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RML Blogs

MCR Membership Renewal Drive: Coming Soon

MCR News - Fri, 2017-02-24 19:02

NNLM MidContinental Region member institutions will be receiving an  invitation, the first week of March, to renew their memberships  via  a link in an email message.  Members will be asked to spend less than ten minutes to fill out an online form and submit it to confirm they are continuing as members.  It will be very important to submit the completed form as soon as possible.

An institution that has submitted the form will receive a new NNLM certificate, suitable for framing.  They will also receive instructions on how to gain login  access to the new NNLM Members’ Directory so that they can edit their institution’s profile.  Rememer – membership is FREE!

Questions can be sent HERE

[jh]

Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming Webinar: “Big Data 2 Knowledge: Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science.”

PSR News - Fri, 2017-02-24 16:12

On March 22, 2017 we are pleased to offer the webinar: “Big Data 2 Knowledge: Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science.” Nathalie Reid, Data Services and Technology Librarian will be coordinating this event which will be on WebEx. We are asking you to encourage librarians and health professionals interested in data science to enroll.

This event will be a watching party of the video: “Introduction to Big Data and the Data Lifecycle,” followed by a discussion of themes that emerge and how they are relevant to our institutions. Video description: “Data are created, they persist for a period of time, and they may be lost or destroyed. With luck, they may be reused and re-explored to yield new insights and to spark new investigations. This talk will highlight major themes in the management and use of scientific data, and the ways in which investigators can ensure that their data will have maximum benefit to the scientific community.”

Looking for a lively discussion about data science? Join us!

Expectations are that attendees will either watch the Youtube video along with the group on WebEx at 1pm PT or on their own then actively participate in the discussion at 2pm PT so that they can be eligible for 2 MLA Contact Hours.

To enroll, please register at https://nnlm.gov/class/big-data-2-knowledge-guide-fundamentals-data-science/7119  

If you have any questions, you can contact me. Thank you for signing up for one of our courses.

 

 

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

A Logic Model Hack: The Project Reality Check

NEO News - Fri, 2017-02-24 15:47

Duct tape or duck tape torn strips of isolated elements of strong adhesive gray material used in packaging boxes or repairing or fixing broken things that need to be sealed air tight.

Logic models just may be the duct tape of the evaluation world.

A logic model’s usefulness extends well beyond initial project planning. (If you aren’t familiar with logic models, here’s a fun introduction.)  Today’s post starts a new NEO Shop Talk series to take our readers beyond Logic Models 101. We call this series Logic Model Hacks. Our first topic: The Project Reality Check. Watch for more hacks in future posts.

The Project Reality Check allows you to assess the feasibility of your project with stakeholders, experienced colleagues, and key informants.  I refer to these people as “Reality Checkers.”  (I’m capping their title out of respect for their importance.)  Your logic model is your one-page project vision. Present it with a brief pitch, and you can bring anyone up to speed on your plans in a New York minute (or two).  Then, with a few follow-up questions, you can guide your Reality Checkers in identifying key project blind spots. What assumptions you are making? What external factors could help or hinder your project? The figure below is the logic model template from the NEO’s booklet Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects . This template includes boxes for assumptions and external factors. By the time you complete your Project Reality Check, you will have excellent information to add to those boxes.

How to Conduct a Logic Model Reality Check

I always incorporate Project Reality Checks into any logic model development process I lead. Here is my basic game plan:

  • A small project team (2-5 people) works out the project plan and fills in the columns of the logic model. One person can do this step, if necessary.
  • After filling in the main columns, this working group drafts a list of assumptions and external factors for the boxes at the bottom. However, I don’t add the working group’s information to the logic model version for the Reality Checkers. You want fresh responses from them. Showing them your assumptions and external factors in advance may prevent them from generating their own. Best to give them a clean slate.
  • Make a list of potential Reality Checkers and divvy them up among project team members.
  • Prepare a question guide for querying your Reality Checkers.
  • Set up appointments. You can talk with your Reality Checkers in one-to-one conversations that probably will take 15-20 minutes. If you can convene an advisory group for your project, you could easily adapt the Project Reality Check interview process for a group discussion.

