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RML Blogs

NNLM SEA COVID-19 Regional Awareness and Information Sharing

SEA News - 2 hours 25 min ago

Like many libraries and organizations across the country, NNLM SEA has transitioned to telework in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Though we are not currently working in our offices, we are striving to provide our region and members with the same level of service and support.

During this time where many libraries are providing virtual support, we know that there are also hospital librarians working on the front lines to support healthcare providers, public librarians addressing the varied concerns of their communities, and health sciences librarians helping faculty transition their courses to online formats.

We want to hear your stories and share them with our network members. Please consider sharing a story about how your library and staff have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • What steps has your library taken?
  • What is your library doing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic?
  • Do you have resource guides you can share?
  • Are you working the front line in hospitals?
  • Are you providing virtual sessions to the public to help them understand COVID-19?
  • Is there an MVP librarian you’d like us to feature?

Please email us your story or reach out to set up a time to chat by phone. Either way, we would be honored to highlight your organization’s efforts to serve during the pandemic and very grateful for the opportunity to inspire others in the process.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Categories: RML Blogs

New On-Demand Course Available – Cool Creative Communications: Dazzling Data Visualization

SEA News - Wed, 2020-04-01 14:27

Earn MLA CEs while you practice your data visualization skills!

Data Visualization enables us to quickly glean insights and patterns from data and communicate its key aspects intuitively, persuasively, and memorably. In this session, participants will discuss the fundamental principles of effective visual data communication as they critique and evaluate existing visualizations. They will also locate sources for downloadable data, and develop simple interactive visualizations using Tableau Public, a free and popular data visualization tool.

This class is intended as a quick-start guide to creating effective data visualizations and is geared toward a general audience with no prior experience creating visualizations.

This is an online, asynchronous class, offered via Moodle, the NNLM’s learning management system.

To learn more or to register: https://nnlm.gov/class/cool-creative-communications-dazzling-data-visualization-online-demand/23692

Questions? Contact Kiri Burcat

Categories: RML Blogs

April NNLM Book Selections are Now Available!

MCR News - Wed, 2020-04-01 14:10

Citizen science is research done by everyday people, anytime, anywhere, to help answer questions scientists can’t answer alone. In order to turn curiosity into impact, Citizen Science Month is recognized annually in April. Community libraries can serve as a hub for citizen science by mobilizing patrons to collect data and spread the word about their efforts, and participants can develop a deeper understanding of scientific and health literacy through their active involvement in the scientific process.

Our friends at SciStarter have easy citizen science ideas to share and some health-related projects selected in collaboration with NLM. There are many citizen science projects that can be done even in a backyard or from home.
To learn more, visit NNLM Reading Club Book Selections and Health Resources: Citizen Science. Choose one of the three featured books. Then either host a digital book club discussion or, when your library reopens, apply for a free NNLM Reading Club Book Kit.

Categories: RML Blogs

Staying Active and Healthy During National Minority Health Month

SEA News - Wed, 2020-04-01 09:50

With Americans advised to stay in and around their homes, this National Minority Health Month (April) the Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will feature the theme Active & Healthy and focus on safe ways all communities can stay physically active and advance mental and emotional wellness.

Join OMH throughout April as we encourage everyone to stay active and support physical, mental and emotional wellness. This year, we invite everyone to join #ActiveandHealthy, a national social media campaign that will focus on ways we can stay active and healthy in and around the house while following the social distancing guidelines to stop the spread of COVID-19. Daily themes will highlight steps people can take in and around the home to maintain and sustain an active and healthy lifestyle while reducing stress and anxiety.

#ActiveandHealthy will promote and share ways we can stay active and healthy during #NMHM2020 and throughout the year. OMH is also asking individuals to use the hashtag to post their own stories, ideas or tips about staying active and healthy. The campaign will include creative ways to keep older adults and children safe and physically engaged, along with ideas to stay connected with friends, family and communities.

OMH and national partners will also use the hashtag to promote the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans and the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s Move Your Way campaign.

Below are ways you can get informed, get involved, and get connected this National Minority Health Month:

Join the conversation by using the hashtags and sharing your stories, tips, resources, and best practices with the community on how to stay #ActiveandHealthy around your home. Daily themes include:

  • Wellness Mondays
  • Trivia Tuesdays
  • Work Out Wednesdays
  • Throwback Thursdays
  • Family Fridays
  • Spotlight Saturdays
  • Empowerment Sunday

Take the OMH weekly Active & Healthy Quiz as part of Trivia Tuesdays via our social media channels to test your knowledge of physical activity and nutrition while also getting resources on how to stay active and support your physical, mental and emotional wellbeing.

Spread the word virtually by downloading our National Minority Health Month Toolkit full of resources, sample social media messages, and downloadable graphics.

Submit your virtual community events and activities to the Office of Minority Health Events Calendar and share photos from your virtual event on social media by using the hashtags #ActiveandHealthy, #EmotionalWellness and #NMHM2020.

Sign up for email updates on OMH’s website to learn more about National Minority Health Month, and follow us on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

Remember—becoming Active & Healthy in and around your home to stay physically and mentally well, while doing your part to slow the spread of COVID-19, is possible through simple changes to your daily routine—so get involved this #NMHM2020.

Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: CHIS Accelerated Learning Plan

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2020-04-01 09:00

Last month’s Consumer Health Minute focused on health reference. Providing any type of health information services can feel a little intimidating but that doesn’t have to be the case. Learning more about various health resources and services can help prepare you and your staff to feel more knowledgeable and confident.  The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) works with the Medical Library Association to provide continuing education toward obtaining CHIS.

What is CHIS?
CHIS is an acronym for Consumer Health Information Specialization, a program by the Medical Library Association (MLA). The CHIS program offers training in providing health information services to consumers, and recognition for the accomplishment of acquiring new health information skills. NNLM provides free, online training in support of CHIS, and can sponsor your CHIS application or renewal fee, making this specialization completely free to you. Once you’ve completed 12 credits of training per guidelines below, simply fill out this form to get your CHIS application fee sponsored by NNLM. Any library staff member or library student in the U.S. interested in providing health information to the public is eligible for sponsorship.

