National Network of Libraries of Medicine
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Hindi Japanese Korean Persian Portuguese Russian Spanish

RML Blogs

It’s National Health Education Week!

MAR News - 1 hour 39 min ago

During the third week of October, the Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE) celebrates National Health Education Week. The goal of NHEW is to increase national awareness of major public health issues and promote a better understanding of the role of health education.

Have you heard of the field of health education, or do you know someone who is a Health Educator? It can sometimes be a misunderstood title, but this is a profession with its own definition from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Health Educators focus on helping individuals and communities adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. They may do this through health education programs or policies. They might also focus on identifying the health needs of their community, or serving as a health resource person. Given their wide range of skills, Health Educators are important resources for communities and health focused organizations where they work.

What academic background do Health Educators have? Many universities across the United States offer bachelor’s degrees in fields such as Health Promotion or Community Health Education. Some Health Educators may have a Master’s in Public Health. In addition, someone with this type of background can become a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) through the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC). Having this credential helps a Health Educator show their competence in many different health education responsibilities.

The role of the Health Educator is a natural fit with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s mission to promote equal access to health information. Health Educators can help their communities connect to trusted sources of health information and ensure understanding of this information.

Did you know that NNLM offers training for Health Educators and public health professionals? We do! In the last year, we have been approved by NCHEC to offer continuing education credit for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES). Most recently, we have offered this credit for three of our courses:

We hope to expand our offerings in 2020, and continue engaging with our growing audience of Health Educators.

Celebrate National Health Education Week with us! If you are CHES certified and would like to be added to the NNLM email list to learn about future CE opportunities for Health Educators, reach out to Erin Seger via email: ers166@pitt.edu. For information about NHEW events, visit the SOPHE website.

Categories: RML Blogs

NMLM Feature: Yoga, Tai Chi Research Shows Public Librarians Already Know

SEA News - Mon, 2019-10-21 11:38

Jonathan Dolce, Branch Supervisor, Lake County Library System, Astor & Paisley County Libraries

Yoga: the numbers are in

According to a recent ALA-YaTsALL (Yoga and Tai Chi Sessions for America’s Limber Librarians) survey, 21% of librarians are now offering public yoga and tai chi sessions. Statistically, this marks the highest level of public library interest in fitness in recorded history. “It only made sense, really” says lead researcher Ben Denstretch.

“We have already been doing yoga and tai chi all these years. We simply had to put names with the repetitive poses we perform during our daily work. Hatha, ashtanga, even bikram when the a/c goes out – we’ve done it all!”

As a result, the increased popularity of yoga and tai chi in libraries has decreased membership in gyms. Sadly, local chambers of commerce have noted this shift: “Many former instructors are struggling, and switching industries”. One instructor says, “It’s good that I double majored. I still have massage therapy to fall back on.”

The Future of Massage Therapy and Libraries

These are in fact prophetic words. State librarian, Oma Gutness says, “Oh! Massage therapy? Yes, at every conference, we always have massage therapists on hand for our attendees!” Currently, librarians are taking advantage of online databases – that tax payers pay for – that demonstrate massage therapy techniques. One bubbly librarian says, “We are expanding our programming reach into the untapped demographic of desk weary executives who would otherwise not patronize libraries. I mean, who doesn’t want a massage after a hard day of spreadsheets and email?!”

Below, Chart A demonstrates common public library yoga poses. Chart B demonstrates common library Tai Chi movements.

Enjoy your work. You are already masters. Namaste.

Chart A:

Chart B:

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month: Sue Groshong

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2019-10-21 04:00

We continue our National Medical Librarians Month series with a profile of Sue Groshong, a librarian at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Seattle, WA.

photo of Sue Groshong, standing in front of a bookshelf

Sue Groshong, librarian, Seattle Children’s Hospital Library & Information Commons

I met Sue Groshong at the Seattle Children’s Hospital Library & Information Commons on a sunny fall morning to talk with her about her experience as a hospital librarian. Sue is one of three librarians at the Seattle Children’s Hospital Library & Information Commons, a library that primarily serves medical staff, researchers, and other hospital employees. Sue has worked at Seattle Children’s 21 years and has held various roles within the library during her tenure. She’s currently responsible for library systems, interlibrary loan, cataloging, and is the library’s liaison to the hospital’s Clinical Effectiveness Program.

I asked Sue one of my favorite questions to ask librarians, “How did you become a librarian?” Sue has always been an avid patron of the public library, and in high school, became interested in genealogy. While in college, she worked in library technical services, and had an internship at the National Archives in Seattle. Later, she worked in a bookstore, and being a book person, applied for a staff position at the library at Seattle Children’s Hospital. While in the position at Seattle Children’s, Sue went to school for her library degree.

Sue shared with me some interesting and meaningful projects that she’s worked on. A few years ago, one of the hospital’s music therapists found a Reginaphone in a closet. The Reginaphone, made in 1902, had been used in the 1970s in the neurology department. The Reginaphone was played while children had EEG tests. The music therapist came to the library to learn more about the Reginaphone. With the help of interlibrary loan, Sue was able to locate information held in libraries and archives. The music therapist used this information to get the Reginaphone running, and digitally recorded the music. In addition to many memorable experiences at the library, Sue’s work makes an impact on clinical care. Sue and her coworkers complete do literature searches for teams across the hospital who are developing clinical pathways and care standards. Sue uses Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane, Trip, CINAHL, and other databases to gather the literature that informs the hospital’s standards. The standards created directly impact and improve the clinical care, spaces, and policies of the hospital. The day we met, Sue was working on a literature search on pneumonia.

I asked Sue about her favorite databases and resources. She recommends the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Evidence-Based Practice Database as an excellent resource for new nurses or nurses who are new to doing research. The database provides evidence-based point of care resources, and is available via Ovid through subscription. She also highly recommends MedlinePlus for professional and personal use.

Sue clearly enjoys her work as hospital librarian, and after talking with her, I have a richer understanding of her day-to-day work as hospital librarian.

Categories: RML Blogs

Resources You Can Use: Health Literacy Month

NER News - Fri, 2019-10-18 14:31

October is Health Literacy Month! People working in health information use the term health literacy a lot. But what is health literacy and how can we improve it?  What resources are available to help support health literacy?

What is Health Literacy?

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) defines health literacy as “the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information needed to make appropriate health decisions.” (Healthy People 2020)

Even with this definition, health literacy is a complex issue that is affected by many factors, but culture can be a major component with cultural backgrounds influencing belief systems, communication styles, and understanding and responses to health information (NLM-Health Literacy).

