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RML Blogs

Apply by January 10 for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians!

PSR News - Thu, 2019-12-05 18:13

Applications are open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians Spring 2020 (February 24 – April 24). The course is sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO) and goes beyond the basics of research data management. The training will expand on concepts from RDM 101:Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians.

Enrollment is limited to 40 participants. The application deadline is January 10, 2020.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

December 16 Informational Webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing

PSR News - Thu, 2019-12-05 18:03

NIH will be hosting an informational public webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance on Monday, December 16, from 6:30 to 11:00 a.m. PST. The purpose of this webinar is to provide information on the draft policy and answer any clarifying questions about the public comment process. Public comments will NOT be accepted via the webinar but must instead be sent electronically by Friday, January 10.

PLEASE NOTE THAT WHILE YOU WILL ABLE TO VIEW THE WEBINAR THROUGH WEBEX, YOU MUST USE THE SPECIFIED PHONE LINE TO BE CONNECTED TO THE AUDIO. YOU WILL BE UNABLE TO CALL-IN VIA YOUR COMPUTER.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

TOXNET Update: LactMed Moved to Bookshelf

PSR News - Thu, 2019-12-05 17:43

As noted previously in the Technical Bulletin, TOXNET will be retired on December 16. One of the most popular TOXNET databases is the Drugs and Lactation Database, usually called LactMed, which has been moved to the NCBI Bookshelf and will continue to be updated there. LactMed is a curated database of drugs and other chemicals to which breastfeeding mothers may be exposed. It includes information on the levels of such substances in breast milk and infant blood, and the possible adverse effects in the nursing infant. Records may include a summary, therapeutic alternatives to selected drugs, references to the scientific literature, and links to credible organizations and other National Library of Medicine (NLM) databases.

LactMed debuted in 2006 and has grown to nearly 1,500 records. It is heavily used by both healthcare providers and the public. With the decision to retire the TOXNET interface, LactMed has been moved to a different platform, NCBI’s Bookshelf. You can already access LactMed at its new Bookshelf location. Users who would like more information about using the new interface can find it at Accessing LactMed Content from NCBI Bookshelf or as a PDF.

Since the TOXNET API and mobile site will also be retired, LactMed data will no longer be available through those means. In addition, the LactMed apps for Android and iOS devices will be retired. Current users of the LactMed apps are encouraged to continue accessing LactMed via Bookshelf. Alternatively, the dataset can be downloaded from NLM’s Data Distribution site and through the NLM Open Access subset.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Resolve to Stay Active: A Fitbit Kit for Your Community

GMR News - Thu, 2019-12-05 16:39

January traditionally is the month for making new resolutions usually with a goal to lose those extra pounds packed on during the winter holidays. Now is the opportunity to help your community make that fitness health resolution and keep it. How? Apply by Friday, December 20th for a one-time award of Resolve to Stay Active Fitbit Kit.

Resolve to Stay Active: A Fitbit Kit supports public libraries or other community organizations which serve populations that are underrepresented in biomedical research in providing access to health technology and consumer health resources. While interest in health-related programs and services has increased, many libraries and other community organizations lack adequate funding to provide health-related materials. The Resolve to Stay Active Fitbit Kits will lower barriers to providing health-related programs and outreach in public libraries and other community organizations.

Any network member within the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) is eligible to apply. However, GMR member public libraries that serve populations underrepresented in biomedical research receive first consideration. Not an NNLM member? Not a problem. It’s easy to apply. Visit our Members page.

Awardees will receive one Program Kit containing:

  • Fitbit Inspire HR (quantity: 20)
  • Your Data, Your Devices, Your Apps: Use Technology for Your Health handouts (quantity: 100)
  • MedlinePlus bookmarks (quantity: 100)
  • NNLM All of Us trifold brochures (quantity: 100)
  • Book: Promoting Individual and Community Health at the Library, ISBN: 978-0838916278

Need program ideas for helping your community start and stay active?