Here are the types of folks who might be good consultants for your project plans:

  • The people who will be working on the actual project.
  • Representatives from partner organizations.
  • Key informants. Here’s a tip: If you conducted key informant interviews for community assessment related to this project, don’t hesitate to show your logic model to those interviewees. It is a way to follow-up on the first interview, showing how you are using the information they provided. This is an opportunity for second contact with community opinion leaders.
  • Colleagues who conducted similar projects.
  • Funding agency staff. This is not always feasible, but take advantage of the opportunity if it’s there. These folks have a birds-eye view of what succeeds and fails in communities served by their organizations.

It’s a good idea to have an interview plan, so that you can use your Reality Checkers’ time efficiently and adequately capture their valuable advice. I would start with a short elevator speech, to provide context for the logic model.  Here’s a template you can adapt;

We have this exciting project, where we are trying to ___ [add your goal here]. Specifically, we want _____{the people or organization benefiting from your project}  to _________[add your outcomes]. We plan to do it by ____{summarize your activities).  Here’s our logic model, that shows a few more details of our plan.”

Then, you want to follow up with questions for the Reality Checkers:

  • What assumptions are we making that you think we need to check?
  • Are there resources in the community or in our partner organization that might help us do this project?
  • Are there barriers or challenges we should be prepared to address?
  • I would also like to check some assumptions our project team is making. Present your assumptions at the end of the discussion and get the Reality Checkers’ assessment.

How to Apply What You Learn

After completing the interviews, your working team should reconvene to process what you learned. Remove some of the assumptions that you confirmed in the interviews. Add any new assumptions to be investigated. Adapt your logic model to leverage newly discovered resources (positive external factors) or change your activities to address challenges or barriers. Prepare contingency plans for project turbulence predicted by your Reality Checkers.

Chances are high that you will be changing your logic model after the Project Reality Check. The good news is that you will only have to make changes on paper. That’s much easier than responding to problems that arise because you didn’t identify your blind spots during the planning phase of your project.

Other blog posts about logic models:

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Logic Models (The Chili Lesson)

An Easier Way to Plan:Tearless Logic Models

Logic Models: Handy Hints

Categories: RML Blogs

Fair Use Myths and Facts

PNR News - Thu, 2017-02-23 19:06

In conjunction with Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017, the Association of Research Libraries is releasing an infographic that refutes 10 popular misperceptions about fair use. Fair use and fair dealing are vitally important rights for everybody, everywhere — students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material. These doctrines provide balance to the copyright system by allowing the use of copyrighted resources without permission from the rightsholder under certain circumstances, thereby promoting creative progress and accommodating freedom of expression. See: “Fair Use Myths & Facts” infographic (PDF).

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual, community celebration coordinated by the Association of Research Libraries to promote the opportunities presented by fair use and fair dealing, highlight successful stories, and explain these doctrines. Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017 is being observed this week, Monday, February 20, through Friday, February 24. Visit fairuseweek.org to participate or find additional resources on popular topics from this week and previous Fair Use Weeks, including copyright policy and the nature of copyright, factors of fair use, government blogs, digital materials, innovation, fair use in the media, scholarly publishing and open access, educational uses, and case studies.

Categories: RML Blogs

Dr. Brennan, Director of the National

MCR News - Thu, 2017-02-23 18:48

Dr. Brennan, Director of the National Library of Medicine, appeared in a fun interview with a reporter from the Washington Post. I appreciated her comment that heading up the library doesn’t make her a librarian. You can read her interview here. /ch

Categories: RML Blogs

February GMR Update: Annotated links

GMR News - Thu, 2017-02-23 16:08

A recording of the February GMR Update is now available on YouTube. Below is an annotated list of the topics discussed with links to each talking point in the video.

The next GMR Update will be Monday, March 20 at 3pm Eastern / 2pm Central.

Topics Covered:

1:14 — Dr. Patti Brennan’s Blog “Musings from the Mezzanine”
1:38 — Updates to PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov interfaces
2:53 — New NLM Board of Regents members
3:50 — GMR Awards: Over $80,000 this year!
5:23 — Medically underserved areas (MUA) map project, March 1, 2017
8:06 — Kernel of Knowledge, April, Health Reach
8:49 — Upcoming courses from GMR and NNLM
10:20 — Quick Links on GMR main webpage, request for feedback
11:15 — Partner with the GMR! New funding to be announced March 1, 2017
12:43 — Award writing courses and assistance
13:42 — “Finding Grey Lit” MLA Webinar, 9 sites funded through GMR
15:12 — Midwest Collaborative for Library Services (MCLS) packages available & training sessions

Additionally, here are all the URLs provided during the presentation:

URLs:

NLM Musings from the Mezzanine
NNLM Training Schedule
GMR Homepage
GMR Funding Page
MCLS
MCLS Training “Focus on Your Users”
MCLS Training “Writing for the Web”

 

Categories: RML Blogs

What’s New on NLM’s Radiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM) Resource

PSR News - Thu, 2017-02-23 13:51

Since the last REMM update in August, 2016, the following important US government document have been incorporated into the resource. Additional information is available by visiting What’s New on REMM?

