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RML Blogs

New Mexico Sees Four Cases of Whooping Cough

SCR News - 1 hour 27 min ago

Untitled by Mindy Olson P is licensed under CC0.

close up of eye

New Mexico is seeing its largest cluster of whooping cough cases in infants since 2013. So far, four infants from Eddy, Curry, Rio Arriba and San Juan have a confirmed case. The cases have all been reported in infants under six months old.

“Whooping cough is very contagious and can cause serious cough illness―especially in infants too young to be fully vaccinated,” said Department of Health Secretary Lynn Gallagher in a New Mexico Department of Health news release. “Getting vaccinated is the best way to prevent your child from getting it.”

Whooping cough, scientifically known as pertussis, is highly contagious. It is characterized by uncontrollable, violent coughing, which often makes it hard to breathe, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. After a bout of coughing, the person often has to take large, deep breaths, creating the “whooping” sound. Anyone can get whooping cough, but it is extremely dangerous and can be fatal to those less than a year old.

Whooping cough is spread by coughing or sneezing, and those who are infected can be contagious for up to two weeks after the cough starts.

Whooping cough is best prevented by getting the vaccine. Infected persons can be treated through antibiotics—early diagnosis and treatment is very important.

To read more about whooping cough in New Mexico and how to prevent it, please visit the New Mexico Department of Health’s website.

To read more general information about whooping cough, please visit the CDC’s website.

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Categories: RML Blogs

2017 eScience Symposium Call for Proposals!

NER News - 2 hours 22 min ago

Call for Proposals: Poster Presentation Abstracts –

The e-Science Symposium Planning Committee invites you to submit a proposal for participation at the 9th Annual University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian eScience Symposium, to be held on Thursday, April 6th, 2017 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA.

This year’s symposium theme “Libraries in Data Science: Addressing Gaps and Bridges” focuses on collaborations and opportunities for librarians becoming involved in data science at their institutions. Check out the confirmed agenda at the 2017 symposium conference page!

We are interested in receiving proposals for posters that highlight librarians involved in collaborations with a research group, department, center, or lab on or off their respective academic campus.

Proposals should be tied to one of these four categories:

Data Repositories (example: developing data repositories; advising researchers on discipline-specific repositories)

Education/Training (example: data information literacy)

Funding Agencies (example: writing data management plan templates for NIH)

Institutional Models (example: solo data librarian vs center/team)

Poster Session: Awards to the Most Informative Poster in Communicating e-Science Librarianship, Poster for Best Example of e-Science in Action, and Best Poster Overall.

The deadline for submitting a Poster Session abstract is Wednesday, February 8th, 2017.

Proposal decisions will be made by Friday, February 24th, 2017

Abstracts must follow the Medical Library Association guidelines for creating a structured abstract, as outlined at http://research.mlanet.org/structured_abstract.html.

Submission Process: Click on Submit Proposal in the left navigation pane to submit your proposal. The submitting/corresponding author will need to log in or create a free eScholarship@UMMS account. Follow the entry instructions for each field.  Before you begin the online submission process, please be sure you have the following items ready:

The submission’s title

Names, affiliations, and email addresses of all authors

The abstract

A list of keywords

Electronic presentation materials (PowerPoints, PDFs, etc) will be required to be submitted by Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 to be posted on the e-Science Symposium website and stored permanently with a Creative Commons License in the eScholarship@UMMS Open Access Repository following the symposium.

To submit a proposal, please refer to the submission instructions.

Questions should be directed to Julie Goldman: Julie.Goldman@umassmed.edu.

Categories: RML Blogs

New England Science Boot Camp for Librarians

NER News - 2 hours 23 min ago

It may be cold outside and the holiday lights are up, but it is already time to look forward to summer time and the annual Science Boot Camp for Librarians!

