11:59 PM ET.

NLM/NIH News

NIH News in Health: Read the February 2021 issue, featuring, “Lowering Your Cancer Risk: Healthy Living for Cancer Prevention,” and, “Chocolate Health Claims: Sweet Truth or Bitter Reality?

A Journey to Spur Innovation and DiscoveryNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Large Study Reveals Prevalence, Health Benefits of Brown Fat – NIH Director’s Blog

Can Blood Thinners Keep Moderately Ill COVID-19 Patients Out of the ICU?NIH Director’s Blog

Air Pollution is a Human Problem: Mary Catterall’s Campaign for a Livable Leeds – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Intel and Google Cloud Team with All of Us Research Program – Intel Newsroom

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced the RxNorm February monthly release.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

February 2021

Love Data Week: Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training – February 8, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

Love Data Week: How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response – February 9, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

The Power of Public Health-Public Library Collaborations: Examples from Iowa Libraries – February 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

SCR CONNECTions: Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Community – February 10, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Love Data Week: Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications – February 10, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” – February 11, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

Love Data Week: If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused – February 11, 1:00-1:30 PM ET

A Conversation on COVID-19 Vaccine with Dr. Anthony Fauci & the American-Muslim Community – February 11, 1:30-2:30 PM ET

Love Data Week: Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation – February 12, 12:00-1:00 PM ET

Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles – February 15-March 26

Effective Health Communication and Health Literacy: Understanding the Connection – February 16, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Serving Library Users with Mental Illness: A Crash Course on Controlling Clashes – February 17, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Getting Started with Creating RNA-based Medicines by Solving Puzzles – February 18, 6:00 PM ET

Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information – February 22-March 22

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community – February 23, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Ethics and Bias Mitigation – February 23, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

NLM’s History of Medicine Division: A Research Collection of Rare Medical Materials – February 24, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

National Library of Medicine Resources for Citizen Scientists – February 25. 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Ask Questions About Creating RNA-based Medicines by Solving Puzzles – February 25, 6:00 PM ET

March 2021

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – March 1-26

Understanding Vaccine Hesitancy and Social Media’s Role in Spreading Vaccine Misinformation – March 1, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Digital Partnership: Academic Health Science Libraries as Partners in the Future of Telehealth – March 2, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – March 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

2021 National Nursing Research Roundtable – March 4-5

How PubMed® Works: Introduction – March 4, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: Selection – March 11, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman – March 11, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Big Game Census: 2021 – United States Census Bureau

A Conversation on COVID-19 Vaccine with Dr. Anthony Fauci & the American-Muslim Community – February 11, 1:30-2:30 PM ET – Sponsored by American Muslim Health Professionals

Introduction to Evaluating Public Datasets using FAIR Data Principles – February 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Thinking in 3D: An Introduction to Medical Imaging and 3D-printing – March 4 & 11, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

2021 Virtual Forum for Migrant and Community Health – March 22-26, 2021 – Sponsored by the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH), North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA), and Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA)

SOPHE 2021dX Annual Conference – April 6-9, 2021 – Sponsored by SOPHE

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2021-02-04 20:05

By Guest Contributor Karen Yother, Community Library Network, Idaho

Anyone who has worked with teens will tell you that they are quite the unique audience. What is trendy one day is out of favor the next. They eagerly develop their own personalities and interests, continually seeking ways to express their ideas in a variety of formats. But today’s teens also are under an intense amount of pressure at home, at school, from friends, the community and – unlike their earlier counterparts — in the virtual world.

Project Rationale/Description/Goals

More than 19,600 teens live in our Northern Idaho Community Library Network service area: approximately 34% of our total population. Yet, similar to most communities, needed programs and services to teens are poorly funded. The Alliance for Excellent Education reports that teens (ages 12-18) receive the least financial support, lagging far behind what is invested in children (birth-11 years) and new adults (ages 19 and up).

Conversations with our community partners working with teens center around Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and ways to help teens overcome traumatic experiences. The more ACEs a child experiences, the more likely he or she will suffer poor academic achievement, substance abuse, and toxic stress. According to the Child Mind Institute, nearly one in three teens meet the criteria for an anxiety disorder by the age of 18. Given that mental health is a topic not frequently discussed, teens often suffer in silence. That needn’t happen as there are a variety of approaches to help teens who have experienced ACEs, including meditation, exercise, and spending time outdoors. To help allay the anxiety suffered by many teens, we developed Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition, with a focus on mindfulness, physical activity, and nutrition.

