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NNLM SEA Digest News – March 5, 2021

SEA News - Fri, 2021-03-05 10:07

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Webinars March 9 – March 11

Webinars March 16 – March 23

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – March 5, 2021 first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit

GMR News - Fri, 2021-03-05 10:02

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries. The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family friendly activities, and all the instructions and materials needed (audio file guides are available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese).

The free kits are available to the first 400 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf. Applications for the kits will be open until they are all gone/April 30th, 2021. If you are a member of NNLM you can apply for a kit by clicking here. Otherwise, it is easy and free to sign your organization up.

Test the Waters Flyer

The post Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit first appeared on Midwest Matters.
Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2021-03-05 07:30

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://covid19.nih.gov/

Learn about Older Adults & COVID-19 Vaccines with My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can get information on what older adults need to know about COVID-19 vaccines, learn about colorectal cancer, and more. Subscribe to receive My MedlinePlus via email.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit – Midwest Matters, from GMR

Words Matter – NER Update

CHES Continuing Education from the Network of the National Library of Medicine – MARquee News Highlights

New NLM Online Exhibitions – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey – Blogadillo, News from SCR

DataFlash: MLA’s New Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate – The Dragonfly, News from the Northwest and Beyond, by PNR

Member Highlights: Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association – MARquee News Highlights

Bias Awareness Resources – NER Update

NNLM Reading Club March Selections Focus on Nutrition: In March, the NNLM Reading Club examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good, or better for us. No matter what fare typically gets you through your day, we invite you to fortify your knowledge diet with these Reading Club selections. Visit the NNLM Reading Club to see our menu. Enjoy!

NLM/NIH News

NIH News in Health: Read the March 2021 issue, featuring, “Understanding COVID-19: How to Protect Yourself During the Pandemic,” and, “Patchy Skin: Vitiligo Explained.”

Vaccines, Vaccinations, and NLMNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Antibody Response Affects COVID-19 Outcomes in Kids and AdultsNIH Director’s Blog

Taking a Community-Based Approach to Youth Substance Abuse PreventionNIH Director’s Blog

NLM Collections Tour: VaccinesCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Through All of Us program, Scripps Research launches wearable technology study to accelerate precision medicine – Scripps Research

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced that the new CORE Problem List Subset of SNOMED CT is available for download.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

March 2021

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Learning from American Indian and Alaska Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic – March 10, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: Selection – March 11, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman – March 11, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library – March 16, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Improve Mental Health and Dementia Research By Playing Games on Your Phone – March 18, 11:00 AM ET

How PubMed® Works: MeSH – March 18, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Addressing Health Misinformation at the Scale of the Internet – March 22, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

NLM’s Human Genetics Resources for Clinicians and Biologists – March 23, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Ethical Issues in Citizen Science Research – March 24, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

BLOSSOM! Building Life-Long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale and Mindfulness – March 24-26

How PubMed® Works: ATM – March 25, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

#CiteNLM Virtual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon – March 31, 1:00-3:00 PM ET

April 2021

From Being to Doing: Anti-Racism as Action at Work – April 13, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Telehealth in Rural Public Libraries – April 14, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Social and Environmental Determinants of Maternal Health Disparities and a Roadmap to Effective Solutions – April 20, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Launching and Leading the Librarian Reserve Corps: Developing an agile librarian network in response to COVID-19 – April 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Thinking in 3D: An Introduction to Medical Imaging and 3D-printing – March 11, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Advanced Searching Instructor-Led Courses Series 2021 – Sponsored by MLA; Both courses: $550 Members, $950 Non-members, Single course: $300 Members, $525 Non-members.

2021 Virtual Forum for Migrant and Community Health – March 22-26, 2021 – Sponsored by the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH), North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA), and Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA)

SOPHE 2021dX Annual Conference – April 6-9, 2021 – Sponsored by SOPHE

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

Words Matter

NER News - Thu, 2021-03-04 12:37

Did you know that illicit drug use disorder is the most stigmatized health condition in the world and alcohol use disorder was ranked not far behind as fourth in the world? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3353607/

A study was conducted by the Recovery Research Institute that asked participants how they felt about two people “actively using drugs and alcohol”.

One person was referred to as a “substance abuser” and the other person was referred to as “having a substance use disorder.” No further information was given about these hypothetical individuals. This study directly addressed the stigma associated with substance use disorder and whether the language we use to describe individuals with substance-related problems has an effect on the stigmatizing attitudes of their peers and care providers. The person labeled as the “substance abuser” provoked a more punitive reaction because they were thought to be more in control and willfully engaging in misconduct.

Specifically, study participants thought that the “substance abuser” was:

  • less likely to benefit from treatment.
  • more likely to benefit from punishment.
  • more likely to be socially threatening.
  • more likely to be blamed for their substance related difficulties and less likely that their problem was the result of an innate dysfunction over which they had no control.
  • they were more able to control their substance use without help.

Those participating in this study had a less harsh reaction to the person with a “substance use disorder” because the word “disorder” conveys the notion that they have some kind of medical condition that is the causing their difficulty.

There also have been other studies conducted (related to alcohol use disorder) that seem to suggest that those who perceived that their alcohol-related problems were highly stigmatized by their families and friends were less likely to seek treatment. While those who felt less stigmatized by those around them were more likely to seek treatment.

The common use of the term “abuser” among clinicians, scientists, policy makers and the general public could be contributing significantly to the stigma of addiction. These studies are part of a body of literature that is helping to bring about a change in the language we use about the disease of addiction.

“Recently, the International Society of Addiction Journal Editors, based in large part on these studies, provided guidance strongly cautioning against use of the term “abuse”, and advocated instead for either substance use disorder (if substance use meets diagnostic thresholds) or several variations on substance use that may cause harm, such as hazardous substance use or harmful substance use.”

Here are 4 general language rules to keep in mind when talking about substance use disorder:

  • Respect the worth and dignity of all persons.
  • Focus on the medical nature of substance use disorders and treatment.
  • Promote the recovery process.
  • Avoid perpetuating negative stereotype biases through the use of slang and idioms.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recommends that “substance use” be used to describe all substances, including alcohol and other drugs, and that clinicians refer to severity specifiers (e.g., mild, moderate, severe) to indicate the severity of the SUD. This language also supports documentation of accurate clinical assessment and development of effective treatment plans.7 When talking about treatment plans with people with SUD and their loved ones, be sure to use evidence-based language instead of referring to treatment as an intervention.

