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RML Blogs

Call for Washington Artists: Seattle Traffic Box Community Connector

PNR Dragonfly - Wed, 2020-11-25 14:32

The All of Us Research Program is holding a call for artists’ designs to transform select traffic signal and utility cabinets in Seattle, Washington. The designs should be reflective of the program’s core values to promote diversity and inclusion in health research and represent the local community. Designs should reflect the project theme: A Healthy Future for All of Us and the diversity of the Seattle community.

 

The project aims to drive awareness and education about All of Us and boost enrollment in communities historically underrepresented in biomedical research. This project utilizes public art to celebrate community diversity and enhance the visual landscape. Artists designs will be printed on vinyl and installed on locally-maintained signal box cabinets in high-traffic areas. In addition, each traffic box will contain a prominently placed QR code that engages passersby in an augmented reality experience introducing the program’s values and goals.

Deadline: December 18, 2020 5:00pm Eastern Time

For more information and submission guidelines, click here.

The post Call for Washington Artists: Seattle Traffic Box Community Connector first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Wed, 2020-11-25 10:41

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

Funding Opportunity: The Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region (NNLM PSR) is offering a professional development award dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC). The award will pair the student in an ALA-accredited program with a BIPOC librarian working in a health sciences position or providing health information. The award provides up to $2,000 for students to participate in meetings, conference sessions, conduct a research project, and other activities designed for them to learn the importance of health information outreach and services conducted by health sciences librarians. Read the recent blog post published by NNLM PSR about the award and visit the funding opportunity page to learn more.  Note: This award is open for all BIPOC LIS students nationwide.

Upcoming Webinar on Evidence-Based Public Health: Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. This webinar will take place on December 10 at 2:00 PM ET. Visit the class page for more details and to register.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

National Family Health History Day – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Provide Health Information Like an Expert – MCR News

Share your story with us! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach projects and activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware.

NLM/NIH News Rise, Service, Lead…And PublishCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Reasons for Gratitude Amid the COVID-19 PandemicNIH Director’s Blog

Read assembly and Annotation Pipeline Tool (RAPT) is available for use and testingNCBI Insights, Providing Insights into NCBI Resources and the Science Behind Them

NIH expands research to improve COVID-19 testing among underserved and vulnerable populations

Community Engagement Alliance Against COVID-19 Disparities (CEAL) Social Media Resources

National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program: NLM is now recruiting for 2021-2022 Associate Fellows. The Associate Fellowship Program (AFP) provides opportunities for recent library/information science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship. The program combines curriculum and project efforts at the NLM on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. Applications and additional information are available on the Web at Associate Fellowship Program: How to Apply. The deadline to apply is January 28, 2021.

RFI Seeking Input on NIH-wide COVID-19 Strategic PlanNIH has issued an RFI inviting comments and suggestions on the NIH-wide strategic plan for COVID-19 research. A Request For Information released this week seeks public feedback on the current plan (NOT-OD-21-018). You or your organization can submit ideas here by December 7, 2020.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced that registration is open for the seventh cohort of Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials for Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

December 2020

Genetics 101 – December 1-15

NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions – December 2, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Rise, Serve, Lead! America’s Women Physicians – December 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

All of Us Research Program’s Virtual Face-to-Face – December 7-9, 12:00-3:30 PM ET

DOCLINE for Health Sciences Libraries – December 8, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Better On The Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self-Care For Incarcerated Persons – December 9, 10:00-11:00 AM ET

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives – December 9, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

How to “Speak Data”: Librarians as Public Data Ambassadors – December 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuff – December 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Citizen Science & Libraries: Help Develop RNA-based Medicines Online Presentation and Q&A – December 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET

Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources – December 17, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

January 2021

Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications – January 4-April 9

Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library – January 8-Feburary 4

Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks and Benefits – January 14, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Trauma Informed Approach in Libraries – January 21, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

PubMed Tips for Expert Searchers – January 27, 1:00-3:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Re-imagining AHRQ’s Insight Platform – AHRQ Views

Covid-19 Comorbidities and Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases in Adults and Children – December 2, 1:00-2:15 PM ET – Sponsored by the Skin of Color Society Foundation, NEJM Group, and VisualDx

Grey (Literature) Matters: Searching for Preprint Sources – December 10, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.

Categories: RML Blogs

National Family Health History Day

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2020-11-24 13:55

Happy family having Thanksgiving dinner at homeThanksgiving is coming up in the United States, and with it, time for conversations and catching up with loved ones and family. Though we may be “zooming” one another instead of sharing our meals at the same table this year, it is still a wonderful opportunity to share family memories, special stories and history. That is why Thanksgiving Day is also National Family Health History Day. These conversations can be difficult, but there are some great resources available to help.

  • My Family Health Portrait – This is a resource from the Surgeon General to help you document your own family health history online. Similar to programs that let you share your cultural heritage, this assists you in tracking your health heritage. This can help you identify if you might be at higher risk for certain conditions. You can use this document to start a conversation with your doctor and with other family members.
  • Does It Run In The Family? Toolkit – This toolkit, made up of two books from Genetic Alliance, is available in English, Spanish and Tagalog. Book 1 can help guide you in having health history conversations with your family, including suggested activities and conversation starters. Book 2 helps you learn more about genes, genetics and how they might influence your own health outcomes.
  • Family Health Resources from NNLM – The NNLM Reading Club has created a page full of resources about family health, heritable conditions, genetics and more. There are also several recommended titles for book club kits. If you would like to learn more about the NNLM Reading Club program you can reach out to the PSR All of Us Community Engagement Librarian, Amy, at abreyes@library.ucla.edu.

If having a family health history conversation leads to questions about conditions you would like more information on, a great place to start is with Medline Plus Genetics. On Medline Plus Genetics you can search for genetic information by the name of a condition or by a particular gene. Of course it is advised to share all of your health history and any questions you might have with you personal healthcare provider.

The post National Family Health History Day first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award!

SEA News - Tue, 2020-11-24 13:22

This post was originally published in PSR Latitudes. Though sponsored through NNLM PSR, this award is open for all BIPOC LIS students nationwide.

—-

As part of the NNLM Student Engagement Initiative, the Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region (NNLM PSR) librarians are excited to announce the first professional development award dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC). The NNLM, made up of eight different regions across the U.S., aims to serve these populations with equal access to health information and promoting a workforce representative of them is one way to reach this goal.

This program aims to help students meet the following objectives:

  • introduce the student to medical librarianship and explore areas of interest,
  • prepare them to work in a health sciences library, and
  • provide them with tools to navigate the complexities and issues of working as BIPOC in a primarily white institution.

The award will pair the student in an ALA-accredited program with a BIPOC librarian working in a health sciences position or providing health information. The award provides up to $2,000 for students to participate in meetings, conference sessions, conduct a research project, and other activities designed for them to learn the importance of health information outreach and services conducted by health sciences librarians. The goal of the award is to promote awareness of health sciences librarianship to LIS students who may not be familiar with the field or conducting research within it. Award activities will be ongoing until April 31, 2021.

The PSR are also seeking BIPOC librarians to participate in the program as well. We invite people from a variety of backgrounds and different types of health science libraries to share their stories as a BIPOC, challenges, and what they love most about being medical librarians. All librarian participants will be compensated up to $300; please reach out to us at psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu if you would like to join and/or have suggestions.

The PSR librarians created an ongoing list of references and resources, which include:

For more information and the application form, please refer to the Funding Opportunities listing for BIPOC LIS Students Professional Development Award. We are currently accepting applications on a rolling basis until funds are depleted.

Interested LIS students, please email your complete application or send any questions to psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu.