Collage of book cover images: This Heart of Mine, Heart, and Beautiful Affliction

  • Create an outdoor story walk.
  • Sponsor a library yoga class.
  • Select an NNLM Reading Club Heart Health book. Then encourage your readers to discuss the book while taking a brisk walk.
  • Install a stationary bicycle or treadmill with a USB connection to listen to an audible book.
  • Work with a local sponsor to install a blood pressure machine.
  • Ask a community health clinic to give mini-med talks about preventing heart disease, cholesterol, or high blood pressure.

We can’t wait to receive your award-winning ideas. Supplies are limited. Apply now!

Fitbit is the official wearable device of the NIH All of Us Research Program.

To learn more about the All of Us Research Program, visit https://joinallofus.org/nlm.

Categories: RML Blogs

Applications Open for Library Carpentry Workshops in Baltimore and Salt Lake City!

SEA News - Thu, 2019-12-05 14:40

The NNLM Training Office (NTO) and Southeastern Atlantic Region (SEA) are pleased to host Library Carpentry workshops this spring and provide professional development funds to support travel to these exciting opportunities.

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective and reproducible data and software practices.

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. The instructors put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower researchers and enable data-driven discovery. Even those with some experience will benefit, as the goal is to teach not only how to do analyses, but how to manage the process to make it as automated and reproducible as possible. Biomedical and health sciences librarians and LIS students are encouraged to participate.

In this two-day interactive, hands-on workshop you will learn core software and data skills, with lessons including:

Participants may apply to attend the workshop series in either:

  • Baltimore, Maryland – March 19-20, 2020 or
  • Salt Lake City, Utah – March 26-27, 2020

To broaden access to this exciting training, we invite applications to cover the costs of travel and attendance, up to $1,500 for Baltimore, and $1,200 for Salt Lake City. Travel costs will be reimbursed after travel occurs.

Eligibility:

Your organization must be a NNLM Network Member. If your organization is not a Network Member, they can join for free!

You must be able to commit to traveling for the workshop dates:

  • University of Maryland, Baltimore – March 19-20, 2020
  • University of Utah, Salt Lake City – March 26-27, 2020

You must be able to bring a laptop computer.

All participants must be prepared to observe The Carpentries Code of Conduct in workshops.

Applications to participate and receive funding are due Friday, January 10, 2020. Notice of acceptance to the Library Carpentry Workshop will be announced on or before January 31, 2020.

See full details and apply via the online application: https://nnlm.gov/nto-sea/funding/library-carpentry-professional-development-award.

For questions, please contact the NTO at nto@utah.edu or NNLM SEA at HSHSL-NLMsea@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: Applications Open for RDM 102 (Spring 2020)

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2019-12-05 13:35

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020) Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity and include practice in using Jupyter Notebooks. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and data storytelling.

The program spans 9 weeks from February 24 – April 24, including 5 modules of asynchronous content, a catch-up week, and a synchronous online session during the week of April 20. The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. Under the guidance of a project instructor, participants will complete a Final Project to demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data science services at their institution. Expect to spend about 6 hours each week on coursework and the project.

Applications are due January 10, 2020.

Additional details, including application link, are available at https://wp.me/p8Qzkf-2LX.

For questions and concerns, please contact the NTO at nto@utah.edu

Categories: RML Blogs

The NNLM Reading Club Honors World AIDS Day

SEA News - Wed, 2019-12-04 11:16

The NNLM Reading Club is pleased to recognize World AIDS Day, celebrated each December 1st. Since World AIDS Day was first observed more than 30 years ago, scientific research has led to progress in preventing and treating HIV. Even so, today millions of people live with HIV and a cure is yet to be discovered. HIV remains a health threat because people don’t know the facts about how to protect themselves and others. And those who are HIV positive live with the trauma of stigma and discrimination. Knowledge about HIV may lead to taking action to prevent its spread and also help reduce the stigma of this disease so those living with HIV receive needed support.

To help spark an important conversation about HIV/AIDS, visit the NNLM Reading Club Book Selections and Health Resources: HIV/AIDS Health. Choose one of the three featured books, then download the discussion guide, promotional materials, and corresponding HIV/AIDS information. Short on time? We’ve got you covered! Apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book kit.