Why Get CHIS?
Librarians know the lifesaving and life-enhancing value of accurate evidence-based health information. By earning CHIS, you acquire skills and knowledge needed to become a confident, expert provider of health information to your community. Your CHIS shows employers, colleagues, and the public you serve that you are committed to offering quality consumer health information services and to staying current with developments in consumer health information resources, technologies, and services.

CHIS Accelerated Learning Plan
Right now NNLM is offering an accelerated learning plan to quickly earn CHIS in about a month through free, online, self-paced classes. For more information download the Plan.

Categories: RML Blogs

Science anytime, anywhere: Celebrate Citizen Science Month with the NNLM Reading Club

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-03-31 21:00

Diary of a Citizen Scientist: Chasing Tiger Beetles and Other New Ways of Engaging the World by Sharman Apt Russell l The Crowd and the Cosmo: Adventures in the Zooniverse by Chris Lintott l Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes in an Age of Extinction by Mary Ellen Hannibal

Citizen science is collaborative research done by everyday people, anytime, anywhere, to help answer questions scientists can’t answer alone. In order to turn curiosity into impact, Citizen Science Month is recognized annually in April to promote all things citizen science. Libraries can serve as a hub for citizen science in their communities by mobilizing patrons to get involved in collecting data and spreading the word about their efforts, and participants can develop a deeper engagement in scientific and health literacy through their active involvement in the scientific process. There are many citizen science projects that can be done in a backyard or from home. Our friends at SciStarter have easy citizen science ideas to share and even some health-related projects selected in collaboration with NLM.

To learn more, visit NNLM Reading Club Book Selections and Health Resources: Citizen Science. Choose one of the three featured books. Then either host a virtual book club discussion or, when your library reopens, download the discussion guide, promotional materials, and corresponding health information. Short on time? No worries! Apply for a a free NNLM Reading Club Book Kit.

Categories: RML Blogs

April NNLM Webinars

MCR News - Tue, 2020-03-31 19:32

#citeNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon Training
April 2
12 MT/1 CT
Registration and Info: https://nnlm.gov/class/citenlm-wikipedia-edit-thon-training/22567

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming for Summer Reading!
April 7
1 MT/2 CT
https://nnlm.gov/class/summer_reading

Nicotine, It’s a Brain Changer
April 8
1 MT/2 CT
Registration and Info: https://nnlm.gov/class/nicotine-it-s-brain-changer/22358

Supporting Open Science in Health Science Libraries: Sharing Strategies for Sustainability and Success
April 9
12 MT/ 1 CT
Registration and Info: https://nnlm.gov/class/supporting-open-science-health-science-libraries-sharing-strategies-sustainability-and-success

Overview of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
April 14
1 MT/2 CT
Registration and Info: https://nnlm.gov/class/overview-health-resources-and-services-administration-hrsa/22704

PNR Rendezvous: Make it Work—Managing Your Solo or Small Hospital Library
April 15
2 MT/3 CT
Registration and Info: https://nnlm.gov/class/pnr-rendezvous-make-it-work-managing-your-solo-or-small-hospital-library/21733

Connecting Communities to Health Information: Graphic Medicine Kits at the Public Library
April 15
12 MT/1 CT
Registration and Info: https://nnlm.gov/class/connecting-communities-health-information-graphic-medicine-kits-public-library/23455

PNR Rendezvous: What’s All This Talk About Citizen Science?
April 29
2 MT/3 CT
Registration and Info: https://nnlm.gov/class/pnr-rendezvous-whats-all-talk-about-citizen-science/23459

Categories: RML Blogs

How Does a Library Respond to a Global Health Crisis?

MCR News - Tue, 2020-03-31 19:28
NLM Musings from the Mezzanine

Patti Brennan, Director National Library of Medicine

Around the world, scientists, public health officials, medical professionals, and others are working to address the coronavirus pandemic.

At NLM, we’ve been working on multiple fronts to improve researchers’ understanding of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes the novel coronavirus) and aid in the response to COVID-19 (the disease caused by the novel coronavirus). By enhancing access to relevant data and information, NLM is demonstrating how libraries can contribute in real time to research and response efforts during this crisis.

Read the full blog post.

Categories: RML Blogs

On Demand Classes

MCR News - Tue, 2020-03-31 19:22

Training opportunities available any time.

A Bird’s Eye View of Health Data Standards – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/birds-eye-view-health-data-standards
Enhance your knowledge on the roles and products of the National Library of Medicine related to applied medical informatics, particularly as applied to electronic health records systems and clinical research.

Chemicals, Drugs, and Genetics: Searching PubMed and Beyond – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/chemicals-drugs-and-genetics-searching-pubmed-and-beyond-online-demand
Learn how to search Pubmed for drugs and genetics using MeSH, Supplementary Concept Records (SCR), and Pharmacologic Actions (PA).

Dissemination and Disasters: Using Information to Save Lives
https://nnlm.gov/classes/dissemination-and-disasters-using-information-save-lives
Learn basic emergency and disaster management concepts and related NLM resources like MedlinePlus, DisasterLit, REMM, and WISER databases

Drug Terminologies and RxNorm – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/drug-terminologies-and-rxnorm
Learn basic concepts of medical terminologies (including what they are and why they are important), followed by a deep dive into RxNorm, an NLM-authored medical terminology specializing in drug information

EvalBasics 1: Community Assessment – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/communityassessment
Learn a four-step process for conducting community assessment that includes data collection, interpretation, and use.

EvalBasics 2: Planning Outcomes-Based Programs – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/planningoutcomes
Create an outcomes-based project plan using a logic models

EvalBasics 3: Data Collection for Program Evaluation – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/datacollection
Good data collection tools follow 3 key principles: decrease perceived risk, increase perceived benefit, & decrease cost. Learn how to apply these principles in developing questionnaires and interviews.

