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DOCLINE 6.0 preview coming in November!

MCR News - Fri, 2018-10-19 18:44

The preview period for the newly redesigned DOCLINE 6.0 will begin in November 2018; watch for an email with your library’s invitation. During the preview, please confirm your login and connection to your library.

As you might imagine, NLM DOCLINE customer support resources are limited.  In order to provide support to each library that needs it, there will be phased login testing over multiple weeks. You will receive an email when your individual preview period begins.

The existing system will be available until DOCLINE 6.0 is ready for borrowing and lending.

If you have any questions, please send them to the NLM Help Desk or refer to the documentation.

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar Discusses Reaching Latino Population

MCR News - Fri, 2018-10-19 13:38

Hear how one agency reached Latinos in rural Minnesota at a webinar on Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities Through Virtual Community Health and Wellness Workshops on Wednesday, Oct. 24, from 1-2 pm CT.

The session offered by the Greater Midwest Regional Medical Library will describe how CLUES (Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio) designed, implemented, and evaluated a virtual health and wellness workshop series covering mental health and wellness topics and targeting the Latino community. The session will wrap up with considerations for other organizations when targeting outreach efforts to the Latino population within their hard-to-reach rural communities.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2018-10-19 12:05

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

The MAReport: read the Summer/Fall 2018 issue of the MAReport newsletter! This quarter, Health Professions Coordinator Erin Seger wrote about her experiences at the 17th annual Philadelphia Trans Wellness Conference, and LGBT health information needs in her article, “LGBT Health Information Resources.”

Member Highlights: Stony Brook University, Southampton, NY – learn about how the Applied Health Informatics Program at Stony Brook used NNLM MAR funding to conduct a Wellness Fair for seniors, and later encorporated the project into the curriculum of the AHI program, providing students with a “real-life” learning experience. Has your organization developed a similar program? Share your story with us to receive a Member Highlight on the MARquee!

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Awards: NNLM MAR is accepting applications for the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Award, for projects that broaden access to, and awareness of health information resources, aim to increase health literacy for the general public in their service community, and raise awareness of the All of Us Research Program. Applications are due November 9 (for projects between $20,000 and $50,000) and November 16 (for projects up to $19,000). If funded, all projects must be completed by April 30, 2019.

New Opportunity for NNLM MAR members: apply to host a traveling exhibition – complete a brief survey by November 9 to indicate your interest in hosting a traveling exhibition from the National Library of Medicine.

The Fall 2018 offering for The Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey’s Group Licensing Initiative (HSLANJ GLI) is still available. MAR members are eligible for this cost-saving opportunity! The deadline to participate is Friday, November 9. Interested in future participation? Join us on November 5 for a 1-hour webinar to learn more about the HSLANJ GLI, with Project Manager Robert T. Mackes!

Meet MAR Staff: Michelle Burda, Education and Health Literacy Coordinator for NNLM MAR,  will be presenting Engage for Health: Taking an Active Role in Your Health Care, at the Where to Turn Resource Fair in Pittsburgh, PA on Tuesday, October 23, 2018. She will be exhibiting and sharing NLM’s health information with social service, human resource, education and health care professionals from the Western PA region.

NLM/NIH News

Data in the Scholarly Communications Solar SystemNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Laughter at the National Library of Medicine?NLM in Focus, a Look Inside the U.S. National Library of Medicine

NIH Director’s Blog

“Fit to Fight”: Home front Army doctors and VD during WW ICirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

NLM Funding Opportunity: Information Resource Grants to Reduce Health Disparities – This funding opportunity announcement calls for projects that develop and deploy a new information resource or service, or expand and improve an existing resource or service in order to meet the needs of a health disparity population. The application deadline is October 22, 2018, by 5:00 PM local time of the applicant organization.

NIH Request for Information on Proposed Provisions for a Future Draft Data Management and Sharing Policy: On October 10, 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a Request for Information (RFI) in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts to solicit public input on proposed key provisions that could serve as the foundation for a future NIH policy for data management and sharing. The feedback they obtain will help to inform the development of a draft NIH policy for data management and sharing, which is expected to be released for an additional public comment period upon its development. Comments on the proposed key provisions will be accepted through December 10, 2018. To further engage stakeholders, NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the proposed key provisions on November 7, 2018, from 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. ET.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

All are webinars, unless noted. Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share these opportunities!

Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities Through Virtual Community Health and Wellness Workshops – October 24, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by GMR, this session will provide attendees with background information about the Latino community, inlcuding demographics and health issues, both in the United States and in Minnesota. The presenters will describe how they designed, implemented, and evaluated a virtual health and wellness workshop series, covering mental health and wellness topics, targeting the Latino community in rural Minnesota towns. The session will wrap up with considerations that other organizations can use when targeting outreach efforts to the Latino population within their local and hard-to-reach rural communities.

NNLM Wikipedia Fall 2018 Edit-a-thon training – October 31, 2:00-2:30 PM ET – Register for this three-part training series in preparation for our Fall 2018 Edit-a-thon! Are you interested in improving the consumer health information available on Wikipedia? Do you want to utilize your librarian research skills towards making Wikipedia a better, evidence-based resource? Have you always wanted to participate in an edit-a-thon? This final session will provide a highlight of women’s health resources from the National Library of Medicine, including how to identify and evaluate pertinent information resources for possible use during the edit-a-thon.

HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative – November 5, 12:00-1:00 PM ET – Join MAR for this webinar about the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey’s Group Licensing Initiative (HSLANJ GLI). Project Manager Robb Mackes will provide an overview of the GLI, including the benefits and what you need to consider in order to participate. If you have been thinking about participating, this is a perfect opportunity to have your questions answered! All medical librarians in a 20-state area including the NNLM’s Middle Atlantic (MAR), Southeastern/Atlantic (SE/A), and New England (NER) Regions are welcome to participate in this technology-sharing, cost-cutting consortium.