The post Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award! first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: November 24, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-11-24 12:18

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

In the Dragonfly:

Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award: We are pleased to share this guest post by Nora Franco, NNLM Pacific Southwest Region Consumer Health Librarian about a funding opportunity dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC) and who reside in any NNLM region. Please spread the word and contact psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu for… Read More »

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for clases and create a free account

Library Carpentry Workshop: The NNLM Training Office is pleased to announce a new opportunity for information professionals to build data skills through online Library Carpentry workshops, at no cost to participants. 5 workshops will be offered October through January. This course is eligible for 20 continuing education credits through the Medical Library Association. Applications and more information available here. Questions can be directed to nto@utah.edu

NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions:  This December, join Julie Botnick of the NLM to learn more about public programming and NLM traveling exhibitions.  December 2nd at 12 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

PNR Rendezvous: Better on the Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self Care for Incarcerated Persons: This presentation describes findings from an Information Resource Grant to Reduce Health Disparities project, funded by the National Library of Medicine. The project aims to engage justice-involved individuals with health education to enhance their knowledge and use of health services and resources. This project won the Frank Bradway Rogers Health Information Advancement Award from the Medical Library Association in 2020. December 9th at 1 p.m. PT (1 MLA CE) Register

Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization: Data visualization design “best practices” often do not prioritize (or outright reject) efforts to be inclusive. Libraries have an opportunity to step into the world of data visualization and empower historically marginalized voices in data creation and sharing. This webinar will explore the intersections of equity, inclusion, accessibility, and data visualization to consider who we’re visualizing for, what we’re visualizing, and how and why we’re visualizing it.  December 10th at 11 a.m. PT (1 MLA CE) Register

Citizen Science and Libraries: Help Develop RNA-based Medicines Online Presentation and Q & A: Eterna invites contributors to become RNA scientists. Contributors solve puzzles to design specialized RNA-based medicines and sensors, receive feedback after their designs are built and tested in a lab at Stanford, and work together to build knowledge about how RNA works. December 16th at 11 a.m. PT (1.5 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Call for Applications to the MLA Research Training Institute (RTI):  The Medical Library Association (MLA) Research Training Institute (RTI) is a unique, highly-effective, and collaborative online research training and support program. The RTI ‘21 immerses practicing librarians in scholarly research, inquiry, and publishing. Librarians of all levels of professional experience and types of work environments who provide health information, services, and support and who have an interest in increasing their research skills and confidence and want to improve library and health care outcomes, are encouraged to apply to the RTI program. The institute is a one-year online program that consists of a series of online modules in advanced research methods, mentoring by faculty experts and peer coaches, preparing and implementing a research project, and an opportunity to present findings at the MLA ‘22 virtual conference. RTI ‘21 features an expanded research curriculum and greater affordability and flexibility for participants. Learn more about RTI program details. Deadline to apply is January 4, 2021. Fees apply

Centering Native Voices: Engagement, Knowledge, and Participation for Prevention from Indigenous Communities: Health Promotion Practice, a journal of the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), curated a collection of articles focusing on health promotion in AI/AN communities: “Centering Native Voices: Engagement, Knowledge, and Participation for Prevention from Indigenous Communities”. The papers in this Special Collection highlight collaborative, participatory strategies developed in and with AI/AN communities on topics as diverse as youth substance use prevention, community food insecurity, HIV activism and commercial tobacco use. Papers are available for free download November 15 – 30, 2021.

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

BLAST+ 2.11.0 now available with limited usage reporting to help improve BLAST

NLM Director’s Blog: Dr Isaac Kohane – Making Our Data Work for Us!

New CORE Problem List Subset of SNOMED-CT Available for Download

NIH to fund research of racial disparities in pregnancy – related complications and deaths

Study of “exceptional responders” yields clues to cancer and potential treatments

New NIH BRAIN Initiative awards move toward solving brain disorders

* NIH expands research to improve COVID-19 testing among underserved and vulnerable populations

Injectable birth control may increase blood lead levels in African American women

CDC Expands US Diabetes Surveillance System with new Social Determinants of Health Module

50.6 Million US Adults Currently Use Tobacco Products

FDA Releases New Outbreak Investigation Table

FDA Approves First Treatment for Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Some Progeroid Laminopathies

Applications are being accepted until January 28, 2021 for the NLM Associate Fellowship program for librarians

*COVID-19 Travel Health Notice Levels and Testing for International Travelers

FYI:

*Join the National COVID-19 Resiliency Network (NCRN)
The HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is working with the Morehouse School of Medicine through a cooperative agreement to develop a national network of state, territorial, tribal and local public and community-based organizations to help address the impact of COVID-19 among racial and ethnic minority populations. Morehouse School of Medicine established the National COVID-19 Resiliency Network (NCRN) which will share important messages and linkages to healthcare and social services in communities across the nation and in areas hardest hit by the pandemic. OMH invites organizations and individuals across the country to be a part of this initiative. To sign up for updates and become a part of this effort, please visit the NCRN website.

Compassion in Action – A Guide for Faith Communities
The HHS Center for Faith and Opportunity Initiatives Compassion in Action: A Guide for Faith Communities Serving People Experiencing Mental Illness and Their Caregivers seeks to help faith leaders from all religious and spiritual traditions, as well as their congregants and community-based organizations, increase awareness and build capacity to serve people in their midst experiencing mental illness, and to care for their family or caregivers.

Worldwide Social Media Event: Rock your Mocs
November is Native American Heritage Month. As part of this national observance, OMH invites you to Rock Your Mocs throughout November 15-21. Rock Your Mocs is a week-long social media event that offers American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) a positive opportunity to be united and celebrate tribal individuality by wearing moccasins. The event honors ancestors and indigenous peoples worldwide. Use the hashtag #ROCKYOURMOCS 

*Best Practices for American Indian and Alaska Native Data Collection
Current standard data collection practices by many federal, state, and local entities effectively omit or misclassify American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations, both urban and rural. This is particularly concerning in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic as these current standards of practice are resulting in a gross under count of the impact COVID-19 has on Native people. Learn about best practices by downloading Best Practices for American Indian and Alaska Native Data Collection

#WhiteCoatsForBlackLives — Addressing Physicians’ Complicity in Criminalizing Communities
A recent commentary in the New England Journal of Medicine takes a look at the role of physicians in contributing to health inequities and the continued racism of the medical and legal systems.

Hate-Motivated Behavior: Impacts, Risk Factors, And Interventions
A recent Health Affairs policy brief states that hate-motivated behavior is a public health threat with structural, interpersonal, and individual antecedents and effects. There is a need for interdisciplinary, multilevel research to better understand the causes of such behavior and to test prevention strategies and interventions.

New Interactive “Family Health: Understanding Family Health History”
November is Family Health History month and we are celebrating by presenting a brand new interactive “Family Health: Understanding Family Health History.” Learn about what family health history is, why it is important, and how to record it.

*Similarities and Differences between Flu and COVID-19
Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19.

*COVID-19 Multilingual Resource Hub
The UCLA Asian American Studies Center, in partnership with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the UCLA Institute of American Cultures, has created the COVID-19 Multilingual Resource Hub, which includes resources in Vietnamese, Swahili, Somali, Hmong, Spanish, Chinese, Chukese and more.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: November 24, 2020 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award!

PNR Dragonfly - Mon, 2020-11-23 13:30

We are pleased to share this guest post by Nora Franco, NNLM Pacific Southwest Region Consumer Health Librarian about a funding opportunity dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC) and who reside in any NNLM region. Please spread the word and contact psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu for more information.

As part of the NNLM Student Engagement Initiative, the Network of the National Library of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region (NNLM PSR) librarians are excited to announce the first professional development award dedicated to Library and Information Science (LIS) students who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color (BIPOC). The NNLM, made up of eight different regions across the U.S., aims to serve these populations with equal access to health information and promoting a workforce representative of them is one way to reach this goal.

This program aims to help students meet the following objectives:

  • introduce the student to medical librarianship and explore areas of interest,
  • prepare them to work in a health sciences library, and
  • provide them with tools to navigate the complexities and issues of working as BIPOC in a primarily white institution.

