Skip all navigation and go to page content

SEA Currents

Newsletter of the NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Archive for July, 2012

Inspiring People in the SE/A Region: Jan LaBeause

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

Jan LaBeause
Director, Medical Library & LRC of Mercer University School of Medicine and Library Professor at Mercer – Macon, GA

How long have you been a librarian?
I was a “common-law” librarian from 1966 to 1979 when I finished my MLS at Vanderbilt, and have been in libraries ever since.

How long have you been a librarian and/or in your current position?
I have been at Mercer since 1993 and Director since 2000. BTW, I will be retiring this summer – July 31, 2012!

What made you decide to be a librarian?
My first position was actually as Medical Editor for Campbell Clinic where Campbell’s Operative Orthopaedics is written. When I was hired, they told me that Dr. Campbell’s books were in the closet in my office, and that they’d like me to “arrange them more like a library” in my spare time. I soon found I enjoyed the “arranging” and the library research part of my job much more than correcting surgeons’ grammar. I went to library school later when I discovered I had taught myself all I could about “arranging” and needed not only some formal training, but also that piece of paper to move forward.

What do you consider your biggest work related challenge?
Maintaining an adequate collection of resources when budgets are staying the same and the cost of resources keeps climbing.

What do you consider to be the most fulfilling part of your job?
My library family. I work with a wonderful group of folks who are much more than just co-workers to me.

What do you see as the biggest concerns in hospital and/or health sciences librarianship?
In hospitals, librarians continue to struggle with justifying their existence in a climate of declining budgets where departments that do not qualify for third-party reimbursement are always under fire. In health sciences librarianship in general, we need to constantly redefine our role in the organization and delivery of information in a very high tech world.

How did you first come to know NN/LM SE/A?
As a hospital librarian at LeBonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, I was invited to serve on what may have been the first RAC at the University of Maryland from 1984-1986.

Have the NLM resources and/or NN/LM SE/A been of help to you? If so, how?
As a hospital librarian, I appreciated having the support and a network of colleagues. As an academic librarian at Mercer, the support and network are still important to me. Plus, we have taken advantage of grant and award opportunities and knowledgeable speakers for the GaIN meetings we host twice a year.

Will you share a success story about the impact of your library or outreach?
In 1983, Jocelyn Rankin (my predecessor, mentor and friend) was awarded  a three-year grant from the National Library of Medicine to create the Georgia Interactive Network for Medical Information (GaIN), the largest grant NLM had made up to that time. As a result of Jocelyn’s foresight and planning, GaIN still exists as the oldest state-wide network of its kind in the United States. I am so grateful that we have been able to continue her work to support health care institutions and individuals in Georgia’s rural and underserved counties.

What advice would you give others who are interested in being a health sciences and/or hospital librarian?
You can certainly make more money in the information private sector, but working with health care professionals is so rewarding especially when you feel you are impacting patient care in some way.

For more information, please contact Sheila Snow-Croft, Public Health Coordinator, NN/LM, SE/A Region  (ssnowcro@hshsl.umaryland.edu).

Beyond the SEA: July 18, 2012 - MEDLINE/PubMed: A Grab Bag of Tips and Tricks for Experienced Searchers

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Date:  July 18th, 2012

Time:  Noon to 1:00 pm (EST)

Presenter: Kate Majewski:

Kate Majewski works in the Bibliographic Services Division of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), developing training for PubMed and other NLM products.  She is originally from Buffalo, New York.  Kate has worked in libraries since 1989, first in State University of New York academic libraries (Buffalo and Delhi) then at NLM, focused primarily on Web development and instruction.  At Delhi she received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship for her part in developing curriculum-integrated information literacy education for the Veterinary Science and Nursing programs.

Presentation: MEDLINE/PubMed: A Grab Bag of Tips and Tricks for Experienced Searchers:

This presentation offers a selection of lesser-known information about the MEDLINE record and PubMed indexing, and techniques to get the most out of PubMed and its related databases. Bring your questions!

How to get connected:

What do you need to join these conferences?

  • A computer (with Flash installed)
  • A telephone

How do I connect?
Go to this URL: http://webmeeting.nih.gov/beyondthesea
Enter as a Guest
Sign in with your first and last name
Follow the instructions in the meeting room to have Adobe Connect call your phone or call 1-800-605-5167 and enter the participant code 816440 when prompted.