Health literacy also relies on many skills to process information on prevention, diagnosis, treatment and make decisions about the best course of action.  Skills include understanding health care services and insurance, calculating dosages and understanding treatment instructions, communicating with providers, evaluating the quality and credibility of information, understand results and locate health information.

A person’s ability to complete these tasks relay on literacy (visual and written), computer literacy (can use a computer and find information online), and numerical literacy (can calculate and reason with numbers).

How can we improve Health Literacy?
  1. Nine out of 10 adults struggle to understand and use health information when it is unfamiliar, complex or jargon-filled.
  2. Limited health literacy costs the healthcare system money and results in higher than necessary morbidity and mortality. (CDC-Talking Points about Health Literacy)

And like many aspects of medicine and healthcare, health literacy has disparities that contribute to disparities in outcomes. Older adults, English Language Learners, people with less than a high school education and disability may influence a person’s health literacy. (Healthy People 2020)

So what can we do?

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-10-18 12:27

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

Read the MAReport: For Health Literacy Month, Education & Health Literacy Coordinator Michelle Burda writes about “Expanding Health Literacy Knowledge” to improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Request for Information (RFI): The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement (UG4) that operates on a five-year cycle. As we prepare for the start of the next cycle (in May 2021), we are seeking input and feedback from the public on ways to ensure that the NNLM can continue to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The deadline to respond is December 2, 2019.

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote Health Literacy Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year. You can also explore health literacy with the NNLM Reading Club.

In the Region – This fall many of the MAR staff are on the road, we’ve welcomed a new Community Engagement Coordinator, and we launched a new service for NNLM Members! Read about more of our recent activities to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in NY, NJ, PA and DE. – MARquee News Highlights

Save the Date for the next NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, coming up on November 20, 2019! Check out our new Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science resource guide for information on how to participate, and follow #CiteNLM to get the latest details as they become available.

NLM’s Profiles in Science Resource Gets a New Look! – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

NLM/NIH News

Hispanic Heritage Month: Improving Access to Health Information – During Hispanic Heritage Month — and throughout the year — it’s important to think about how NLM can better engage with the populations we serve. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Panel Finds Exercise May Lower Cancer Risk, Improve Outcomes – Exercise can work wonders for your health, including strengthening muscles and bones, and boosting metabolism, mood, and memory skills. Now comes word that staying active may also help to lower your odds of developing cancer. – NIH Director’s Blog

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted several new features that have been added to the new PubMed.

NLM Launches a New Exhibition in Recognition of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week – In recognition of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week (October 20-26, 2019), the National Library of Medicine announces This Lead Is Killing Us: A History of Citizens Fighting Lead Poisoning in Their Communities, an online exhibition that opens October 15, 2019.

New PubMed Recap: Did you miss A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals? A recording, a list of key points and an FAQ page are now available from the webinar.

NLM Special Lecture: Gender, Race and Power in Science – October 31, 10:00-11:00 AM ET – Angela Saini, British science journalist, broadcaster, and author, will present a lecture on “Gender, Race, and Power in Science”. Saini has a master’s degree in engineering from Oxford University and is a former MIT Knight Science Journalism Fellow. She has written for The Guardian, New Scientist, Wired, and Science, and she regularly presents science programs on the BBC. Saini will explore how prejudice can affect scientific research on race and gender and will describe her efforts to uncover manipulation of evidence, abuse, and wrongdoing by those in power. She will also address the inadvertent and inappropriate use of race by mainstream scientific researchers in health and genetics. Drawing from themes in her two most recent books, “Superior: The Return of Race Science” and “Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong”, she will show why researchers need to be careful not to conflate social gender and racial disparities with biological differences.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

October 2019

Registration closing soon! Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community – October 22, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course will provide an overview of ideas to conduct health outreach and create health programs for libraries and community/faith based organizations. Participants will learn how to integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies to introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways.

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW): An Overview and Action – October 23, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) and guest speaker Marisa Miakonda Cummings, Director of Native Student Services at the University of South Dakota, for a one-hour webinar on the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women. Participants will discuss a historical perspective and current challenges in reporting and jurisdiction. Opportunities for ally-ship and advocacy with legislation will also be discussed. The outcome of this presentation will lead to more informed librarians and better community advocates.

November 2019

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – November 4-December 2, 2019 – Sponsored by the MidContinental Region (MCR), This asynchronous online class will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will leave equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites. This class will discuss creative ideas for health information outreach, and wrap up with an opportunity to explore effective marketing approaches and develop an elevator speech.

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – November 5, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. In addition to 1 MLA CE, this program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour.

PubMed for Librarians: Introduction to PubMed – November 8, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the NNLM Training Office (NTO), PubMed for Librarians is made up of five 90-minute classes presented via WebEx that include hands-on exercises. In this first webinar, participants will learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a basic PubMed search, assess your search results, analyze search details, customize PubMed with My NCBI, search for a known citation; plus, brief introductions to MeSH, automatic term mapping, search tags and subheadings. This class will be demonstrated in the new PubMed interface. All demonstrations will be done in PubMed Labs.

Working Across Difference: Making Better Connections – November 13, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and guest speaker Jessica Pettitt for the next installment in this webinar series about Diversity, Equity and Inclusion! We communicate across difference in passing, on purpose, and can even arrange a virtual conversation where everyone can see everyone easily even though we are potentially thousands of miles apart. While we “know” our co-workers, we often struggle to understand the cultural nuances of dealing with people of different cultural backgrounds, religions, languages, sexual orientations, gender expressions, socioeconomic variety, and more. This webinar will help participants understand what is required to work with people who are “not the same” as they are.

Thinking Outside the PubMed Box – November 18, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Do you develop or support wellness programming at your library or help patrons find health information? Do you support health sciences instructors or students at a school, college, or university? Are you familiar with PubMed, but curious if there are other resources out there that might be better suited to your patron audience? Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will introduce you to a range of trustworthy and freely available online health information resources developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Awareness of these resources will help you “think outside the PubMed box” when assisting patrons or developing programming, allowing you to better tailor your resource usage and recommendations to particular contexts.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Posting:

MLA Diversity and Inclusion Task Force Critical Librarianship Webinar Series (part 2) – October 21, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Want to know what critical librarianship looks like in practice? In this free webinar sponsored by MLA, hear three working librarians talk about how they use critical librarianship in their everyday practice.