The following chart is from the NIDA website and is a helpful resource to use as it identifies terms to avoid, terms to use and also the reason why. Consider using these recommended terms to reduce stigma and negative bias when talking about addiction. Language is powerful and can affect people in ways that we cannot always predict or anticipate.  The authors challenge readers not to underestimate the importance of using language and terminology that gives dignity and respect to those suffering from substance use disorders.

The post Words Matter first appeared on NER Update.
Categories: RML Blogs

Online Library Carpentry Workshop Opportunity: March 25th – 26th

SEA News - Thu, 2021-03-04 11:53

The NNLM SEA is pleased to host an online Library Carpentry workshop on March 25th – 26th 2021.

Library Carpentry focuses on building software and data skills within library and information-related communities. Their goal is to empower people in these roles to use software and data in their own work and to become advocates for and train others in efficient, effective, and reproducible data and software practices.

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience. The instructors put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower researchers and enable data-driven discovery. Biomedical and health sciences librarians and LIS students are encouraged to participate.

In this interactive, hands-on workshop you will learn core software and data skills, with lessons including:

Logistics:

  • This workshop will be held via Zoom, from 9 am – 5:00 pm ET each day.
  • Participants must have access to a computer (no tablets or Chromebooks) with Windows, Mac, or Linux operating system and an internet connection that can support a Zoom video meeting.
  • Participants must agree to follow theCarpentries Code of Conduct.
  • Participants will be responsible for downloading some files and software before the workshop. Setup instructions will be provided.

To apply, please complete the NNLM SEA Library Carpentry application.

There are 20 seats available. They will generally be awarded on a first-come-first serve basis, but applicants from organizations in the Southeastern Atlantic region of the NNLM will be prioritized.

Notice of acceptance to the workshop will be announced on Monday, March 15th.

Questions? Contact Kiri Burcat at kburcat@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

The post Online Library Carpentry Workshop Opportunity: March 25th – 26th first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

CHES Continuing Education from the Network of the National Library of Medicine

MAR News - Thu, 2021-03-04 10:00
Upcoming CHES Eligible Webinars

All CHES-eligible courses from NNLM are free. To register, select the link in the title of the course in which you are interested and sign up with your username and password on nnlm.gov.

Please note: to claim CHES CECH, a participant must log in to the session using the WebEx or Zoom link provided upon registration. In addition, you may only receive CHES CECH for a session if you have not previously received credit for attending the same course or watching the recording of the course.

As of April 30, the NNLM Middle Atlantic Region offices will be closing due to a consolidation of NNLM regions. As a result, we will no longer be approving courses for CHES CECH. Please send any outstanding inquiries regarding CHES CECH to nnlmmar@pitt.edu by April 23, 2021.

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2021, 2:00 – 3:00PM ET – As public health practice and public librarianship evolve to meet the current needs of communities, their goals and missions are converging, but we use different language. In this webinar, we’ll discuss how to find common ground, establish shared language, and identify how libraries and public health departments can work together to promote the health of their communities.

Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe current and past programs involving public health and public library partnerships, including the outcomes of those partnerships
  2. Explain current needs, gaps, barriers, and opportunities for collaboration between public health and public libraries
  3. Identify opportunities for collaboration within your own community

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Learning from American Indian and Alaska Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic – March 10, 2021, 11:00AM – 12:00PM ET – This talk will cover the complexities and nuances between American Indian and Alaska Native Communities and COVID-19. Specifically, I will discuss the unique environmental, social, and cultural implications for COVID-19 for Indian country. This discussion will extend beyond the limitations and hardships that AIAN populations have had to shoulder during the pandemic and highlight the resilience that AIAN communities have emulated as lessons for public health officials.

Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe the environmental, social, and cultural implications for COVID-19 for Indian country
  2. Discuss the limitations and hardships that AIAN populations have had to shoulder during the pandemic
  3. Explain how the resilience that AIAN communities have emulated are lessons for public health officials

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2021, 2:00 – 2:45PM ET – Public health practice depends on quality information but there isn’t a lot of time for busy practitioners to find what they need and put it to use. This webinar will share resources and strategies from three public health-trained librarians to help you optimize the time you spend searching so you can focus on sharing what you find with your clients and colleagues. Through examples of diverse questions, we will suggest efficient and quality health information sources, as well as strategies to address technical challenges with terminology, a lack of useful evidence, and limitations to access to journal articles and other content for professional audiences.

Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Describe efficient approaches to retrieving public health content from free online resources
  2. Explain gaps in discoverability due to terminology differences between public health practitioners and content producers, and suggest opportunities to improve this by collaboration between public health and librarians
  3. Identify ways to share published information within your community of practice and the communities you serve

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Recorded Webinars Available for CHES CECH

Did you miss a live class? The recorded webinars listed below are available for CHES CECH. Please note: You can only get credit from recorded classes if you have not previously received credit for attending the live webinar version or a previously offered recorded version of the same course.

HESPA II 2020 Curricular Mapping for Advancing Health Education Specialist Professionals Webinar – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 8, 2021 The New HESPA II 2020 Curricular Mapping for Advancing Health Education Specialist (HESPA) Professionals Webinar, is a one hour webinar for any public health professional who would like to learn how to map Health Education curriculum to the new HESPA II 2020 competencies.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the steps in conducting a complete HESPA II 2020 curriculum mapping process
  2. Identify the need for curricular mapping using HESPA II 2020 Competencies and Sub-competencies to create curricular improvements and changes
  3. Discuss the importance of the HESPA II 2020 model for professional preparation and practice
  4. Discuss the steps involved with health department activities relating to the HESPA II 2020 Competencies

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 1

Health Statistics on the Web Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 This course focuses on the location, selection, and effective use of statistics relevant to health on the local, state, national, and international levels. The importance and relevance of health statistics in various contexts will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several statistics Internet resources through the use of numerous exercises.