EvalBasics 4: Data Analysis for Program Evaluation – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/dataanalysis
Learn how to work with qualitative and quantitative data to assess program value and make effective decisions

Getting the Right Information to Patients Using MedlinePlus Connect – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/getting-right-information-patients-using-medlineplus-connect
Learn how terminology standards make patient educational materials accessible through electronic health record systems, health apps, and other systems via MedlinePlus Connect

Grants and Proposal Writing-On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/grants-and-proposal-writing
Get a general overview of the NNLM funding processes for and the level of detail required for a successful proposal.

Introduction to Health Reference: Ethics and Best Practices – On demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/introduction-health-reference-ethics-and-best-practices
Learn how to conduct a health reference interview using ethical and effective communication strategies through hands on tutorials

MedlinePlus for Public Librarians
https://nnlm.gov/classes/medlineplus-public-librarians
Learn all about MedlinePlus in this one-hour interactive tutorial.

Online Resources to Support Evidence-Based Practice on Population Health: An Introduction to MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj
https://nnlm.gov/class/online-resources-support-evidence-based-practice-population-health-introduction-medlineplus
Public health professionals and librarians alike will find this class useful

PubMed Essentials 2020 – On Demand
https://nnlm.gov/classes/pubmed-essentials-demand
Learn the 9 the essential topics you need to know to use PubMed effectively.

Serving Diverse Communities: Accessing Reliable Health Information in Multiple Languages
https://nnlm.gov/class/serving-diverse-communities-accessing-health-information-multiple-languages/8320
Focus your knowledge about health information resources related to working with diverse communities with this 3 part, 3 hour series

Serving Diverse Communities: Building Cultural Competence and Humility into the Workplace
https://nnlm.gov/class/serving-diverse-communities-accessing-health-information-multiple-languages/8320
Focus your knowledge about health information resources related to working with diverse communities with this 3 part, 3 hour series

Serving Diverse Communities: Finding Data on Health Disparities
https://nnlm.gov/class/serving-diverse-communities-accessing-health-information-multiple-languages/8320
Focus your knowledge about health information resources related to working with diverse communities with this 3 part, 3 hour series

Categories: RML Blogs

Webinar- Strategies and Resources to Maintain Sobriety During COVID-19 

MCR News - Tue, 2020-03-31 18:47

Strategies and Resources to Maintain Sobriety During COVID-19 

Date: Thursday, April 9, 2020

12-1:15 MT/1-2:15 CT

Webinar Registration Link – https://nnlm.gov/class/strategies-and-resources-maintain-sobriety-during-covid-19/23708

 Presenters:

  • Scott Pelletier, M-CTTS, LADCII, CMA Behavioral Health Coach, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA
  • John Monfredo, MA, MSW, LCSW, PsyD Candidate, Substance Use Clinician, Addictions Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA
  • Michael Earielo, Director Spectrum Health System Everyday Miracles Peer Recovery Center, Worcester, MA
  • Joseph Tobin, Peer Coordinator, Spectrum Health System Everyday Miracles, Peer Recovery Center, Worcester, MA
  • Amy Nichols, Certified Addictions Recovery Coach (CARC), Certified Peer Specialist (CPS), University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA

Audience: Individuals with substance use disorder and people supporting others with substance use disorder.

Webinar Description:

Did you know that the opposite of addiction is not sobriety, it is connection? Recovery is hard. It has become more challenging as we live with uncertainty, distancing, and other barriers to connection that have recently occurred because of COVID-19. The coronavirus epidemic  and the stay-at-home safety measures we have been asked to implement create additional challenges that can have an effect on an individual’s ability to maintain sobriety. We invite you to a webinar presented by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and several behavioral health and addiction support professionals from central Massachusetts as they share strategies, insight and practical ideas for accessing virtual resources, locating the most helpful support and sources of connection, as well as some tangible guidance for navigating the specific situations and circumstances COVID-19 is presenting to those pursuing recovery.

Categories: RML Blogs

Congratulations to the 2020 MLA Awards, Grants, and Scholarships Recipients!

SEA News - Tue, 2020-03-31 12:25

Congratulations to the recipients of the 2020 Medical Library Association (MLA) awards and honors in the NNLM Southeastern/Atlantic Region!

All recipients will be recognized at the Medical Library Association 2020 Annual Meeting. Visit the MLA Website for a full list of Awards, Grants and Scholarships and 2020 President’s Awards recipients.

AWARDS AND HONORS

Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award

  • Gail Kouame, Greenblatt Library, Augusta University, Augusta, GA

Janet Doe Lectureship for 2021

  • Sandra G. Franklin, AHIP, FMLA, Woodruff Health Sciences Center Library, Emory University, Atlanta, GA

Fellowships

  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, FMLA, Tompkins-McCaw Library of the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond

Research Advancement in Health Sciences Librarianship Awards

  • Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond

Rising Stars 2020–2021

  • Erin M. Smith, University Libraries, Virginia Tech–Blacksburg

Rittenhouse Award

Data Sharing Barriers during Infectious Disease Outbreaks

  • Sarah Clarke, AHIP, Darnall Medical Library, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD

2020 President’s Awards

The President’s Award is given to MLA members who have been selected by the association’s offices and Board of Directors for notable or important contributions that enhance the profession of health sciences librarianship or further the objectives of the association.

Futures Task Force, 2013-2014

  • Tara Douglas-Williams, AHIP, M. Delmar Edwards, M.D. Library, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
  • Lisa Federer, AHIP, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Heather N. Holmes, AHIP, Libraries, MUSC Library, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston
  • Steven L. MacCall, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alabama–Tuscaloosa
  • Anne K. Seymour, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • M.J. Tooey, AHIP, FMLA, Health Sciences & Human Services Library and Southeastern/Atlantic Region, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, University of Maryland–Baltimore

Strategic Priorities Task Force, 2015–2016

  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond

Rising Stars, 2016–2017

  • Tony Nguyen, AHIP, Southeastern/Atlantic Region, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Health Sciences & Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore

Communities Strategic Goal Task Force, 2016–2019

  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond
  • Anne K. Seymour, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Communities Transition Team, 2019–2020

  • Keith W. Cogdill, AHIP, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Shannon D. Jones, AHIP, MUSC Libraries, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston
  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond
  • Beverly Murphy, AHIP, FMLA, Medical Center Library & Archives, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
Categories: RML Blogs

April 2020: Citizen Science Month and the PNR!