Grey (Literature) Matters: Structuring Your Google Search – November 6, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Join Sarah Bonato for the second of a two-part series on grey (literature) matters. You’ll learn how to address the challenges of Google searches, adapt a database search, employ decision aids, set search limits, optimize data saturation, track search results, and select a search scope. You’ll also examine examples of published research projects that used Google and look at alternative search engines, such as DuckDuckGo, MillionShort, and WolframAlpha. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Beyond PRISMA– Health Research Reporting Guidelines: Your new secret weapon! – November 18, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – How often have you been asked for guidance from a medical student or resident who wants to submit a case study to a journal? Maybe a systematic review team member has asked for help with a data extraction form? Or you’ve been asked to lead journal club—now what? Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) with support from the NNLM South Central Region (SCR), this webinar will take you beyond PRISMA by introducing you to the family of health research reporting guidelines, and discuss the ways in which they can be used for more than just reporting. This class will also examine study execution assessment tools.

Western Pennsylvania Health Literacy Event – Visit Carlow University in Pittsburgh on Friday, October 25 to celebrate Health Literacy Month! Hosted by the Healthcare Council of Western Pennsylvania (HCWP) in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Health Literacy Coalition, this free event will feature sessions on the basics of health literacy, unconscious bias, and cultural humility. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn how to apply health literacy techniques to their personal and professional lives.

Developing Health Literacy Skills in Youth: A Workshop – Presented by the National Academy of Sciences, the Roundtable on Health Literacy will convene on November 19 for a public workshop to discuss the necessity of developing health literacy skills in youth, examine the research on developmentally appropriate health literacy milestones and transitions and measuring health literacy in youth, learn from programs and policies that represent best practices for developing health literacy skills in youth, and explore potential collaborations across disciplines for developing health literacy skills in youth. Register to attend this event in person or via live webcast!

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship – The Medical Library Association (MLA) is now accepting applications for The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. The purpose of this fellowship is to fund research aimed at expanding the research knowledge base, linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and advances in biomedical research. The endowment will provide a grant of up to $10,000. It is awarded by MLA through a competitive grant process, to a qualified health sciences librarian, health professional, researcher, educator, or health administrator. The deadline to apply is November 15, 2019.

Hospital Libraries Section (HLS)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Professional Development Grant – Whether you are in the middle of your career, new to it all, or have worked for many years, the HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant is an opportunity for an amazing professional journey into education or research. The grant is open to librarians working in a hospital, health system or similar clinical settings. Grant funds can be used for professional development through MEDLIB-ED or to help attend the MLA Annual Meeting or CE courses. It may also be used to support reimbursement for expenses incurred in conducting research such as a statistician to help with survey design, analyses etc. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2019.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – October 18, 2019

SEA News - Fri, 2019-10-18 10:22

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars October 22 – October 29

Webinars November 5 – November 13

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Expanding Health Literacy Knowledge

MAR News - Fri, 2019-10-18 04:00
Michelle Burda

Michelle Burda

Health literacy is a complex concept. As professionals and health care consumers, it is equally important to develop or improve both your communication and health literacy skills. To do this we must first understand what health literacy is. One of the current definitions of health literacy as defined in The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)1 Title V: Subtitle A; Sec. 5002 “means the degree to which an individual has the capacity to obtain, communicate, process, and understand health information and services in order to make appropriate health decisions.

The significance of this definition is the inclusion of the word communicate. This applies to the provider of health information as well as the receiver. Helen Osbourne, a health literacy expert and the founder of Health Literacy Month, explains it this way, “health literacy is a shared responsibility between patients (or anyone on the receiving end of health communication) and providers (or anyone on the giving end of health communication). Both must communicate in ways the other can understand.”

We must also be aware that readability, plain language, and health literacy each mean something different. Readability ≠ Plain Language ≠ Health Literacy. Each is unique, each is related and each is important but are often used interchangeably.

Our outreach services and programming can be targeted to those at risk of low health literacy. According to results from the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003)2, only 12% of adults have proficient health literacy and that rate has held steady through the years3. This means only one out of ten of us have the skills to manage our health.

Created using Iconarray

We must also be aware of the health literacy status of our communities. The Health Literacy Data Map, an interactive, searchable, national map website, allows us to identify a state and its counties that are most affected by low health literacy. This can help us to determine who is in the greatest need of our services, trainings and where we should develop future programs advocating for a health literate community.

The health literacy experts within the federal government have created many resources and toolkits. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a webpage that provides information, tools, and links on health literacy research, practice, and evaluation for public health topics and situations. There are online trainings available for public health professionals, writing and speaking with the public and Effective Communication for Healthcare Teams: Addressing Health Literacy, Limited English Proficiency and Cultural Differences (free continuing education).

The Agency for HealthCare Research and Quality (AHRQ) developed a Health Literacy Topics Page with health literacy resources to help health care professionals and delivery organizations make information easier to understand and systems easier to navigate. One of their newest tools is a Question Builder mobile app to help patients prepare and organize questions and other health information that will make their medical visit more engaging.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) and the American Library Association (ALA) have partnered through the Libraries Transform public awareness campaign to create a free health literacy toolkit. The toolkit will help libraries and their staff raise awareness of how libraries provide trusted health information to their communities. You can be part of the campaign.

A “Because“ statement from the Libraries Transform Campaign

Medical Library Association (MLA) continuing education (CE) credits are offered for various NNLM classes. The classes are offered throughout the Network to further professional development and expand advocacy promoting and raising awareness the impact health literacy has on the management of people’s healthcare and their ability to navigate the healthcare system. An example of a recent offering is: Effective Health Communication and Health Literacy: Understanding the Connection. This one-hour webinar is an introductory class to health literacy and health communication. Your role in raising health literacy awareness in your organization and ideas on how this can be achieved are discussed in addition to NLM, government agencies and other recognized resources in health literacy.

The importance of health literacy was recognized in the 1970’s when Leonard and Cecile Doak studied the reading skills of hospitalized patients. In 2010 the US Plain Language Writing Act, HHS’s National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy, and the national ACA/Health Care Reform were pivotal actions taken to improve health literacy in the United states. We are far from done. We must continue on this journey enhancing and developing everyone’s health literacy skills. It is important that we share in making informed decisions about our health and receive the care we deserve.