Objectives: 

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Identify selected key websites for use in the location of data sets and statistics for use at the local, state and national level, including PHPartners and MedlinePlus.
  2. Discuss of the types of data sets and statistics available on the Internet.
  3. Define the 4-step process used to successfully locate relevant health statistics for a particular circumstance or issue.
  4. Describe where to locate additional health statistics training through the National Information Center on Health Services Research & Health Care Technology (NICHSR)

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Rural Health Resources – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This webinar will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities. Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from higher incidence of chronic illness, they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. This webinar will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities. We will explore websites from the National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, Rural Health Information Hub and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The origins of each website will be explained. Each of the websites contain consumer-level information and offers an opportunity for data downloads. The downloads will be demonstrated. These resources are relevant to nurses, librarians, public health workers, allied healthcare professionals, educators, faith- and community-based organizations.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Describe current demographic trends in rural America
  2. Download data sets and visualizations from rural health resources
  3. Find information on health conditions, demographic groups and social issues
  4. Identify methods of discovering potential community partners

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

DNA to Z: Direct-to-consumer genetic testing – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This webinar class will provide an overview of the history and current state of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, which has become extremely popular in recent years. The differences between ancestry and health testing will be explored. The veracity of claims commonly made by testing companies will be assessed, and concerns and challenges surrounding these tests will be examined. Attendees will learn where to go to find essential background information about genetics needed to understand DTC tests and how to locate more advanced professional assistance. This class can also provide a template for information professionals looking to offer similar programs at their own libraries.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Describe the general history and current technological state of DTC genetic testing
  2. Assess the veracity of claims commonly made by testing companies
  3. Recognize specific NLM and other resources for providing basic genetics information
  4. Discuss practical and ethical challenges surrounding DTC testing
  5. Explore essential background information about genetics and genetic testing
  6. Explore resources for professional assistance

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in our Lives – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – The webinar will help “de-mystify” the concept of behavioral and mental health by describing the continuum of human thoughts and emotions from wellness to illness to chronic impairment. Speakers will share insights and updated approaches for managing common conditions such as depression and anxiety. Additionally, new ways of approaching mental health outside specialty care as well as methods to address the persistently mentally ill will be inventoried. Special focus will be given to the role society can play in recognizing the impact of childhood trauma and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Describe a framework for characterizing human behavior in a continuum from well to ill
  2. Describe two methods to impact the listener’s own behavior
  3. List two conditions that if depression coexists, outcomes are worse if depression is unaddressed
  4. Describe the traditional structure of medical and behavioral funding in health benefits
  5. List one outcomes-demonstrated solution for integrating mental health into medical settings

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Partnering for Improved Communication: A Health Literacy Program-in-a-Box – Recording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – Are you interested in health literacy? Are you unsure of what types of health literacy programs exist or what resources are available to you? This session will discuss the NNLM program Engage for Health, a community health education “program in a box” that you can offer. Engage for Health teaches community members how to effectively communicate with their health care providers. Program materials are freely available for use by libraries, community and faith based agencies, public health organizations or others who promote health literacy in their community. Available materials include presentation slides with speaker notes, a role-play exercise, pre-post evaluation tool, and marketing materials. This presentation will also emphasize the importance of public health and public library partnerships in engaging the community around the topic of health literacy.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Demonstrate how to locate the Engage Health Program on nnlm.gov
  2. List the materials included in the Engage for Health Program-in-a-Box
  3. Describe the community partners typically involved in the implementation of Engage for Health

CECH: .75
Advanced CECH: 0

On-demand CHES Eligible Courses

Learn on your own time! Select the hyperlink in each course title to register on the NNLM website for these free, on-demand courses.

Online Resources to Support Evidence-Based Practice on Population Health: An Introduction to MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProjAvailable for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – The course is designed to teach public health professionals and librarians to use MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj to find reliable health information and data related to population health and Healthy People 2020. This asynchronous course is offered through Moodle using Storyline Articulate software. Please note that the content in the course is for basic/beginner users of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss population health and its relation to Healthy People 2020
  2. Describe the purpose of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj databases
  3. Identify when to use each database based on the information need
  4. Perform advanced searching techniques to identify more accurate results

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Accessing Health Information in Multiple LanguagesAvailable for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with some basic statistics on individuals with limited English proficiency in the United States and demonstrate how to use resources from the National Library of Medicine to access reliable health information in multiple languages. Attendees will learn about data from the American Community Survey and U.S. Census Bureau, and then receive demonstrations on how to access reliable health information in multiple languages through the National Library of Medicine’s HealthReach and MedlinePlus databases.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current population of non-native English speakers in the United States
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health information in multiple languages
  3. Analyze resources to access reliable health information in multiple languages

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Building Cultural Competence and Humility into the Workplace Available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with an introduction to the concepts of culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility. Participants will learn about some of the current critiques to using cultural competence principles and how cultural humility can be supplemented to create a more accepting, welcoming, and reflective working environment. Short demos of Think Cultural Health, PubMed, and Project Implicit are included to showcase three external resources that can be used to further explore this topic.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility;
  2. Describe the differences between cultural competence and humility; and
  3. Utilize three online resources to help build a more culturally competent and humble workplace.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Finding Data on Health DisparitiesAvailable for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This course is designed to introduce attendees to health disparities and how the social determinants of health contribute to an inequity in health. Participants will be shown demonstrations on how to utilize tools from the National Library of Medicine, the Office of Minority Health, and HealthyPeople.gov to locate data on health disparities.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss health disparities in public health
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health disparity data
  3. Analyze resources to access data on health disparities

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Sponsored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine – Middle Atlantic Region, a designated provider of contact hours (CECH) in health education credentialing by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc., these programs are designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour. Advanced level CECH is indicated on a course by course basis above.

Reach out to Erin Seger, MPH, CHES at ers166@pitt.edu with any questions about receiving CECH for these courses.

If you want to learn more about the Network of the National Library of Medicine in your area, find your region on our website.

The post CHES Continuing Education from the Network of the National Library of Medicine first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

New NLM Online Exhibitions

PNR Dragonfly - Thu, 2021-03-04 06:27

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is known for its vast collection of biomedical information and for providing freely available and authoritative resources such as PubMed and MedlinePlus. Its History of Medicine division also provides a wonderful exhibitions program highlighting history, the arts, social issues, professions, and medicine utilizing NLM’s vast collections.