The award will pair the student in an ALA-accredited program with a BIPOC librarian working in a health sciences position or providing health information. The award provides up to $2,000 for students to participate in meetings, conference sessions, conduct a research project, and other activities designed for them to learn the importance of health information outreach and services conducted by health sciences librarians. The goal of the award is to promote awareness of health sciences librarianship to LIS students who may not be familiar with the field or conducting research within it. Award activities will be ongoing until April 31, 2021.

The PSR are also seeking BIPOC librarians to participate in the program as well. We invite people from a variety of backgrounds and different types of health science libraries to share their stories as a BIPOC, challenges, and what they love most about being medical librarians. All librarian participants will be compensated up to $300; please reach out to us at psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu if you would like to join and/or have suggestions.

The PSR librarians created an ongoing list of references and resources, which include:

For more information and the application form, please refer to the NNLM PSR Funding Opportunities listing for BIPOC LIS Students Professional Development Award. We are currently accepting applications on a rolling basis until funds are depleted.

Interested LIS students, please email your complete application or send any questions to psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu.

The post Announcing the NNLM PSR BIPOC LIS Student Professional Development Award! first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Provide Health Information Like an Expert

MCR News - Fri, 2020-11-20 19:10

The MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) offers training to librarians in providing health information services to consumers and recognizes them for the accomplishment of acquiring new health information skills.

By earning a CHIS, you develop the skills and knowledge needed to become a confident, expert provider of health information to your community. Your CHIS shows employers, colleagues, and the public you serve that you are committed to offering quality health information services. It also shows that you are staying current with developments in consumer health information resources, technologies and services.

In addition to earning your CHIS, NNLM will cover the CHIS application fee (a $75 value) for level 1 or level 2 and renewals.

To learn more about how you can obtain your CHIS certification, visit mla.org or go to nnlm.gov to see the free courses taught by NNLM to work toward your CHIS.

The post Provide Health Information Like an Expert first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2020-11-20 12:22

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

Funding Opportunity: The Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) is now accepting applications for Rapid Response Virtual Professional Development. This award enables individuals in the Middle Atlantic Region to expand professional knowledge and experience in data science or health information access/delivery through virtual professionals. You must submit your application at least 5 business days before the course/training and no later than March 1, 2021. Continuous reviews will take place for this award. The opportunity will close when funds are expended so early application is strongly encouraged.

Learn about Borderline Diabetes with My MedlinePlus: In the latest edition of the My MedlinePlus Newsletter you can learn about borderline diabetes, quitting smoke, GERD, and more! Subscribe to receive My MedlinePlus via email.

Network of the National Library of Medicine News

Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections – MCR News

Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind – MCR News

UCSF Receives NNLM PSR Subaward: “The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic: Digitizing and Providing Universal Access to Historical AIDS Records” – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later – Latitudes, the Newsletter from PSR

Getting the Most from NNLM: Public Health Part 3 – NER Update

NLM/NIH News

Dr. Isaac Kohane: Making Our Data Work for Us!NLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Airborne Infection Control in 20-Century Peace and WarCirculating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Mini-Lungs in a Lab Dish Mimic Early COVID-19 InfectionNIH Director’s Blog

Why is it important to know my family medical history? – MedlinePlus

National Library of Medicine Associate Fellowship Program: NLM is now recruiting for 2021-2022 Associate Fellows. The Associate Fellowship Program (AFP) provides opportunities for recent library/information science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship. The program combines curriculum and project efforts at the NLM on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. Applications and additional information are available on the Web at Associate Fellowship Program: How to Apply. The deadline to apply is January 28, 2021.

RFI Seeking Input on NIH-wide COVID-19 Strategic PlanNIH has issued an RFI inviting comments and suggestions on the NIH-wide strategic plan for COVID-19 research. A Request For Information released this week seeks public feedback on the current plan (NOT-OD-21-018). You or your organization can submit ideas here by December 7, 2020.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using! The current issue announced that a new (CORE) Problem List Subset of SNOMED CT is available for download.

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

November 2020

DNA to Z: Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing – November 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

December 2020

NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions – December 2, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Rise, Serve, Lead! America’s Women Physicians – December 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

All of Us Research Program’s Virtual Face-to-Face – December 7-9, 12:00-3:30 PM ET

DOCLINE for Health Sciences Libraries – December 8, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Better On The Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self-Care For Incarcerated Persons – December 9, 10:00-11:00 AM ET

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives – December 9, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

How to “Speak Data”: Librarians as Public Data Ambassadors – December 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuff – December 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Citizen Science & Libraries: Help Develop RNA-based Medicines Online Presentation and Q&A – December 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET

Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources – December 17, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

January 2021

Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications – January 4-April 9

Making Sense of Numbers: Understanding Risks and Benefits – January 14, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

Trauma Informed Approach in Libraries – January 21, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

PubMed Tips for Expert Searchers – January 27, 1:00-3:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

From Historical Sources to Datasets: A Preview of DataScribe – Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM)

Explore Your Identity to Improve Your Practice: An Introduction to Critical Health Sciences Librarianship – November 24, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Covid-19 Comorbidities and Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases in Adults and Children – December 2, 1:00-2:15 PM ET – Sponsored by the Skin of Color Society Foundation, NEJM Group, and VisualDx

Grey (Literature) Matters: Searching for Preprint Sources – December 10, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 20, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-11-20 10:06

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars December 2 – December 9

Webinars December 10 – December 15

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – November 20, 2020 first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections

MCR News - Thu, 2020-11-19 13:22

Two libraries in the Salt Lake City area hired library staff with special connections to diverse communities as part of a project funded this year by the NNLM MidContinental Region.

These “community wellness liaisons,” aided members of their communities in accessing library services and programs, with a special emphasis on health-related information. They were hired to work for nearly a year at the main branch of the Salt Lake City Public Library and at the West Valley branch of the Salt Lake County Library.

Five individuals were selected with the input of the Community Faces of Utah (CFU) collaborative. CFU members include Calvary Baptist Church representing African Americans in Salt Lake City, the National Tongan American Society representing Pacific Islanders and Native Hawaiians, the Hispanic Health Care Task Force representing Spanish-speaking populations, the Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake representing indigenous Americans, and Best of Africa representing African refugees and immigrants. CFU also includes the Community Collaboration and Engagement Team at the University of Utah’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCET) which coordinated the project, and the Utah Department of Health.

Each liaison was a member one of the CFU communities. They worked for 20 hours a week for one of the two libraries, splitting their time between the library and community outreach. One liaison also spent part of their time at the Glendale branch of the City Library. In addition to working with library staff, the liaisons coordinated closely with leaders from their respective CFU organizations.

All liaisons received training in health-information skills from NNLM and completed level 1 of the Consumer Health Information Specialist training.

The liaisons worked with their libraries to conduct public programs and participated in virtual community outreach activities after the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closure of the libraries. Examples of programs and activities included a Kwanzaa celebration, discussions on trauma and mental wellness, in-library displays on health, and library resource lists on health topics of highest interest to each community.

 They and the CFU community leaders also conducted trainings for staff on such topics as diversity, inclusion and allyship. This helped to create a two-way conversation between communities and library.

The project initially arose from a discussion at a CFU meeting in which the community leaders discussed their perceptions that individuals from diverse communities did not feel welcome in local libraries, in part because of the lack of diversity among library staff. As a result, many individuals from diverse communities around the Salt Lake Valley did not use their local libraries and were unaware of library services and programs that could meet their needs.

Based on this discussion, CFU designed a research study that included community engagement sessions, similar to focus groups, which were conducted with each of the CFU communities. Each CFU community leader co-facilitated the session in their community along with a CCET staff member.

The participants in the engagement sessions suggested ideas for addressing the problem, such as having library staff from similar backgrounds as community members and making health information more accessible by bringing library resources and programs directly into the communities. The discussions involving community group members, library leaders and the researchers led to the pilot project that hired the CWLs.

Project organizers shared the results from the engagement sessions with a sixth group consisting of city and county librarians and library administrators. In a culminating workshop, CFU community leaders and representatives from the two library systems reviewed the research findings and developed a plan for the pilot project.