This year’s Science Boot Camp will be held June 14-16, 2017 on the campus of University of Massachusetts Amherst, in Amherst, Massachusetts. Science Boot Camp is a fun and affordable 2 ½ day immersion into science topics offering opportunities for librarians and library students interested in science, health sciences, and technology to learn, meet and network in a fun, laid-back atmosphere. Now in its ninth year, the New England Science Boot Camp has been hosted on multiple New England campuses and has been attended by librarians and library students from various regions of the US and beyond—and has inspired the development of other Science Boot Camps in the West, Southeast, and Canada!

Each science session will include one scientist presenting an overview of the field and a second scientist discussing their research applications within the field.

The topics for this year’s SBC science sessions are still TBD!

For up-to-date information, visit http://guides.library.umass.edu/BootCamp2017

Please Save the Date for 2017 New England Science Boot Camp June 14-16, 2017 at the University of Massachusetts Amherst!

For more information: http://esciencecommunity.umassmed.edu/2016/12/14/2017-science-boot-camp-save-the-date/ 

Categories: RML Blogs

Big Data and e-Science Basics

SCR News - Wed, 2017-01-18 19:00

The terms Big Data and e-Science are increasingly used in a multitude of forums. Many of us are inundated with these terms at work and they are increasingly talked about in the media. But what do they mean? The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative has been featured here before and the ongoing webinar series on Fridays are a great resource.

But sometimes it is helpful to return to the basics.

So what is Big Data? It is more than just a large count. Big Data represents the full range of challenges and complexities created by the vast amounts of data and data sources that the research community is now collecting and using.

For a basic primer on Big Data, visit the BD2K explanation. For librarians and other information specialists there is also a valuable resource in the e-Science Portal for Librarians. This resource is created and managed by the NN/LM New England Region. This portal serves as an excellent resource to foster learning and collaboration in e-Science while providing e-Science education for librarians.

Categories: RML Blogs

Professional development opportunity- “Building Your Research Data Management Toolkit: Integrating RDM into Your Liaison Work”

PNR News - Wed, 2017-01-18 10:55

ACRL Research Data Management logo

The Inland Northwest Health Science Libraries group, in collaboration with libraries at Washington State University, Eastern Washington University, Gonzaga University and area hospitals is bringing the Association of College and Research Libraries workshop, Building Your Research Data Management Toolkit to Gonzaga University in Spokane on Monday, April 10th, 2017.

Research data management (RDM) has emerged as a need among academic researchers and liaisons are building skills in response. This one-day workshop will assist liaisons to identify their existing skills and mindsets that transfer to research data management services and then create a learning plan for the RDM specific knowledge needed to serve their subject disciplines. Tools, hints, and tricks will be shared that facilitate partnerships on campus with disciplinary faculty and with other RDM service providers.

This workshop is intended for liaisons who are seeking to engage with research data management for the first time, or who have a very basic knowledge of research data management. This workshop is an introductory level experience. Attendees are not expected to have previous experience with research data management. The primary audience is subject liaison librarians, secondary audience include senior library administrators, middle management and department heads, and technical services librarians and staff. Other campus partners such as Office of Research, Sponsored Programs, Technology Transfer, IRB, or campus IT may be interested but would be a tertiary audience.

When: Monday, April 10, 8:00am – 5:00pm PT

Where: Gonzaga University’s Hemmingson Center Room 314 in Spokane, WA

Learn more and register: https://nnlm.gov/class/building-your-research-data-management-toolkit-integrating-rdm-your-liaison-work/6788

Categories: RML Blogs

Registration Available for the February/March 2017 NLM Webinar Series: “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”

PSR News - Tue, 2017-01-17 15:28

Beginning February 21, 2017, the National Library of Medicine will present the three-part Webinar series, Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed. This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

Registration is currently open for the February/March 2017 series:

  • Part 1: Getting PubMed Data, Tuesday, February 21, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST
  • Part 2: Extracting Data from XML, Tuesday, February 28, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST
  • Part 3: Building Practical Solutions, Tuesday, March 7, 10:00 – 11:30 AM PST

Students are expected to attend Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 in a single series. Due to the nature of this class, registration will be limited to 50 students per offering.