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai | Taking Turns by MK Czerwiec | When We Rise by Cleve Jones

Categories: RML Blogs

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020)

SEA News - Wed, 2019-12-04 11:14
Course Description

Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity. It will also include practice in using Jupyter Notebooks through an open-source browser-based application (JupyterHub) that allows users to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations, and narrative text.

The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and data storytelling.

To have a successful experience in this course, we recommend that you are familiar with the concepts covered in RDM 101 and statistical concepts addressed in these videos:

Components
The program spans 9 weeks from February 24 – April 24, including 5 modules of asynchronous content, a catch-up week, and a synchronous online session during the week of April 20. The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. Under the guidance of a project instructor, participants will complete a Final Project to demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data science services at their institution. Expect to spend about 6 hours each week on coursework and the project.

Instructors

  • Shirley Zhao, MSLIS, MS, Assistant Librarian (Clinical), Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, The University of Utah
  • Leah Honor, MLIS, Education & Clinical Services Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Tess Grynoch, MLIS, Research Data & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Nancy Shin, MLIS, NNLM PNR Research and Data Coordinator, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington
  • Vicky Steeves, MLIS, Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, Division of Libraries & Center for Data Science, New York University

CE Credits
Participants who complete all modules, the Final Project, and the course evaluation will receive 36 hours of Medical Library Association Continuing Education credit. No partial CE credit is granted.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in the program.

Important Dates
  • Application deadline: January 10, 2020
  • Notifications begin: January 21, 2020
  • Course: February 24 – April 24, 2020
Applications

Who can apply?
Applications are open to health science information professionals working in libraries located in the US. Applicants must have previous training or experience in research data management through the RDM 101 course or attest to the objectives listed here. Enrollment is limited to 40 participants.

How to apply
Complete the online application form by January 10, 2020. The application will gather the following information:

  • Name, email address, phone number, state, place of employment, current job title.
  • Did you complete RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians? (It is not required for RDM 102).
  • Please briefly describe your knowledge or experience in research data management and/or data science.
  • Why do you want to take this course?

Questions?
Contact NTO.

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH to Host Informational Webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

MCR News - Tue, 2019-12-03 19:50

NIH will be hosting an informational public webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance on Monday, December 16, 2019, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET. The purpose of this webinar is to provide information on the draft policy and answer any clarifying questions about the public comment process. Public comments will NOT be accepted via the webinar but must instead be sent through the link provided below.

Instructions for Accessing Webinar:

  • To view the webinar presentation, please click here
  • To call-in to the webinar:
    • U.S. and Canadian participants can dial: 866-844-9416 and enter passcode: 4009108
  • For international participants, please refer to the table of toll-free numbers found here.

PLEASE NOTE THAT WHILE YOU WILL ABLE TO VIEW THE WEBINAR THROUGH WEBEX, YOU MUST USE THE SPECIFIED PHONE LINE TO BE CONNECTED TO THE AUDIO.  YOU WILL BE UNABLE TO CALL-IN VIA YOUR COMPUTER.

Participants may also send questions in advance of the webinar to SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

Comments on the draft policy and draft supplemental guidance can be made electronically here through Friday, January 10, 2020.

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH to Host Informational Webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance

GMR News - Tue, 2019-12-03 16:02

NIH will be hosting an informational public webinar on the Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance on Monday, December 16, 2019, from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET. The purpose of this webinar is to provide information on the draft policy and answer any clarifying questions about the public comment process. Public comments will NOT be accepted via the webinar but must instead be sent through the link provided below.

Instructions for Accessing Webinar:

  • To view the webinar presentation, please click here
  • To call-in to the webinar:
    • U.S. and Canadian participants can dial: 866-844-9416 and enter passcode: 4009108
  • For international participants, please refer to the table of toll-free numbers found here.

PLEASE NOTE THAT WHILE YOU WILL ABLE TO VIEW THE WEBINAR THROUGH WEBEX, YOU MUST USE THE SPECIFIED PHONE LINE TO BE CONNECTED TO THE AUDIO.  YOU WILL BE UNABLE TO CALL-IN VIA YOUR COMPUTER.