Funding for the project came from the NNLM All of Us Community Engagement Network, which helps public libraries in supporting the health information needs of their users by providing training to library staff, funding and other resources to support health programming and activities, and connections to medical libraries and other NNLM members in their area.

The CEN is part of the All of Us Research Program, which has a mission to accelerate health research and medical breakthroughs, enabling individualized prevention, treatment and care for all of us. The program aims to build one of the largest, most diverse datasets of its kind for health research, with one million or more volunteers nationwide who sill sign up to share their information over time.

The project wraps up in November. You can read more details about the three-part project in the reports for the project’s first stage and second stage.

The post Teaming up to Strengthen Library-Community Connections first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind

MCR News - Wed, 2020-11-18 10:32

 

light at the end of the tunnel photoThe GOOD news on the vaccine front over the past few weeks related to the progress of the pharmaceutical companies may be an indicator that we are seeing the light at the end of this dark COVID-19 tunnel. Although no vaccine is 100% effective (WHO, 2020), numbers like 90 – 95% efficacy should bring us hope that the rising hospitalization numbers and death tolls will eventually decrease. However, we still need to be diligent in wearing masks and social distancing now more than ever because it will take time to implement a plan to vaccinate over 300 million people.

This good vaccine news made me think about some visualizations I saw in the past that were created to show just how effective vaccines can be. Before COVID, the Wall Street Journal in 2015 published a series of visualizations that depict the impact of several vaccines. This type of visualization is called a heat map and shows, through a range of color squares, how cases of disease have decreased across time and especially after the point where vaccines have been introduced. I hope to see the COVID-19 visualization get added to this list soon so that we can watch our states slowly move from red to blue. Not only is a heat map a compelling image that tells a story, it is also interactive and you can mouse over the color squares to see the data behind the square and explore the numbers in your own state.

Does this peak your interest to see more interesting visualizations? Here is a galley of visualizations created in Tableau Public, a free visualization software. In addition, The New York Times has a great website called “What’s Going On in This Graph?” that is being used to teach students about statistics.

Want to learn more about creating visualizations? NNLM has some great additional resources you can explore. This recorded webinar, Data Visualization: Theory to Practice provides an overview of data visualization and an introduction to some tools to create visualizations. This webinar recording, What’s in a Data Story? Understanding the Basics of Data Storytelling focuses on how storytelling and data visualizations are connected.

Sometimes a picture really is worth a thousand words!!

Photo source: Pickpik

The post Living on the Data Fringe: Vaccines on the Mind first appeared on MidContinental Region News.

Categories: RML Blogs

Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later

PSR Newsletter - Tue, 2020-11-17 18:10

by John Borghi
Manager, Research and Instruction
Stanford University, Lane Medical Library

A little over a year ago, I boarded a plane to Washington DC to attend the 2019 meeting of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). At this point in my career, I had been working in academic libraries for over six years. For much of that time, I had worked in biomedical settings and focused my activities on research data. I teach classes on data management and data sharing, but I had come to AMIA because I wanted to learn more about clinical data, informatics, and health information technology.

Over the next few days, I attended sessions on ethics in biomedical informatics, the emergence of artificial intelligence in healthcare, and so many other interesting topics that I was constantly exhausted and in search of coffee. Because the conference was in D.C., I also learned a lot about data-related initiatives at federal agencies, especially the National Institutes of Health and National Library of Medicine.

So why am I writing about this now? As I sit down to write this, the 2020 AMIA meeting is occurring. But rather than being held in a conference center it is, like so many other meetings in the last year, entirely virtual. Shortly after I returned from the 2019 meeting, the first cases of the disease we now know as COVID-19 began to emerge. I can’t even begin to summarize or even characterize the year that followed. But topics related to how researchers and clinicians collect, analyze, and apply data to healthcare decisions now consume so many of our personal, professional, and political conversations and activities. Everything I learned at last year’s meeting resonates very differently in the time of COVID.

The session I was most eager to attend last year was about the data-related initiatives at the NIH. At the time, I had just contributed to my institution’s response to a request for comments on a draft data management and sharing policy and I was eager to hear more about what was happening and what was planned in the future. A year later, and the final policy has been announced and I’m glad to see that the suggestions made by my peers and I- both in the meeting and in our written comments- have been integrated into the new policy. But also, the necessity of biomedical and health science researchers making the products of their work available (and in a usable form) to one another could not be clearer than during a global pandemic.

Another standout session I attended at the AMIA meeting concerned the All of Us Research Program, an effort to gather genetic and health data from one million or more people living in the United States in order to accelerate medical breakthroughs. At the time, I was amazed at the sheer scale of the project and interested in how the data would be curated and made available to the research community. Now, when I check the project’s website, I see there are a series of efforts to leverage the dataset to study COVID antibodies, survey the pandemic’s effect on community health, and use the electronic health record to study patterns and learn about COVID-related symptoms. Rather than a redirection of the project, this represents its immediate application.

When I proposed attending the 2019 AMIA meeting, I told my colleagues I wanted to explore another dimension of our profession- to understand more about how clinical data was actually being applied and used. Looking back now, at all of the notes I took during the meeting, I am struck by two things. The first is that the meeting feels like it occurred a lifetime ago. Everything surrounding my attendance at the meeting, from walking through a crowded airport to catch my flight to D.C. to presenting on what I saw to a room full of my colleagues upon my return, feels so remote now. But I am also struck by the immediacy of everything I learned at the meeting. Understanding and working to improve how clinical data is collected, analyzed, and applied are always absolutely vital pursuits. But the last year has shined a light on just how vital.

The post Reflecting on the 2019 American Medical Informatics Association Meeting, A Year Later first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

PNR Weekly Digest: November 17, 2020

PNR Dragonfly - Tue, 2020-11-17 10:56

Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an *

*COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.

In the Dragonfly:

NIH calls on clinical researchers to swiftly share COVID-19 results
NIH is taking an all-hands-on-deck approach to speeding life-saving research for vaccines, treatments, and diagnostic tests to end the COVID-19 pandemic. Through the establishment of major public-private initiatives such as the Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) and the Rapid Acceleration of Diagostics (RADx) initiatives, NIH and its partners have launched dozens of COVID-19 vaccine and treatment clinical trials and funded dozens of new and innovative testing technologies at an unprecedented rate…read more of the NIH Director’s statement

Professional Development:

NNLM CE Opportunities:
NNLM offers training on a variety of topics related to health information. A complete listing of NNLM educational opportunities is available. Please note you need to create an NNLM account prior to registration if you don’t already have one. This is not the same as being a member of NNLM.  Learn how to register for clases and create a free account

Library Carpentry Workshop: The NNLM Training Office is pleased to announce a new opportunity for information professionals to build data skills through online Library Carpentry workshops, at no cost to participants. 5 workshops will be offered October through January. This course is eligible for 20 continuing education credits through the Medical Library Association. Applications and more information available here. Questions can be directed to nto@utah.edu

DOCLINE for Health Sciences Libraries: DOCLINE is an integral part of interlibrary loan services in Health Sciences Libraries. Journal Holdings, Library Profiles, and Routing Tables guide all DOCLINE requests. In this webinar, NDCO Coordinator Erin Latta will review current best practices for maintaining your Journal Holdings, Library Profiles and Routing Tables. This webinar will include how experienced librarians participate in the FreeShare Library Group, and how they utilize the Electronic Fund Transfer System (EFTS) for borrowing costs. December 8 at 10:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register 

NNLM Reading Club Presents… : This session of the webinar series is scheduled to host Indiana University School of Medicine Professor and author of the book, Please to Meet Me. Bill Sullivan describes how genetics, epigenetics, microbiology and psychology combine to affect our personalities and actions. November 17 at 12:00 p.m. PT.  Visit the webinar webpage to learn more about how to attend this free session. 

Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community for Public Libraries: Do you work in a public library? Are you interested in engaging with other public librarians and staff members to improve your knowledge and comfort with health and wellness related reference and services? Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community is a free online course that was developed in cooperation with WebJunction, PLA, and public librarians to create a cohort learning experience. Registration is limited to public library staff. This 4 week asynchronous class runs from January 11 – February 5, 2021. It qualifies for the first level of the Medical Library Association’s Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS). (12 MLA CE) Register

Better On The Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self-Care For Incarcerated Persons: This presentation describes findings from an Information Resource Grant to Reduce Health Disparities project, funded by the National Library of Medicine. The project aims to engage justice-involved individuals with health education to enhance their knowledge and use of health services and resources. This project won the Frank Bradway Rogers Health Information Advancement Award from the Medical Library Association in 2020. Join the PNR Rendezvous session to learn more about this award winning project. December 9 at 1:00 p.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives: The webinar will help “de-mystify” the concept of behavioral and mental health by describing the continuum of human thoughts and emotions from wellness to illness to chronic impairment. Additionally, new ways of approaching mental health outside specialty care as well as methods to address the persistently mentally ill will be inventoried. Special focus will be given to the role society can play in recognizing the impact of childhood trauma and the COVID-19 pandemic. December 9 at 8:00 a.m. PT. (1 MLA CE) Register

Additional Educational Opportunities:
These learning opportunities are provided by organizations beyond NNLM. All are free unless otherwise indicated.

Society, Culture, and Politics: The Government Has Resources to Make You Socially, Culturally, and Politically Educated: The Government has resources to offer in sociology, anthropology, and political science. If your users have questions about the basic functions of society, culture, and politics, this webinar is for you. The information available in these areas range from how to find a career in these subject fields to lessons plans for teachers and scientific investigations. The webinar will introduce sources in these areas from the Library of Congress, the U.S. Census Bureau, the National Science Foundation, ERIC, along with state and local information. November 19 at 11:00 a.m. PT. Register

Call for Applications to the MLA Research Training Institute (RTI):  The Medical Library Association (MLA) Research Training Institute (RTI) is a unique, highly-effective, and collaborative online research training and support program. The RTI ‘21 immerses practicing librarians in scholarly research, inquiry, and publishing. Librarians of all levels of professional experience and types of work environments who provide health information, services, and support and who have an interest in increasing their research skills and confidence and want to improve library and health care outcomes, are encouraged to apply to the RTI program. The institute is a one-year online program that consists of a series of online modules in advanced research methods, mentoring by faculty experts and peer coaches, preparing and implementing a research project, and an opportunity to present findings at the MLA ‘22 virtual conference. RTI ‘21 features an expanded research curriculum and greater affordability and flexibility for participants. Learn more about RTI program details. Deadline to apply is January 4, 2021. Fees apply

News from the National Library of Medicine & National Institutes of Health:

“Making Connections and Enabling Discoverability – Celebrating 30 Years of UMLS”, from the NLM Director’s blog

Applications are being accepted until January 28, 2021 for the NLM Associate Fellowship program for librarians

Revealing Data: Flu Masks on Ships, 1918

From the NIH Director’s blog:

Rural youth often lack access to suicide prevention services

NIH study finds long-acting injectable drug prevents HIV acquisition in cisgender women

Join the Learn More Breathe BetterSM program in an effort to promote COPD resources and educate others during National COPD Awareness Month (November)

The Human Pangenome, Explore the monumental effort to redefine the human genome and our understanding of human genomic diversity.

National Human Genome Research Institute Spanish Resource on Polygenic Risk Scores

Census Bureau releases new report on commuting patterns of older workers

* Treatments for People with Early COVID-19 Infection is an Urgent Research Focus

Trans-NIH FIRST program will address faculty diversity and inclusion in biomedical research

National Family Caregivers Month, Tips for helping an older relative with oral care

Neighborhood conditions associated with children’s cognitive function

FYI:

*Join the National COVID-19 Resiliency Network (NCRN)
The HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is working with the Morehouse School of Medicine through a cooperative agreement to develop a national network of state, territorial, tribal and local public and community-based organizations to help address the impact of COVID-19 among racial and ethnic minority populations. Morehouse School of Medicine established the National COVID-19 Resiliency Network (NCRN) which will share important messages and linkages to healthcare and social services in communities across the nation and in areas hardest hit by the pandemic. OMH invites organizations and individuals across the country to be a part of this initiative. To sign up for updates and become a part of this effort, please visit the NCRN website.

Compassion in Action – A Guide for Faith Communities
The HHS Center for Faith and Opportunity Initiatives Compassion in Action: A Guide for Faith Communities Serving People Experiencing Mental Illness and Their Caregivers seeks to help faith leaders from all religious and spiritual traditions, as well as their congregants and community-based organizations, increase awareness and build capacity to serve people in their midst experiencing mental illness, and to care for their family or caregivers.

Worldwide Social Media Event: Rock your Mocs
November is Native American Heritage Month. As part of this national observance, OMH invites you to Rock Your Mocs throughout November 15-21. Rock Your Mocs is a week-long social media event that offers American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) a positive opportunity to be united and celebrate tribal individuality by wearing moccasins. The event honors ancestors and indigenous peoples worldwide. Use the hashtag #ROCKYOURMOCS 

*Best Practices for American Indian and Alaska Native Data Collection
Current standard data collection practices by many federal, state, and local entities effectively omit or misclassify American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations, both urban and rural. This is particularly concerning in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic as these current standards of practice are resulting in a gross under count of the impact COVID-19 has on Native people. Learn about best practices by downloading Best Practices for American Indian and Alaska Native Data Collection

#WhiteCoatsForBlackLives — Addressing Physicians’ Complicity in Criminalizing Communities
A recent commentary in the New England Journal of Medicine takes a look at the role of physicians in contributing to health inequities and the continued racism of the medical and legal systems.

Hate-Motivated Behavior: Impacts, Risk Factors, And Interventions
A recent Health Affairs policy brief states that hate-motivated behavior is a public health threat with structural, interpersonal, and individual antecedents and effects. There is a need for interdisciplinary, multilevel research to better understand the causes of such behavior and to test prevention strategies and interventions.

New Interactive “Family Health: Understanding Family Health History”
November is Family Health History month and we are celebrating by presenting a brand new interactive “Family Health: Understanding Family Health History.” Learn about what family health history is, why it is important, and how to record it.

*Similarities and Differences between Flu and COVID-19
Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19.

*COVID-19 Multilingual Resource Hub
The UCLA Asian American Studies Center, in partnership with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the UCLA Institute of American Cultures, has created the COVID-19 Multilingual Resource Hub, which includes resources in Vietnamese, Swahili, Somali, Hmong, Spanish, Chinese, Chukese and more.

The post PNR Weekly Digest: November 17, 2020 first appeared on Dragonfly.

Categories: RML Blogs

Getting the Most from NNLM: Public Health Part 3

NER News - Mon, 2020-11-16 09:41

In November, 2019 and February, 2020, I wrote about NLM and NNLM resources that our public health partners often find particularly useful in their work. Since then, ongoing streamlining has moved, retired and reorganized some of the resources previously discussed in this series.

So what’s new for our public health partners?

HealthReach and Genetics Home Reference have been retired as stand alone resources and the information from these resources can now be found on MedlinePlus.  Find health information in multiple languages and genetics information on MedlinePlus.

Community Health Maps has a new home and is now solely run by Bird’s Eye View instead of being a joint project with NLM.

NLM’s AIDSSource and the NIH’s AIDSInfo have combined to form HIVInfo under the NIH’s Office of AIDS Research.

Stay up to date on changes to NLM products and resources by subscribing to the technical bulletin.

And don’t forget these great resources and services

Partners in Information Access for Public Health Workforce (PHPartners) is committed to helping the public health workforce find and use information effectively and includes listings for trainings, conferences, internships, jobs and more. PHPartners is a collaboration of government agencies, public health organizations and health science libraries.