An update to Mobile REMM is also coming soon!

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Three Resources to Locate Recorded Presentations on Health Information Outreach Topics!

PSR News - Thu, 2017-02-23 13:38

Have you wondered how to locate recordings of webinars or other online presentations hosted by government agencies, private organizations, or academic institutions on health information outreach topics? If so, use the following resources as a helpful guide:

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

New Look for NLM Search Engine Results Display!

PSR News - Wed, 2017-02-22 19:05

The National Library of Medicine has just released a new design for its main Web site search engine results page. The new design is responsive and is a result of usability testing, analytics, and user feedback. Searches for health topics will feature a MedlinePlus result on the right side of the screen. Search results from PubMed and the LocatorPlus catalog record will display separately, also on the right. Searches for an NLM product or service will highlight a curated result in the “NLM Recommended Resources” box. The facets have been combined into four basic categories and now can be found above the results display. They include:

  • Health Information: MedlinePlus encyclopedia pages, drug monographs, health topic pages, supplement pages, and MedlinePlus Magazine pages.
  • Programs and Services: NLM main Web site pages including NCBI and SIS.
  • Exhibits and Collections: History of Medicine Division exhibition sites and the Digital Collections records.
  • Web Archives: Older Web pages from the NLM main Web site.
Snapshot of NLM website search engine page

Further details about the redesigned web site are available in the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Pennsylvania Community College Library Consortium Meeting

MAR News - Wed, 2017-02-22 17:20
Join members of the Pennsylvania Community College Library Consortium (PCCLC) at the Harrisburg Area Community College for a half-day of free health programming! All are welcome to attend. April 27, 2017, 9:00am – 2:00pm ET Presentations will include: Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks & Benefits: Learning How to Communicate Health Statistics – Elaina Vitale, […]
Categories: RML Blogs

NN/LM Webinar on March 9: Five Questions You Can Answer Using the NCBI Gene Database

PSR News - Wed, 2017-02-22 16:52

Registration is available for the one-hour NN/LM webinar Five Questions You Can Answer Using the NCBI Gene Database, on Thursday, March 9, 10:00-11:00 AM PST. Presenters will be Peter Cooper and Bonnie Maidak from NCBI. The Gene resource at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is a central hub for accessing nearly all molecular and literature resources for a particular gene. You can easily answer the most common questions and perform the most common tasks by starting in Gene. This webinar will cover the structure and contents of the Gene resource and how to use it to answer the following questions:

  • Where is the gene located (chromosome and position) in the genome assembly?
  • What are the Reference genomic, transcript and protein sequences for the gene?
  • What variations are present in the gene and are they associated with disease?
  • In what tissues and under what conditions is the gene expressed?
  • What are the equivalent genes (homologs) in other species?
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Rare Disease Day is February 28

PNR News - Wed, 2017-02-22 09:51

Rare Disease Day PosterMore than 6,500 rare diseases exists at this time and less than 5 percent have a treatment. In the United States a rare disease is one that affects less than 200,000 people. However, roughly 25 to 30 million Americans are affected by a rare disease. Many of these diseases:

  • May involve chronic illness, disability, and often premature death
  • Often have no treatment or not very effective treatment
  • Are frequently not diagnosed correctly
  • Are often very complex
  • Are often caused by changes in genes

The theme for this year’s Rare Disease Day is “Research” with the slogan, “With research, possibilities are limitless”.  Research is key to find treatments and possible cures as well as  improving the care of those with a rare disease. The philosophy of NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) is to work closely with families, caregivers, advocates and and patients in order to make greater advancements in rare disease research. February 28 is a time to recognize the advancements being made, bring awareness, share personal stories, and encourage dialogue among researchers, advocates, families and others.