You may be familiar or even have hosted past exhibitions such as Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Wellness or Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine in Harry Potter’s World.

Two new exhibitions are now available to view.

Outside/Inside: Immigration, Migration, and Health Care in the United States
Guest curated by Dr. Beatrix Hoffman, PhD, Outside/Inside features items from the NLM historical collections and explores the history of ideas about immigrant health and immigrants’ and migrants’ experiences with U.S. health care since the late 1800s.

This online exhibition includes education resources featuring a K-12 lesson plan and a university module developed by the guest curator. The digital gallery showcases a photo album from the 1930s created by and depicting visiting nurses from the Henry Street Settlement social service agency, at work caring for an immigrant community in the Bronx.

Making a World of Difference: Stories About Global Health
The exhibition explores how communities around the world, in collaboration with scientists, activists, governments, and international organizations, prevent disease and improve quality of life in their communities and beyond. It revives stories featured in the 2008 exhibition Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health for a contemporary audience.

Featured in the online exhibition are two timely, newly-developed videos: “The Power of Memory: Fighting Disease With Vaccines & Immunization” and “Bitten! Mosquito-Borne Illness and You”. The online exhibition also includes a K-12 lesson plan and a digital gallery that further explores selected works from the historical collections of the NLM.

Though the traveling exhibitions are on hold, the online exhibitions are freely available for you to enjoy and include in your library or organization’s programming. The Exhibitions’ staff are available to support your development of programming based on the digital exhibition and accompanying resources.

The best way to keep in the know about upcoming opportunities to host and announcements of new exhibitions is to join the listserv and explore the NLM Exhibitions’ webpage

The post New NLM Online Exhibitions first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey

SCR News - Wed, 2021-03-03 19:37

This week’s guest blog post comes from Paula Mozen, Director of the film LIFE INTERRUPTED. In this post, Paula shares a bit of her story and her journey with this film about the trials of breast cancer survivors. Please note that portions of the original post have been edited for clarity.

I was a documentary filmmaker long before I became a breast cancer survivor. When I was first diagnosed, I wanted to take care of my situation and move on. The last thing I wanted to do was to make a film about it, a project that I knew would take several years to fundraise and complete. As time passed and I gained perspective on my own situation, I realized I was NOT alone; there are hundreds of thousands of us out here. In the United States, 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2021, an estimated 330,000 new cases will be diagnosed. 

Breast Cancer is indeed an epidemic. It can be found across all age, gender, socio-economic, ethnic, and geographic groups. It does not discriminate; however, as we know, access to quality healthcare can be very discriminatory.

MSU photo by Kelly Gorham

Holding these truths together plus having the inside track to my own experience, I decided to make the film I wish I could have seen when I was diagnosed – both times. I wanted LIFE INTERRUPTED to put a face to the statistics and tell meaningful stories in order to inspire change. 

Breast cancer patients are often asked to make their own choices in terms of treatments available. The moment the diagnosis is received, each person must gather information and make life-altering decisions under extreme emotional duress, all in a relatively short period of time. While individual circumstances are unique, hearing about the personal journeys from articulate women who have traveled this road before is invaluable for navigating treatments and keeping hope alive. Knowledge is power; the successful prevention and treatment of breast cancer depends on this. 

Persistence is a common theme for indie filmmakers and breast cancer survivors alike. Just when you think you are finished, there is usually another mountain to climb.

From Berkeley to Berlin to Beirut and back to Bozeman, MY LIFE INTERRUPTED was screened, was reviewed, and won several awards at festivals. After these events, I wanted to connect directly with audiences who cared about the themes and issues the film covered, including Healthcare Advocates, Providers, and survivors. My hope was to provide empowerment for survivors to be self-advocates  and to share with family members, advocates and healthcare providers what it truly means to survive breast cancer.

I learned about the All of Us Research Program and partnership with NNLM through Julie Sherwood, the Partnership & Community Engagement Manager for the Wichita Public Library. After a series of emails, a partnership was formed that would involve collaborations with NNLM staff from throughout the organization, including Brittany Thomas, Brian Leaf, Linda Loi, Darlene Kaskie, Michelle Spatz, George Strawley, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Richard McLean, Helen Spielbauer, Rachel Maller, Holly Stevenson, Laura Bartlett, and Frost Keaton. 

Beginning March 3rd through April 15th, NNLM and I look forward to presenting the LIFE INTERRUPTED Virtual Screening Series which includes live interactive panel discussions in partnership with The Black Women’s Health Imperative, The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS), Asian Health Coalition, Henry Ford Health System, Greensboro AHEC and Nashville Public Library.

During the panel discussions, hear from medical or research professionals who specialize in breast cancer, breast cancer survivors, and advocates who represent populations historically underrepresented in medical research. Panelists will share their experiences and knowledge on diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, living with breast cancer, advancing treatments and cures for breast cancer, and advocating for precision medicine and diversity of medical research through programs like All of Us.

It has been an absolute honor and pleasure to work with the entire team so far, a group of talented, motivated and detail-oriented individuals who are dedicated to creating the best possible audience user experience. Everyone is focused on making each event engaging, interactive, relevant and accessible. To work with a team like this is – well – a filmmaker’s dream come true; we are all on the same page, doing the right thing for the right reasons, all to empower patients and share meaningful stories. 

Thank you to Paula Mozen for the work she is doing and for contributing to this blog post! We look forward to seeing the great things that come from this project.

For more information or to attend any of these upcoming free events, visit watch.eventive.org/lifeinterrupted

For more Information on the film LIFE INTERRUPTED, click here: www.lifeinterruptedfilm.com

Remember to like NNLM SCR on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

The post Paula Mozen, Director of LIFE INTERRUPTED, Shares Her Filmmaking Journey first appeared on Blogadillo.
Categories: RML Blogs

Fortify Your Knowledge Diet with the NNLM Reading Club!

SEA News - Wed, 2021-03-03 14:44

The NNLM Reading Club in March examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good or better for us.