Doing research and building searches that produce relevant results are skills that need to be learned and practiced.  Getting the most from PubMed and other databases can be learned.  Use the PubMed Search Builder Tutorial to learn more.

For more about using PubMed, check out the How PubMed Works on-demand class.

Webinars and Classes

All NNLM regions create and host webinars that are free and available nationally.  Webinars and classes cover a wide variety of health, information and data management topics including some that may be of interest to public health professionals.

Search the full NNLM class catalog or find NNLM webinars that are CHES eligible.

Upcoming CHES eligible classes:

11/19/20: Rural Health Resources

12/9/20: Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives

12/15/20: The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuff

There are also on-demand CHES eligible classes available anytime.

NNLM now has a Public Health Webinar Series with sessions every other month on the second Wednesday from 2-2:45 (ET).

The post Getting the Most from NNLM: Public Health Part 3 first appeared on NER Update.

Categories: RML Blogs

UCSF Receives NNLM PSR Subaward: “The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic: Digitizing and Providing Universal Access to Historical AIDS Records”

PSR Newsletter - Mon, 2020-11-16 03:00

NNLM PSR recently awarded the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), $138,370 for a subaward titled The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic: Digitizing and Providing Universal Access to Historical AIDS Records.

UCSF’s project supports a priority area for NLM and NIH by digitizing approximately 43,000-45,000 pages from 15 archival collections related to the early days of the AIDS epidemic in the San Francisco Bay Area with the goal of making them widely accessible to the public. This project will chronicle the experience and struggles of communities of color and other marginalized communities during the onset of the AIDS epidemic.

The materials that will be digitized range from hand handwritten correspondence and notebooks to typed and printed reports and agency records. Photographic prints, negatives, transparencies, and posters will also be digitized. They will be added to a growing digital collection documenting the AIDS crisis established by UCSF on Calisphere and publicly accessible around the world.  The materials will be digitized by the University of California, Merced Digital Assets unit that has been partnering with UCSF on successful collaborative digitization projects for more than 10 years. All materials selected to be digitized will be carefully examined for privacy concerns and the archivists will consult with an existing Advisory Board.

UCSF plans to partner with NLM’s History of Medicine Division and DPLA to create a collaborative AIDS history primary source set on the Digital Public Library of America in order to disseminate the project results and enable their educational use. UCSF will also promote the availability of this resource to organizations in the San Jose, San Francisco, and Oakland, CA area. This project will be led by Polina Ilieva and Edith Escobedo will serve as a project archivist.

PSR is looking forward to the execution of this project!

The post UCSF Receives NNLM PSR Subaward: "The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic: Digitizing and Providing Universal Access to Historical AIDS Records" first appeared on Latitudes.

Categories: PSR, RML Blogs

Weekly Postings

MAR News - Fri, 2020-11-13 11:34

See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions!

Spotlight

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

New Funding Opportunities! The Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR) is now accepting applications for two funding opportunities. Rapid Response Virtual Professional Development enables individuals in the Middle Atlantic Region to expand professional knowledge and experience in data science or health information access/delivery through virtual professionals. The Virtual Health Programming in Public Libraries Award funds virtual health programs for public library patrons that incorporate MedlinePlus and information about the All of Us Research Program. Read the full Request for Proposals for more details on eligibility, deadlines, and the application process. The application deadline for the Virtual Health Programming in Public Libraries Award is November 16. 

Upcoming Webinars: NNLM MAR is sponsoring two webinars next week, which are listed below. Are you unable to attend the sessions live? We will be posting the class recordings on our YouTube channel!

  • Partnering for Improved Communication: A Health Literacy Program-in-a-Box – November 18, 2:00-2:45 PM ET – Are you interested in health literacy? Are you unsure of what types of health literacy programs exist or what resources are available to you? This session will discuss the NNLM program Engage for Health, a community health education “program in a box” that you can offer.
  • DNA to Z: Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing – November 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET – This webinar class will provide an overview of the history and current state of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, which has become extremely popular in recent years.
Network of the National Library of Medicine News

CHES Continuing Education from NNLM – MARquee News Highlights

Conducting Focused Outreach with Patient Populations – NER Update

Satellites – Who is watching whom? – NER Update

NLM/NIH News

Making Connections and Enabling Discoverability – Celebrating 30 Years of UMLSNLM Musings from the Mezzanine, Innovations in Health Information from the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Revealing Data: Flu Masks on Ships, 1918Circulating Now, from the Historical Collections of the National Library of Medicine

Planning Your Holidays During the COVID-19 PandemicNIH Director’s Blog

NIH Issues New Policy for Data Management and SharingDataScience@NIH, Driving Discovery Through Data

NIH calls on clinical researchers to swiftly share COVID-19 results – The NIH Director

Early State Investigator Research Project Grant: NIH has just issued a new R01 research grant funding announcement, aimed at making it easier for early stage investigators to obtain NIH Research project grants. The Stephen I. Katz Early Stage Investigator Research Project Grant supports an innovative project that represents a change in research direction for an early stage investigator (ESI) and for which no preliminary data exist. Applications submitted to this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) must not include preliminary data.

RFI Seeking Input on NIH-wide COVID-19 Strategic PlanNIH has issued an RFI inviting comments and suggestions on the NIH-wide strategic plan for COVID-19 research. A Request For Information released this week seeks public feedback on the current plan (NOT-OD-21-018). You or your organization can submit ideas here by December 7, 2020.

Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin for the latest updates on NLM tools you may be using!

NLM and NNLM Educational Opportunities

NNLM and NLM classes are free and open to all. Please feel free to share our training opportunities!

November 2020

Evaluating Information during COVID-19: Preprints, retractions, rumors and more – November 16, 12:00-1:00 PM ET

NNLM Reading Club Presents…Bill Sullivan, PhD, author of Pleased to Meet Me – November 17, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Partnering for Improved Communication: A Health Literacy Program-in-a-Box – November 18, 2:00-2:45 PM ET

Citizen Science & Libraries: Create Your Own Air Quality Sensor with CanAir.io – November 18, 2:00-3:30 PM ET

Crea tu propio sensor de calidad del aire con CanAir.io! – November 18, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

2020 NIH Rural Health Seminar: Challenges in the Era of COVID-19 – November 19, 1:00-5:00 PM ET

Rural Health Resources – November 19, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

DNA to Z: Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing – November 20, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

December 2020

NNLM Resource Picks: Public Programming and NLM Traveling Exhibitions – December 2, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

Rise, Serve, Lead! America’s Women Physicians – December 3, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

DOCLINE for Health Sciences Libraries – December 8, 1:00-2:00 PM ET

PNR Rendezvous: Better On The Outside After Being Inside – Improving Health Literacy and Self-Care For Incarcerated Persons – December 9, 10:00-11:00 AM ET

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives – December 9, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM ET

Better than Best Practices: Inclusive Data Visualization – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health – December 10, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

How to “Speak Data”: Librarians as Public Data Ambassadors – December 15, 2:00-3:00 PM ET

The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuff – December 15, 4:00-5:00 PM ET

Citizen Science & Libraries: Help Develop RNA-based Medicines Online Presentation and Q&A – December 16, 2:00-3:30 PM ET

Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources – December 17, 3:00-4:00 PM ET

On-Demand Learning

Looking for self-paced learning opportunities? Check out our list of on-demand classes that are available to begin at any time! You can also watch recordings from past NNLM classes on a broad range of topics.

*Please note that the class registration system requires obtaining an NNLM account prior to registration. Learn how to register for classes from the NTO.