Participants may also send questions in advance of the webinar to SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

 

Comments on the draft policy and draft supplemental guidance can be made electronically here through Friday, January 10, 2020

Categories: RML Blogs

NER Funded Grant Project – HPV Educational Interventions in American Indian Populations

NER News - Tue, 2019-12-03 11:59

The following blog post is about a current NER-funded grant project. The post was written by the Team Maureen organization, Dr. Allesandro Villa, Lisa Bennett Johnson and Kelly Welch.

No one should die of an HPV-related cancer. Dr. Alessandro Villa from the Division of Oral Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Team Maureen, a nonprofit dedicated to ending cervical cancer by educating about HPV, have utilized NNLM funds this year to work toward that auspicious goal. Together, they are conducting HPV-related cancer education among health care providers working with American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) populations across the US with the long-term goal of decreasing the disease burden and mortality rates from preventable HPV-related cancers.

Based on information from an assessment done by Dr. Andria Apostolou of the Indian Health Service, it was clear that oral health care providers serving AI/AN populations were lacking important training and information on HPV and were also receptive to increasing their role in HPV prevention.  Team Maureen and Dr. Villa, who have worked together on numerous other oral HPV related projects, combined efforts to meet these needs in partnership with the Indian Health Service’s Division of Oral Health.

The program, HPV Educational Interventions in American Indian Populations, is working to engage with Tribal oral health providers and connect them to high quality resources and materials about HPV. One of these resources was a custom-made Oral HPV Toolkit, adapted by Team Maureen to be specific to the AI/AN population and their health care system. A key component of the Toolkit highlights the resources of NNLM including PubMed, Medline and MedlinePlus, where providers can find quality information for themselves, and for their patients.

Both the Toolkit and NNLM reference materials were presented during the key note at the Dental Updates conference in June 2019 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Over 150 providers attended the key note presentation delivered by Dr. Villa. Team Maureen hosted an educational table where attendees could ask questions and receive additional resources, including a physical copy of the newly adapted Toolkit and NNLM reference sheet.

Based on post-program survey data, most of the providers who attended the program significantly improved their knowledge about HPV related cancers and current HPV immunization guidelines. The providers look forward to educating their patients about cancer prevention and the importance of the HPV vaccine.

Although efforts will continue on this project throughout the year, recent accomplishments and highlights to date will be presented by Indian Health Service’s Nathan Mork, DDS at the 7th Annual HPV-Related Cancer Summit on December 6th in Marlborough, MA. Registration is open to all medical and dental providers at www.tinyurl.com/HPVSummit2019.

For more information about the Team Maureen organization, visit their website https://teammaureen.org/

Categories: RML Blogs

December 2019 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

PSR News - Tue, 2019-12-03 11:46

illustration of food covering half of the face of a clockCheck out the December issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Health Capsule: Veggie Eating Boosted By Tasty Names
    Everyone knows they should eat more vegetables. But only about 10% of Americans eat the recommended number of veggies per day. A recent study found that tasty descriptions can encourage people to make healthier choices.
  • Health Capsule: Safety Tips for Physical Activity
    Staying active is key for good health. No matter your age or fitness level, getting more physical activity will help support your body and mind. Experts recommend getting at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity a week.
  • Featured Website: Finding Treatment for Drug Use Disorder
    If you or a loved one needs treatment for a drug use problem, it can be challenging to know where to start. NIH has step-by-step guides to finding treatment for teens and adults, as well as guides for friends and family. Find more information on treatment options and available resources.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

December NIH News in Health newsletter now online

MCR News - Mon, 2019-12-02 21:13

Check out the December 2019 issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. Download a PDF version for printing.

Image of fruit and clockTo Fast or Not to Fast Does When You Eat Matter?

Not eating for stretches of time could have health benefits for some people. But not all fasting diets are backed by science. Learn more about research on fasting.

Staying in the Hospital? Safety Tips for Your Visit

Being an informed patient can help lower the risk of medical errors and infections when you’re in the hospital. Here’s what you should know.

 

Health Capsules

Categories: RML Blogs

Applications are open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management

MCR News - Mon, 2019-12-02 21:00

Applications are open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020 – February 24 – April 24).  The course is sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO) and goes beyond the basics of research data management. The training will expand on concepts from RDM 101:Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians.