References:

  1. Affordable Care Act — Title V. Health Care Workforce – HHS.gov https://www.hhs.gov › sites › default › files › v-healthcare-workforce. Accessed 10/4/2019.
  2. National Center for Education Statistics. 2006. The Health Literacy of America’s Adults: Results From the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.
  3. Health Literacy Interventions and Outcomes, Update: Full Title: Health Literacy Interventions and Outcomes: An Updated Systematic Review. March 2011. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK82434/

Written by Michelle Burda, Education & Health Literacy Coordinator, for the Fall 2019 edition of The MAReport quarterly newsletter.

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Board of Regents Approves NLM Collection and Preservation Policy

PSR News - Wed, 2019-10-16 16:13

On September 11 the National Library of Medicine Board of Regents (BOR) approved the NLM Collection and Preservation Policy. The 2019 policy provides the framework for NLM collection and preservation activities and acknowledges the changing landscape of scholarly communications and growth in electronic publishing. The policy aligns with the NLM Strategic Plan 2017-2027: A Platform for Biomedical Discovery and Data-Powered Health, recognizing the interconnected nature of the biomedical and scientific literature with data and other research objects in a digital landscape. Other considerations include funder policies for public access; the development of several heavily used NLM databases including PubMed; changes in the volume, formats and expectations of research outputs; and the overall increase in data and digital objects. The policy recognizes that the scope of the collection may change over time, and that NLM collecting efforts must be flexible to support a variety of NLM, National Institutes of Health, and other federal policies, initiatives, and programs.

The BOR adopted the Collection Development Policy of the NLM in 1976 and subsequently updated it in 1983 and 1992. The NLM Preservation Policy was adopted in 1986 to fulfill the mandate to maintain and preserve the biomedical literature. The new NLM Collection and Preservation Policy combines these two policies, as both collection and preservation of biomedical materials are integral to NLM’s mission.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Learn the Basics of Consumer Health in the Stand Up For Health Class

SEA News - Wed, 2019-10-16 10:28

Jarrod Irwin, Consumer Health Coordinator, NNLM SEA

On September 12, I had the privilege of attending Stand Up for Health, a class taught by my colleague Bobbi Newman in the Greater Midwest Region. I attended as preparation for teaching the class in the Southeastern/Atlantic Region. Stand Up for Health gives an introduction to consumer health, covering topics like finding health information on a variety of topics, handling conversations with library patrons about health questions, and programming ideas related to health and wellness.

To me, the most beneficial part was hearing from everyone about their libraries’ current health programming. The class was invited to write down health-related programs or projects that their libraries have done, then post these on the wall where we were meeting. The wall was covered with dozens of these notes. Besides the excellent program ideas that people shared, it was inspiring to see all the labor and energy that libraries devote to consumer health represented in this way.

This class is also a great professional-development option for public librarians who are interested in health information. By completing this class, you fulfill all requirements for the Level 1 Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) offered by MLA. The Level 1 CHIS shows that you are knowledgeable in competencies that MLA has identified as important to consumer health. NNLM will sponsor your CHIS certificate so you can obtain it at no cost to yourself; see this webpage for information about CHIS sponsorship.

Stand Up for Health is limited to public library staff, but NNLM offers classes that cover similar content for other library staff as well. In particular, Beyond an Apple a Day and Health and Wellness @ the Library can be useful to you.

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM’s Profiles in Science Resource Gets a New Look!

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2019-10-15 19:39

On September 30, the National Library of Medicine re-launched Profiles in Science. The new platform, integrated with NLM Digital Collections, supports growing functionality for public access, engagement with, and sharing of these digital resources documenting the history of science, medicine, and public health in the 20th- and 21st-centuries. Profiles in Science is an online archive of more than 30,000 digitized items selected from the Archives and Modern Manuscripts collections of NLM’s History of Medicine Division and from the collections of collaborating institutions. The site features over 40 collections of digital content and continues to grow. Through primary source materials and accompanying biographical narrative texts researchers can explore stories of scientific discovery, achievements in clinical medicine, and advances in public health. Information about navigating the site is available on Profiles in Science collection homepages and on the About page.

Each name on the Profiles in Science home page links to a collection (or “Profile”) focused on an individual and selections from his or her personal papers. From the menu bar, “The Story” provides access to in-depth biographical narrative texts organized chronologically with an aim to share how the individual became interested in science, his or her career path, as well as challenges and obstacles faced along the way. The Michael E. DeBakey Profile, for example, tells the story of a legendary American surgeon, educator, and medical statesman whose work transformed cardiovascular surgery, raised medical education standards, and informed national health care policy. Readers learn about Debakey’s life growing up in Louisiana, his mentors, surgical colleagues, and the influence of his sisters Lois and Selma DeBakey. Alongside “The Story,” researchers can select “Collection Items” from the menu bar to browse the digitized collection items in list, gallery, or slideshow views. You can browse all items in a Profile, or sets of documents (texts), visuals, or moving images only. Within the DeBakey collection you can see a variety of document types, including photographic prints, correspondence, published and unpublished articles, oral histories, diaries, and much more. These items tell their own stories—of DeBakey’s early interests in and outside of science, collaborations across the country and around the world, and engagement with the general public on matters of public health and medicine.

Researchers can access, manipulate, and share Profiles content in new ways on the new site, including zooming in and out, rotating images, flipping through pages, searching the content of text, downloading, and accessing more information about the item (e.g. whether it is in the public domain). NLM is using the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) to share items in NLM’s systems and beyond. Other institutions and researchers using the same image framework can add Profiles images and metadata to their own digital collections and compare and manipulate images held in different repositories. Profiles in Science is a work in progress. New content will continue to be added, as well as new ways to make collection materials available and accessible for researchers with a broad range of questions, using new tools and approaches to historical analysis. Explore the new site and learn more!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Launches a New Exhibition in Recognition of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2019-10-15 19:16

In recognition of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week (October 20-26, 2019), the National Library of Medicine announces This Lead Is Killing Us: A History of Citizens Fighting Lead Poisoning in Their Communities, an online exhibition that opened October 15. This Lead Is Killing Us tells an important story of citizen action taken against an environmental danger. Lead exposure can cause neurological problems and sometimes even death; yet this metal has been pervasive in many aspects of American life for over a century. Historically, mining, battery manufacturing, smelting, and enameling industries included lead in their production processes, impacting factory workers and consumers. Manufacturers added lead to household paints and gasoline, endangering the health of families and polluting the air through exhaust fumes. To protect themselves against the dangers of lead poisoning, scientists, families, and individuals opposed industries, housing authorities, and elected officials.