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2020-03-30 20:42

Welcome to Citizen Science Month at the PNR.  Thanks to the support of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), SciStarter – a web-based research affiliate of the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at the Arizona State University – is helping all kinds of libraries curate activities for Citizen Science Month.  In fact, the activities that PNR is doing for Citizen Science Month 2020 are inspired by SciStarter’s collaboration with the NLM.  Citizen Science Month promotes all things citizen science which range from amazing discoveries to inspiring projects that are all citizen science-related!

What is citizen science?  Citizen science connects research scientists and everyday people to help accelerate research and discovery.  Yes, this means that anybody can become a citizen scientist and make an impact on society by contributing to groundbreaking research!  Next question, “Where can I get started?” To help, throughout the month of April, NNLM PNR’s Citizen Science Team is curating a Dragonfly blog series on different types of environmental health or health-focused citizen science projects that you can do with your library patrons virtually throughout the year and especially during Citizen Science Month.

Each week, we will highlight  a new citizen science project that you and your library patrons can do from the comforts of home; these citizen science projects come from the SciStarter/NLM microsite which feature half a dozen health-related citizen science projects.  PNR’s Citizen Science Month will wrap with an exciting PNR Rendezvous webinar, “What’s all this talk about citizen science?” featuring  SciStarter founder Darlene Cavalier, and two high school teachers from Oregon, who will share their experience working with their students and families on citizen science projects.

Here’s PNR’s Citizen Science Month schedule for April 2020:

Week 1 (April 1-3) – Welcome to Citizen Science Month 2020 Dragonfly Blog (Nancy Shin)
Week 2  (April 6-10)– “Stallcatchers” Citizen Science Project Dragonfly Blog (Michele Spatz)
Week 3 (April 13-17) – “Flu Near You” Citizen Science Project Dragonfly Blog (Nancy Shin)
Week 4 (April 20-24)– “What’s in Your Backyard?”  Citizen Science Project Dragonfly Blog
(Emily Hamstra)
Week 5 (April 27- 30) –  “Crowd the Tap” Citizen Science Project Dragonfly Blog (Nancy Shin)
What all this talk about citizen science?” PNR Rendezvous webinar (April 29th, 2020)

We here at the PNR hope you enjoy our blog series throughout the month of April and our webinar entitled “What all this talk about citizen science?” on April 29th, 2020.  Happy 2020 Citizen Science Month!!!

 

Categories: RML Blogs

#NDAFW

NER News - Mon, 2020-03-30 11:42

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first one was ten years ago. Scientists were trying to engage American students in community events so that they would learn what science has taught us about drug use and addiction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse or better known as NIDA was the sole organization involved with this annual event and reached out to just Americans back then. Today,  National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week (NDAFW) has grown considerably because it has a many other federal partners such as Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the Office of Safe and Healthy Students in the U.S. Department of Education, and the Drug Enforcement Administration in the U.S. Department of Justice. The collaboration of these partners has brought this important information to teens in countries all over the world.

From Monday, March 30, through Sunday, April 5 students will have the opportunity to engage with scientists and other experts in the field of addiction to dispel myths about drugs and addiction teens may have received from sources that are not always credible like the internet, their friends, movies, music and social media. This week of focused attention on drugs and alcohol will provide information and many free materials to educate young people about how drugs affect the brain, body and behaviors.

NDAFW will be different this year because of our response to COVID-19. In lieu of in-person events and activities, NIDA encourages virtual participation.

The following information about the virtual events and resources is taken directly from the https://teens.drugabuse.gov/national-drug-alcohol-facts-week  webpage. Use the links to participate in  the countless activities that teens, parents, caregivers, and teachers can do that don’t involve leaving the house.

Here’s a list of our favorite activities:

  • Playing the new Kahoot! games with an online class or encouraging students to play the games individually.
  • Taking the National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge. Test students’ knowledge about drugs and alcohol with this short, interactive quiz available in English and Spanish that can be used on mobile devices. More than 200,000 people took the IQ Challenge last year.
  • Join NDAFW by sharing why you want to
    SHATTER THE MYTHS®
    Learn more

Sharing the facts on social media. Tweet, snap, or post. Social media platforms can be powerful tools to SHATTER THE MYTHS® about drugs and alcohol. Use the new “Not everyone’s doing it” social media cards and hand-held placards.

  • Participating in the Drug Facts Challenge!, an interactive game using scientific facts about the brain and addiction, marijuana, vaping, and more.
  • Join the NDAFW Tweetstorm on Monday, March 30 from 3 to 4 p.m. ET. Help us get #NDAFW to trend on Twitter by sharing messages about drugs and alcohol during the planned hour.
  • On Friday, April 3, at 3 p.m. EDT, NIDA will host a Twitter Trivia Challenge in collaboration with Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD). Anyone can test their knowledge by following the hashtag #NDAFW and answering multiple-choice questions about drugs and alcohol.

Taking advantage of the free, science-based resources to use in classrooms and communities, or at home. These include toolkits and activity ideas on various topics; science- and standards-based classroom lessons and multimedia activities on teens and drugs; and the recently updated Mind Matters series, which helps teachers explain to students the effects of various drugs on the brain and body.