More information about the course and the application process is available online . Enrollment is limited to 40 participants. The application deadline is January 10, 2020.

Categories: RML Blogs

12th Annual Diagnostic Error in Medicine Conference, Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine

MCR News - Mon, 2019-12-02 19:10

Kristen DeSanto
Strauss Health Sciences Library
University of Colorado

I was fortunate to receive a Professional Development Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, and I used it to attend the 12th Annual Diagnostic Error in Medicine Conference, presented by the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine (SIDM). The conference took place in Washington, DC from November 11th to the 13th. As a clinical librarian at the Strauss Health Sciences Library, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, I wanted to gain a better understanding of the problem of diagnostic error and learn how I could support my patrons in the diagnostic process.

There were roughly 500 people in attendance at the conference, the majority of whom were physicians, residents, and medical students. Another difference between this and medical librarian conferences is that SIDM invited patients and patient advocates to attend the conference at a reduced price. Each day started with a brief statement from a patient or family member of someone affected by diagnostic error, including misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis. It was a powerful way to start each day, and a good reminder of why we were there. On the last day of the conference there was an extended session of presentations by family members, including a discussion of how they partnered with clinicians and policy makers to advocate for policy changes.

Diagnostic error can be rooted in system-related errors, such as an inefficient organizational processes, or cognitive errors, which could include insufficient knowledge or critical thinking and synthesis skills. I was more interested in the latter, and how library resources or librarian services could play a role. One of the sessions addressed improving diagnosis by improving competency-based education. The author discussed the SIDM’s three-year project to develop a consensus Curriculum to Improve Diagnosis. The curriculum includes key competencies with learning objectives and milestones.

Patients were also encouraged to play an active role in decreasing diagnostic error. I learned about the Checklist for Getting the Right Diagnosis, which can be used with patients and their caregivers to make sure they’re communicating complete and accurate information to their providers. This could be an important resource for consumer health librarians to provide to their patrons.

I enjoyed the conference and getting to learn about a problem that is important to the patrons I work with, and appreciate the support provided by MCR.

Categories: RML Blogs

Applications Open for RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020)

NTO News - Mon, 2019-12-02 17:09

RDM 102: Beyond Research Data Management for Biomedical and Health Sciences Librarians (Spring 2020)

Course Description
Biomedical and health sciences librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online training course going beyond the basics of research data management, sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). This course will expand on concepts covered in RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management Training for Librarians, and threaded throughout will be the librarian’s role in research reproducibility and research integrity. It will also include practice in using Jupyter Notebooks through an open-source browser-based application (JupyterHub) that allows users to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations, and narrative text.

The major aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the support of data science and open science with the goal of developing and implementing or enhancing data science training and services at participants’ institutions. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course topics include an overview of data science and open science, data literacy, data wrangling, data visualization, and data storytelling.

To have a successful experience in this course, we recommend that you are familiar with the concepts covered in RDM 101 and statistical concepts addressed in these videos:

Course Components
The program spans 9 weeks from February 24 – April 24, including 5 modules of asynchronous content, a catch-up week, and a synchronous online session during the week of April 20. The format includes video lectures, readings, case studies, hands-on exercises, and peer discussions. Under the guidance of a project instructor, participants will complete a Final Project to demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to support data science services at their institution. Expect to spend about 6 hours each week on coursework and the project.

Course and Project Instructors

  • Shirley Zhao, MSLIS, MS, Data Science Librarian, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
  • Leah Honor, MLIS, Education & Clinical Services Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Tess Grynoch, MLIS, Research Data & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Nancy Shin, MLIS, NNLM PNR Research and Data Coordinator, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington
  • Vicky Steeves, Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility, Division of Libraries & Center for Data Science, New York University

CE Credits
Participants who complete all modules, the Final Project, and the course evaluation will receive 36 hours of Medical Library Association Continuing Education credit. No partial CE credit is granted.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for participating in the program.

Important Dates

  • Application deadline: January 10, 2020
  • Notifications begin: January 21, 2020
  • Course: February 24 – April 24, 2020

Applications

Who can apply?