The online exhibition includes an education component featuring a new K-12 lesson plan that challenges students to examine historical cases of lead poisoning through primary and secondary sources. A digital gallery features a curated selection of fully digitized items from NLM Digital Collections that showcase numerous historical scientific studies and reports about the dangers of lead. A companion traveling banner exhibition is coming soon. For more information, join the Making Exhibition Connections listserv, a place to learn, share, and find out what’s happening and what’s new with NLM Traveling Exhibitions.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

TOXNET Website to be Retired, Most Content Will Remain Available

MCR News - Mon, 2019-10-14 15:13

from NLM Technical Bulletin:

On December 16, 2019, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXNET (TOXicology Data NETwork) website will be retired. Most content will remain available through other NLM databases as well as from external websites.

TOXNET has served as an integrated system of toxicology and environmental health information. The most frequently used databases are being incorporated into three NLM core resources: PubChem, an open chemistry database; PubMed, a resource for biomedical literature; and Bookshelf, a free online resource to access books and documents in life science and healthcare.

Several resources in TOXNET came from other organizations, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and will continue to be available from those sources. Some databases will be retired.

The TOXNET transition page provides a list of its databases and how to access their content. Please check that page and the NLM Technical Bulletin for updates.

If you have questions, please contact NLM Customer Support at https://support.nlm.nih.gov/.

Categories: RML Blogs

Expanding the Health Professions Pipeline in Nevada

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-10-14 04:00

Did you know that rural healthcare providers can 3D print tools and materials they otherwise might never have access to? Did you know virtual reality headsets can guide patients through their treatments step-by-step? 

a man holds up a 3D printed bone

Kyle Mefferd, MS, Senior Learning Specialist at TUN shows a 3D printed bone.

We had the immense pleasure of visiting Joanne Muellenbach and her wonderful interdisciplinary team of librarians, student affairs specialists, and information technologists at Touro University Nevada in Henderson, NV. Joanne’s outreach subaward project, Using Virtual Reality & 3D Technologies to Expand the Health Professions Pipeline in Southern Nevada, will harness emerging technologies to increase learning outcomes for health sciences students and draw in new, diverse students to the health sciences field. “We want to increase and expand the health professions pipeline,” Joanne says. 

Two librarians stand next to a 3D printer in operation.

[Above: Joanne Muellenbach shows Nora Franco how the 3D printer operates.]

During our visit, the team showed us the range of resources they have developed as part of this project, including a research guide on virtual reality technologies and the health sciences; a presentation for staff and faculty to promote use of library resources in their classrooms; and a compilation of NLM resources that encourage students to consider careers in health sciences, such as MedlinePlus’ Health Occupations page.

We especially love that Joanne has brought together an interdisciplinary team to work on this project, and to conduct outreach that meets students where they are.

With NNLM PSR subaward funding, as Joanne says, “The library gets more notice, which is always a good thing.” Congratulations to the Touro team for a great start to this project, and thank you for hosting!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

A.T. Still Memorial Library hosts NLM’s “Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care” Traveling Exhibit!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-10-14 04:00

by Adrienne Brodie, MLS
Liaison Librarian
A. T. Still University Memorial Library
Mesa, AZ

Students in scrubs read exhibit panel text

PA Students enjoying the NLM’s traveling exhibit, Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care.

A.T. Still Memorial Library hosted the National Library of Medicine’s Traveling exhibit, Physician Assistants: Collaboration and Care. On display were six freestanding panels that explore the profession from its early beginnings to the present day; documenting its diversity, collaborative nature, and contributions to the field of medicine and patient care. The library displayed the exhibit from late August through the end of National Physician Assistant (PA) week in October.

Woman speaks to a crowd with a powerpoint slide to her left

Dr. Michelle DiBaise speaking on the history of medicine.

To celebrate PA week and our PA students and faculty, the library hosted a joint lecture and open house with our PA program. Dr. Michelle DiBaise, DHSc, PA-C, DFAAPA Chair of Physician Assistant Studies presented on the journey of American Medicine and the forces that generated the PA profession, the growth of the PA profession since its inception, and where the profession may go in the future. An open house with light refreshments followed. Attendees were our PA students, PA faculty and staff, and additional A.T Still University faculty and staff.

This exhibition was produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the Physician Assistant History Society.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month: Toan Lam-Sullivan

PNR Dragonfly - Sun, 2019-10-13 21:00

Throughout October, National Medical Librarians Month and also Health Literacy Month, NNLM is featuring Pacific Northwest Librarians and highlighting their commitment to health literacy. This week we shine a spotlight on Toan Lam-Sullivan. Toan is the Bilingual Regional Librarian at Multnomah County Library in Portland, Oregon. Multnomah County Library has 20 locations throughout the Portland metro area.

What made you interested in a library career?  When I attended elementary school in Saigon, Vietnam, I frequently visited the tiny school library. However, the books were only available for reading while at the library. After I arrived in Portland, Oregon, as a teenager, my high school teacher took our class on a school field trip to the Central Library. The place was so beautiful, and every floor was filled with books. We were even allowed to borrow books and return them in three weeks. I was completely awestruck and fell in love right there.

While attending Grant High School, my friends and I frequently visited the nearby Hollywood Library. We loved reading about airplanes and sport cars in the library’s collection. We’d read and compare which planes and cars were the fastest and most powerful. One day, while at the Hollywood Library, I made a wish about how wonderful it would be if I was a librarian so that I could read books all day long. Several years later, while attending college, a friend informed me that the Multnomah County Library was hiring; I applied and was hired as a library page at the Hollywood Library, my favorite hangout place with friends!

Five years later, I was promoted to a Bilingual Vietnamese Library Assistant at the Holgate Library. The Holgate administrator talked with me about library school and encouraged me to attend. I applied, was accepted into the Master of Library Science Program and two years later, was promoted to the Bilingual Vietnamese Youth Librarian and currently work as a Bilingual Chinese Regional Librarian.

My love of reading and serendipity led me to become a librarian. I am very grateful to be a librarian and I just want to continue reaching out to patrons, letting them know about our many wonderful library services and resources.

Please briefly describe a favorite health-related library program, activity or service offered by your library. How has the public responded to this program, activity or service? We invited Tai Chi instructors to teach and demonstrate Tai Chi Fan Dance and Tai Chi 24 Form at our Holgate, Midland and Woodstock libraries. Each of these workshops lasted four weeks. After the two Tai Chi workshops ended, patrons continued to request them. However, the cost for inviting instructors over the long term was unsustainable. To make it more sustainable and meet the needs of the community, we asked administration if we could offer a staff-facilitated Tai Chi club. The request was approved.