 The Future of Nutrition by Dr. T. Colin Campbell, How to Eat by Mark Bittman and David Katz, and Resetting the Table by Robert Paarlberg

The Future of Nutrition by Dr. T. Colin Campbell | How to Eat by Mark Bittman and David Katz | Resetting the Table by Robert Paarlberg

Dr. T. Colin Campbell, whose previous books include best-seller The China Study, covers the nutrition industry and its impact on both our health and the practice of science with The Future of Nutrition. In How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered, Mark Bittman and David Katz, M.D., use a Q&A format address to dispense advice on topics such as dietary patterns and lifestyle; specific diets like the Mediterranean diet, intermittent fasting and the keto diet; and various foods such as grains, meat, dairy and alcohol. Finally, Robert Paarlberg, an associate at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, contradicts some of the conventional wisdom surrounding things like organic foods and those neighborhoods and communities known as food deserts. He looks for solutions to food problems that can make sense for farmers and consumers alike in Resetting the Table: Straight Talk about the Food We Grow and Eat.

No matter what fare typically gets you through your day, we invite you to fortify your knowledge diet with these Reading Club selections. Visit nnlm.gov/all-of-us/nnlm-reading-club/nutrition to see our menu. Enjoy!

The post Fortify Your Knowledge Diet with the NNLM Reading Club! first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Free: Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit!

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2021-03-03 13:47

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries. The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family friendly activities, and all the instructions and materials needed (audio file guides are available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese).

The free kits are available to the first 500 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf. Applications for the kits will be open until they are all gone/April 30th, 2021. If you are a member of NNLM you can apply for a kit by clicking here. Otherwise, it is easy and free to sign your organization up.

To learn more about the Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit, click here.

Questions? Email us at lib-nnlmallofus@uiowa.edu

The post Free: Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit! first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM Reading Club March Selections Focuses on Nutrition

MCR News - Wed, 2021-03-03 11:55

In March, the NNLM Reading Club examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good, or better for us.

Dr. T. Colin Campbell, whose previous books include best-seller The China Study, covers the nutrition industry and its impact on our health and the practice of science with The Future of Nutrition. In How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered, Mark Bittman and David Katz, M.D., use a Q&A format address to dispense advice on topics such as dietary patterns and lifestyle; specific diets like the Mediterranean diet, intermittent fasting, and the keto diet; and various foods such as grains, meat, dairy, and alcohol.

Finally, Robert Paarlberg, an associate at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, contradicts some of the conventional wisdom surrounding things like organic foods and those neighborhoods and communities known as food deserts. He looks for solutions to food problems that can make sense for farmers and consumers alike in Resetting the Table: Straight Talk about the Food We Grow and Eat.

No matter what fare typically gets you through your day, we invite you to fortify your knowledge diet with these Reading Club selections. Visit nnlm.gov/all-of-us/nnlm-reading-club/nutrition to see our menu. Enjoy!

The post NNLM Reading Club March Selections Focuses on Nutrition first appeared on MidContinental Region News.
Categories: RML Blogs

Fortify Your Knowledge

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-03-02 20:00

The NNLM Reading Club in March examines the food we eat and all the factors that make it bad, good or better for us.

The Future of Nutrition by T. Colin Campbell l How to Eat by Mark Bittman & David L. Katz l Resetting the Table by Robert Paarlberg

T. Colin Campbell, whose previous books include best-seller The China Study, covers the nutrition industry and its impact on both our health and the practice of science with The Future of Nutrition. In How to Eat: All Your Food and Diet Questions Answered, Mark Bittman and David Katz, M.D., use a Q&A format to dispense advice on topics such as dietary patterns and lifestyle; specific diets like the Mediterranean diet, intermittent fasting and the keto diet; and various foods such as grains, meat, dairy and alcohol. Finally, Robert Paarlberg, an associate at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, contradicts some of the conventional wisdom surrounding things like organic foods and those neighborhoods and communities known as food deserts. He looks for solutions to food problems that can make sense for farmers and consumers alike in Resetting the Table: Straight Talk about the Food We Grow and Eat.

No matter what fare typically gets you through your day, we invite you to fortify your knowledge diet with these Reading Club selections. Enjoy!

The post Fortify Your Knowledge first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

BLOSSOM! Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness, free virtual symposium

GMR News - Tue, 2021-03-02 12:00
The GMR is proud to offer a free virtual symposium for library staff focused on their health and wellness. BLOSSOM! Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness, free virtual symposium BLOSSOM Announcement Details

This free three-day virtual symposium will bring together experts on morale, invisible services, vocational awe, burnout, and self-care in libraries. The symposium will provide library staff at all levels, including management, with key takeaways to improve library staff’s health and wellness. This event is open to all library staff regardless of employment status and to library science students.

March 24, 25, 26, 2021

Speakers

Abigail Phillips, Amanda Leftwich, Amy Tureen, Callan Bignoli, Eamon Tewell, Eileen Ybarra, Fobazi Ettarh, Janet Damon, Jenn Carson, JJ Pionke, Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, Max Bowman, Nikhat Ghouse, Nisha Mody, Tasha Nins, Twanna Hodge, Wendy Peters, and more!

Objectives:
  • To provide educational and inspirational speakers so that the members may increase their knowledge related to self-care and wellness
  • To provide network members an opportunity to collaborate, share expertise, and recharge their spirit
  • Increase understanding of diversity, equity, inclusion, and disability among NLM members
  • Provide access to research and resources to improve library staff health and wellness
  • Engage with library members
  • Increase awareness of NNLM, NLM, and NLM products

Why Attend?

  • Re-energize your work by sharing/learning with like-minded individuals
  • Learn practical skills to improve self-care starting immediately
  • Burnout mitigation skills and ideas to take back to your library
  • Decrease sense of isolation amongst library staff
  • Participating in this virtual symposium could help with ideas to provide your own virtual events in the future
  • This event is free
  • The event provides 8 CE credits

Visit this website to register for the symposium and select the presentation, panels, and virtual networking events you want to attend.

For questions or comments regarding the event, including technical issues, please email nnlm-blossom@uiowa.edu(link is external).

The post BLOSSOM! Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness, free virtual symposium first appeared on Midwest Matters.
Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: MLA’s New Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-03-02 11:06

Last January, MLA announced the Data Services Specialization (DSS) certificate that librarians can earn to demonstrate their attainment of the relevant knowledge and skills necessary to provide data services.