Our Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project was funded by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region. Our project goal was to provide health literacy programming along with technology access, exploration, and training to teens in the Community Library Network service area. We planned to use a mobile discovery bike and van to reach young members whose communities lack the facilities and infrastructure to offer wellness programming by using tech-discovery options.

Through this wellness initiative, teens would gain first-hand experience with various mindfulness techniques, access technology to find quality health resources, and discover how their local library is available to assist their wellness exploration, practices and learning.

Regrettably, onset of the COVID pandemic required us to forego the majority of our programming for the time being. Following is a report of what we planned to accomplish … and what we still hope to achieve, once conditions allow.

Project Plans

Our project focuses on teens ages 11-18 and their health literacy needs, specifically providing them access to quality health information and community resources to help reduce stress and anxiety. We identified teens’ health and wellness because teens increasingly use our library for respite and safe harbor. Our project embraces one of the core tenets of precision medicine, a focus of the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network and aimed to equip teens with access to quality health information and resources, as well as to empower them to make the best choices for themselves. According to the Precision Medicine Initiative, precision medicine is “an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person.” While we are not medical professionals, we recognize the individuality of teens in our community and the need to offer a variety of programs and resources to meet their unique and varying needs.

The Wellness Open House is one program we designed to offer through Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition. Health, wellness, alternative medicine, and other practitioners were invited to participate, share information, and provide demonstrations as appropriate. All of Us materials would be distributed to all attendees in an effort to raise awareness of the All of Us Research Project. While the Wellness Open House was designed with teens in mind, the event was also open to their family members and the general public. COVID-19 put our Open House on hold, but plans are in place to offer this event later this year.

Many families within our District’s 1,100 square miles lack access to technology and quality health resources, especially in our rural areas. Four of our library communities — Athol, Harrison, Pinehurst and Spirit Lake — are towns with fewer than 2,500 people. These small towns lack the resources and infrastructure to expose teens and families to the countless educational, cultural and entertainment opportunities available through today’s technology. This lack of technology access coupled with work and school schedules, shelter and transportation difficulties, add to the stress of daily life for many teens, contributing to increased anxiety. All of these factors are obstacles to success.

We planned to use Pop-Up Library Book Bikes, equipped with hotspots, tablets, virtual and augmented reality equipment to bring programming to neighborhoods, parks and targeted community locations.  Engaging programs such as meditation, yoga, Zumba, healthful cooking, and paint & sip will be scheduled once it is safe again to do so. Teens will receive access to new technologies and learn about health resources for their personal health literacy toolkits.

During our planning sessions, the Youth Services (YS) team discussed the project’s programs, community partnerships, timelines and branding needs. We wanted to create a brand that empowered teens and opened them up to a world of possibilities. The team selected “I Am” as the theme to empower teens to think of all the positive characteristics to define themselves: bold, strong, empowered, loved, fearless, creative. Once the project’s logo was completed, using Community Library Network funds, we created materials for distribution at community events to engage teens, including stickers, magnets, and stress balls.

We built a project website, I am ME, which provides quality health resources for teens. Topics include mental health, self-care, relaxation, food, be your best self, along with hotlines, helplines, and text lines.

We purchased six (6) sandwich boards to use as ‘talk back’ boards. Drawing from the Public Library Association Project Outcomes evaluation tools, we selected three questions for teen response at each program’s conclusion:

  1. Did you learn something helpful?
  2. Are you more aware of health-related resources and services provided by the library?
  3. What did you like most about the program?

Using this method, teens will write their responses on Post-it notes and place them under each question, giving them an opportunity to respond honestly and anonymously.

COVID-19

We held a few initial programs and were just about to fully launch our Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project when the pandemic hit and everything shut down. Staff attempted to re-invent programs to meet community health requirements but were unable to do so in a safe, engaging way. Throughout the pandemic, it has been heartbreaking for staff to see teens stressed and distanced from both their friends and routines, knowing there is nothing we can do. Pre-COVID-19, the library was a safe place for teens to come and hang out, chat with friends and staff, and attend quality programs. Being closed has heightened teens need for a safe place and not being able to provide it was a significant blow to the staff as well as the community.