  • NIDA Toolkit for Out of School Time. This toolkit offers science-based activities and resources on drug use and addiction for educating teens during out of school time (OST). The OST setting—before and after school, in the summer, or any time teens attend a supervised program outside of the typical school time—offers a unique opportunity for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) learning.
Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Adopts New Library Services Platform

PSR News - Fri, 2020-03-27 17:33

As part of the modernization of NLM’s infrastructure, it will replace the Voyager Integrated Library System with the Library Services Platform, Alma. Voyager was implemented at NLM in 1998 for library management operations, including acquisitions, cataloging, collection management, circulation, and preservation. For enhanced integration of, and public access to, the NLM collection, NLM will also replace WebVoyage Classic (LocatorPlus) and SFX OpenURL link resolver with PrimoVE. NLM will begin the migration to these products in March 2020 and expects the process to take 12-15 months. The decision to modernize infrastructure, consolidate systems, and streamline workflows aligns with the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Strategic Plan 2017-2027.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

The Ebola Vaccine: A Race Against Time

SCR News - Fri, 2020-03-27 14:54

In 1976, near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo, the disease known as Ebola was first described. For years afterward, scientists fought a largely fruitless uphill battle toward development of an effective and sustainable vaccine for this disease. After sporadically plaguing parts of Africa for decades, a 2014 widespread outbreak of Ebola sent shockwaves through not only West Africa, but the entire world, finally demanding the attention and scientific research support that it had always so desperately needed. The clinical trials and approval process for the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine, known as Ervebo, were a whirlwind, commonly regarded as a scientific and logistical miracle; however, the road leading to these advancements was littered with seemingly insurmountable obstacles. 

Electron microscopic image of the 1976 isolate of Ebola virus.  Image by CDC

A promising Ebola vaccine backbone was first seriously discussed in the early 1990s – so what took so long to get it developed and approved? It was only through the dogged determination of a few scientists and a laboratory mishap that the vaccine status arrived where it is today.

Barriers on this long road were many. The World Health Organization (WHO) turned down multiple vaccine proposals. Funding was scarce and scant due to lack of interest in working on Ebola prevention and eradication; the pharmaceutical industry brazenly questioned the purpose of pouring resources into research which would largely benefit only poor and rural African communities. Scientists frequently found themselves having to defend their research against persistent scrutiny. Health infrastructure in affected nations was weak. Other more visible widespread health scares such as the SARS virus garnered more attention and therefore more research funding. Urgency simply did not exist. 

In 2009, a German scientist accidentally pricked her finger with a needle containing the Ebola virus, initiating a swift response which would drastically change the course of vaccine development. The unnamed scientist was almost immediately given the vaccine, which was not human grade and completely untested on humans. After several days of quarantine, she was found to be uninfected with Ebola and, more importantly, had not suffered any adverse side effects to the drug. Funding for the Ebola vaccine was eventually secured, but only to the tune of 2 million dollars, small by scientific research standards, from a company focused on biomedical terrorism. The lab in Winnipeg where research was being conducted finally found a development partner, but one who was not specifically interested in the work that was being done, but rather focused on growing its portfolio assets. The lab took the support wherever they could get it.

Then began the now-infamous Ebola outbreak, which likely began in Guinea in 2013 when patients with the disease were misdiagnosed and healthcare professionals contracted the illness from them; it was only then that Ebola was formally diagnosed. In 2014, it began to spread like wildfire in unparalleled ways into urban areas and eventually into other countries. It was declared a global health emergency by the WHO in August 2014.

It was during this time that scientists worked at a fever pitch to accelerate the development of the vaccine they so fervently believed in, often navigating murky ethical waters. Even after the drug was found to be clinically effective, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States expressed no interest in it. Still, researchers pressed on. Out of sheer necessity, complete clinical trials were eventually conducted, taking (from start to finish) fewer than 12 months, an unprecedented timeline in the field. Even after apparent vaccine success, there was substantial backlash doubting whether its efficacy was adequately proven.

Since another outbreak, this time in 2018 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, healthcare workers in the area have agreed to administer the vaccine via a “compassionate care” model. Since then, around 260,000 people have been successfully vaccinated.

At long last, the end of 2019 brought the news that scientists had been waiting for; In November, the European Commission approved Ervebo and in December, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) did the same.

Read the full remarkable story here. To learn more about Ebola’s chronology, visit this page maintained by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

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Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2020-03-27 11:11

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

10 Ways to Stay Connected During the COVID-19 Pandemic – Working remotely and want to stay involved? Looking for ways to participate in classes and events while practicing social distancing? Check out NNLM MAR’s list of ways to stay connected!

National Network of Libraries of Medicine News

Funding Deadline Extended: The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) invites applications for health information outreach and programming projects. Review our available awards and submit your proposal by April 30 at 12:00 PM ET.

NNLM’s Spring Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon focusing on Preventative Health & Wellness will take place on Thursday, April 30. Get ready to #citeNLM by joining MAR and SEA for a training webinar on April 2 to learn more about participating in the edit-a-thon or hosting your own event!

Still lending in DOCLINE? Let your Colleagues Know – DOCLINE Talkline

Interested in the CHIS Certification? Learn from Someone Who Received It! – MCR News

Participate in a Pandemic Response Hackathon This Weekend! – The Pandemic Response Hackathon is a virtual hackathon aimed at better understanding and mitigating the spread of COVID-19 and future pandemics. The goal is to bring public health professionals alongside the technology community’s talent to contribute to the world’s response to the pandemic. The hackathon will kick off March 27-29, with continued support for developing projects. – MARquee News Highlights

New on YouTube:

NLM/NIH News

The National Library of Medicine expands access to coronavirus literature through PubMed Central – The National Library of Medicine (NLM), part of the National Institutes of Health, is working on multiple fronts to aid in the COVID-19 response through new initiatives with the global publishing community and artificial intelligence researchers. NLM is expanding access to scientific papers on coronavirus for researchers, care providers, and the public, and for text-mining research. This work makes use of NLM’s PubMed Central® (PMC), a digital archive of peer-reviewed biomedical and life sciences literature. PMC currently provides access to nearly 6 million full-text journal articles.