Funding opportunity: NLM Disaster Health Information Outreach and Collaboration Projects 2012

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) announces a funding opportunity for small projects to improve access to disaster medicine and public health information for health care professionals, first responders and others that play a role in health-related disaster preparedness, response and recovery.

NLM is soliciting proposals from partnerships that include at least one library and at least one non-library organization that has disaster-related responsibilities, such as health departments, public safety departments, emergency management departments, prehospital and emergency medical services, fire/rescue, or other local, regional, or state agencies with disaster health responsibilities; hospitals; faith-based and voluntary organizations active in disaster; and others.

NLM encourages submission of innovative proposals that enhance mutually beneficial collaboration among libraries and disaster-related agencies. For example, projects may increase awareness of health information resources, demonstrate how libraries and librarians can assist planners and responders with disaster-related information needs, show ways in which disaster workers can educate librarians about disaster management, and/or include collaboration among partners in developing information resources that support planning and response to public health emergencies.  Summaries of the seven projects  funded for 2011-2012 can be viewed at http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/2011disasteroutreachawards.html.

Contract awards will be offered for a minimum of $15,000 to a maximum of $30,000 each for a one-year project.

The deadline for proposals is Wednesday, August 8, 2012 at 2 pm ET. Proposals are limited to six pages plus supplemental materials such as resumes, letters of support, and a budget.

The Request for Proposal (RFP) for this requirement has been split into two solicitations; one Partial Small Business Set-Aside (RFP No.: NIHLM2012411) and; one Full and Open (RFP No.: NIHLM2012412). The solicitation notices are on FedBizOpps.gov as follows:

Partial Small Business Set-Aside  https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=ad2bb9b6b067a1b0cb704070dbcc4f13&tab=core&_cview=0

Full and Open  https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=9d9f0974ab8150e88e20ef5a1fdce4b3&tab=core&_cview=0

For more information and instructions about the “Disaster Health Information Outreach and Collaboration Project 2012”, please visit http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/2012disasteroutreachrfp.html .

The National Library of Medicine (http://www.nlm.nih.gov) is the world’s largest biomedical library and provides extensive online health information resources. Visit the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center site (http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov ) to learn more about disaster-related health information from WISER (hazardous materials information for emergency responders), REMM-Radiation Emergency Medical Management, CHEMM-Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management, and other resources.

 

Beyond the SEA: July 18, 2012 – MEDLINE/PubMed: A Grab Bag of Tips and Tricks for Experienced Searchers

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Date:  July 18th, 2012

Time:  Noon to 1:00 pm (EST)

Presenter: Kate Majewski:

Kate Majewski works in the Bibliographic Services Division of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), developing training for PubMed and other NLM products.  She is originally from Buffalo, New York.  Kate has worked in libraries since 1989, first in State University of New York academic libraries (Buffalo and Delhi) then at NLM, focused primarily on Web development and instruction.  At Delhi she received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship for her part in developing curriculum-integrated information literacy education for the Veterinary Science and Nursing programs.

Presentation: MEDLINE/PubMed: A Grab Bag of Tips and Tricks for Experienced Searchers:

This presentation offers a selection of lesser-known information about the MEDLINE record and PubMed indexing, and techniques to get the most out of PubMed and its related databases. Bring your questions!

How to get connected:

What do you need to join these conferences?

  • A computer (with Flash installed)
  • A telephone

How do I connect?
Go to this URL: http://webmeeting.nih.gov/beyondthesea
Enter as a Guest
Sign in with your first and last name
Follow the instructions in the meeting room to have Adobe Connect call your phone or call 1-800-605-5167 and enter the participant code 816440 when prompted.

Sources & Strategies for Technology Trend Awareness

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

By Andrew Youngkin, Emerging Technologies and Evaluation Coordinator, NN/LM, SE/A Region

As Emerging Technologies Coordinator, I often encounter great questions on the relevance of a particular technology or social media site, and whether libraries need to be aware of it or not. Most recently, I have encountered ‘bigger picture’ questions, such as “how do I stay current on new technology trends?” and “what resources should I be looking at?” The question of how to stay in the technology trends loop is one of the bigger questions I am constantly revisiting and rethinking. For what it is worth, here are some strategies I have used to scout out those upcoming tech trends.