Other Items of Interest

Job Postings:

Diagnostic Safety in the COVID Era: Let’s Not Squander the Opportunity – AHRQ Views

How to Spot Fake News – COVID-19 Edition – IFLA

The Impact of Skin Color and Ethnicity on Clinical Diagnosis and Research – October 28-December 2, 1:00-2:15 PM ET – Sponsored by the Skin of Color Society Foundation, NEJM Group, and VisualDx

  • Pigmentary Disorders and Keloids – Wednesday, November 18
  • Covid-19 Comorbidities and Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases in Adults and Children – Wednesday, December 2

Explore Your Identity to Improve Your Practice: An Introduction to Critical Health Sciences Librarianship – November 24, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Grey (Literature) Matters: Searching for Preprint Sources – December 10, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – Sponsored by MLA; $65 for members / $85 for non-members

Medical Heritage Library Conference – November 13, 11:00 AM-5:00 PM ET – Sponsored by The Medical Heritage Library, Inc.

MAR Postings is a comprehensive weekly news series authored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NNLM MAR)

The post Weekly Postings first appeared on The MARquee.

Categories: RML Blogs

NNLM SEA Digest News – November 13, 2020

SEA News - Fri, 2020-11-13 10:08

Welcome to the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), Southeastern/Atlantic (SEA) Region’s Weekly Digest. This digest includes upcoming events, online training opportunities, news, and past events.  

NNLM News

Upcoming Online Training Opportunities*

Moodle LMS Asynchronous Course Opportunities

Webinars November 16 – November 19

Webinars November 20 – December 10

Visit the NNLM Training Schedule for all upcoming webinars, scheduled, and on-demand classes. For past webinars and classes, please visit the NNLM on YouTube**

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) News

NIH News

NLM News

NCBI Insights

NNLM SEA Communications

* Notes on NNLM Training Opportunities

  • All sessions listed are sponsored by a specific regional or national office, but open to all.
  • Webinars are scheduled for 1 hour unless otherwise noted.
  • The NNLM class registration system requires a free NNLM account prior to registration.
  • Visit the NNLM Training Opportunities to register and view a full calendar of training opportunities.
  • Please visit the NNLM Acronym Guide to understand the acronyms.
  • Refer to this guide to claim MLA CE credit.
  • Not all Training Opportunities listed provide MLA CE credit. Please refer to the class page to see if a specific session offers credit.

** Please note that NNLM recordings on YouTube may not have MLA CE Credit available. Please contact the regional office that sponsored the webinar for details.

The post NNLM SEA Digest News – November 13, 2020 first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

CHES Continuing Education from NNLM

MAR News - Thu, 2020-11-12 07:00
Upcoming CHES Eligible Webinars

All CHES-eligible courses from NNLM are free. To register, select the link in the title of the course in which you are interested and sign up with your username and password on nnlm.gov.

Partnering for Improved Communication: A Health Literacy Program-in-a-Box – November 18, 2020, 2:00 PM ET – Are you interested in health literacy? Are you unsure of what types of health literacy programs exist or what resources are available to you? This session will discuss the NNLM program Engage for Health, a community health education “program in a box” that you can offer. Engage for Health teaches community members how to effectively communicate with their health care providers. Program materials are freely available for use by libraries, community and faith based agencies, public health organizations or others who promote health literacy in their community. Available materials include presentation slides with speaker notes, a role-play exercise, pre-post evaluation tool, and marketing materials. This presentation will also emphasize the importance of public health and public library partnerships in engaging the community around the topic of health literacy.

Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will:

  1. Demonstrate how to locate the Engage Health Program on nnlm.gov
  2. List the materials included in the Engage for Health Program-in-a-Box
  3. Describe the community partners typically involved in the implementation of Engage for Health

CECH: .75
Advanced CECH: 0

Rural Health ResourcesNovember 19, 2020, 2:00 PM ET – Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from higher incidence of chronic illness, they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. This webinar will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities. We will explore websites from the National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, Rural Health Information Hub and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The origins of each website will be explained. Each of the websites contain consumer-level information and offers an opportunity for data downloads. The downloads will be demonstrated. These resources are relevant to nurses, librarians, public health workers, allied healthcare professionals, educators, faith- and community-based organizations.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe current demographic trends in rural America
  2. Download data sets and visualizations from rural health resources
  3. Find information on health conditions, demographic groups and social issues
  4. Identify methods of discovering potential community partners

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

DNA to Z: Direct-to-Consumer Genetic TestingNovember 20, 2020, 2:00 PM ET – This webinar class will provide an overview of the history and current state of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, which has become extremely popular in recent years. The differences between ancestry and health testing will be explored. The veracity of claims commonly made by testing companies will be assessed, and concerns and challenges surrounding these tests will be examined. Attendees will learn where to go to find essential background information about genetics needed to understand DTC tests and how to locate more advanced professional assistance. This class can also provide a template for information professionals looking to offer similar programs at their own libraries.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the general history and current technological state of DTC genetic testing
  2. Assess the veracity of claims commonly made by testing companies
  3. Recognize specific NLM and other resources for providing basic genetics information
  4. Discuss practical and ethical challenges surrounding DTC testing
  5. Explore essential background information about genetics and genetic testing
  6. Explore resources for professional assistance

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Understanding the Power Human Behavior Wields in Our Lives – December 9, 2020, 11:00 AM ET – The webinar will help “de-mystify” the concept of behavioral and mental health by describing the continuum of human thoughts and emotions from wellness to illness to chronic impairment. Speakers will share insights and updated approaches for managing common conditions such as depression and anxiety. Additionally, new ways of approaching mental health outside specialty care as well as methods to address the persistently mentally ill will be inventoried. Special focus will be given to the role society can play in recognizing the impact of childhood trauma and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Objectives:

  1. Describe a framework for characterizing human behavior in a continuum from well to ill
  2. Describe two methods to impact the listener’s own behavior
  3. List two conditions that if depression coexists, outcomes are worse if depression is unaddressed
  4. Describe the traditional structure of medical and behavioral funding in health benefits
  5. List one outcomes-demonstrated solution for integrating mental health into medical settings

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public HealthDecember 10, 2020, 2:00 PM ET – Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention. The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define and describe evidence-based public health
  2. Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question
  3. Locate and search applicable literature and resources

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

The evolution of public health: Tackling tough questions and messy stuffDecember 15, 2020, 4:00 PM ET– As public health has taken the world stage during a global pandemic, the future of public health is both clear and unclear. How does COVID-19 relate to factors that impact health and future health? How do we apply lessons learned? What are the key roles of nature and mental health, in this pandemic and beyond? How can we cross sectors for change? This session will explore these questions and more. We will tackle the hard questions and messy stuff of public health.

Objectives:

After completing this session, the participant/learner will be able to:

  1. Describe the impact of social determinants on public health in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic
  2. Plan to engage sectors outside of traditional public health (libraries and information centers) in tackling the larger issues impacting health
  3. Explain mental health as an essential part of public health and its relationship to the COVID-19 pandemic

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Recorded Webinars Available for CHES CECH

Did you miss a live class? The recorded webinars listed below are available for CHES CECH. Please note: You can only get credit from recorded classes if you have not previously received credit for attending the live webinar version or a previously offered recorded version of the same course.