How Does a Library Respond to a Global Health Crisis? – Around the world, scientists, public health officials, medical professionals, and others are working to address the coronavirus pandemic. NLM has been working on multiple fronts to improve researchers’ understanding of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes the novel coronavirus) and aid in the response to COVID-19 (the disease caused by the novel coronavirus). By enhancing access to relevant data and information, NLM is demonstrating how libraries can contribute in real time to research and response efforts during this crisis. – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Archiving Web Content on the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) – The National Library of Medicine is archiving web and social media documenting the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak as part of the Library’s ongoing Global Health Events web archive collection. NLM’s Web Collecting and Archiving Working Group began this effort on January 30 when the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), and will continue to develop the collection throughout its duration. – Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Genomic Study Points to Natural Origin of COVID-19 – No matter where you go online these days, there’s bound to be discussion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Some folks are even making outrageous claims that the new coronavirus causing the pandemic was engineered in a lab and deliberately released to make people sick. A new study debunks such claims by providing scientific evidence that this novel coronavirus arose naturally. – NIH Director’s Blog

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue recently highlighted continued updates to the New PubMed.

NLM Welcomes Applications to its Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine for 2021 – The NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine provides up to $10,000 to support onsite research in the historical collections of the National Library of Medicine. To receive consideration, all required materials must be submitted to the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences (FAES), via the online application portal, by midnight ET, September 25, 2020. Selected fellows will be notified and awards will be announced in December.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

April 2020

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – April 1-29, 2020 – Sponsored by the MidContinental Region (MCR), this hands-on class will cover the health information seeking behavior of consumers, and the role of the librarian in the provision of health information for the public. Come learn about the evolution of consumer health, health literacy and the e-patient. Participants will leave equipped with knowledge of top consumer health sites, discuss creative ideas for health information outreach, and the class will wrap up with an opportunity to explore effective marketing approaches and develop an elevator speech.

Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles – April 1-May 13, 2020 – Join the Pacific Southwest and Southeastern Atlantic Regions (PSR/SEA) for a 6-week course that helps health sciences librarians understand the issues of big data in clinical outcomes, and what roles health sciences librarians can take on in this service area. The course will provide an overview of data science, talk about big data from a systems perspective, dig into how big data impacts patients and researchers, help participants think about the role of librarians in supporting big data initiatives, and finish with an opportunity for you to develop an action plan based on course content. The class will be taught via Moodle and includes short readings, videos, and activities. This class has been approved for 6 hours of continuing education credits by the Medical Library Association.

#citeNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon Training – April 2, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – This April, join the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for the Spring 2020 #citeNLM Edit-a-thon as we add citations to Wikipedia articles on preventive health and wellness. In preparation for the edit-a-thon, join the Middle and Southeastern Atlantic Regions (MAR/SEA) for this hands-on training to gain an overview of the importance of Wikipedia as a health information resource, more about the ongoing #citeNLM Wikipedia project, how to participate in a #citeNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, hosting an edit-a-thon for your community, and adding citations from trusted National Library of Medicine resources.

Activate, Collaborate, and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming for Summer Reading! – April 7, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – For a second year, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine has partnered with the Collaborative Summer Library Program to bring health programming to your library for Summer Reading! For Imagine Your Story 2020 we have incorporated fairy tales, mythology, and fantasy into program plans for nutrition, nature walks, graphic medicine, dental health storytime, and more. During this one-hour webinar with the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), attendees will be introduced to small and large health programming ideas that can be used for Summer Reading 2020 and beyond. Intended for those who work in public libraries, but open for anyone who is interested in health programming.

Supporting Open Science in Health Science Libraries: Sharing Strategies for Sustainability and Success – April 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – Sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR), in this webinar two health sciences librarians will provide an overview of open science services (OSS) and research in libraries and outline the challenges encountered in supporting researchers in this space. This presentation will engage attendees in a discussion of how libraries can build on their support of open science by aligning programs and services with the goals of their research communities and institutions. As practitioners, the presenters will also share ideas around adopting sustainable “open” approaches into their own work and research.

Connecting Communities to Health Information: Graphic Medicine Kits at the Public Library – April 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – To combat health misinformation and stigma, Darien Library in Connecticut created Graphic Medicine Kits to circulate within their community. During this webinar with the New England Region (NER), hear about the creation, promotion, and circulation of these kits, successes and potential improvements in the process, and the NNLM grant that made it all possible.

Make it Work—Managing Your Solo or Small Hospital Library – April 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET – Whether you work by yourself or with a small staff, the nitty-gritty of successfully delivering your services can be challenging. Join the Pacific Northwest Region (PNR) and two successful solos in this webinar as they discuss the importance of building partnerships throughout their organization, staying visible and valuable, all at the best possible price.

Beyond the Binary: Health Resources for Sexual and Gender Minorities – April 17-May 15, 2020 – Sponsored by the Pacific Southwest and Greater Midwest Regions (PSR/GMR), this course will provide culturally sensitive health information resources for Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM) populations and the librarians, health care practitioners, and others who support them. Participants are eligible for 4 MLA CE, applicable to a Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS).

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out the classes below that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

A Bird’s Eye View of Health Data Standards – This one-hour training session with videos and exercises is intended to introduce you to health data standards and how they are used, including relevant National Library of Medicine (NLM) products and services.

Bibliometric Training – Provided by the NIH Library, this series is a collection of thirteen free online videos that introduce viewers to the theories and practices of bibliometric analysis, as implemented by the NIH Library’s bibliometric service program. The goal of the series is to show how NIH does bibliometrics for research evaluation, to act as a springboard for others to get started with bibliometrics so that they feel more comfortable moving beyond this series on their own.

Chemicals, Drugs, Genetics: Searching PubMed and Beyond Online On Demand – This specialized class will help improve your effectiveness in searching PubMed and related NLM and NIH databases for literature information on chemicals, drugs and genetics. The course begins with searchinag PubMed for drug information with MeSH terms, Supplementary Concept Records (SCR), and Pharmacologic Actions (PA). Additional topics include searching related databases for drug information, chemicals and with chemical nomenclature, and lliterature related to genetics and genomics.

Dissemination and Disasters: Using Information to Save Lives – This hour-long, asynchronous course will introduce you to the four phases of emergency management. You’ll be shown demonstrations on how to utilize tools from the National Library of Medicine to access life saving information about hurricanes, opioids, radiological incidents, and chemical spills. Specifically, demos of MedlinePlus, DisasterLit, REMM, and WISER will be shown.