Below, I have outlined some general categories and named some specific sources I find helpful. By no means is this a complete list or the best list of sources for everyone. Feel free to pick and choose those that will work for you. You may notice several themes as you continue reading. First, I try to diversify in terms of the types of information sources I use and the formats in which they are delivered. Second, I strive to make it as easy and seamless as possible. I think information overload is more avoidable if the information itself remains the focus and the process by which the information is delivered or organized can become more automated. Diversify sources and automate where possible.

Print

I subscribe to a handful of print publications that are delivered to me at my office that I skim during breaks or when I am traveling. When I see something of relevance or importance, I scan them with an iPad app and create a PDF. The PDFs are organized and sent to my Inbox and ready when I need to reference them. Some of my regular print publications include: Wired, Information Today, Internet Librarian, Computers in Libraries, Technology Review, and Fast Company. I also look at reports such as The Higher Education edition of the NMC Horizon Report, which provides a wealth of insight on trends perceived to become more relevant in higher education at a number of different time intervals.

RSS/Web

In addition to print publications, I have set up RSS feeds composed of various technology topic searches and terms from within the databases to which our library subscribes. I have the search results fed to my Inbox, allowing me to quickly scan titles of relevance and obtain full text if needed. I use both broad terms and specific technologies. I also create feeds around specific technology companies like Apple, Microsoft, HP, Amazon, Google, etc., so that I can intercept announcements, patents, or press releases that may reveal new technologies to review. I also subscribe via RSS to various blogs, websites, and online sources and have them streamed to my Google Reader account, which I (try to) scan weekly. From there I can make notes and ‘favorite’ the best articles for me. Some sources I subscribe to via RSS include: NPR Technology, FUMSI magazine, NY Times Technology section, Washington Post Technology section, Search Engine Land, and Search Engine Watch.

Social Media

Sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Tumblr, and even Pinterest can be used to intercept news on the latest emerging technologies. Search for and subscribe to people/groups/topics that may be talking about technology topics. I would especially recommend Twitter Feeds of technology focused/interested librarians/libraries. And let’s not forget YouTube. Search with specific terms or subscribe to various technology channels. CommonCraft is another site that specializes in explaining difficult or abstract concepts such as augmented reality or cloud computing with short, succinct video tutorials.

Conferences

Conferences, especially library conferences, play a big part for me in pinpointing what is new. Attending, participating, and contributing to conferences and sub-groups is huge. Computers in Libraries, Internet Librarian, Educause, SLA, and LITA (ALA group) are some that I have attended or plan to attend. I have recently joined and intend to be active in the Medical Library Association’s Educational Media & Technology Section (EMTS) and the Medical Informatics Section (MIS). Conference papers and poster presentations are also great ways to see how librarians and other practitioners are using technology out in the real world. If you cannot attend your conferences of choice, you may also look into availability of the conference proceedings/recordings to see what was presented, discussed, and potential new directions for the organizations.

Professional Development

Various professional development activities such as workshops and classes can provide insight into new technologies. NNLM SE/A offers many free classes—both on site and online to groups like libraries, healthcare professionals, educators, and community activists. The class, “Geeks Bearing Gifts: Unwrapping New Technology Trends” is specifically designed to give participants a glimpse of a handful of new technologies and allow time for hands-on practice and application. “Super Searcher: Enhancing Your Online Search Super Powers,” exposes participants to a wide range of web search techniques, strategies, and tools to focus, enhance, or better use Internet search results.

TV/Radio

To be honest, I usually don’t seek out news from television or radio. But often, while at the gym, in a restaurant, or in the car, I will overhear a news story about a particular technology that has been relevant to a topic I am teaching about, and I will mention it during my next class. Local and national news stories can offer helpful context to understand a new technology. When choosing sources, I have been known to favor NPR, CNN, and PBS.

As you identify which sources best suit your information needs in finding new technology trends, remember that the strategies of getting to the information (or getting it to you) can be as valuable as the sources themselves.

For further information, please contact Andrew @ ayoungki@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

Last updated on Friday, 22 November, 2013

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under contract HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the Health Sciences and Human Services Library of the University of Maryland