Help Us Combat the World’s Most Dangerous Animal with an App! – November 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET – Mosquitoes are the world’s most dangerous animal, and there is something we can all do to reduce the threat of mosquito-transmitted disease in our communities. Join SCR for this webinar to find out why mosquitoes are so dangerous and to learn how NASA Earth-observing satellite data is being used in an effort to predict, monitor, and respond to vector-borne disease around the world. In this presentation, participants will be introduced to a program that connects with citizen scientists of all ages to monitor changes in the frequency, range, and distribution of potential disease vector mosquitoes by reporting observations using the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper app.

Inside Our Minds – November 16, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Inside Our Minds is a Pittsburgh-based organization that works to elevate the voices of people with lived experience of mental illness and madness. As an entirely peer-controlled organization, Inside Our Minds works in response to the lack of people with lived experience of the mental health system involved in leading and advising mental health advocacy organizations. Sponsored by MAR, this webinar will discuss the foundations of Inside Our Minds and its commitment to community-based radical mental health programming, providing an overview of what Inside Our Minds offers and why it is important for our community.

Understanding Grief After an Overdose Death – November 28, 1:00-2:00 PM ET – Sponsored by NER, this webinar focuses on the dynamics of grief after a death caused by substance use. It begins with a look at three key questions people bereaved by an overdose death commonly ask themselves: “Why did the person die from an overdose?” “Did the person intend to die?” “Was the death preventable?” It also covers the stigma, stress, and trauma that can come with grief after a death from substance use, and it considers issues that begin to influence survivors’ experience of grief and loss long before a death occurs, such as struggling with a loved one’s addiction and the demands of caring for a chronically ill person.

Understanding the Opioid Crisis: Where do I begin? – November 28, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – An estimated 1.9 million people in the U.S. have a prescription opioid use disorder, while another 586,000 have a heroin use disorder. Sponsored by MAR, this class will help you to understand what addiction and opioids are and where you can find authoritative information to understand this complex epidemic. Participants will learn about many resources and explore ideas for their use in community outreach education and programs. This class is appropriate for anyone providing health information to the general public including public and medical librarians, patient or community educators and healthcare professionals.

New classes on-demand! Looking for more self-paced learning opportunities? Check out the new Community Health Maps online course from the National Library of Medicine. This class will help you gain the skills needed to assist communities and individuals collect and map health-related data: to build a plan for collecting data; to create the forms for capturing data points; to use a mobile device to collect the data; and to visualize health data by creating online and printable maps that can be customized to meet the needs of your audience and stakeholders.

Other Items of Interest

Job posting: Electronic Resources Librarian, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scott Memorial Library at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.

Grants.gov will be down for maintenance October 20-22, 2018 to allow for a system upgrade. Details.

October is Health Literacy Month – health.gov, from the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2018 – NLPPW, held October 21-27, 2018, is a call to action to bring together families, individuals, community-based organizations, state and local governments and others, to increase lead poisoning prevention awareness and increase efforts to reduce childhood exposure to lead.

Diversity in Clinical Research – Monday, October 22, 2:00 PM ET – The Office of Minority Health at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will host this one-hour webinar to discuss strategies for increasing Hispanic enrollment in clinical trials.  The FDA does not conduct clinical trials, but relies on data discovered in them to determine whether medical products are safe and effective. Participation from certain populations, however, is low.  As of the 2010 Census nearly ten percent of the population in rural and small-towns is Hispanic, making them the largest minority group in these areas.

Learn About the Rural Health Research Gateway – Tuesday, October 23, 3:30 PM ET – Hear from Dr. Shawnda Schroeder, principal investigator of the Rural Health Research Gateway, as she gives a brief overview of the Gateway and how the website and its resources can benefit rural community programs and State Offices of Rural Health. In this 30-minute presentation, Schroeder will discuss how to use the resources available, and why rural health research is important for rural community and healthcare facility planning.

Seeking Applications to Curb the Public Health Impact of Unhealthy Alcohol Use – AHRQ Views

Who Doesn’t Love a Good Story? Using Stories in Academic and Community-Based Health Education – November 7, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Are you looking for ways to grab attention, increase recall, and improve understanding in your bioscience, clinical, or community-based health information literacy skills courses or workshops? Stories are a well-documented means for accomplishing these goals! They are an innovative pedagogical tool that supports active learning, builds context, transcends culture, and brings complex ideas to life. Join this MLA webinar to gain fundamental knowledge and strategies on using stories in health education. You will discuss benefits and challenges of using stories and experience, and interact with stories as part of your learning. And you will leave inspired to spin tales in your next class! #MLAStories. The cost of this webinar is $65 for MLA members/ $85 for non-members.

Easy Steps to Building a Team-Based Systematic Review Service-A new model – Novemver 9, 9:30 AM-12:00 PM ET – The Philadelphia chapter of MLA is sponsoring a CE course at Temple’s Ginsburg Library. If you are interested in implementing a team-based systematic review service at your library, but don’t know where to begin, this course is for you. It will support librarians who have to educate, guide, and support researchers throughout all stages of the process. This interactive course will consist of hands-on learning activities, give you the tools to be successful, and perhaps the confidence needed to lead a systematic review team! Earn 2 MLA CE credits and meet with your local library colleagues during this engaging class. Lunch and CE credits included with cost.

Apply now to participate in the 2019 Critical Appraisal Institute for Librarians! – Craving more confidence in leading EBM sessions for medical students? Puzzled on how to guide students about study design and in depth critical appraisal? Frustrated with statistics? This six week online program will develop librarian’s critical appraisal skills via enhanced understanding of research design, biomedical statistics, and clinical reasoning to apply knowledge in teaching target populations. The program will take place January 23-March 4, 2019. Participants may be eligible for up to 35 MLA CE credits (approval pending).