This series of classes involves hands-on demonstrations and exercises. Before registering for these classes, NLM strongly recommends the following:

  • Watch the first Insider’s Guide class “Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed” or be familiar with the basic concepts of APIs and E-utilities.
  • Be familiar with structured XML data (basic syntax, elements, attributes, etc.)
  • Have access to a Unix command-line environment on your computer (see the Installing EDirect page for more information.)
  • Install the EDirect software (see the Installing EDirect page for more information.)
Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM Glossaries: Terminology for HIV/AIDS, Disasters, Toxicology and More!

PSR News - Tue, 2017-01-17 15:09

Whenever learning about a new health topic, it helps to become familiar with a new set of terms related to the topic, and a glossary may come in handy. Specialized Information Services at the National Library of Medicine provides access to glossaries covering a range of health topics, from HIV/AIDS to disaster-related terminology:

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Apply Now! NLM Associate Fellowship Program

MAR News - Tue, 2017-01-17 14:29
The NLM Associate Fellowship Program offers a formal curriculum with exposure to library operations, research and development, intramural and extramural research, development and lifecycle of the NLM web-based products and services and the extensive outreach and education program reaching consumers, special populations, health professionals and librarians. In the second half of the year, Associate Fellows […]
Categories: RML Blogs

Join the NNLM Journal Club

NER News - Tue, 2017-01-17 13:12

Join your colleagues in reading and discussing new research in the field of health sciences librarianship! Participants will commit to attending four one-hour online sessions every three months. Outreach specialists at the Greater Midwest Region will host and present an article at each session via WebEx. After the 30-minute presentation, participants from each NNLM region will separate into online breakout rooms for a facilitated discussion led by a coordinator from your region. Medical Library Association (MLA) continuing education credits will be available for those who participate in all four sessions. There are a limited number of spots. Please register here (https://nnlm.gov/class/nnlm-quarterly-journal-club-ner-region/7015).

The journal club sessions will take place from 2-3pm ET. The schedule for 2017 is as follows:

February 9, 2017 Instructional methods used by health sciences librarians to teach evidence-based practice (EBP): a systematic review

May 11, 2017 Information Needs in the Precision Medicine Era: How Genetics Home Reference Can Help

August 10, 2017 The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care

November 9, 2017 Usability and Acceptance of the Librarian Infobutton Tailoring Environment: An Open Access Online Knowledge Capture, Management, and Configuration Tool for OpenInfobutton

For questions or more information please contact Martha Meacham, Education & Outreach Coordinator, NNLM NER (Martha.meacham2@umassmed.edu 508-856-1267)

Categories: RML Blogs

Patricia Brennan – New ADDS

NER News - Tue, 2017-01-17 10:23

On January 6, NIH announced that National Library of Medicine (NLM) Director Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD will assume an additional role as NIH Interim Associate Director for Data Science (ADDS). The ADDS and team provide input to the overall NIH vision and actions undertaken by each of the 27 Institutes and Centers in support of biomedical research as a digital enterprise. Among other duties, the office oversees the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative, stimulating the best developments in the data science community. This year will see the transition of trans-NIH data science initiatives to NLM, with the operational oversight of the BD2K initiatives being housed within the Common Funds programs in the Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives (DPCPSI). This change builds on the recommendations by the NLM Working Group Report to the NIH Director, makes concrete steps towards the vision of NLM’s future proclaimed in the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director’s report — that the NLM become the “epicenter of data science for the NIH.” Read the NLM Press Release.

Categories: RML Blogs

Beyond the Memes: Evaluating Your Social Media Strategy – Part 1

NEO News - Fri, 2017-01-13 16:14

Welcome to our new NEO blogger, Kalyna Durbak.  Her first post addresses a topic that is a concern to many of us, evaluating our social media!

By Kalyna Durbak, Program Assistant, NNLM Evaluation Office (NEO)

Have you ever wondered if your library’s Facebook page was worth the time and effort? I think about social media a lot, but then again I’ve been using Facebook daily for over 10 years. The book Measuring the Networked Nonprofit, by Beth Kanter and Katie Delahaye Paine, can help your library or organization figure out how to measure the impact of your social media campaigns have on the world.