The purpose of the Tai Chi club is to attract folks who are interested in and want to practice Tai Chi together. Even though there was no formal instructor, a dedicated group came every Wednesday.  Library staff set up the room, laptop and projector and participants shared Tai Chi video clips, which we all followed together to learn and practice Tai Chi movements.

Recently, two Tai Chi instructors, one of whom has been practicing Tai Chi for over 30 years, heard about the club. They’ve been volunteering their time at the Library and generously showing everyone Tai Chi.

Why does health literacy matter to you? As a youngster, I experienced a debilitating illness. I was bedridden and unable to perform many simple, essential tasks. I am very fortunate and grateful because I fully recovered. However, this experience impacted me deeply. I learned to take better self- care and I try to stay as healthy as possible. According to what I understand, health literacy encompasses information on health and wellness, and the ability to make decisions based on what we know. Health literacy matters to an individual and is equally important to a community.

As recent recipients of a Health Literacy Outreach award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, we’ve been focusing on our Asian communities. Through our award, we are inviting health instructors to the Library and offering health-related programs. We’re also showing members of our Asian communities how to use MedlinePlus and other health and wellness databases. So far, we have been receiving many positive comments from patrons.

Categories: RML Blogs

October is Health Literacy Month

MCR News - Fri, 2019-10-11 18:03

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote Health Literacy Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year.

Categories: RML Blogs

New PubMed Slides for New Users

MCR News - Fri, 2019-10-11 17:51

Please follow the link below for slides introducing new users to PubMed.

Introduction to PubMed – NNLM Slides to Adapt

These slides were designed to introduce PubMed to new users who have no prior experience with PubMed, and can be presented in about 45 minutes, as-is. However, we encourage you to abridge, expand, adapt and/or redistribute these slides to better meet the needs of your audience:

  • We especially encourage you to review the examples provided, and to replace them with examples more appropriate to your audience.
  • Additionally, five slides (numbers 1, 2, 6, 13, and 38) should be either removed or modified, depending on your specific needs.

 These slides are free of copyright restriction, but we appreciate attribution to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

These slides were created by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and adapted by the Office of Engagement and Training (OET) at the U.S. National Library of Medicine at the beginning of October, 2019. Please keep your materials up to date by testing all examples and assertions using PubMed Labs (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pubmed/) and by monitoring the PubMed news via the NLM Technical Bulletin (https://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/).

Categories: RML Blogs

Updates from NER Hospital Librarians Summer Session

NER News - Fri, 2019-10-11 09:57
screenshot of PubMed website

Use MyNCBI login with new PubMed interface!

Just over two months ago, twenty-eight librarians gathered at UMass Medical School for our One-Day Summer Session for New England Region hospital librarians.

In the morning, we discussed National Library of Medicine changes to DOCLINE, LinkOut, PubMed and the elimination of LoansomeDoc, as well as the upcoming EFTS transition from UConn Health to the Medical Library Association. We took a long look at the impacts on document delivery services in hospital libraries.

In the afternoon, Michelle Bass, PhD, MSI, AHIP, lead a discussion about Impostor Phenomenon among health sciences librarians, Michelle is Manager of Research and Instruction at Countway Library, Harvard Medical School. She facilitated a brainstorming exercise on ways to cope with this phenomenon.

Participants enjoyed the entire day. They especially commented on the opportunity to catch up with colleagues, and to learn new tips and tricks from one another.

Updates on NLM Changes

During our morning discussion, several questions were raised. We have updates!

DOCLINE

Q: I heard a rumor that only e-journals will be listed in any library holdings [in DOCLINE and LinkOut] beginning in 2020. Is that true?
A: LinkOut will be e-journal only for the forseeable future. There are no plans to ONLY include e-journals in DOCLINE. We are however planning to enhance DOCLINE in ways that make e-journals easier to access.

Q: DOCLINE used to say (basically) “hey, your library reports owning this title/issue, are you sure you want to request it?” This was very helpful. Will this feature be added to the new DOCLINE?
A: The ‘you own this’ alert during borrowing is one of the features listed on the DOCLINE user feedback page as high priority for users that we heard about after the launch of DOCLINE 6.  Since then, we have added half of alerts mentioned and ‘in your holdings’ is slated to return, but is not yet on the development schedule.

Q: Several hospital librarians are frustrated with ordering book chapters and NLM books through DOCLINE. One of these librarians left a note: We need UID requesting for NLM book collections specifically. Could you give me information that I can share?
A: Although Book and Book chapter requests do not route ‘automatically’ because there are only serial holdings in DOCLINE, previously you could ‘automatically’ populate your request with all of a Book’s bibliographic information by inputting a Unique ID, whether NLM UI or an ISBN.  Because DOCLINE 6 manual ordering does allow book ordering, and because 98% of requests are for articles, UI ordering for books was not part of the DOCLINE redesign initial release.  Development plans do include improved book ordering in the future.

Q: One of our librarians left a note: We cannot send PubMed search results to “order to” DOCLINE. Not sure if this is a comment about a new change, or a request for an upgrade. Could you give me information that I can share with our hospital librarians?
A: This feature is not currently available in DOCLINE. It is also not currently on our development schedule. This feature existed in the previous version of DOCLINE. As PubMed is currently undergoing a redesign, we are waiting until the redesign is complete before we develop new integrations with the PubMed system.

Q: When will we be able to submit multiple PMIDs in DOCLINE?
A: Now available! Please check the DOCLINE blog for more updates.

PubMed 

Q: Do you know when the training handouts will be updated to reflect the new version of PubMed?
A. We now have slides for your use! Here is the link for slides introducing new users to PubMed.

Q: I am hearing a concern that the new interface will be a difficult transition for older, experienced users of PubMed (clinicians–doctors at hospitals). Are you doing usability testing with older people?
A: PubMed Labs is under active development, and features will be introduced and updated on a regular basis as we continue to enhance the system. We are continuing to prioritize features based on user research, including usability testing and feedback from users. The Labs usability testing has been and will continue to be wide-ranging. We endeavor to talk to as many users as possible [including older users familiar with the PubMed interface].

EFTS

Q: Will Medical Library Association membership be required when EFTS transitions to be a service hosted by MLA?
A: No, MLA membership will not be required. Please check the MLA blog post for more information.