Learn more about Rare Disease Day and how you and your organization can get involved at http://www.rarediseaseday.org/

Learn more about rare diseases through a number of websites:

Categories: RML Blogs

Welcome New NDCO Coordinator, Erin Latta

SEA News - Wed, 2017-02-22 08:35
We are happy to announce that, on February 20, Erin Latta joined us as the new NNLM DOCLINE Coordination Office (NDCO) Coordinator. Erin will handle day-to-day customer service and member training of DOCLINE for the entire country. Erin began work at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) in 2005, leaving for a short time to work at the Base Library of the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Since 2008 she worked with Electronic Resources at the HS/HSL while serving on several committees including the Staff Education & Training and Events, Display, and Promotion committees as well as Staff Events committees throughout the years. In 2015 she completed the UMB Emerging Leaders program Erin is currently working on her BA in Graphic Communication, with an eye toward her MLS. Her personal interests include pre-war Delta blues, painting, podcasting, and perfume collecting as well as various other artistic endeavors with her cartoonist husband, Josh
Categories: RML Blogs

Arkansas Sees Flu Cases Rise

SCR News - Tue, 2017-02-21 22:58

Flu Vaccination Grippe by Daniel Paquet is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

marshall islands

In the midst of flu season, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) has announced the flu has become “widespread” in the state, meaning the disease has been reported in all areas of the state. As of Feb. 17, 19 people had died from flu-related illnesses, 11 more than the 2015-2016 flu season.

ADH is urging those who have not already gotten this season’s flu vaccine to get it–it is not too late. The vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older, particularly those with higher risk for complications like young children or adults over the age of 65.

To find out where the closest location to get a flu vaccine is to you, please visit healthy.arkansas.gov.

To learn more about this season’s flu, including what the current vaccine protects against and symptoms of the illness, please visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

To learn more about the flu in Arkansas, please visit “Flu Cases on the Rise.”

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Categories: RML Blogs

Upcoming: Five Questions You Can Answer Using the NCBI Gene Database

MAR News - Tue, 2017-02-21 17:21
The Gene resource at NCBI is a central hub for accessing nearly all molecular and literature resources for a particular gene. You can easily answer the most common questions and perform the most common tasks by starting in Gene. In this upcoming webinar, Five Questions You Can Answer Using the NCBI Gene Database, you will […]
Categories: RML Blogs

NIH Request for Information (RFI) on Processes for database of Genotypes and Phenotypes Data Submission, Access, and Management

PSR News - Tue, 2017-02-21 16:03

The National Institutes of Health has just issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking public comment on the data submission and access processes for the NIH National Center for Biotechnology (NCBI) database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). The RFI also seeks comment on the management of data in dbGaP in order to consider options to improve and streamline these processes and to maximize the use and utility of dbGaP. The complete RFI, as well as instructions on how to comment, are available on the NIH website. Electronic responses will be accepted through April 7, 2017. NIH will consider all public comments before taking next steps. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in responses. Comments received, including any personal information, will be posted without change after the close of the comment period to the NIH Genomic Data Sharing website.

Additional information about the importance of this RFI is included in a new Under the Poliscope blog posting, published by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz. For more information or additional questions, please contact the NIH Office of Science Policy.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Debrief and Discuss -BD2K Fundamentals of Data Science – This week’s topic: Unsupervised Machine Learning

MCR News - Tue, 2017-02-21 15:20

 

Dear Network member data geeks or those interested in learning neat things about data and how it will save the planet…

Please consider joining a 30 minute debrief/discussion shortly following the BD2K Guide to the fundamentals of Data Science weekly webinars. The debriefing/discussion will start after a 10 minute break after the series session ends.

If you attend both the debriefing and BD2K GFDS can earn you 2 MLA CE contact hours. No registration is required.

If you can’t attend the live sessions, you can participate asynchronously.

This week’s topic is: Unsupervised Machine Learning

Speaker: Ali Shojaie, University of Washington

Webinar Date/Time: February 24, 2017 / 10 am MT-11 am CT

Debrief Date/Time: February 24, 2017 / 11:10 am MT-12:10 pm CT

If you are new to the topic or series, past sessions have been posted to the BD2KCCC’s YouTube Channel

The debrief/discussion will be held online here: nih.webex.com/meet/johnbramble

To shape the discussion, we will address these questions:

  1. In the context of health information access (organization of information, research, findability, etc.) what role can the librarian play to support researchers in their data lifecycle at your institution?
  2. What assets do librarians have to bring to the table?
  3. What skills do librarians need?
  4. What Resources are needed?
  5. Who are the most important stakeholders librarians need to align with to get a seat at the table?