Not all of us work for a nonprofit, but I feel many organizations share similar constraints with nonprofits – like not being able to afford to hire a firm to develop and manage the social media accounts. It’s easy to think that social media is easy to do because we all manage our personal profiles. Once you start managing accounts that belong to an organization, it gets hard. What do you post? What can you post? How many likes can I collect?

One does not simply post memes on Facebook

Before we get into any measurement, I want to briefly write about why social media outcomes are important to have, and why they should be measured. A library should not create a Facebook page simply to collect likes, or a Twitter page to gather followers. As my husband would say, that’s simply “scoring Internet points.” Internet points make you feel good inside, but do not impact the world around you. The real magic in using social media comes from creating a community around your organization that is willing to show up and help out when you ask.

A library should create a social media page in order for something to happen in the real world – an outcome. Figuring out why you need a social media account will help your library manage its various accounts more efficiently, and in the end measure the successes and failures of your social media campaigns. If you need more convincing, read Cindy’s post “Steering by Outcomes: Begin with the End in Mind.” For help on determining your outcomes, I suggest reading Karen’s blog post “Developing Program Outcomes using the Kirkpatrick Model – with Vampires.”

What are some reasons for using social media in your library? Maybe you will have an online campaign to promote digital assets, or perhaps you will add a social media component to a program that already exists in your library. Whatever they are, any social media activity you do should support an outcome. A few outcomes I can think of are:

  • Increased awareness of library programs
  • New partnerships found for future collaborative efforts
  • Improved perceptions about the organization
  • Increase in library foundation’s donor base

None of the outcomes specifically mention Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media platforms. That’s because outcomes outline the big picture – it’s what you want to happen after completing your project. In the above examples, a library wants the donor base to be increased, or the library wants increased awareness of library programs. It’s the ideal world your library or organization wants to exist in. Facebook and Twitter can help achieve these outcomes, but the number of retweets you get is not an outcome.

To make that ideal future a reality, you need to create objectives. Objectives are the signposts that will indicate whether you are successful in reaching your outcome. Next week, we will craft social media oriented objectives for a library in our favorite hypothetical town of Sunnydale. Catch up on Sunnydale with these posts:

Let me know if you have any questions or comments about this post! Comment on Facebook and Twitter, or email me at kalyna@uw.edu.

Categories: RML Blogs

Updated Disaster Health Information Courses from NLM

MAR News - Fri, 2017-01-13 14:46
NLM disaster health information courses have been updated and reformatted for 2017! These self-paced online courses allow you to earn CE credits from the Medical Library Association, and can lead to an MLA Disaster Information Specialization certificate. These courses can also be accessed in the Public Health Foundation TRAIN. The enhanced NLM Disaster Health Training […]
Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Announces Two New Digital Collections!

PSR News - Fri, 2017-01-13 14:27

The National Library of Medicine has announced two additions to the NLM Digital Collections, the Library’s free online repository of biomedical resources including books, still images, videos, and maps.

Incunabula: A collection of books and broadsides printed in Europe before 1501 includes over forty items from the Library’s world-renowned collection of more than 580 incunabula on subjects relating to science and medicine, from printed classical works of Galen and Hippocrates to materials on the plague and other “pestilences.” Incunabula (from the Latin for “cradle”) are books and other materials produced with movable type on a printing press between the mid-1450s through the end of 1500 — the infancy of the age of printing. This digital collection will grow over time as the Library scans more incunabula titles.

World War 2, 1939-1949: A collection of U.S. government documents includes more than 1,500 federal, state, and local government publications. Among the variety of materials included are government reports, first aid manuals, informational pamphlets, and recruitment materials that demonstrate the efforts of government, military personnel, health professionals, and scientists, among others, on the home front and overseas during and immediately following the Second World War.