Call for Applications to the MLA Research Training Institute (RTI) – Apply by December 1 for this week-long residential workshop that provides librarians and library information professionals with the opportunity to work intensively on research design and planning to conduct research, that improves practice and adds to the professional knowledgebase. The workshop will be held in Chicago from July 15–19, 2019.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – October 19, 2018

SEA News - Fri, 2018-10-19 08:28

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Celebrating National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunity

Webinars October 22-26

Webinars October 29 – November 2

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NLM Technical Bulletin

NCBI Insights

Miscellaneous News

NNLM SEA Communications

Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

October is Health Literacy Month!

PSR Newsletter - Thu, 2018-10-18 16:28

Celebrated annually in October, Health Literacy Month is a time for organizations and individuals to promote the importance of understandable health information. This annual, worldwide, awareness-raising event has been going on since 1999. The theme for Health Literacy Month is Be a Health Literacy Hero. It’s about taking action and finding ways to improve health communication. Health Literacy Heroes are individuals, teams, or organizations who not only identify health literacy problems but also act to solve them. Health literacy refers to how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, and how well they understand them. It is also about using them to make good health decisions. More than 90 million adults in the United States have low health literacy. It affects their ability to make health decisions, and can harm their health. They may have trouble managing chronic diseases, and leading a healthy lifestyle. They may go to the hospital more often, and have poorer health overall. Find out how your library can celebrate Health Literacy Month!

Recipients of the 34th Guam Legislatures resolution as Guam’s Health Literacy Advocates

Recipients of the 34th Guam Legislatures resolution as Guam’s Health Literacy Advocates: (from left to right) Cherie Taisacan (USNH), Luis Martinez (USNH), Sen. Dennis Rodriguez, Dr. Phillip Tutnauer (GRMC), Renee Veksler (GMHA), Johnny Sablan (Department of Chamorro Affairs, Guam Public Libraries), Melliza Young (GRMC), Erica Taijeron (GRMC), Janice Baldonado (GRMC), and Kathleen Ho (GRMC)

Health literacy advocates conduct awareness campaigns through promoting use of culturally-sensitive and reader-centered health information materials, as well as by encouraging healthcare professionals to use plain language and effective communication skills when they discuss medical care with patients and their families. In the Pacific Southwest Region, Guam Regional Medical City (GRMC) joined with the island’s other hospitals and the Nieves M. Flores Public Library to host a special presentation celebrating Health Literacy Month on October 17 at the Nieves M. Flores Public Library.

GRMC Patient Education Team showing their legislative resolution certificate

GRMC Patient Education Team showing their legislative resolution certificate from the 34th Guam Legislature, honoring them as one of the island’s health literacy advocates: (from left to right) Erica Taijeron (patient educator), Janice Baldonado (patient educator), Kathleen Ho (Chief Nursing Officer), Melliza Young (Patient Education Manager) (not in photo: Kalyne Roberto, Patient Education Coordinator)

Senator Dennis Rodriguez presented a legislative resolution declaring October as Health Literacy Month and honoring the island’s health literacy advocates like GRMC, Guam Memorial Hospital, US Naval Hospital, and Nieves M. Flores Public Library. There was also a special guest reader from GRMC who read the story Tricky Treat to children at the public library. Tricky Treat is a children’s book on diabetes education created by the Native American Diabetes Project.

Your very own NNLM PSR celebrated Health Literacy Month at the 16th Annual Visión y Compromiso Conference. Yamila El-Khayat, Nora Franco, and Kelli Ham were pleased to exhibit and discuss how resources such as MedlinePlus, Healthfinder.gov, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) may be used to increase health literacy in the areas Visión y Compromiso serves – Washington, Oregon, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, one region in Mexico, and 12 regions in California. Each month, 4,000 Visión y Compromiso Promotores provide 120,000 Californians with health information! Promotores are “liaisons between their communities and health and social service providers.” Learn more about Promotores. And because Promotores share and understand the nuances, lived experiences, and values that make up these cultures, they create a natural bridge between them and the health-care system. Culture affects our perceptions, definitions, and interactions with society, which is an integral piece of health literacy. Supporting the expertise and skills of groups such as Promotores highlights one way libraries can help create more health-literate societies.

Nora Franco and Yamila El-Khayat at an exhibit booth with a promotora

Nora Franco and Yamila El-Khayat introducing MedlinePlus en español to a promotora at the Visión y Compromiso conference in Ontario, CA

Another fun event was the 8th Annual Día de Los Libros and Fall into Literacy Festival held in Wilmington, California, on October 13. Surprisingly, the event was nearly rained out – highly unusual for Southern California! Luckily, the skies cleared, and Nora and Kelli shared information with many members of the community about easy-to-understand health resources in English, Spanish, and other languages. Children were delighted to receive bilingual coloring booklets about healthy activities, and visitors appreciated learning about MedlinePlus and other resources that were available en español.

How is your library celebrating Health Literacy Month?

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

New Opportunity for NNLM MAR members: apply to host a traveling exhibition

MAR News - Thu, 2018-10-18 15:06

The National Library of Medicine Exhibition Program creates lively and informative exhibitions and resources that enhance awareness of and appreciation for the collection and health information resources of the National Library of Medicine. These exhibitions and supportive educational resources engage diverse audiences and explore a variety of topics in the history of medicine. The National Library of Medicine provides traveling banner exhibitions free of charge to public, university, and medical libraries, as well as cultural centers across the country. Each exhibition has an accompanying web presence with additional resources and activity ideas.

NLM is making several exhibitions available exclusively to NNLM member organizations. If you have wanted to host an exhibition but were intimidated by years-long waiting periods, now is your chance to bring an exhibition to your library, school or community setting. Exhibition availability varies – dates are available from January 2019 until April 2021.