Best geared for health sciences librarians and information professionals and built upon the MLA Data Services Competency, the Basic Certification requires the completion of four 4-credit free Network of the National Library of Medicine courses. These courses cover 5 skill areas (i.e. principles of data literacy; data services; research data best practices across the data lifecycle, open science practices, and training and consultation on data-related topics) and are available on demand. An additional three credits in the five skill areas are required and several NNLM courses are listed on the NNLM Data Services Specialization page.

Registration for the NNLM courses is open and free.  MLA DSS certification costs for MLA members is $55 and for MLA nonmembers is $75. You can find more information about the DSS certificate, including cost, requirements, and skills on the MLA website.

The post DataFlash: MLA’s New Data Services Specialization (DSS) Certificate first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: March 2, 2021

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2021-03-02 10:50

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for classes and create a free account

BLOSSOM! Building Life-long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale, and Mindfulness symposium: This free three-day virtual symposium will bring together experts on morale in libraries, invisible services in libraries, vocational awe, burnout, and self-care. The symposium will provide library staff at all levels, including management, with key takeaways to improve library staff’s health and wellness. This event is open to all library staff regardless of employment status and to library science students. This virtual even provides 8 continuing education (CE) credits. March 24 – 26. Learn more and register 

*Learning from American Indian and Alaska Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic: This webinar will cover the complexities and nuances between American Indian and Alaska Native Communities and COVID-19. Specifically, I will discuss the unique environmental, social, and cultural implications for COVID-19 for Indian country. This discussion will extend beyond the limitations and hardships that AIAN populations have had to shoulder during the pandemic and highlight the resilience that AIAN communities have emulated as lessons for public health officials. March 10 at 8:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

NLM’s Human Genetics Resources for Clinicians and Biologists: After attending this webinar, you will be able to direct clients to relevant resources & support:

  • Basic Biological Scientists who study variations that impact human biology
  • Translational Scientists who study human disease and create diagnostics and therapies
  • Clinical Practitioners who diagnose and select a targeted therapy for their patient’s specific issues

Resources which will be introduced include: RefSeq, dbSNP & dbVar, dbGaP, GTR & ClinVar, MedGen, GeneReviews & Medical Genetics Summaries. March 23 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Ethical Issues in Citizen Science Research: In this presentation, Lisa Rasmussen will describe a series of ethical issues arising in citizen science, how they are situated with respect to contemporary research infrastructure, what the field of citizen science is doing to address ethical challenges, and future steps for ensuring that citizen science research is conducted ethically March 24 at 11:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Changes are coming to the way you log in to your NCBI account: Learn about changes to NCBI account log ins that will affect those of you who sign in directly your NCBI account.  After June 1, 2021 you will need to log in using your institution, social media, Google, Microsoft or login.gov account username and password. In this webinar, you will learn how to register for a free login.gov account and how to link this to an existing NCBI account. You’ll also see where to find the most up-to-date information and FAQs on this topic. We will answer a few questions from our mail bag on these changes. March 3 from 9:00 – 9:45 a.m. PT. Register

2021 National Nursing Research Roundtable: Join the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) and the Western Institute of Nursing (WIN) on March 4-5 for the 2021 National Nursing Research Roundtable (NNRR). The virtual meeting, titled “Nursing Research of the Future: Using Clinical Big Data to Explore Health Inequities and Social Determinants of Health,” will bring together individuals representing member organizations — nurse scientists, practitioners, and educators to learn about recent research findings aimed at strengthening nursing practice and improving client outcomes. The 2021 meeting will be streamed live to the public via Videocast. 

Preferring Print in a Digital World: Many educators, administrators, and popular media assume that college and university students today are high-tech oriented, fluent with the latest digital gadgets, and captivated by flashy communication trends.  Policies are made that emphasize technology over more traditional forms of learning and does not recognize learners’ individual styles and needs, hindering them in the process. The Academic Reading Format International Study (ARFIS) gathered data from over 21,000students in 33 countries and found that majority reported preferring to read from print when engaging with their academic texts. But even the print preferrers admitted to times when they liked the convenience of digital. This is the story of how this research began, the results we uncovered, and where we hope to go from here. March 4 at 8:00 a.m. PT. Register

Copyright Basics for Academia: From learning management systems to e-reserves, technology and changes to copyright law are affecting the way faculty, staff, and students share information. This Copyright Clearance Center program is intended to provide a quick, but in-depth look at important concerns surrounding the use of copyright-protected content within an academic environment. March 4 at 10:00 a.m. PT. Register

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Nursing and Libraries – Powerful Forces in Motion”, from the NLM Director’s blog

NLM Launches a New Online Exhibition – Outside/Inside: Immigration, Migration, and Health Care in the United States

Important Update About How You Log Into your NCBI Accounts

NIH’s Sequence Read Archive to be made available on AWS’s Open Data Sponsorship Program

Outside/Inside: Immigration, Migration, and Health Care in the United States

* Statement from NIH and BARDA on the FDA Emergency Use Authorization of the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

* Statement from NIH and BARDA on the FDA Emergency Use Authorization of the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

NIH stands against structural racism in biomedical research

*NIH launches new initiative to study “Long COVID”

*Humidity from masks may lessen severity of COVID-19

Charla en Español por Twitter Durante La Semana Nacional de Protección del Consumidor, 4 de marzo a las 10:00 a.m.

National Consumer Protection Week Twitter Chat March 4 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. PT

Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Approaches

*The March issue of NIH News in Health provides information about how to protect yourself during the pandemic, vitiligo explained, COVID-19 resources in Spanish and more

Disparities in Lifetime Risks of Death

FYI:

 *COVID-19 Resources

*OMH Announces Theme for National Minority Health Month 2021
April is National Minority Health Month, and this year, the HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is focusing on the disproportionate impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on racial and ethnic minority and American Indian and Alaska Native communities and underscore the need for these vulnerable communities to get vaccinated as more vaccines become available. This year’s theme for National Minority Health Month is #VaccineReady. The focus will be to empower communities to get the facts about COVID-19 vaccines, share accurate vaccine information, participate in clinical trials, get vaccinated when the time comes and practice COVID-19 safety measures. 

*Data Genocide of American Indians and Alaska Natives in COVID-19 Data
A report card grading U.S. States’ quality of COVID-19 racial data and their effectiveness in collecting and reporting data on American Indian and Alaska Native populations, available on the Urban Indian Health Institute website.