All of the content in NLM Digital Collections is freely available worldwide and, unless otherwise indicated, in the public domain. As with all printed materials added to the NLM Digital Collections, items from these new collections will also be included in the Internet Archive, and as part of the Medical Heritage Library through the ongoing collaboration with that international digital curation collaborative. More information about the content of these two new digital collections is available from the NLM History of Medicine Division Reference Desk.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

NLM, SEA and NDCO Offices Closed Monday, January 16, 2017

SEA News - Fri, 2017-01-13 08:30
The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, SE/A Region office and the NDCO will be closed on Monday, January 16, 2017 to observe  Dr. Martin Luther King Day.  We will reopen at 8:30 am on Tuesday, January 16,2017. The National Library of Medicine will also be closed on the 16th of January for MLK Day.
Categories: RML Blogs

NLM Announces Two New Appointments in Library Operations!

PNR News - Thu, 2017-01-12 17:35

National Library of Medicine Associate Director for Library Operations Joyce Backus has announced the appointment of Amanda J. Wilson as Head of the National Network Coordinating Office (NNCO); and the appointment of Mark Ziomek as Chief, Public Services Division, both in NLM Library Operations.

Amanda WilsonMs. Wilson will lead the office responsible for coordinating NLM’s nationwide program designed to advance the progress of medicine and improve the public health by providing access to biomedical and health information for both health professionals and the public. Eight Regional Medical Libraries and five National Offices lead a collaboration of members that includes academic health sciences libraries, hospital, pharmaceutical and other special biomedical libraries, public libraries, information centers and community-based organizations. Ms. Wilson assumed her new position on January 9, 2017. Mr. Ziomek will lead the Division responsible for several key NLM programs including MedlinePlus, the main NLM web site, customer service, management and preservation of the collection, and delivery of onsite services and interlibrary loans. Mr. Ziomek brings experience in serving a variety of library users, managing performance, and crafting federal information policy.

Mark ZiomekMs. Wilson brings considerable experience in leading a national network of library members, leading change in large organizations, and collaborating across organizations to produce positive results for users. She joins NLM from the U.S. Department of Transportation, where she has been an Assistant Director, Office of Transportation Information Resources, for the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, and the Director of the National Transportation Library. She has served in these roles since 2006, leading the operations and expansion of the National Transportation Library and establishment of the National Transportation Knowledge Network. Since 2015 she has chaired CENDI, an interagency federal scientific and technical information managers group. Ms. Wilson’s professional experience and service include Assistant Professor and Metadata Librarian at The Ohio State University Libraries; Adjunct Professor in the Department of Library and Information Science at the Catholic University of America; CUA Department of Library and Information Science Board; and the ALA Committee on Accreditation External Review Panels. Ms. Wilson has a MS in library science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a BA in music and psychology from Emory University in Atlanta.

Mr. Ziomek brings experience in serving a variety of library users, managing performance, and crafting federal information policy. He joins NLM from the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), where he served as the Manager of Library Services since 2008. In that role he oversaw reference and research for GAO staff, collection development, contract management and procurement, cataloging, interlibrary loan, and electronic content management. From 1995-2008 he was Chief, Library Services Division of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, directing acquisitions, cataloging, reference, and collection development. From 1990-1995 he was a Senior Cataloging Policy Specialist and from 1984-1990 a Senior Music Cataloger, both at the Library of Congress. He has a master’s degree in library science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a bachelor’s degree in history and music from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, ME.

Please join us in welcoming Ms. Wilson and Mr. Ziomek to their new positions!

Categories: RML Blogs

Breezing Along with the RML Koffee Klatch

MCR News - Thu, 2017-01-12 15:24

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 10am MT / 11am CT

Registration: https://nnlm.gov/class/breezing-along-rml/6693

Calling all health sciences librarians in hospital and academia! Join Jean Shipman, Director, and Claire Hamasu, Associate Director, of the NN/LM MidContinental Region. Pretend we’re all meeting over coffee or tea ready to solve the problems of the library world. They’ll be thinking out loud as they mull over questions that are weighing on their minds. Maybe you’ve been mulling over these same questions? They hope you’ll join in the conversation. Some of the topics that are on their list to address:

  • New skills to add to your value.
  • What does it mean when libraries are no longer collection centric? Is there a continuum in moving from collection to focusing primarily on teaching, expert searching, patient consults, research support etc. in the new information environment?
  • How many hats do you wear? How does that impact your librarian role?
  • What new roles should we take on? What traditional roles should we give up?
  • Vision for the library.