Please let us know if you have a question that we did not answer. We are happy to investigate for you.

 

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2019-10-11 05:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

National Health Observances: Looking for tools and materials to promote Health Literacy Month? Check out the NNLM Community Engagement Network’s National Health Observances page for premade slides, handouts, social media blurbs, and kits that support health programming throughout the year. You can also explore health literacy with the NNLM Reading Club.

Sleep: Getting Your Z’s with My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can learn all about sleep, including how much sleep you need, sleep disorders, improving your sleep habits, and more! Subscribe to receive My MedlinePlus via email.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Request for Information (RFI): The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is supported by a cooperative agreement (UG4) that operates on a five-year cycle. As we prepare for the start of the next cycle (in May 2021), we are seeking input and feedback from the public on ways to ensure that the NNLM can continue to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individuals’ access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The deadline to respond is December 2, 2019.

NNLM Delivery is live! Our upgraded document delivery, storage and retrieval service is now available! The old platform, MARDelivery, will be discontinued on November 1, 2019. Visit delivery.nnlm.gov to start using NNLM Delivery today.

In the Region – This fall many of the MAR staff are on the road, we’ve welcomed a new Community Engagement Coordinator, and we launched a new service for NNLM Members! Read about more of our recent activities to learn what your Regional Medical Library is doing to support health outreach and programming in NY, NJ, PA and DE. – MARquee News Highlights

Save the Date for the next NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, coming up on November 20, 2019! Follow #CiteNLM to get the latest details as they become available.

Increase Information Literacy: Host a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon – MCR News

Keeping Up with the Facts Related to Lung Illnesses from E-cigarettes and Vaping – NER Update

New on YouTube:  Cooking Classes without a Kitchen, September 24, 2019

NLM/NIH News

Taking NLM’s Story to Capitol Hill – Last month, [Dr. Patricia Brennan] had the honor of joining National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, and four other NIH Institute Directors to provide testimony before the U.S. House Congressional Subcommittee on Appropriations for NIH Investments in Medical Research. This was the first time in 12 years that NLM provided testimony to Congress. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

World Health Organization: Picturing Health for All – This week, World Health Organization: Picturing Health for All, a new special display, opened in the History of Medicine Division Reading Room of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The exhibition features a selection of images from the NLM Prints & Photographs collection of World Health Organization (WHO) photographs that highlight some of WHO’s work in the 20th century. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Multiplex Rainbow Technology Offers New View of the Brain – The NIH-led Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies® (BRAIN) Initiative is revolutionizing our understanding of how the brain works through its creation of new imaging tools. One of the latest advances—used to produce this rainbow of images—makes it possible to view dozens of proteins in rapid succession in a single tissue sample containing thousands of neural connections, or synapses. – NIH Director’s Blog

NIMH Twitter Chat: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) – Join the National Institute of Mental Health for a one-hour Twitter chat on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Follow or use #NIMHchats to join the conversation. October 16, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted several new features that have been added to the new PubMed.

NIH News in Health: Read the October 2019 issue, featuring, “A Well-Aged Mind: Maintaining Your Cognitive Health” and “Family Health Matters: How Twin Studies Can Help Everyone.”

New PubMed Recap: Did you miss A New PubMed: Highlights for Information Professionals? A recording, a list of key points and an FAQ page are now available from the webinar.

Job Opportunities at NLM: NLM is recruiting recent graduates with a master’s degree or higher to fill entry level positions across the Library. Applications are also being accepted for three unit head positions in the Division of Library Operations.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

October 2019

Helping Patrons Navigate “Dr. Google” – October 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Technology is continuing to improve, and more and more people are looking online for health information, managing care, and trusted advice. Despite the increasing use, there is a digital divide for many individuals with low health literacy. Sponsored by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR), this webinar will discuss how Wisconsin Health Literacy developed a digital health literacy program, Health Online: Finding Information You Can Trust, to focus on improving the digital divide. Learn about strategies to make digital resources user friendly for all patrons and ways to help them access reliable health information online.

The Tide is Rising and So are We: Stabilizing Our Communities Through Climate Change and Resilience Programming – October 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Libraries, as important communities centers and partners, have an important role to play in education around tough subjects including emergency preparedness, our relationship to climate change and brainstorming ideas for building community resilience. In this session with the New England Region (NER), participants will reflect on the outcomes of Climate Preparedness Week 2019 that included more than 50 library events across Massachusetts, discuss lessons learned, best practices and what you can do to help foster climate change and resilience discussions and events at your institutions.

Being a Better Ally to All – October 16, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) for this next installment of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Nine Conversations that Matter to Health Sciences Librarians with Jessica Pettitt. Every organization has a group of stakeholders, staff, and volunteers who must foster effective communication through conflict, change, and crisis. With increased comfort and confidence, you can be prepared to hold and encourage others to have the challenging conversations that lead to better collaboration and teamwork. Developing a culture based on listening, speaking up, and taking responsibility builds teams of cooperation for the short- and long-term.

Health Information Needs of Immigrant Populations – October 16, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Join the Pacific Southwest Region (PSR) for this one-hour webinar that will address the health issues, public health implications, and health literacy needs of immigrant populations. Learn about methods to improve health literacy and address information access issues. We will review reliable health information resources, which include the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus, HealthReach, and the Disaster Information Management Research Center.

Health Insurance Literacy and How Librarians Can Help – October 16, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Many adults have difficulty knowing how to find a physician, fill a prescription, use and pay for medications, and use health information to make informed decisions about their health. Libraries are prominent places in communities making libraries and librarians excellent resources for advancing health information literacy. Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and guest presenter Emily Vardell, Ph.D., for this webinar that will address these critical information needs.

2019 Fall Wikipedia Edit-a-thon Overview – October 17, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Are you interested in improving mental health information available on Wikipedia? Do you want to utilize your librarian research skills towards making Wikipedia a better, evidence-based resource? Have you always wanted to participate in, or learn how to host your own edit-a-thon? In preparation for the NNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on November 20, join the New England Region (NER) for this edit-a-thon training overview with a live question and answer session.

Health Statistics on the Web – October 17, 4:30-5:30 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course focuses on the location, selection, and effective use of statistics relevant to health on the local, state, national, and international levels. The importance and relevance of health statistics in various contexts will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several statistics Internet resources through the use of numerous exercises. In addition to 1 MLA CE, this program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour.

