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SEA Currents

Newsletter of the NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Archive for the ‘For The Region’ Category

Free Online Class Announcement: Public Health Information on the Web

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

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Class:  Public Health Information on the Web

Where: Free, Online via Moodle. Moodle does not require a software download.

Presenter: Sheila Snow-Croft, MLIS, MA, Public Health Coordinator. National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern Atlantic Region (NN/LM SE/A)

Contact Sheila at: ssnowcro@hshsl.umaryland.edu

Register: http://nnlm.gov/sea/training/register.html

Date/Time: August 5-26, 2014

Three webinars will be broadcast during this class:

  • Thursday, 8/07/14: 11am – 12pm  ET
  • Thursday, 8/14/14: 11am – 12pm  ET
  • Thursday, 8/21/14: 11am – 12pm  ET

Summary:  The field of public health encompasses a wide array of disciplines including health education, epidemiology, and nursing. Digital literacy and the effective utilization of online information are among the core public health informatics competencies of the 21st century. This course will highlight web resources tailored to the public health workforce and public health information specialists.

The course uses Moodle, a free online course management system that does not require a software download. There will be three 1 hour Adobe Connect webinars along with discussions and assignments. If attending the live webinars is not possible, recordings will be available for viewing afterwards.

Participants who complete all requirements will be eligible for 4 Medical Library Association Contact Hours.

Call for Participation: New SE/A Tech PAC Webinars

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Written by Kimberley R. Barker, MLIS, Technology Program Advisory Committee Chair, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Contact Kimberley at: Grumpy_Cat@virginia.edu

On behalf of the Southeastern/Atlantic (SE/A) Technology Program Advisory Committee (PAC), happy summer! We hope that you had some time for fun and relaxation and are beginning to look forward to autumn and whatever professional challenges await you and your institution.

We’ve been outlining our goals for the coming year and deciding how best to meet your needs. One of the Tech PAC’s multi-year goals (based on the results of the survey given in 2012), is to address head-on the technology issues that some of you face in your daily professional lives. To that end, in 2013, the Tech PAC offered the popular webinar “Managing Technology Barriers in the Health Sciences Library,” which featured a discussion with panelists (librarians like you!) who overcame significant technology barriers in their workplaces in order to provide a service to their patrons. As it was well-attended and the feedback positive, the Tech PAC thought to host a series of webinars along those lines, but we need your help.

We’d like for the first webinar to address relationship-building between libraries and the technology departments which support them. To that end, we’d like to feature the partnership of one or more librarians and the tech people with whom they’ve built a relationship. Have you always been buddies? Great! There was a rocky start to your professional relationship, and you reached out to each other? Even better! We’re looking for real-life examples that could serve as models for others in the medical librarian community, so don’t be shy!

The second webinar in the series is tentatively titled, “How to speak IT,” and will focus on defining and contextualizing basic IT terms. Just as it never hurts to speak even a few phrases of the language of the country in which you’re travelling so, too, is it helpful to not be completely lost when your IT person is trying to explain something. Do you know a good “explainer”? Are you one yourself? Would you or they be willing to participate as a speaker? Get in touch!

Finally, we’d love to hear your ideas for webinars or other programs based on your technology needs. We’re here to help you and facilitate your access to/ understanding of technology, so please: make us feel useful and tell us how we can help. Contact me via Twitter (@KR_Barker) or email (Grumpy_Cat@virginia.edu). Thanks so much!

Kimberley R. Barker, MLIS

Chair, Tech PAC

Register for the PubMed® for Trainers Class – It’s free!

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

Offered by the

National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC)

and the National Library of Medicine (NLM)

I would highly recommend this course to anyone who teaches PubMed.”

“You all did an amazing job of (1) modeling instructional design by providing a very well-designed course; and, (2) demonstrating how online instructional environments can still provide engaging learning experiences.”

“I really learned a lot of new information about how to search PubMed and good ideas for how to best teach that to my students.

–Comments from recent “PubMed for Trainers” participants

 

Would you like to gain new skills, brush up on existing PubMed skills and collaborate with colleagues to help create effective training strategies? The NTC is offering PubMed® for Trainers (PMT) in two locations of interest to our region: at the University Of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, TN (in November 2014) and at the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD (in October 2014).

PMT is held in 4 sessions; 3 online and 1 in person session (attendance in all is expected). The last of the four sessions is an in-person class.

This hands-on course consists of 9 presentations created by the National Library of Medicine, live demonstrations, hands-on exercises, group work and discussions, and networking opportunities over the course of four sessions. You can expect an additional 2-3 hours of independent homework. Upon completion of the class, participants receive 15 hours of MLA CE credit.

By the end of the course, you should:

  • Have a functional knowledge of the MEDLINE® database
  • Understand behind the scenes details of how PubMed translates your search
  • Know how to use Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)
  • Increase your knowledge of how to more effectively search for drugs, diseases, and patient centered research.