Drug Terminologies and RxNorm – This course will introduce you to the basic concepts of medical terminologies (including what they are and why they are important), followed by a deep dive into RxNorm, an NLM-authored medical terminology specializing in drug information.

Finding and Using Health Statistics – Written by staff at AcademyHealth and provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, this tutorial on finding and using health statistics is aimed at students, librarians, and other professionals interested in an introduction to the principles behind health statistics.

Getting the Right Information to Patients Using MedlinePlus Connect – This one-hour training session with videos and exercises is intended to introduce you to what MedlinePlus Connect does and how, and point you to resources for implementing MedlinePlus Connect at your institution.

Grants and Proposal Writing – Designed for beginning grant proposal writers, this class presents a general overview of the grant and funding processes as well as the level of detail required in a successful proposal.

In Case of Emergencies: Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planning – Provided by the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC), this asynchronous online course defines and describes COOP planning, why it is important for libraries to have a continuity plan, and provides a one-page COOP plan template with instructions that librarians or information specialists can use to develop their own plan.

Introduction to Health Reference: Ethics and Best Practices – Learn how to conduct a health reference interview using ethical and effective communication strategies through interactive, self-paced tutorials and a synthesis exercise.

MedlinePlus for Public Librarians – This hands-on, narrated tutorial explains why MedlinePlus should be the first choice for public librarians when answering health information questions. The class takes about an hour to complete and provides an auto-generated certificate of completion at the end.

Online Resources to Support Evidence-Based Practice on Population Health – This course is designed to teach public health professionals and librarians to use MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj to find reliable health information and data related to population health and Healthy People 2020.

PubMed Essentials – Are you looking for a way to kick start your PubMed search skills? PubMed Essentials is made up of 9 very short video-modules with built-in, interactive exercises so you can explore PubMed at your own pace.

Serving Diverse Communities – this three-part series of online trainings is focused on accessing health information resources related to working with diverse communities, including accessing health information in multiple languages, finding data on health disparities, and building cultural competence and humility into the workplace.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

  • NNLM Project Director, NLM Office of Engagement and Training, Bethesda, MD
  • Informationist, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, Academic Health Sciences Libraries, Danville, PA

How Medical Librarians Are Handling the Coronavirus Crisis – Library Journal

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® is just around the corner, March 30-April 5, 2020. There are several ways you can get involved to SHATTER THE MYTHS® about drugs and alcohol, even if your organization is closed or operating remotely!

  • Play the new Kahoot! games with an online class, or encourage students to play the games individually.
  • Take the National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge. Test students’ knowledge about drugs and alcohol with this short, interactive quiz available in English and Spanish that can be used on mobile devices.
  • Participate in the Drug Facts Challenge!, an interactive game using scientific facts about the brain and addiction, marijuana, vaping, and more.
  • Follow #NDAFW on Twitter and share messages about drugs and alcohol during the NDAFW Tweetstorm on March 30 at 3:00 PM ET. You can also participate in a Twitter Trivia Challenge on April 3 at 3:00 PM ET.
  • Take advantage of free, science-based resources students can use at home, including toolkits and activity ideas on various topics; science- and standards-based classroom lessons and multimedia activities on teens and drugs; and the recently updated Mind Matters series, which helps teachers explain to students the effects of various drugs on the brain and body.
  • Check out the NIDA Toolkit for Out of School Time. This toolkit offers science-based activities and resources on drug use and addiction for educating teens during out of school time.
  • See the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s online guide for additional free materials, activities, and more!

Call to Action: Public Libraries and the Opioid Crisis – March 31, 3:00-4:00 PM ET – Public libraries are respected local institutions that connect community members to credible information and services. As community anchor institutions, libraries are leveraging their assets in response to the opioid crisis that has gripped the country. After 16 months of research, OCLC, and the Public Library Association have released a call to action on how libraries can address the opioid crisis in their communities. Sponsored by WebJunction, Panelists in this webinar will share resources, including ideas for organizations to partner with, additional perspectives to consider, and strategies for getting started.

Make Fun of Learning! Game-Based Learning for Student Success – April 15, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – This course will explore the use of games in the classroom to enhance student participation and learning. The instructor will discuss the differences between gamification and game-based learning, why those distinctions are important, and the psychology behind both philosophies. Participants will learn how to spot opportunities for games in their own classrooms, the board game design process, and when games are appropriate in a class setting. Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – March 27, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-03-27 09:42

Welcome to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars April 2 – April 9

Webinars April 15 – April 29

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

Categories: RML Blogs

Congratulations to the 2020 MLA Awards, Grants, and Scholarships Recipients!

SEA News - Fri, 2020-03-27 08:56

Congratulations to the recipients of the 2020 Medical Library Association (MLA) awards and honors in the NNLM Southeastern/Atlantic Region!

All recipients will be recognized at the Medical Library Association 2020 Annual Meeting. Visit the MLA Website for a full list of Awards, Grants and Scholarships and 2020 President’s Awards recipients.

AWARDS AND HONORS

Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award

  • Gail Kouame, Greenblatt Library, Augusta University, Augusta, GA

Janet Doe Lectureship for 2021

  • Sandra G. Franklin, AHIP, FMLA, Woodruff Health Sciences Center Library, Emory University, Atlanta, GA

Fellowships

  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, FMLA, Tompkins-McCaw Library of the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond

Research Advancement in Health Sciences Librarianship Awards

  • Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond

Rising Stars 2020–2021

  • Erin M. Smith, University Libraries, Virginia Tech–Blacksburg

Rittenhouse Award

Data Sharing Barriers during Infectious Disease Outbreaks

  • Sarah Clarke, AHIP, Darnall Medical Library, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD

2020 President’s Awards

The President’s Award is given to MLA members who have been selected by the association’s offices and Board of Directors for notable or important contributions that enhance the profession of health sciences librarianship or further the objectives of the association.