  • Applicants must have previous training or experience in research data management through the RDM 101 course or attest to the objectives listed here.
  • Applications are open to health science information professionals working in libraries located in the US.
  • Enrollment is limited to 40 participants.

How to apply

  • Complete the online application form by January 10, 2020.
  • The application will gather the following information:
    • Name, email address, phone number, state, place of employment, current job title
    • Did you complete RDM 101: Biomedical and Health Research Data Management for Librarians? (It is not required for RDM 102).
    • Please briefly describe your knowledge or experience in research data management and/or data science.
    • Why do you want to take this course?

Questions?

Contact NTO.

Categories: RML Blogs

Register for 2020 MeSH Classes Coming in January!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-12-02 15:31

Join the National Library of Medicine and NNLM Training Office for two training events in January 2020, highlighting the 2020 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and how to adjust to MeSH changes in PubMed searches and alerts.

  1. NLM Webinar: 2020 MeSH Highlights
    Join NLM staff for a highlight tour of the 2020 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) on Friday, January 10, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST. A brief presentation will feature:

    • Updates to the Infections tree
    • Additional clinical trial publication types
    • Updates to Cell Death terms
    • Additional terminology for myotoxicity and ototoxicity.

    Following the presentation, Indexing and MeSH experts will be available to answer questions.

  2. NNLM Class: MeSH Changes and PubMed Searching
    Every year, the Medical Subject Headings are updated. Join NNLM for MeSH Changes and PubMed Searching on Friday, January 17, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM PST to learn:

    • How does this affect your PubMed searches?
    • What happens when a term gets changed, or added, or removed; or moved to a different part of the MeSH hierarchy?
    • How do you accommodate vocabulary changes over time in your comprehensive searches?
    • How do you check your saved searches and alerts?

For more information about 2020 MeSH, visit What’s New in MeSH.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Margaret McGhee Appointed Chief of NLM Public Services Division!

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2019-12-02 15:01

woman smiling dressed in a business suit

Margaret McGhee

National Library of Medicine Associate Director for Library Operations Joyce Backus has announced the appointment of Margaret McGhee as Chief, NLM Public Services Division. She will assume this role on December 9. Ms. McGhee will lead the Division responsible for several key NLM programs, including MedlinePlus, the main web site, customer service, management and preservation of the collection, and delivery of onsite services and interlibrary loans. Ms. McGhee brings solid experience in serving a variety of library users to her new position.

Ms. McGhee comes to NLM from the NIH Library, whose mission is to serve the biomedical researchers, clinicians and administration of the NIH, where she is the Chief of the Education Services Branch. She has experience overseeing the Library’s efforts to optimize customer experience using the Balanced Scorecard strategic planning tool, and managing the informationist program, bibliometrics services, instruction and training, communications, and outreach and marketing program.

From 2016-2018, Ms. McGhee was the Head of the Collection Management Unit in the Preservation and Collection Management Section of NLM, where she directed a portfolio to maintain the physical collections and provide information services to library users. She served as the Technology Librarian in the NLM National Network Office managing library services, contracts and grants from 2014-2016. From 2005-2014 she was a Librarian in the MEDLARS Management Section of NLM’s Bibliographic Services Division, supporting MEDLINE/PubMed and other NLM databases. She started her professional career in 1984 as a Technical Literature Searcher at CPC International in Bedford Park, IL. Margaret has an MLIS from the University of Texas, Austin, and BS degrees in biology and chemistry from Quincy University, IL.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Public Health and Library Partnerships at APHA

MAR News - Mon, 2019-12-02 10:04
Erin Seger

Erin Seger

At the beginning of November, I coordinated a session at the American Public Health Association Annual conference in Philadelphia about library and public health partnerships. I spoke about National Library of Medicine Resources for the public health workforce including Health Services and Sciences Research Resources (HSRR), Health Services Research Projects in Progress (HSRProj), Health Services Research Information Central (HSRIC), and Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce (PHPartners). Also included were resources that public health professionals can use with their communities such as MedlinePlus and ToxTown. In addition, I highlighted services from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine that public health organizations can benefit from, such as training, programs, and funding. Because I coordinated this session in partnership with four other partner organizations in the Middle Atlantic Region, the strength of the work of NNLM MAR’s partners was an important part of this session.