The dates and times for the four class sessions for the Bethesda location are:

  1. Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 11 am – 1 pm ET (online via Adobe Connect)
  2. Thursday, October 23, 2014, 11 am – 1 pm ET (online via Adobe Connect)
  3. Tuesday, October 28, 2014, 11 am – 1 pm ET (online via Adobe Connect)
  4. Thursday, October 30, 9 am -4:30 pm ET (in-person in Bethesda, MD)

The dates and times for the four class sessions for the Memphis location are:

  1. Monday, October 20, 2014, 10 am – 12 noon CT (online via Adobe Connect)
  2. Monday, November 3, 2014, 10 am – 12 noon CT (online via Adobe Connect)
  3. Monday, November 10, 2014, 10 am – 12 noon CT (online via Adobe Connect)
  4. Thursday, November 13, 9 am -4:30 pm CT (in-person in Memphis, TN)

For more information and to register, visit http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=359.

Upcoming Online Classes Available for Registration

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

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The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region would like to announce registration for a number of upcoming online classes starting in August and September.

Consumer Health

Promoting Health Literacy through Easy-to-Read Materials

From Snake Oil to Penicillin: Evaluating Consumer Health Information on the Internet

  • Instructor: Terri Ottosen
  • September 8 – September 29
  • 3 MLA CE

These consumer health classes qualify for Consumer Health Information Specialization through the Medical Library Association.

Health Information Professionals

ClinicalTrials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians

Chemicals, Drugs, and Genetics Oh My! Searching PubMed and Beyond

  • Instructor: Tony Nguyen
  • August 18 – September 12
  • 6 MLA CE

Public Health and Public Health Information Professionals

NEW – Public Health Information on the Web

Technology

Geeks Bearing Gifts: Unwrapping New Technology Trends – 2014 edition

These online classes will be offered for free via Moodle. Moodle does not require a software download.

To register for any of these classes, please visit: http://nnlm.gov/sea/training/register.html.

 

Understanding Population Health and Librarian Support

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Written by Terri Ottosen, Consumer Health Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region.

Contact Terri at: tottosen@hshsl.umaryland.edu

An interesting new buzzword is intriguing me lately. It’s called population health, and the term has been around for over 10 years. The American Public Health Association defines it as “the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group.” David Kindig and Greg Stoddart wrote an article in March 2003, published in the American Journal of Public Health that discussed the relatively new term and the fact that it hadn’t yet been precisely defined. (http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.93.3.380) They argued that “the field of population health includes health outcomes, patterns of health determinants, and policies and interventions that link these two.” Many health organizations now have divisions or projects in population health management and researchers are increasingly giving their attention to population health and the opportunities it provides for improving the U.S. health care system, including costs and individual experiences of care.

In a publication by Academy Health, “Population Health in the Affordable Care Act Era,” Michael A. Stoto, Ph.D., writes about the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the implications for addressing population health. He believes that it addresses it in four ways: one, the provisions to expand insurance coverage aim to improve population health by improving access to the health care delivery system, which is critical to any community’s health. Second, it aims to improve the quality of care delivered. Third, a less well-known provision of the ACA, seeks to enhance prevention and health promotion measures within the health care delivery system. Finally, the fourth provision aims at promoting community- and population-based activities, including the establishment of the National Prevention, Health Promotion and Public Health Council, which has already produced the mandated National Prevention Strategy (DHHS 2011) as well as a new Prevention and Public Health Fund (authorized at $1 billion in fiscal year 2012) and funding for Community Transformation Grants (https://www.academyhealth.org/files/AH2013pophealth.pdf).

Much of the literature is focused on the education and roles of public health professionals, but I believe health sciences and public librarians can play a part in the education of the public and health sciences students by integrating and exploring partnerships and through information and health literacy training. All efforts should work toward the ultimate goal of an engaged, healthy, and knowledgeable patient population. Librarians can demonstrate and provide training on using resources for comparative effectiveness or “how to read a study” and critical appraisal. I think consumers can be trained to critically evaluate items they hear in the news or when they are researching treatment options. Classes are available from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern Atlantic Region (http://nnlm.gov/sea/training), both in-person and online for anyone wanting to know more about reliable health information resources.

I recently read an article about a new analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), published in the American Journal of Medicine. This article reveals that in the past 20 years, there is a sharp decrease in physical exercise and an increase in average body mass index (BMI), while caloric intake remains steady. Investigators theorized that a nationwide drop in leisure-time physical activity may be responsible for the upward trend in obesity rates. This comes on the heels of many recent media reports that caution people about the dangers of sitting too much (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3404815/). One takeaway of the research article is that increased caloric intake is often blamed for rising rates of obesity. There are no direct associations found in this study, but rather a trend over time that lack of physical activity correlates with high BMI numbers in America. (http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(14)00191-0/abstract)

As we increasingly hear and read these studies, more evidence and important information relevant to our overall individual health will result. This makes me ponder, how can we as librarians and information professionals be involved? What should our roles be within our institutions and what are the implications for outreach? The results of these studies are interesting. To me, they suggest that “we” should focus on movement and exercise more and emphasize the benefits of physical activity. The NN/LM SE/A has received some fantastic funding proposals in the last couple of years that incorporate movement and fitness into their programming and training. (http://nnlm.gov/sea/funding/projects.html) I think this is a step towards improving the health of our communities and institutions.

 

Last updated on Friday, 22 November, 2013

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under contract HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the Health Sciences and Human Services Library of the University of Maryland