Futures Task Force, 2013-2014

  • Tara Douglas-Williams, AHIP, M. Delmar Edwards, M.D. Library, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
  • Lisa Federer, AHIP, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Heather N. Holmes, AHIP, Libraries, MUSC Library, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston
  • Steven L. MacCall, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alabama–Tuscaloosa
  • Anne K. Seymour, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • M.J. Tooey, AHIP, FMLA, Health Sciences & Human Services Library and Southeastern/Atlantic Region, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, University of Maryland–Baltimore

Strategic Priorities Task Force, 2015–2016

  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond

Rising Stars, 2016–2017

  • Tony Nguyen, AHIP, Southeastern/Atlantic Region, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Health Sciences & Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore

Communities Strategic Goal Task Force, 2016–2019

  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond
  • Anne K. Seymour, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Communities Transition Team, 2019–2020

  • Keith W. Cogdill, AHIP, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Shannon D. Jones, AHIP, MUSC Libraries, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston
  • Teresa L. Knott, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond
  • Beverly Murphy, AHIP, FMLA, Medical Center Library & Archives, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
Categories: RML Blogs

10 Ways to Stay Connected During the COVID-19 Pandemic

MAR News - Thu, 2020-03-26 13:49

Working remotely and want to stay involved? Looking for ways to participate in classes and events while practicing social distancing? If so, here is a list of ways to stay connected!

  • Take on-demand classes offered by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) or Public Library Association (PLA). NNLM class topics include evaluation basics, grant and proposal writing, PubMed essentials, and many more!
  • Attend one or more of the upcoming webinars hosted by NNLM, Every Library Institute, or the Medical Library Association (MLA). Both single and multi-week courses are available to participate in.
  • Participate in the #citeNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon this April. The objective of #citeNLM is to improve the credibility and content of medical and health-related articles on Wikipedia by adding citations and information from National Library of Medicine (NLM) sources. The spring #citeNLM campaign period will run from April 1-30, 2020. Host your own event during the campaign period or join us for our virtual #citeNLM Edit-a-thon on Thursday, April 30.
  • Attend the virtual Pandemic Response Hackathon March 27-29 hosted by Datavent. The hackathon is aimed at better understanding and mitigating the spread of COVID-19 and future pandemics. Public health experts, clinicians, and health care workers will be working alongside the technology community (e.g., engineers, back-end and front-end software developers, data scientists; product managers, UX designers, etc.) to contribute to the world’s response to the pandemic. Online registration for the hackathon remains open.
  • Keep your body and mind energized by exercising at home! The National Institute on Aging‘s (NIA) exercise and physical activities page includes links to several resources and videos that are appropriate for all ages.
  • Attend a virtual conference. During the week of April 13-17, the Association of College & Research Libraries Distance Learning Section (ACRL DLS) is hosting a virtual poster session. Posters may focus on successes and failures in teaching distance and online students, instructional techniques and approaches, and the tools and technologies used by librarians teaching virtually. Other virtual conferences taking place include the 2020 Community Oncology Conference (April 23-24) and American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting (dates TBD).
  • Contribute to a blog. NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach projects and activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware. Currently, we would love to hear about how you are connecting with your patrons and/or community members during the pandemic. Share your story with us to receive a Member Highlight on the MARquee! Other blogs like YALSAblog and The Hub are always looking for content as well. Please note: Blog submissions to NNLM MAR must be a minimum of 200 words (preferably in 3 paragraphs).
  • Start a virtual book club for your patrons or community members. The NNLM Reading Club has several pre-selected books with discussion guides and promotional materials available. Topics cover a variety of National Health Observances. If you’re a virtual book club newbie, there are several free guides available online that may be useful to you.
  • Participate in citizen science projects online. Invite your community to participate in projects that advance research on human and environmental health on the SciStarter website.
  • Move your National Public Health Week (NPHW) activities online. NPHW is April 6-12, 2020 and the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) events are going all-digital. The APHA’s NPHW website has tips on how to move your activities online and incorporating daily themes into your COVID-19 messaging.

We hope that you find these resources to be useful over the next several weeks.

Wishing you all the best of health!

Regards,

The NNLM MAR Staff

Categories: RML Blogs

Interested in the CHIS Certification? Learn from Someone Who Received It!

MCR News - Wed, 2020-03-25 11:43

Interested in the CHIS Certification? Learn from someone who received it!

Words from Lee Whiting, Assistant Manager, Sandy Branch, Salt Lake County Library

How did you hear about the CHIS Certification?

I learned of the CHIS certification through the Public Library Association’s CHIS training at the 2018 annual PLA pre-conference workshop in Philadelphia, PA. I applied for and received a stipend to attend this workshop.

 

How has your CHIS Certification helped you in your current role?

I have used what I have learned in the CHIS training to write and obtain an NNLM grant for skin cancer awareness.  I have also leveraged our library’s resources by partnering with the local health department to promote health and wellness topics at our library.  We participate in annual health events, such as Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October), Diabetes Prevention Month (November) and Mental Health Awareness Month (May).  We also have improved some of our monographs in our collection in support of some of these initiatives. Having the CHIS has also led to my involvement with other like-minded individuals who are interested in health literacy. I am now a member of the Utah Health Literacy Coalition.

 

Describe your experience with the CHIS Certification classes

The 1-day pre-conference workshop was a great way to push though this certification.  With just a little bit of prep work and then a post-conference assignment, the credential was easy to obtain. I enjoyed meeting other librarians and sharing programming ideas with them.

 

Any advice for folks looking to earn their CHIS Certification?

I would strongly recommend anyone involved in providing reference or other direct services to public library patrons to obtain this certification.  An emphasis on evidence-based resources is invaluable in delivering valid and actionable information to our patrons. I would also encourage participating in face-to-face training if it is offered, as it creates a collaborative learning environment where idea sharing can take place in a social setting.

Wow! Thanks Lee, for talking to us about your CHIS Certification Process. Are you ready to obtain your CHIS? Browse some of the current classes here. Read more about the CHIS here.

 

Categories: RML Blogs

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