Details:
• A set itinerary of 6-week booking periods will be established that will allow for up to 6 host venues per 12-month period. We will do our best to accommodate each request. Schedules will be finalized in mid-December.
• Each host library will be responsible for the cost and arrangements for outgoing shipping from their library to the next host library. FEDEX 3-day super saver service is the required shipping method. For those without a FEDEX account, another reliable service such as UPS or DHL may be used as long as it meets the 3-day service with tracking.
• NLM will provide support to host libraries by providing exhibitor resources to assist with hosting as well as outgoing shipping information to let host venues know where and when to ship the exhibition to the next host venue. Host institutions will be required to complete a brief survey about their experience hosting the exhibit.

Once you know when/if your organization is hosting an exhibition, consider organizing related programming around the exhibition. Shipping costs, guest speaker and other programming fees are a great use of NNLM MAR Outreach Awards. Clinton-Essex-Franklin Library System applied for funds for a year of programming, beginning with its hosting of Confronting Violence: Improving Women’s Lives. Requests for proposals will be announced in early 2019 for projects from May 1, 2019 to April 30, 2020.

To see which exhibitions are available and to indicate your interest in hosting, please complete the survey by November 9, 2018: Survey link

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Meet Rachel Johnson, CAE, Communications Services Division Chief Prince William County Public Library System Office of Community Engagement

SEA News - Thu, 2018-10-18 11:17
Prince William County Public Library System

Prince William Library System Director Deborah Wright and Assistant Director Joslyn Bowling Dixon (center, left to right) receive a Certificate of Completion upon solidifying collaborative consumer health program plans for the year with partners from Virginia Commonwealth University and the Prince William County Health District

Rachel Johnson, CAE
Communications Services Division Chief
Prince William County Public Library System Office of Community Engagement
Prince William, VA

October is Health Literacy Month, a time to focus on your overall health and well-being, and get access to resources and information to help you do so. The Prince William Public Library System provides a valuable asset to our users on their journey to a healthier self. Not only does the Library offer resources in both digital and print, but we have recently begun to offer health and wellness programs to our patrons.

In addition to numerous databases, the library also provide access to the Health and Wellness Resource Center for our users. This digital resource offers carefully compiled and trusted medical reference materials for informational purposes. Our premium online resources provide our users access to health and medical journals, videos, and general interest publications.

Aside from our databases, we provide our library patrons access to many personal health and wellness improvement books, eBooks, and audio materials. Resources like Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics: A 10% Happier How-To Book by Daniel Harris is available in multiple formats. This guide to meditation debunks its misconceptions and provides a wealth of techniques. How to Be Well: The Six Keys to a Happy and Healthy Life by Frank Lipman helps patrons learn the habits and tactics to improve health and establish lifelong vitality.

Starting this month through November, we plan to offer a number of different health-focused programs throughout the library system including everything from Child & Me Yoga to Healthy Holiday Eating to a Community Health Open House. At the Community Health Open House, we intend to bring together representatives from local and regional agencies to answer questions our community members have related to health topics like heart attacks, strokes, and hypertension. We are excited about all of the upcoming programs we have scheduled throughout our library system and invite you to attend!

Bull Run Regional Library and Potomac Community Libraries are increasing their efforts to provide more resources as part of a greater Consumer Health initiative. This initiative includes partnerships with other health-related organizations in the county and throughout Virginia. This is a developing initiative that we will enhance our resources in the coming months for the public.

If you are in Prince William County, VA, we hope you visit the Public Library and take advantage of many of the health and wellness opportunities available!

Categories: RML Blogs

Get Your Flu Shot and Have a Healthier Winter

NER News - Thu, 2018-10-18 10:00

 

 if only some get vaccinated, the virus spreads. if most get vaccinated, spreading is contained.

Illustration from the CDC showing Herd Immunity, also known as Community Immunity

It’s that time of year again, the wind turns cold, the leaves change color and everyone is talking about the flu.  This year get the facts and get vaccinated to protect yourself, your family and your community.

Anyone can get the flu and have serious complications, but people over 65, people with chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease, pregnant women and children under five are at higher risk for hospitalization or death from the flu.

Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu shot every season. Children younger than 6 months and people who are allergic to some vaccine ingredients can’t be vaccinated. So getting your flu shot also protects them by containing the spread of the flu virus.

Why every year?  Because the flu strains that the vaccine protects against may change from year to year.  Even if it doesn’t change, the immune protection can decline over time, so getting your flu shot every year gives the best defense.

There are a lot of misconceptions and myths about the flu and the vaccine.  Below are some of the most common, but to learn more about flu and flu vaccine myths, visit the CDC’s Flu and Flu Vaccine Q&A page.

  1. You can get the flu from the vaccine.
    • FALSE: You can’t get the flu from the vaccine. Flu vaccines are made with “inactivated” (killed) viruses that can’t cause infection or by using a single gene from a flu virus instead of the whole virus.
  2. It’s better to get the flu than the vaccine. The flu isn’t that big of a deal.
    • FALSE: It is NOT better to get the flu instead of the vaccine. Flu can cause serious health complications, hospitalization or death even in generally healthy children and adults.
  3. You can get the flu if you’ve been vaccinated.
    • TRUE, but being vaccinated can still protect you from the more severe consequences.
    • And some people who think they got the flu after being vaccinated may have had a rhinovirus (common cold), or may have been exposed to the virus shortly before getting the shot. So it’s still important to get your shot.

Learn more about the flu shot by visiting MedlinePlus.  MedlinPlus also has flu and flu vaccine health information in multiple languages to share with family and friends.

And finally, flu season is a good reminder that kids aren’t the only ones who need vaccines.  Visit the CDC’s Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults to learn about vaccines that adults should be getting beyond their annual flu shot.

Categories: RML Blogs

Tomorrow – Breezing Along with the RML

MCR News - Tue, 2018-10-16 17:39

Join us tomorrow for Breezing Along with the RML!