Alison Wessel discussed a project she was involved with during her time with the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services Library. This library did an assessment of thirty-three public libraries in the state of Delaware to better understand the health information needs of the community and training needs of public library staff. Alison discussed the design and results of this survey and some of the activities that occurred in response to these results, such as placing social workers in public libraries and offering mental health first aid training.

Chad Thomas from the Philadelphia Department of Public Health discussed four emergency preparedness projects that he oversaw in partnership with the Free Library of Philadelphia. These projects included training library staff in emergency preparedness, developing library emergency response roles, and disseminating bookmarks with public health messaging. In addition to collaborating with the local library branches, these projects incorporated resources from the National Library of Medicine, such as the Disaster Information Management Resource Center (DIMRC).

Alison Wessel, Erin Seger and Rachel Feuerstein-Simon

Rachel Feuerstein-Simon from the University of Pennsylvania shared the results of a project that evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of an opioid reversal training that was facilitated by the Philadelphia Department of Public Health and hosted by the Free Library of Philadelphia. She explained that as a result of this training, participants were more likely to say that they “completely agree” that they would help someone experiencing an overdose. These trainings also showed knowledge gain among participants, including improved knowledge about the indicators of an opioid overdose.

Kelly Sines with Philadelphia FIGHT discussed a digital literacy program developed at Philadelphia FIGHT’s Critical Path Learning Center. This was a hybrid online-in person course called Upgrade Your Health! that taught critical health literacy skills such as finding health information online, how to use personal health management devices, and how to communicate effectively with healthcare providers. Upgrade Your Health! incorporated MedlinePlus as the primary tool for locating quality health information and used the NNLM program Engage for Health for the training on talking with your doctor.

While all of these speakers discussed projects that addressed different public health topics that were initiated by diverse organizations, there was a common thread between all of them – that libraries are important public health partners. Public libraries were a local partner in many of these projects, and the National Library of Medicine and National Network of Libraries of Medicine played a role as national and regional partners, offering trusted resources and programming, as well as funding for many of these projects. These projects make it clear that we can improve health information access and public health through continued partnership.

Written by Erin Seger, Health Professions Coordinator, for the Fall 2019 edition of The MAReport quarterly newsletter.

Categories: RML Blogs

NLM SEA Funding Announcement: Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Project Awards

SEA News - Mon, 2019-12-02 07:44

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SEA) seeks applications to support Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Projects. The purpose of the Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Award is to enable organization to address all phases of disaster management; including preparedness, mitigation, recovery, and response with the aid of information resources available from the National Library of Medicine and/or the NIH. A disaster is defined as an incident that has become so severe that it cannot be controlled or fully addressed by local resources.

Projects are encouraged to incorporate one or more of the following:

  • Increase access to high quality biomedical and health information
  • Improve the use of technology for health information access, especially to underserved and underrepresented populations
  • Improve access to library and information services
  • Prepare organizations to effectively prepare for and/or respond to disasters using evidence-based practices
  • Integrate and promote NLM’s disaster-related resources, services, and tools into educational program or continuity plans
  • Enhance disaster preparedness through education, programming, and partnerships
  • Develop solutions and mechanisms that support the continuity of health information-based services
  • Train individuals, professionals, and communities to effectively find authoritative disaster health information
  • Encourage collaboration between libraries, community, faith-based, and volunteer organizations, hospitals, and first responders to develop programs or engage in joint exercises that enhance coordination of resources in response to a disaster
  • Projects that include a biomedical information or health literacy component must incorporate National Library of Medicine resources, like PubMed, CLinicalTrials.gov, or MedlinePlus. You can refer to the NLM list of Databases, Resources, and APIs for a complete overview of resources by topic.

Amount: Up to $5,000

Awards Available: Up to ten (10) Project Awards

Application Deadline: Sunday, January 5, 2020, 11:30 PM ET

SEA staff are available for consultations. Please email NNLM SEA to schedule an appointment.

Please visit the Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Project Award for details regarding the award, eligibility, and to access the application.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

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