[apm]

Categories: RML Blogs

SCR Regional Highlight: Texas Colonias See Increased Health Problems

SCR News - Thu, 2017-01-12 10:30

Colonias. If you’re from a border state, you may be quite familiar with this word, as it is generally used to describe unsanitary or unsafe housing located along the border between the U.S. and Mexico.

In Texas, colonias date back to at least the 1950s; developed as unincorporated subdivisions because the land was agriculturally worthless, they were sold at very low prices to low-income individuals. According to the Texas Secretary of State, colonias are defined as a residential area along the Mexico-Texas border which lacks basic necessities, like potable water, sewer systems, electricity, paved roads and simply safe and sanitary housing.

As one may assume by this definition, the health of many of the nearly 500,000 colonia residents is poor.

According to a New York Times article, in the highest health risk colonias water- and mosquito-borne illnesses are rampant due to no sewer system or wastewater disposal. There are high rates of asthma, rashes and lice infestations because of the burning garbage, mold and large amount of cockroaches and rodents. But still, there are more health ailments.

Because they have poor diets, as many people in poverty do, they have poor dental hygiene, diabetes, and other diseases. But what’s worse is most of these residents have no means to help themselves. There is no easy solution of going to the doctor. With many without health insurance and little access to healthcare clinics, they have no way to receive treatment.

Thankfully, there is some light at the end of the tunnel. More rural healthcare clinics are opening to fulfill this need that is so desperately needed for colonias. Like the University of Texas recently opened a new campus—University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine, which currently has its inaugural class. This new medical school will not only bring in medical students from around the country but will also allow students to serve the population they grew up in.

To read more about Texas colonias, please visit the following resources:

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Categories: RML Blogs

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

SCR News - Thu, 2017-01-12 08:30

Untitled by Liam Welch is licensed under CC0.

close up of eyeDid you know more than 3 million people in the U.S. are affected by glaucoma? Do you know what glaucoma is?

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve, the part of the eye that connects it’s to the brain. When damaged, it can cause vision loss, and in fact, glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in the United States, according to MedlinePlus.

Everyone is at risk for glaucoma, but there are certain groups of people who should be more aware of potentially contracting the disease—mainly seniors. Those over age 60 should get an eye exam every two years. Additionally, African Americans over age 40 and those with a family history of glaucoma should also get checked regularly, as they are more at risk.

Glaucoma symptoms vary, and those with the disease may experience none. But over time they may notice a loss of peripheral vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, nausea, blurred vision, halos around lights and/or reddening of eyes.

There is no cure for glaucoma, but it can usually be controlled, especially when caught early on. Current treatments include prescription eye drops and surgery.

This January, recognize National Glaucoma Awareness Month by considering getting an annual eye exam.

To read more about glaucoma, please visit “Glaucoma Resources for Special Populations from National Library of Medicine,” and/or MedlinePlus.

Follow NN/LM SCR on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Categories: RML Blogs

NIH MedlinePlus Salud Winter 2016 Issue Now Available!

PSR News - Wed, 2017-01-11 19:47

The Winter 2016 issue of NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is now available online! Featured on the front cover of the issue is American designer Carmen Marc Valvo, who speaks out about his personal journey with colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection. The issue also discusses health disparities, tips for your doctor visit, alcohol-medicine interactions, finding good online health information, fibromyalgia, Zika Virus and more!

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine and NIH MedlinePlus Salud are free, trusted consumer guides to the vast array of authoritative online health and medical information at MedlinePlus.gov (español). These magazines present the best in reliable, up-to-date health information, showcase the latest breakthroughs from NIH-supported research, and feature people from all walks of life talking about how they’ve handled their health challenges. NIH MedlinePlus Salud is a bilingual publication, with articles in both English and Spanish.

Both magazines are available online in HTML and PDF format. Free print subscriptions are also available for US addresses.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

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