Public Health Resources – Breezing Along with the RML
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 – 2 MT/3 CT
Register

The public health work force can have barriers to accessing tools to find the best evidence in public health research and practice. They can get help to break through those barriers from the NNLM Public Health Coordination Office (NPHCO.) We will provide an overview of their services and profile some of the organizations that benefit from those service along with future plans.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Funding Announcement: All of Us Community Engagement Project Award

SEA News - Tue, 2018-10-16 13:13

The All of Us Research Program’s goal is to learn how differences between us might lead to different types of treatments. With a goal to have one million people participate in this study, researchers may use this information to improve the health for everyone. As part of a partnership with the All of Us Research Program, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NNLM SEA) is pleased to offer the All of Us Community Engagement Project Award.

Amount: Up to $10,000

Application Deadline: Sunday, November 11, 2018

The purpose of the SEA All of Us Community Engagement Award is to support libraries for projects that improve health information literacy, improve access to, awareness of, and skills to locate high quality biomedical and health information, and improve understanding and importance in participation of clinical trials, including the All of Us Research program.

Potential Project Ideas

  • Hosting a symposium or panel presentations at public libraries that serve underrepresented or diverse populations on understanding clinical trials, informed consent, and what it means to participate in research.
  • Incorporating NLM health and science information resources and the All of Us Research Program community resources into new or existing health programs within public libraries. See National Health Observances for some ideas.
  • Training programs that educate finding and evaluating consumer health information found on the Internet and incorporate the All of Us Research Program.
  • Placing web-accessible computers in locations where they can be used by under-represented and minority populations to locate health information, free clinics, community health centers, and information on clinical trials, like the All of Us Research Program.
  • Train-the-trainer projects that enhance the skills of library staff and other consumer health information intermediaries to train a target population on locating and evaluating health information, clinical trials and informed consent, or the All of Us Research Program.
  • Exhibiting at community health fairs or presenting at local meetings to promote health literacy, NLM products and services, and the importance of participating in medical research.
  • Other creative ideas that integrate health information outreach and the All of Us Research program are strongly encouraged.

SEA staff are available for consultations. Please email NNLM SEA to schedule an appointment.

Please visit the All of Us Community Engagement Project Award for details regarding the award, eligibility, and to access the application.

Categories: RML Blogs

Seeking News Following Hurricane Michael

SEA News - Tue, 2018-10-16 12:45

Hurricane Florence swept across the southeastern United States and devastated the Gulf Coast. It is impossible for NNLM SEA to know which of our network members have suffered loss or damage based upon news reports.

Have you, your library or organization experienced ill effects from the storm?

Is there good news after the hurricane that you would like to share with our network members?

We would still like to hear from you! Please call our office at 410-706-2855, e-mail HSHSL-NLMsea@hshsl.umaryland.edu, or share in the comments section of this post.

Let us know; we want to hear from you!

Categories: RML Blogs

Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC)– Chelsea Misquith, Ruth Lilly Medical Library

GMR News - Tue, 2018-10-16 11:54

Thanks to the NNLM/GMR, I was able to attend the 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) this year in Albuquerque, New Mexico from September 26 – 30. JCLC is a joint initiative organized by the ethnic caucuses of the American Library Association (ALA): American Indian Library Association (AILA), the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), and REFORMA: The National Association to Promote Library & Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Historically, it has taken place every 6 years, and so I was incredibly lucky and grateful to be afforded the opportunity to attend this year.

Photo Credit: Jennifer Jones
Image Description: Session attendees standing on either side of the screen with a slide titled “Transforming Communities through Health Outreach & Programming” projected onto it.

 

I started JCLC off by attending the pre-conference session titled “Transforming Communities through Health Outreach and Programming”, by Lydia Collins, Christian Minter, Kelli Ham, and Jennifer Jones. During this 4-hour session, we discussed different levels of engagement and ways to conduct health outreach, and we brainstormed some solutions to common challenges to doing this work. Some key resources I learned about are:

  • NLM’s HealthReach has patient education materials in multiple languages
  • National Institute on Aging’s Go4Life has resources about physical activity and aging
  • American Libraries Association’s LibrariesTransform campaign for resources, toolkits, trends on library services backed by research and data that will be useful for library advocacy and promotion
  • MEDLINEPlus also has pet health resources!!

Special shout out to Lydia Collins for bringing the energy to the early morning 8 AM session!

I also had the opportunity to visit the University of New Mexico Library and Archives and learn a bit about their Indigenous Nations Library Program (INLP). Through the INLP, Indigenous/Native students have access to a welcoming space that includes study spaces and customized instruction sessions, in addition to LibGuides specific to Indigenous/Native research and topics.

 

Photo Credit: Carla Bywaters
Image Description: Me, standing in front of the desk in the West Wing reading room at the University of New Mexico Library.

 

Ana Ndumu’s session on “Engaging and serving Black immigrant communities” was a wealth of information and knowledge as well. Through the course of her session, I learned that the biggest information-related issue affecting Black immigrant communities in the US is Information Overload. During her research on Black immigrants’ information behaviors, she found some broad themes in the answers given by her focus group participants:

  • Compliance and Advancement: The information landscape is ever-changing, so they felt like they were constantly struggling to catch up with new information.
  • Concerns over Fake News
  • Ideas of “the public”/ministries: In their home countries, people don’t generally turn to public services (universities, etc) unless in need, so “public” libraries are assumed to be working for the government. This can lead to a distrust of libraries/library programs.
  • Importance of Community
  • Decentralized Information: It can be overwhelming and confusing to have multiple options to find information about something. For example, having different procedures for applying for an official document online vs. over the phone vs. in-person.