HIV/AIDS Policy Agenda for Black Women
HIV/AIDS Policy Agenda for Black Women is a report published by the Black Women’s Health Imperative that was released in December 2019. The publication provides detailed statistical data illustrating the impact of HIV infection on women of color, and discusses issues such as stigma, prevention strategies, healthcare access, housing, criminalization, and employment challenges.

America’s HIV Epidemic Analysis Dashboard (AHEAD)
The HHS America’s HIV Epidemic Analysis Dashboard (AHEAD) was created to track the progress towards the goals of the Ending the HIV Epidemic (EHE) initiative. The updated Dashboard includes new interactive features that allow you to filter data by demographics and compare HIV data across county-level EHE geographic areas. It also includes updated linkage to care and diagnosis data, as well as HIV indicator data for all 50 states. Learn more

Rural Early Childhood Health Promotion Toolkit
Welcome to the toolkit for Rural Early Childhood Health Promotion. This toolkit compiles evidence-based and promising models and resources to support rural communities and organizations implementing early childhood health promotion programs across the United States. The modules in the toolkit provide resources and information focused on developing, implementing, evaluating, and sustaining rural programs for health promotion in early childhood.

*ALA COVID-19 Recovery
Strong libraries — and a well-supported library workforce — are essential to the recovery of communities devastated by the COVID-19 pandemic. This collection of tools, developed and updated by units across the American Library Association (ALA), will help communities, library workers, and library supporters plot the best course forward for their libraries.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: March 2, 2021 first appeared on Dragonfly.
Categories: RML Blogs

New Citizen Science Exploration Kit from NNLM

SEA News - Mon, 2021-03-01 12:56

In partnership with Cornerstones of Science and the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is offering an exciting new citizen science resource to public libraries.

The Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit is a fun, accessible, loanable kit which includes four family-friendly activities to learn about water as it affects personal and environmental health. All instructions and needed materials are included, with audio file guides available in in Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish and Vietnamese. The free kits are available to the first 500 requesting libraries! They come in a lockable plastic tote and can fit on a typical library shelf.

Applications for the kits will be open until April 30th, 2021. If you are a member of NNLM you can apply for a kit by visiting https://nnlm.gov/all-of-us/resources/citizen-science-health/ttw. Otherwise, it is easy and free for your organization to join the network.

Cartoon raindrop announcing the NNLM and Cornerstones of Sciences Test the Waters Family Exploration Kit

The post New Citizen Science Exploration Kit from NNLM first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Member Highlights: Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association

MAR News - Mon, 2021-03-01 09:00

NNLM MAR is pleased to share successes of health outreach projects and activities in our region. Learn what your amazing colleagues are doing to increase access to quality health information for the communities they serve.

Thanks to generous funding from the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) and the All of Us Research Program, Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association partnered to deliver an incredible 24-hour virtual Black Health and Healing Summit, implementing what one of our presenters accurately described as “24 hours of Black excellence.” This live summit reached 3,921 people of all ages across the country and beyond with a roster of speakers that was nothing short of extraordinary. The event featured top experts in the fields of medicine and science, as well as notable entertainers, musicians and athletes. Presenters delved into a plethora of health and wellness issues faced by the Black community. This event was inspired by the need to promote health and healing as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to disproportionately affect Black communities across the nation.

Dr. Kizzmekia S. Corbett, PhD. and Dr. M. Joycelyn Elders, MD were two of the event’s esteemed speakers. Dr. Corbett is one of the leading scientists at the forefront of coronavirus vaccine development. She passionately shared about her work leading up to the COVID-19 vaccine in the context of medical mistrust and historical abuses and answered many audience questions about the vaccine. One participant during Dr. Corbett’s session shared in the chat that, “Information was very helpful. I’m leaning closer to taking the vaccine.” Dr. Elders, another public health hero who is the first African American and second female US Surgeon General, shared her insights on raising Black children during these especially trying times. Her husband, Coach Elders, also made a surprise appearance to close her session with a powerful poem. While we might think of virtual platforms as being less intimate, one thing that made this summit so special and different was the intimacy of hearing from presenter’s family members, seeing the inside of their homes, and being able to communicate with other audience members in real time via the chat.

The summit also stood out for its focus on fun and entertainment. As the World Health Organization (WHO) defines it and as Kelsa Bartley, the Chair of the African American Medical Librarians Alliance Caucus, recognized in her summit closing, health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease. This summit was relevant and informative, but it also demonstrated that health is a holistic experience that cannot be compartmentalized from all aspects of who we are. Health includes connecting with others, listening to music, finding balance, seeking joy, having fun, embracing your and the world’s beauty, and even taking the revolutionary act of resting. One way that we demonstrated this holistic approach to health was a panel discussion with beatboxing legend Doug E. Fresh, who was joined by hip-hop pioneer and Queens Public Library’s Hip Hop Coordinator, DJ Ralph McDaniels, and Dr. Olajide Williams, Chief of Staff of the Department of Neurology at Columbia University. They let us join them for a laid back but extremely insightful conversation, called “Friday Night Live: Building Health Equity Through the Transformative Power of Music”. Immediately after that session, we heard from actress, rapper, singer, songwriter, comedian, DJ, poet, and activist Amanda Seales. Amanda, who earned a masters degree in African-American studies with a concentration in Hip Hop from Columbia University, allowed us to bear witness to her candid conversation with Columbia University professor and Program Director, Dr. Chris Emdin. They discussed everything from Hip Hop culture to personal mental health struggles and their strategies to prevent and overcome them.

While there were too many incredible presentations to describe them all here, we warmly welcome you to view the session replays that are available at https://blackhealth.queenslibrary.org for the next 11 months, thanks to Virtual Experience Design Agency, our production and platform partner. We also thank NewYork-Presbyterian, City’s First Readers and Queens Public Library for supplemental funds to support this event.

Written by: Tamara Michel, Kim McNeil Capers, Janet Umenta, Zakia Ringgold, Cliff Ross, Amanda Beekharry, Yves Etheart, John Pham, Denise Clark, Lisi de Bourbon and Ewa Kern Jedrychowska.