From Beyond our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information – Recording available for CHES CECH until 12/2/2020 – This class is designed to assist librarians and others who work with diverse populations in locating health information. The resources presented are selected for their emphasis on providing culturally relevant information in the preferred language of the population. Background information on refugees and immigrants in the U.S. and their unique health issues will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several Internet resources.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current landscape of refugees, immigrants, and migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the United States
  2. Explain the difference between cultural competence and humility and how they influence workplace environments
  3. Identify reliable websites that provide quality health information in multiple languages

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Introduction to Community Needs Assessment: finding the dataRecording available for CHES CECH until January 8, 2021 – During this session you will learn about health information and data as it relates to community health assessment. The speaker will highlight reasons for conducting a community health assessment, the parties involved, and how to define a target community. The focus of this session will be identifying data issues and locating primary and secondary data to best describe the health of your community. You’ll also learn about prioritizing and contextualizing your findings once you’ve collected your data.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the organizations needed in developing community needs assessments
  2. Develop and identify the community and/or population being assessed
  3. Identify data issues and the data needed for community needs assessments
  4. Describe how to contextualize and prioritize findings

CECH: .75
Advanced CECH: 0

We Mapped This City: Centering Health Resources and Engagement Around Community AssetsRecording available for CHES CECH until February 26, 2021– When service providers and practitioners enter a new community or neighborhood, they can carry a top-down map of existing assets. They may rely on geographic systems that make sense on paper, or are designed to make sense with existing programs. However, community members and residents do not navigate resources based on program maps and systems. What and where are the resources community members use? What are the hard boundaries locals don’t cross and the third places that people gather? Germantown Info Hub Coordinator Diana Lu will share approaches to stakeholder engagement and trust-building. Using urban design evaluation tactics introduced by architect Kevin Lynch in The Image of the City and as well as models in community-based journalism, Lu shows ways that practitioners can work with community members, stakeholders, and local organizations to build the base layer of information.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. By the end of the session, attendees will understand the basics and potential applications of community asset mapping.
  2. By the end of the session, attendees will be equipped to integrate asset mapping as part of a grassroots community engagement tactic to understand key places/spaces/institutions that are important to community members and local stakeholders.
  3. By the end of this session, attendees will be familiar with inclusive, ‘non-expert’ language and communication tools that non-public health professionals and community members can use to discuss issues and resources that affect public health.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Grey Literature Resources to Support Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery Recording available for CHES CECH until March 9, 2021 – September is National Preparedness Month. Join us to learn about Grey Literature and how it can be helpful during evolving situations. What is Grey Literature? How do you find it? And how can it help during emergency preparedness, response and recovery? This session will introduce participants to the concept of Grey Literature, its uses and resources for finding it. This session will also include a live demonstration of one resource for finding Grey Literature related to emergency preparedness, response and recovery.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define grey literature and list three examples.
  2. List an example of a non-traditional source for grey literature.
  3. Identify resources to search for grey literature.
  4. Describe how grey literature can help during emergency preparedness, response and recovery phases.

CECH: .75
Advanced CECH: 0

HESPA II 2020 Curricular Mapping for Advancing Health Education Specialist Professionals WebinarRecording available for CHES CECH until April 8, 2021 – The New HESPA II 2020 Curricular Mapping for Advancing Health Education Specialist (HESPA) Professionals Webinar, is a one hour webinar for any public health professional who would like to learn how to map Health Education curriculum to the new HESPA II 2020 competencies.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the steps in conducting a complete HESPA II 2020 curriculum mapping process
  2. Identify the need for curricular mapping using HESPA II 2020 Competencies and Sub-competencies to create curricular improvements and changes
  3. Discuss the importance of the HESPA II 2020 model for professional preparation and practice
  4. Discuss the steps involved with health department activities relating to the HESPA II 2020 Competencies

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 1

Health Statistics on the WebRecording available for CHES CECH until April 15, 2021 – This course focuses on the location, selection, and effective use of statistics relevant to health on the local, state, national, and international levels. The importance and relevance of health statistics in various contexts will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several statistics Internet resources through the use of numerous exercises.

Objectives: 

At the conclusion of the class, participants will:

  1. Identify selected key websites for use in the location of data sets and statistics for use at the local, state and national level, including PHPartners and MedlinePlus.
  2. Discuss of the types of data sets and statistics available on the Internet.
  3. Define the 4-step process used to successfully locate relevant health statistics for a particular circumstance or issue.
  4. Describe where to locate additional health statistics training through the National Information Center on Health Services Research & Health Care Technology (NICHSR)

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

On-demand CHES Eligible Courses

Learn on your own time! Select the hyperlink in each course title to register on the NNLM website for these free, on-demand courses.

Online Resources to Support Evidence-Based Practice on Population Health: An Introduction to MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj – The course is designed to teach public health professionals and librarians to use MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj to find reliable health information and data related to population health and Healthy People 2020. This asynchronous course is offered through Moodle using Storyline Articulate software. Please note that the content in the course is for basic/beginner users of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss population health and its relation to Healthy People 2020
  2. Describe the purpose of MedlinePlus, PubMed, and HSRProj databases
  3. Identify when to use each database based on the information need
  4. Perform advanced searching techniques to identify more accurate results

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Accessing Health Information in Multiple Languages -This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with some basic statistics on individuals with limited English proficiency in the United States and demonstrate how to use resources from the National Library of Medicine to access reliable health information in multiple languages. Attendees will learn about data from the American Community Survey and U.S. Census Bureau, and then receive demonstrations on how to access reliable health information in multiple languages through the National Library of Medicine’s HealthReach and MedlinePlus databases.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current population of non-native English speakers in the United States
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health information in multiple languages
  3. Analyze resources to access reliable health information in multiple languages

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Building Cultural Competence and Humility into the Workplace – This online, asynchronous course is designed to provide attendees with an introduction to the concepts of culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility. Participants will learn about some of the current critiques to using cultural competence principles and how cultural humility can be supplemented to create a more accepting, welcoming, and reflective working environment. Short demos of Think Cultural Health, PubMed, and Project Implicit are included to showcase three external resources that can be used to further explore this topic.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define culture, cultural competence, and cultural humility;
  2. Describe the differences between cultural competence and humility; and
  3. Utilize three online resources to help build a more culturally competent and humble workplace.

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Serving Diverse Communities: Finding Data on Health Disparities– This course is designed to introduce attendees to health disparities and how the social determinants of health contribute to an inequity in health. Participants will be shown demonstrations on how to utilize tools from the National Library of Medicine, the Office of Minority Health, and HealthyPeople.gov to locate data on health disparities.

Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss health disparities in public health
  2. Identify at least three online resources for accessing health disparity data
  3. Analyze resources to access data on health disparities

CECH: 1
Advanced CECH: 0

Sponsored by the Network of the National Library of Medicine – Middle Atlantic Region, a designated provider of contact hours (CECH) in health education credentialing by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc., these programs are designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I contact education contact hour. Advanced level CECH is indicated on a course by course basis above.

Reach out to Erin Seger, MPH, CHES at ers166@pitt.edu with any questions about receiving CECH for these courses.

If you want to learn more about the Network of the National Library of Medicine in your area, find your region on our website.

The post CHES Continuing Education from NNLM first appeared on The MARquee.

Categories: RML Blogs

Evaluating Information During COVID-19: Preprints, retractions, rumors and more

SEA News - Wed, 2020-11-11 15:17

Date: Monday, November 16, 2020

Time: 12 PM ET/11 AM CT

Description: In the midst of a global pandemic, every person has to balance the “need for speed” with the risks of moving too fast. Healthcare providers seek reliable information about treatments while making immediate life-or-death decisions. Researchers investigate biological mechanisms and interventions to combat COVID-19 and share their findings as quickly and responsibly as possible. And each of us wades through the flood of headlines and rumors for answers that will keep us safe. Looking at the case of hydroxychloroquine and COVID-19, we will explore the risks and rewards of different forms of information, from published articles to tweets.

Objectives:

After attending this webinar, you will be better prepared to:

– Navigate the quickly shifting landscape of information in a pandemic
– Describe ways to approach the quality of information that is being produced and disseminated at a faster pace than ever seen before
– Identify the limitations and cautions of relying on a single source of information for decisions

Speaker Information: 

Erica Brody is a Research and Education Librarian at Virginia Commonwealth University, serving as the library’s liaison to the School of Dentistry since 2017. She holds a master’s in public health from Emory University in addition to a master’s in library science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her experience includes work in library and clinical settings, the CDC and EPA, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and RTI International.

Hillary Miller is the Scholarly Communications Librarian at Virginia Commonwealth University. In this role, she supports and expands the university community’s understanding of scholarly publishing, open access, open education, copyright, and research impact. She holds a master’s in library science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Registration: Registration is free and can be accessed through the NNLM class instance.

For additional information, please contact Liz Waltman.

The post Evaluating Information During COVID-19: Preprints, retractions, rumors and more first appeared on SEA Currents.

Categories: RML Blogs

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