Here are her tips on what those of us in libraries can do to cater our services towards Black immigrants:

  • Continue doing what we are doing
  • Provide life management tools – how to use apps, information resilience (giving patrons the space to let people know when they feel overwhelmed by information)
  • Remember that personal narratives matter
  • Think about strengths, not deficits – don’t just focus on “Americanizing” people
  • Stay abreast on issues affecting Black immigrants
  • Pursue partnership (not intervention) and resilience (not remediation) – work together with their existing experience/credentials
  • Recruit Black immigrants to the Library and Information Sciences (LIS) profession – may be a great second career

For more information on her research and other resources, Ana Ndumu’s toolkit is available at blackimmigrantsinlibraries.com.

One poster that really stuck out for me was the one on the Virtual Blockson project by Jasmine Clark at Temple University. She has been working to convert the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American collections into Virtual Reality (VR), and she spoke about concerns over long-term preservation and accessibility as they relate to VR.

These are just a few snippets of the wonderful initiatives that I’ve learned about through JCLC. I appreciated how Black, Indigenous/Native, and other people of color were centered during this conference, and our experiences considered valid and real and not up for debate. Special shout out to this sign, pasted by Jennifer Brown, Jennifer Ferretti, Sofia Leung, and Marisa Mendez-Brady, outside their JCLC session titled “We Here: Community Building as Self Care”, which reads-

“DO NOT ENTER THIS ROOM IF YOU DON’T BELIEVE THE NARRATIVES OF PEOPLE OF COLOR.

everything being made and said in this room is rooted in believing the narratives of people of color and recognizing systemic oppression.”

Photo Credit: Jennifer A. Ferretti

 

Being surrounded by immensely talented people of color in LIS who’re working on innovative projects has been incredibly inspiring for me, especially as an early-career librarian of color. I’m also happy to have made some amazing new LIS friends, as well as getting the opportunity to meet up with an old one. I’m glad that I will not have to wait another 6 years for the next JCLC, as they’ve announced that it will be held in 2022 (location TBD)! I’m looking forward to it!

Chelsea Albuquerque Chair

Categories: RML Blogs

Science Boot Camp for Librarians – Scholarship Recipient Post 10

NER News - Tue, 2018-10-16 11:30

This is the tenth blog post in a series authored by twelve individuals who received scholarships to attend the 2018 Science Boot Camp held at Brandeis University on June 13-15, 2018. For more about this year’s Science Boot Camp resources or other upcoming events, please visit the NNLM NER website, or contact anyone in the NNLM NER office.

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New England Science Boot Camp 2018 – Alyssa Valcourt, MLIS

The Science Duck of Science Boot Camp, giving good advice about dragons.

NE Science Boot Camp for Librarians Scholarship Winner Blog Post

This year’s Science Boot Camp, hosted at Brandeis University), was another lesson of the highs and lows in all aspects of life for me. I was fortunate to receive a scholarship to attend the 2018 Boot Camp, which I was thrilled about (Boston! Science! Librarians! Yay!). However, I was unfortunate to have a raging cold the entire time. With the inner strength seemingly inherent to librarians (and a whole lot of Dayquil), I was able to enjoy my time at Science Boot Camp, learn so many interesting things, and meet some fantastic science librarians from all over.

Now that I’m back in the comfort of my library, I’d like to share 10 highlights and lessons I’ve learned from the three days at boot camp:

  1. Retraction Watch. My absolute favorite lecture of the conference was from Dr. Ivan Oransky of Retraction Watch. I loved that he took the initiative to contact a conference of librarians and ask to speak about his website- it is such an important tool in scholarly communication. I was delighted to learn that they are developing a Retraction Watch database (still in beta). The sheer amount of retractions makes it hard for them to report on all of them, but having them in a searchable database can help researchers double check their references or help show trends in retractions.
  2. Lozenges. Having a stash of cough drops in your purse can be the most important decision you make during the long lectures (and it can make you friends!).
  3. Twitter. Twitter is the place to be for librarians. Lots of conversations and information is shared on twitter, including other librarian’s takes on the conferences you attend. The official conference hashtag (#sciboot18) allowed me to contribute information related to the speakers’ subjects and let me follow the reactions of my fellow librarians in real time. I’ve made it a goal to be more involved on twitter in the coming year. So many important discussions are happening around librarianship and science in general on the platform- as a science librarian in a relatively isolated place, Twitter is a great way to stay connected.
  4. Community. Librarians answer questions, even seemingly rhetorical ones. It’s what we do. We also fight for free, openly accessible information, the privacy of our patrons, and the pursuit of knowledge. I feel so content when I’m with a large group of librarians- the general inquisitiveness and ability to stand up and demand answers reaffirms my love for the profession in an indescribable way. I know I’m not alone when I say that the most valuable parts of Boot Camp are the people involved, networking, and making new librarian friends.
  5. Citizen Science. Ecology is a broad field with vast applications, looking at individual species to entire biospheres. The future of Ecology, according to the speakers, Dr. Miranda Davis (University of Connecticut) and Dr. Brian Olsen (Brandeis University), will focus on environmental changes, holistic approaches, and big data. One of the contributors to big data is citizen science- crowdsourcing data from everyday wildlife enthusiasts through various websites and apps. One of these is iNaturalist, an app that allows any member to upload sightings of flora and fauna while out and about, provides data for researches, and even allows members to get species identifications from experts.
  6. Possums. Tick-borne diseases are becoming an increasing problem in ever-increasing areas of North America. Possums, widely impugned as being pests, eat ticks that carry those diseases. Therefore, possums are our friends.
  7. Evaluation. Researchers are often turned off of Open Access because they are worried about journal quality. Luckily, librarians have them covered: Carolyn Mills, librarian at University of Connecticut created this handy Evaluating Journal Quality LibGuide with a Creative Commons Attribution so we can share.
  8. ‘Magical’ Science. The Materials Science lectures, from Christopher Schuh (MIT) and Seth Fraden (Brandeis University), were displays of incredible innovation. Schuh, Director of the Materials Science and Engineering department at MIT, brought materials created by researchers in his department that show how magical this branch of science is – they have made big items shrink to a tiny size and have changed heavy metals to be feather-light – while Fraden’s lab at Brandeis has created animated particles from those that were once static. With these kinds of technologies, we’re just one great discovery away from “Wingardium Leviosa!”.  
  9. Mentors. Part of winning an early-career librarian scholarship to Boot Camp was the opportunity to have a mentor to connect with before, during, and after the experience. My mentor was Sue O’Dell from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. It was great to meet another science librarian in Maine and get to hear some great advice about professional development and science librarianship in general. I’ve said it before, the connections I made at Boot Camp were the most valuable part of the entire experience, hands down.
  10. Celebrations. This year was the 10th anniversary of the New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians. The entire camp was filled with small nods to the auspicious occasion, but Thursday night was an official celebration of the history of Boot Camp and, most importantly, the people who made it what it is today. Boot Camp was started with a mission to have an affordable way for science librarians to get together and learn about science in a fun and laid-back atmosphere. The night was filled with games, a photobooth, conversation, a killer science-themed playlist, and the sort of fun that only a group of librarians can supply. Here’s to the next ten years!  