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community – October 22, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this course will provide an overview of ideas to conduct health outreach and create health programs for libraries and community/faith based organizations. Participants will learn how to integrate resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies to introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways.

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW): An Overview and Action – October 23, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join the the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) and guest speaker Marisa Miakonda Cummings, Director of Native Student Services at the University of South Dakota, for a one-hour webinar on the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women. Participants will discuss a historical perspective and current challenges in reporting and jurisdiction. Opportunities for ally ship and advocacy with legislation will also be discussed. The outcome of this presentation will lead to more informed librarians and better community advocates.

November 2019

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – November 5, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), this class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention.  The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour.

PubMed for Libraries: Introduction – November 8, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM ET – PubMed for Librarians is made up of five 90-minute classes presented via WebEx that include hands-on exercises. In the first webinar, participants will learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a basic PubMed search, assess your search results, analyze search details, customize PubMed with My NCBI, search for a known citation; plus, brief introductions to MeSH, automatic term mapping, search tags and subheadings. This class will be demonstrated in the new PubMed interface. All demonstrations will be done in PubMed Labs.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Posting:

Health Resource Highlight:  The Pennsylvania Insurance Department’s health literacy group provides resources on health insurance literacy, including mental health and substance use disorder, short-term health insurance plans, health insurance special enrollment, and health insurance appeals.

Empowering Primary Care Using Data and Analytics to Build a Healthier America – AHRQ Views

Hospital Libraries Section (HLS)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Professional Development Grant – Whether you are in the middle of your career or new to it all, or have worked for many years, the HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant is an opportunity for an amazing professional journey into education or research. The grant is open to librarians working in a hospital, health system or similar clinical settings. Grant funds can be used for professional development through MEDLIB-ED or to help attend the MLA Annual Meeting or CE courses. It may also be used to support reimbursement for expenses incurred in conducting research such as a statistician to help with survey design, analyses etc. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2019.

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship – The Medical Library Association (MLA) is now accepting applications for The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. The purpose of this fellowship is to fund research aimed at expanding the research knowledge base, linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and advances in biomedical research. The endowment will provide a grant of up to $10,000.  It is awarded by MLA through a competitive grant process, to a qualified health sciences librarian, health professional, researcher, educator, or health administrator. The deadline to apply is November 15, 2019.

Engaging Citizen Scientists: Will the Walls of the Ivory Towers Come Tumbling Down? – October 16, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Citizen scientists have been engaged to measure bird migration, the proliferation of plastics pollution, and disease outbreaks. As a scientist, are you afraid of competition from members of the public? If you are a member of the public, would you like to join this movement? In this free webinar, listen in as a group of citizen science gurus discusses its pros and cons. Sponsored by Fondation IPSEN.

MLA Diversity and Inclusion Task Force Critical Librarianship Webinar Series – Want to know what critical librarianship looks like in practice? In this free webinar, hear three working librarians talk about how they use critical librarianship in their everyday practice. Sponsored by MLA – October 21, 2:00-3:30 PM ET.

Grey (Literature) Matters: Structuring Your Google Search – November 6, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Join Sarah Bonato for the second of a two-part series on grey (literature) matters.  You’ll learn how to address the challenges of Google searches, adapt a database search, employ decision aids, set search limits, optimize data saturation, track search results, and select a search scope. You’ll also examine examples of published research projects that used Google and look at alternative search engines, such as DuckDuckGo, MillionShort, and WolframAlpha. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

Navigating LGBTQ Adolescent Health for the Healthcare Provider – The New York State Area Health Education Center System, in collaboration with the Clinical Education Initiative, will be hosting a continuing education seminar on Saturday, October 12 in Buffalo, NY titled Navigating LGBTQ Adolescent Health for the Healthcare Provider. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth must navigate the typical challenges of adolescence while also managing the social stigma associated with their emerging sexual/gender identities. This seminar will highlight the unique health and developmental challenges of LGBTQ youth, and discuss ways to address these issues in the clinical setting. Registration is $125 for health professionals and $25 for students.

Western Pennsylvania Health Literacy Event – Visit Carlow University in Pittsburgh on Friday, October 25 to celebrate Health Literacy Month! Hosted by the Healthcare Council of Western Pennsylvania (HCWP) in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Health Literacy Coalition, this free event will feature sessions on the basics of health literacy, unconscious bias, and cultural humility. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn how to apply health literacy techniques to their personal and professional lives.

OpenCon 2019 in Philadelphia, PA – Join Temple University on November 1 for OpenCon Philly, a free one-day series of panels and interactive workshops for idea exchange and learning around open access, open education, and open data. Connect with regional colleagues and find future collaborators as you share success stories, learn from each other’s failures, and discuss challenges in your work towards making research, educational materials, data, and government information more equitable and accessible to all. This event is free and open to all! Registration for the event is now available.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

Increase Information Literacy: Host a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

MCR News - Thu, 2019-10-10 13:51

Liz Waltman, Outreach, Education, and Communications Coordinator, NNLM SEA

April Wright, All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator, NNLM SEA

 

NNLM’s mission “to improve the public’s access to information to facilitate making informed decisions about their health” relies on building the skills of consumers and librarians in finding, reading, understanding, and using authoritative health information.

Information literacy, and more precisely related to NNLM’s mission, health information literacy, is a practice. As with any skill, information literacy must be learned, practiced, refined, and used for school assignments, looking critically at the news, and evaluating websites. In this regard, Wikipedia edit-a-thons are excellent tools for teaching and learning information literacy skills – they require that participants assess existing information, decide where changes need to be made, and add citations to relevant and authoritative sources.

This fall, join NNLM in our ongoing #citeNLM campaign by hosting a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at your organization. By hosting an event you will be joining a network of librarians, health professionals, and students from around the country working to improve the quality of mental health articles on Wikipedia using trusted National Library of Medicine resources. To get you started, we have created a Guide for Organizers that will walk you through the steps of hosting your own edit-a-thon. In this toolkit you will find an overview of the #citeNLM project, a comprehensive planning checklist, sample marketing materials, and a guide to share with your participants. We also invite you to attend our training session on Thursday, October 17 where you will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn more information, and connect with the #citeNLM community.

No matter if you host your own event or join us for our virtual edit-a-thon on November 20, we look forward to working with you to improve mental health information on Wikipedia! Check out nnlm.gov/wiki to learn more about the project and make sure to follow along on Twitter with the hashtag #citeNLM to ask questions, post photos, and share your Wikipedia experience.

Categories: RML Blogs

Pages