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SEA Currents

Newsletter of the NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Archive for the ‘NLM/NIH News’ Category

Webinar: Thursday July 30, 2015 – Using SciENcv to Create Your NIH Biosketch

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

Date: Thursday, July 30, 2015 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST

NCBI staff will present a webinar on SciENcv, our platform for maintaining your record of research accomplishment in the form of a CV. In this webinar, we’ll show you how to use SciENcv to maintain your scientific record and generate the new BioSketch.

Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7147698960003179522

A recording will be posted on the NCBI YouTube account after the live presentation; subscribe to our YouTube channel to be notified. To see upcoming webinars and materials from past presentations, visit the Webinars and Courses page.

NLM Request for Comments: Discontinuation of Artificial Subject Strings for Cataloging Records

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has been recording geographic locations and publications types in the MARC21 fields 651 and 655 respectively since 1999 to match indexing practices in subject assignment. This differs from the Library of Congress’ practice of putting geographic locations in 650 $z and publication types in 650 $v.  In 1999, 80% of medical libraries responding to the announcement of this practice being adopted at NLM, indicated that subjects in this format would be difficult to incorporate in their OPAC.  NLM therefore continued to provide a specially programmed output with a traditional subject string of 650 $a $x $z $v for subscribers to Catfile.  (See the example at the end of this announcement.)

In 2005, NLM once again surveyed the community and proposed discontinuing the special programming to create traditional subject strings and to distribute records as they appear in LocatorPlus.  At that time, a small majority of libraries were in favor of such a proposal.  However, those who were opposed were very passionate about the issue and made some compelling arguments for keeping the strings.  NLM made some minor changes to the record distribution programs at that time to ease some of the complexities its catalogers encountered in trying to code subjects for proper output, but continued to output traditional subject strings.

It is now 10 years since this issue was considered, and NLM believes that the environment has changed enough to once again propose discontinuing the practice of creating artificial subject strings for subscribers to Catfile. Rather than traditional OPACs, many libraries are using discovery systems that search across different input streams and provide faceted searching options.  The library community is planning to make much more use of linked data, particularly with the future adoption of BIBFRAME.  Long subject strings do not work well in a linked data environment, and in fact, we see many libraries breaking up the traditional LCSH subject string into its component parts using the FAST vocabulary. MeSH has recently been released in RDF triples that correspond to data in 650 $a and $x, 651 or 655 fields. NLM believes the time is now appropriate to stop creating artificial subject strings and distribute NLM records exactly as they appear in our database.  This would mean that libraries that take copy from both NLM and OCLC would not have to edit one form or another to have consistency in their catalogs.

NLM is asking the medical library community to let us know what the effect would be on your institution if NLM were to discontinue distributing its MARC cataloging bibliographic records with artificially reconstructed subject strings. Records in MARC format would continue to have MeSH headings combined with the appropriate topical subheadings (650 $a $x), but geographic locations, and publication types would be carried in separate fields in the record, rather than as subfields of the MeSH heading. This would mean that records distributed to bibliographic utilities and other licensees would be identical to the records in LocatorPlus.

Please send your comments by August 31, 2015 to:

  • Diane Boehr
  • Head, Cataloging and Metadata Management Section
  • National Library of Medicine
  • 8600 Rockville Pike, Room 1N11
  • Bethesda, MD 20894
  • boehrd@mail.nlm.nih.gov

NLM will announce the final decision on whether or not to implement this change by September 30, 2015.  Any changes to distribution files will not occur until calendar year 2016.

Example of current practice:

In NLM database:

  • 650 12  $a Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome $x ethnology
  • 650 22  $a Cross Cultural Comparison
  • 650 22  $a Health Policy
  • 651 _2  $a Africa $x ethnology
  • 651 _2  $a Caribbean Region $b ethnology
  • 655 _2  $a Congresses

Subject strings created for distribution

  • 650 12  $a Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome $x ethnology $z Africa $v Congresses
  • 650 12  $a Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome $x ethnology $z Caribbean Region $v Congresses
  • 650 22  $a Cross Cultural Comparison $z Africa $v Congresses
  • 650 22  $a Cross Cultural Comparison $z Caribbean Region $v Congresses
  • 650 22  $a Health Policy $z Africa $v Congresses
  • 650 22  $a Health Policy $z Caribbean Region $v Congresses

June NIH News in Health Now Available

Friday, June 5th, 2015

NIH News in Health: A monthly newsletter from the National Institutes of Health, part of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

 

 

 

Check out the June issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research: To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov

 

hiv

 

HIV and AIDS: Know the Facts
Treatments Work, but Prevention Is Key

Today, people infected with HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—can live full, healthy lives, in large part because of medicines and other discoveries made with NIH support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talking With Your Doctor
Make the Most of Your Appointment

Clear and honest communication between you and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your health.

 

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

 

NIH News in Health Now Available

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

NIH News in Health: A monthly newsletter from the National Institutes of Health, part of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

 

 

 

Check out the May issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research: To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov

grocerypic

 

Opportunities Abound for Moving Around
Get Active, Wherever You Are

No matter where you live, work, or go to school, you can find ways to move more and sit less throughout your day.

 

 

 

 

visionpic

 

Keep Your Vision Healthy
Learn About Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exams

Even if your vision seems fine, the only way to know for sure that your eyes are healthy is to get a comprehensive dilated eye exam. Read more about keeping your vision healthy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health Capsules

HIV Therapy Promising in First Human Study
Add NIH’s Free Content to Your Website
Featured Website: Allergens & Irritants

 

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

 

Funding Opportunity: NLM Administrative Supplements for Informationist Services in NIH-funded Research Projects (Admin Supp) (PA-15-249)

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

NLM Administrative Supplements for Informationist Services in NIH-funded Research Projects (Admin Supp) (PA-15-249)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-15-249.html

See also http://www.nlm.nih.gov/ep/AdminSupp.html

Purpose The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other participating NIH Institutes and Centers solicit applications for administrative supplements to eligible NIH awardees with active R01 grants and, depending on each participating Institute or Center’s preferences, with active P01, P20, P30, P50, R21, R34, U01, U19, U24, UM1 and U54 grants. The purposes of this administrative supplement program are (1) to enhance collaborative, multi-disciplinary basic and clinical research by integrating an information specialist into the research team in order to improve the capture, storage, organization, management, integration, presentation and dissemination of biomedical research data; and (2) to assess and document the value and impact of the informationist’s participation.

The Funding Opportunity Announcement(FOA) encourages eligible NIH awardees as described above, who are interested in integrating an informationist into their research teams for the above-stated purposes to begin to consider applying for this new FOA. Interested eligible awardees are encouraged to begin seeking collaborative arrangements with informationists at their institutions or another institution as appropriate. Informationists are information specialists, usually health sciences librarians, who have graduate training and practical experience that provides them with disciplinary background in biomedical, behavioral or biological sciences and in library and information sciences/informatics. Their cross training provides informationists with a unique perspective on the acquisition, synthesis, management and use of information in research. Informationists work as team members with research scientists and health professionals, and are sometimes called in-context or ‘embedded’ information specialists.

NLM Contact Dr. Alan VanBiervliet, alan.vanbiervliet@nih.gov

For contact information for participating Institutes and Centers see the FOA.

Deadline

  • Deadline for Applications – July 17, 2015
  • This program expires July 18, 2015

Last updated on Friday, 22 November, 2013

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under contract HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the Health Sciences and Human Services Library of the University of Maryland