I would like to thank the scholarship committee for making it possible for me to attend Boot Camp this year. I loved the whole experience (aside from my cold) and I can’t wait to return next year!

Anne Marie Engelsen
Science Reference Librarian
Fogler Library | University of Maine

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I hope you enjoy the latest installment of the Science Boot Camp for librarians. To read the first post please click here

Categories: RML Blogs

Member Highlights: Stony Brook University, Southampton, NY

MAR News - Tue, 2018-10-16 08:00

NNLM MAR is pleased to share successes of health outreach projects and activities in our region. Learn what your amazing colleagues are doing to increase access to quality health information for the communities they serve.

Connect to Your Health Fair

The Applied Health Informatics program at Stony Brook University received the “Outreach to Consumers” Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to conduct a Wellness Fair for the senior population in the Southampton, N.Y. The purpose of the Wellness Fair was to encourage patient engagement and health literacy through health technologies, patient-physician engagement and health and community resources. On September 27, 2018 the fair was held at the Hampton Bays Senior Center. It featured a discussion on patient-physician engagement by Dr. Charles V. Guida, Board-Certified Geriatrician from Stony Brook Southampton Hospital. Health fair stations were set up with iPads for interactive, age-specific, hands-on iPad training sessions relevant to health conditions (i.e. heart disease, diabetes, fall/risk prevention, medication management, nutrition and exercise and physical activity) in the senior population. There was one room dedicated to beginner iPad training sessions for seniors that were not comfortable with using technology. The interactive sessions were scheduled for 30-minutes. Seniors were also provided with community, preventative health and tick-disease resources and blood pressure screenings.

Over 40 seniors participated in the event. Seniors that were uncomfortable with using iPad technology were encouraged to participate in the beginner iPad training sessions. While the feedback from the senior population about the event was positive, there were several seniors that were resistant to using iPad technology. To address resistance and enable seniors to practice skills learned during the event, 15 iPads purchased from the grant were given to the Hampton Bays Senior Center. In addition, MedlinePlus and ChooseMyPlate shortcut icons were added to each iPad. Ongoing training sessions for iPad technology and MedlinePlus are currently being scheduled to improve the technical skills of the senior population. An evaluation will be distributed 30-days after the Wellness Fair to assess outcomes of learning activities. It is expected that the seniors that attended the Health Fair will increase their use and comfort with using iPad technology to access reliable health-related resources. It is also expected that participants will increase their engagement with their personal health.

The Applied Health Informatics (AHI) program at Stony Brook University partnered with Robert Chaloner, Chief Administrative Officer at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital and Liz Dwyer, director of Town of Southampton Senior Centers for this project. Students volunteered from the School of Health Technology & Management AHI program and the School of Nursing. Additionally, personnel from Stony Brook Southampton Hospital and Stony Brook Medicine participated. The “Connect to Your Health” project was woven into the curriculum of the AHI program providing students with a “real-life” learning experience. Their dedication and enthusiasm contributed to the success of this project. Findings from this research will indicate if this innovative educational opportunity has the potential to be an effective intervention that would merit further investigation.

This project was recently highlighted in an article from the Stony Brook University News.

To learn more about the Connect to Your Health Fair or the Applied Health Informatics Program at Stony Brook University, contact Program Director Carmen McCoy via email: carmen.mccoy@stonybrook.edu or telephone: (631) 357-6912.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Medical Librarians Month Feature: Medical Librarianship with Ruth Riley – LibraryVoicesSC Podcast Episode 64

SEA News - Mon, 2018-10-15 12:36

Ruth RileyRuth A. Riley, MS, AHIP
Assistant Dean for Executive Affairs
Director of Library Services
School of Medicine Library
University of South Carolina – Columbia, SC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curtis R. Rogers, Ed.D. Communications Director South Carolina State Library – Columbia, SC

Dr. Curtis Rogers, Communications Director for the South Carolina State Library and producer of the LibraryVoicesSC podcast, discusses medical librarianship, the University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine Library, and more with Ruth Riley, Director of Library Services at the USC School of Medicine in Columbia, South Carolina.

Ruth has served as Director of the USC School of Medicine Library since 2000. She has worked in three other academic health sciences libraries including the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Library, the Alfred Taubman Medical Library at the University of Michigan, and the J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

Since 2012, Ruth has also served as the Assistant Dean for Executive Affairs at the USC School of Medicine. She is presently serving as Past-President of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries and has served as Chair of the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association and Chair of the Partnership Among South Carolina Academic Libraries.

Listen online at Podbean, Stitcher, or TuneIn Radio today!

The episode is also featured on the South Carolina State Library website: http://www.statelibrary.sc.gov/news/medical-librarianship-ruth-riley-libraryvoicessc-podcast-episode-64.