Special Acknowledgements: Shauntee Burns-Simpson, Nichelle M. Hayes, Elisa Garcia, Syntychia Kendrick-Samuel, Tamela Chambers

The post Member Highlights: Queens Public Library and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association first appeared on The MARquee.
Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – February 26, 2021

SEA News - Fri, 2021-02-26 11:24

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars March 3 – March 10

Webinars March 11 – March 23

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – February 26, 2021 first appeared on SEA Currents.
Categories: RML Blogs

Bias Awareness Resources

NER News - Fri, 2021-02-26 07:47

Bias in biomedical data has come to the forefront in the last year in light of how groups of patients have received care for COVID-19. This discussion has also highlighted other ways that data can be examined for different types of social justice biases. But before you can examine the data for biases, it’s essential to take time to read and educate yourself on the types of biases, resources, and conversations being had around social justice in the library and in medicine.

The NNLM has recorded workshops and other resources about general concepts in diversity, equity and inclusion as well as resources on specific areas of bias. This background can make you a better informed librarian and provide a foundation for understanding different aspects of looking at, searching for, or teaching about data.

One non-NNLM resource is the book chapter Mitigating implicit bias in reference service and literature searching,by Molly Higgins and Rachel Keiko Stark from the book Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Action: Planning, Leadership, and Programming. The chapter is made available via their institutional repository.

In the past few years, medical and allied health schools have developed curricula to address implicit bias and provide better care for patients. Libraries, too, have created material to address personal biases. We expand upon both of these bodies of literature by considering the impact of implicit bias on finding and accessing the scientific literature. Health sciences librarians play a crucial role in ensuring access to the health sciences literature and as such, teaching librarians to recognize and address implicit bias in reference interviews and literature searches holds the potential to improve health sciences education and ultimately patient care. In this chapter, we aim to provide a relatively comprehensive review of the growing body of literature on implicit bias within health sciences libraries; to briefly describe our workshop on identifying and addressing implicit bias within the reference interviews and searching; and to leave the reader with concrete strategies for addressing implicit bias within their own reference and research process”

These are just a few of the many diverse areas related to this topic, and just a few of the resources available to you through the NNLM and elsewhere. Continued learning and professional development is key to learning to serve all of our patrons better.

Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash

The post Bias Awareness Resources first appeared on NER Update.
Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2021-02-26 07:00

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://covid19.nih.gov/

Upcoming Webinar on Digital Partnerships: The nature of library partnerships continue to evolve based on the introduction of new technologies and programs that focus on leveraging the expertise of academic and health system libraries to support telehealth applications. These partnerships benefit from strong support in traditional areas such as research and scholarship while taking advantage of the community relationships that extend out for health promotion and education. Sponsored by NNLM MAR, this one hour webinar will focus on the ability of libraries to take concrete steps to support the development and provision of telehealth services in ways that meet the needs of new populations while furthering the research surrounding healthcare access and equity. Join us for this webinar on March 2 at 1 PM ET. Registration is now open.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

Bias Awareness Resources – NER Update

NExT Continuing Education Modules Available – Midwest Matters, from GMR

Health Information for All: Language Resources – NER Update

NNLM Spring #citeNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Join us for the month of March in our campaign to improve health information on Wikipedia using NLM and other quality health information resources. Our focus this campaign is on Healthy Aging, which includes the habits, behaviors, and environmental factors that contribute to healthy living throughout your entire life span. There are several ways to participate, including joining our live session, taking a course on Wikipedia and libraries, and attending our health misinformation webinar series.

NLM/NIH News

Nursing and Libraries – Powerful Forces in MotionNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Is One Vaccine Dose Enough After COVID-19 Infection?NIH Director’s Blog

Outside/Inside: Immigration, Migration, and Health Care in the United StatesCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Humidity from masks may lessen severity of COVID-19NIH Research Matters

Computerized screening may help identify youth at risk for suicideNIH Research Matters

NCI study finds that people with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may have a low risk of future infection – National Cancer Institute

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NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

March 2021

NLM Lecture – Atlas of AI: Mapping the social and economic forces behind AI – March 1, 4:00-5:30 PM ET

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – March 1-26

Digital Partnership: Academic Health Science Libraries as Partners in the Future of Telehealth – March 2, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

2021 National Nursing Research Roundtable – March 4-5

How PubMed® Works: Introduction – March 4, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Pitching Public Health to Public Libraries: Finding Common Ground – March 9, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Learning from American Indian and Alaska Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic – March 10, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Enhance Your Public Health Searching Skills – March 10, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

How PubMed® Works: Selection – March 11, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Resurrection Lily with author Amy Byer Shainman – March 11, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Wikipedia + Libraries: NNLM – March 15-April 9

Caring for the Mind: Providing Mental Health Information At Your Library – March 16, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Improve Mental Health and Dementia Research By Playing Games on Your Phone – March 18, 11:00 AM ET

How PubMed® Works: MeSH – March 18, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

NLM’s Human Genetics Resources for Clinicians and Biologists – March 23, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

Ethical Issues in Citizen Science Research – March 24, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

BLOSSOM! Building Life-Long Opportunities for Strength, Self-Care, Outlook, Morale and Mindfulness – March 24-26

How PubMed® Works: ATM – March 25, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

End-of-Life Care: Planning, Information and Discussion – March 26-April 15

#CiteNLM Virtual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon – March 31, 1:00-3:00 PM ET

April 2021

Healthy Aging at Your Library: Connecting Older Adults to Health Information – April 9, 12:00-1:00 PM ET

From Being to Doing: Anti-Racism as Action at Work – April 13, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Social and Environmental Determinants of Maternal Health Disparities and a Roadmap to Effective Solutions – April 20, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Launching and Leading the Librarian Reserve Corps: Developing an agile librarian network in response to COVID-19 – April 21, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Exposure to Pollution Has Long-Term Effect on Multiple Generations – United States Census Bureau

Thinking in 3D: An Introduction to Medical Imaging and 3D-printing – March 4 & 11, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Advanced Searching Instructor-Led Courses Series 2021 – Sponsored by MLA; Both courses: $550 Members, $950 Non-members, Single course: $300 Members, $525 Non-members.

2021 Virtual Forum for Migrant and Community Health – March 22-26, 2021 – Sponsored by the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH), North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA), and Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA)

SOPHE 2021dX Annual Conference – April 6-9, 2021 – Sponsored by SOPHE

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.
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