Summaries of the discussions will be posted to https://nnlm.gov/mcr at a location to be announce in the future (likely in the P2PP).

If you have questions about this post, please contact john.bramble@utah.edu or 801 585 5743 – jb

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH Requests Information on Processes for database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) Data Submission, Access, and Management

SEA News - Tue, 2017-02-21 13:16
Today, in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts, NIH published a Request for Information (RFI) that seeks public comment on the data submission and access processes for the NIH National Center for Biotechnology (NCBI) database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP).  The RFI also seeks comment on the management of data in dbGaP in order to consider options to improve and streamline these processes and to maximize the use and utility of dbGaP. The complete RFI, as well as instructions on how to comment, can be found by clicking here.  Electronic responses will be accepted through April 7, 2017. NIH will consider all public comments before taking next steps. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in your response. Comments received, including any personal information, will be posted without change after the close of the comment period to the following website: https://gds.nih.gov/ Comments may also be mailed to: Office of Science Policy, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20892. Mailed comments must be postmarked by April 7, 2017, to be considered. Additional information about the importance of this RFI can be found in an “Under the Poliscope” blog published today by Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz. For more information or additional questions, please contact the NIH Office of Science Policy, by email at SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov or by telephone at 301-496-9838.
Categories: RML Blogs

Free Gene Database Webinar – 5 Questions you can answer using Gene

SEA News - Tue, 2017-02-21 13:14
The Gene resource from NCBI is a central hub for accessing nearly all molecular and literature resources for a particular gene. You can easily answer the most common questions and perform the most common tasks by starting in Gene. In this webinar you will learn about the structure and contents of the Gene resource and how to use Gene to answer the following questions about a gene: Where is the gene located (chromosome and position) in the genome assembly? What are the Reference genomic, transcript and protein sequences for the gene? What variations are present in the gene and are they associated with disease? In what tissues and under what conditions is the gene expressed? What are the equivalent genes (homologs) in other species? Presenters: Peter Cooper and Bonnie Maidak, NCBI Class Details: Mar 9, 2017 1:00PM – 2:00PM ET 1 MLA CE credit Registration: https://nnlm.gov/class/five-questions-you-can-answer-using-ncbi-gene-database/7094
Categories: RML Blogs

SCR Regional Highlight: University of Arkansas assists displaced Marshall Islands community

SCR News - Tue, 2017-02-21 10:51

The Marshall Islands – Majuro – Window by Stefan Lins is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

marshall islands

In the Pacific Ocean near the equator and just west of the international dateline, there is a small country known as the Marshall Islands, which has a population of 53,000 inhabitants. Somewhat similarly, if you head to Springdale, Arkansas, located in the northwest corner of the state, you will find not only the Consulate of the Marshall Islands, but the largest community of Marshallese Americans in the continental U.S., with an estimated population between 6,000 and 14,000.

The Marshall Islands have become a place of despair and great poverty. It was the site of 67 nuclear tests that occurred over a 12-year period; in 1956, the Marshall Islands was called “the most contaminated place on Earth” by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

In 1986, after the war had ended, the Marshall Islands became their own fully sovereign nation, but also became a U.S. Associated State, receiving assistance from the U.S., and also allowing Marshallese to travel and work within the U.S. without a visa. Springdale, Arkansas became the best immigration option after the first Marshallese to arrive, John Moody, sent back word about jobs available at Tyson Foods, where the company is headquartered.

And while 1,000s of Marshallese traveled halfway across the world to to escape the poverty and health issues, they are still plagued by diseases including diabetes, heart disease and cancer, some of which stem from the nuclear tests, but others that occurred after the fact; like how U.S. food aid to the Marshall Islands came in the form of processed items, which have contributed to the diabetes among the population as well as obesity.

Besides having a general distrust for health professionals, causing them not to seek medical treatment, many Marshallese also have no way to afford it, as the U.S. rescinded Medicaid and Medicare following the original 1986 agreement, leaving many without any form of health insurance.

But there is some hope for the Marshallese in Springdale, Arkansas. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Library has begun a program to assist those displaced Marshallese, in part through funding by NNLM SCR. By teaching classes to Marshallese health workers and raising awareness for the health literacy information available, UAMS hopes to be able to eventually improve the overall health of the Marshallese of Northwest Arkansas. It will just take time.

To read more about the Marshallese population in Springdale, please visit “For Pacific Islanders, Hopes and Troubles in in Arkansas.”

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