Links featured in this episode:

USC School of Medicine Library: https://uscmed.sc.libguides.com/
Medical Librarian’s Month: https://www.mlanet.org/page/national-medical-librarians-month
MedlinePlus: https://medlineplus.gov

 

 

 

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming Webinar: Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities

GMR News - Mon, 2018-10-15 11:57

Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities Through Virtual Community Health and Wellness Workshops

10/24/2018 – 1:00 – 2:00 PM

This session will provide attendees with background information about the Latino community both in the United States and in Minnesota. An overview of current demographics and health issues will be covered. The presenters will then describe how they designed, implemented, and evaluated the virtual health and wellness workshop series*, covering mental health and wellness topics, targeting the Latino community in rural Minnesota towns. The session will wrap up with considerations that other organizations can use when targeting outreach efforts to the Latino population within their local and hard-to-reach rural communities.

To register, please visit: https://nnlm.gov/class/addressing-latino-health-and-wellness-disparities-through-virtual-community-health-and

This session will be presented by Carla Kohler, Manager of Community Health Services and Dr. Benjamín Feigal, Director of Mental Health Services at CLUES (Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio).

*This workshop series was developed with funding support from the Greater Midwest Region.

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming GMR Webinar: Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities

SEA News - Mon, 2018-10-15 11:29

Date/Time: October 24, 2018 1 PM CT/2 PM ET

Addressing Latino Health and Wellness Disparities Through Virtual Community Health and Wellness Workshops

This session will provide attendees with background information about the Latino community both in the United States and in Minnesota. An overview of current demographics and health issues will be covered. The presenters will then describe how they designed, implemented, and evaluated the virtual health and wellness workshop series, covering mental health and wellness topics, targeting the Latino community in rural Minnesota towns.* The session will wrap up with considerations that other organizations can use when targeting outreach efforts to the Latino population within their local and hard-to-reach rural communities.

Register Here: https://nnlm.gov/class/addressing-latino-health-and-wellness-disparities-through-virtual-community-health-and

This session will be presented by Carla Kohler, Manager of Community Health Services and Dr. Benjamín Feigal, Director of Mental Health Services at CLUES (Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio).

*This workshop series was developed with funding support from the GMR

Categories: RML Blogs

Register for Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community

MCR News - Fri, 2018-10-12 17:44

Register for the Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community course and learn how to  introduce your community members to resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other trustworthy organizations in exciting and engaging ways.

This course will give participants the ability to plan a potential health outreach or health program for their organization and to effectively provide NLM resources that are relevant to health needs of their community.

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Provisions for a Future Draft Data Management and Sharing Policy

SEA News - Fri, 2018-10-12 15:45

On October 10, 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a Request for Information (RFI) in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts to solicit public input on proposed key provisions that could serve as the foundation for a future NIH policy for data management and sharing.  The feedback we obtain will help to inform the development of a draft NIH policy for data management and sharing, which is expected to be released for an additional public comment period upon its development.

Comments on the proposed key provisions will be accepted through December 10, 2018, and can be made electronically by visiting here.

To further engage stakeholders, NIH will also be hosting a webinar on the proposed key provisions on November 7, 2018, from 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. ET. Details about the webinar, including how to register can be found by clicking here.

For a perspective on the importance of obtaining robust stakeholder feedback on this topic, please see the latest Under the Poliscope by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz.

Questions about the proposed provisions may be sent to the NIH Office of Science Policy at SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar Announcement: Help Us Combat the World’s Most Dangerous Animal with an App!

SEA News - Fri, 2018-10-12 14:15

Title: Help Us Combat the World’s Most Dangerous Animal with an App!

Guest Speaker: Dorian Janney, GLOBE Mission Mosquito Campaign Coordinator and Lead for NASA Satellite Collaborations, GFSC/NASA/ADNET

Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Time: 10am CT / 9am MT

Description: Mosquitoes are the world’s most dangerous animal, and there is something we can all do to reduce the threat of mosquito-transmitted disease in our communities. Join us to find out why mosquitoes are so dangerous and to learn how NASA Earth-observing satellite data is being used in an effort to predict, monitor, and respond to vector-borne disease around the world.

In this presentation, participants will be introduced to a Citizen Science effort and the newest GLOBE field measurement campaign, GLOBE Mission Mosquito! This program connects with citizen scientists of all ages to monitor changes in the frequency, range, and distribution of potential disease vector mosquitoes by reporting observations using the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper app. Participants are encouraged to download the free app here before the webinar.

Speaker Bio: Dorian Janney works at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. She is the Education and Outreach Specialist for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission as well as the GLOBE Mission Mosquito Campaign Coordinator and Lead for NASA Satellite Collaborations. She is a GLOBE Program Master Trainer, and enjoys going outside with people of all ages to assist them in learning more about this fantastic planet we all live on! She was a classroom teacher for over thirty years, and served as the head of the science department at a middle school which focused on Aerospace Technology and Astronomy.  Feel free to contact her at dorian.w.janney@nasa.gov.

For more information: https://nnlm.gov/scr/professional-development/connections. No registration is required for this class.

To Join the Meeting

  1. Go to https://nih.webex.com.
  2. Enter the session number: 625 372 995​​ and password: webinar
  3. Please provide your name and email address.
  4. You may have to download and install a web add-on or run a temporary application depending on the browser you use.
  5. Select your audio connection preference:
    *Call using computer – Adjust settings and test the connection
    *Call from WebEx – Enter your direct phone number and press 1 when prompted
    *Call in – Call: 1-650-479-3208 (US/Canada toll number)
    Enter access code: 625 372 995​​ #
    Enter the Attendee ID on your screen and press #
  6. If you are using a mobile device, your access code is: webinar

For live captioning, please use http://livewrite-ncc.appspot.com/attend?event=cit001

For any technical issues, please call: 817-735-2223.

Categories: RML Blogs

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