Recently our local schools began offering mental health and suicide prevention programs to the 3rd-5th grade students. Because of its “I Am” initiative through the Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project, the library is poised to provide support and resources to the schools for these students. Being able to support and embed ourselves in the community again to provide kids and teens with tools for their well-being toolbelt is gratifying.

Our “Why”

The Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project’s “I Am” initiative is important because one year ago, three teens in our community committed suicide. We are not naïve to think that this project, once fully launched, will save every teen who struggles with mental health, self-esteem, family issues, food insecurity, bullying, trauma – the list of ACEs goes on and on. Rather, we want the library, through this project, to be part of the solution, the place teens will think of to:

  • provide the tools and resources to help them make the best decisions possible.
  • learn to take a deep breath before they lash out.
  • understand the connection between a balanced diet and their overall health.
  • understand the importance of a good night’s sleep.
  • learn ways to gather their thoughts, use positive internal messaging, find ways to manage stress, and develop skills to have a healthy school/work life balance.

Will our teens always make the ‘right’ decision? No. But having the proper tools gets them one step closer and that is something we can all support.

The Community Library Network’s mission, “We empower discovery” encompasses nearly every aspect of what we do. This project aligns closely with what we aim to accomplish every day – to better the lives of our members through empowerment. While we did not get to complete the entire year of our project’s plans, we consider this project one of our stars. Our early efforts were well-received by teens; community members expressed their appreciation; partners have signed on to support it post-pandemic; and staff frequently share new ideas and plans for upcoming virtual and in-person programs.

Setting COVID-19 aside, issues facing teens today can feel overwhelming and insurmountable. The spotlight the pandemic shone on teen health was a stark reminder of why what we do is so important. While we did not have the opportunity to host every aspect of our projects’ programs or events that we wanted to in 2020, we’ve chosen to persevere and forge ahead into 2021 with renewed vigor and excitement to reach the teens in our community and ensure access to quality health resources and programs in whatever format possible.

Note: If you would like more information about the Pop-Up Library: Wellness Edition project, you may reach Karen Yother at: kareny@communitylibrary.net

The post Pop-up Library: Wellness Edition first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Love Data Week with NNLM

SEA News - Thu, 2021-02-04 13:10

Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”

At four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions on Monday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data.

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Monday, Feb 8th

Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training
Ibraheem Ali, Sciences Data Librarian, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday, Feb 9th

How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response
Bob Gradeck, Project Director, Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center

Wednesday, Feb 10th

Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications
Yasmeen Shorish, Associate Professor & Head of Scholarly Communications, James Madison University Libraries

Thursday, Feb 11th

If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused
Lisa Federer, Data Science and Open Science Librarian at the National Library of Medicine

Friday, Feb 12th

Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation
Our panelists will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more

The post Love Data Week with NNLM first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th)

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2021-02-04 11:06

See the source image

Love Data Week is an annual international celebration of all aspects of data. This February 8th-12th, NNLM is spotlighting four experts on various aspects of open data for a week of learning and sharing in the spirit of “open.”

At four 30-minute “coffee chat” sessions fromMonday through Thursday, listen to each one of our guest experts discuss their work and answer audience questions in an informal setting. Then, join us on Friday as part of the RDM Webinar Series for a moderated panel discussion with all speakers to discuss bigger questions about their experiences working with open data.

Monday, Feb 8th

Reflections on Open Access and Ethics in Data Literacy Training

Ibraheem Ali, Sciences Data Librarian, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday, Feb 9th

How Open Data Can Support a Pandemic Response

Bob Gradeck, Project Director, Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center

Wednesday, Feb 10th

Advocating for Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications

Yasmeen Shorish, Associate Professor & Head of Scholarly Communications, James Madison University Libraries

Thursday, Feb 11th

If You Share It, Will They Come? Exploring How Open Data Are Reused

Lisa Federer, Data Science and Open Science Librarian at the National Library of Medicine

Friday, Feb 12th

Spotlight on “Open” Panel Presentation

Our panelists will weigh in on their careers and what brought them to working with open data, important skills and favorite resources, project management and working with a team, and more.

The post DataFlash: NNLM’s Love Data Week (February 8th-12th) first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

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