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Newsletter of the NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Send in Your Application to Participate in “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Bioinformatics Course

Zipser J. Send in Your Application to Participate in “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Bioinformatics Course. NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Sep-Oct;(400):e10.

2014 September 29

Health science librarians in the United States are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC).

The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution.

Instructors will be NCBI staff and Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

Online Pre-Course and In-Person Course Components
There are two parts to “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” listed below. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching,” an online (asynchronous) course,
    January 12-February 13, 2015

The major goal of this part is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course encompasses visualizing bioinformatics end-user practice. It places a strong emphasis on hands-on acquisition of NCBI search competencies, and developing a working molecular biology vocabulary through self-paced hands-on exercises.

  • Part 2: A 5-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, March 9-13, 2015.

The in-person course will focus on using the BLAST sequence similarity search and Entrez text search systems to find relevant molecular data. The course will describe the various kinds of molecular data available and explain how these are generated and used in modern biomedical research. The course will be a combination of instruction, demonstration, discussions, and hands-one exercises (both individual and group).

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.
  • Applicants will be accepted both from libraries currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services.
  • Enrollment is limited 25 participants.

What does it cost?

  • There is no charge for the classes. Travel and lodging costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant.

Important Application Dates

  • Application deadline: November 17, 2014
  • Acceptance notification: On or about December 15, 2014

How to Apply

  1. Please fill out the Application Form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/guide_2015_app.
  2. Once you complete the Application Form, you will be directed to download the Supervisor Support Statement (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/Supervisor_Supportv2.pdf). This is to be filled out and signed by your immediate supervisor. This statement describes your current and/or future role in bioinformatics support at your institution and confirms your availability to attend the course if selected.
  3. Provide your current curriculum vitae (CV). Please use the suggested CV model as a guideline for the type of information desired (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/LibGuide_CV_model.pdf).

Course Page
The course page with additional information is at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/education/librarian/

Questions?
Please direct any questions to: ncbi_course@lists.utah.edu

By Janet Zipser
MEDLARS Management Section

National Library of Medicine Environmental Health Student Resources

The National Library of Medicine has several online environmental health student resources that serve students from grades 1-12.  The information and data in these resources are free and vetted by science professionals.  The resources are versatile and can be used by science educators in their classrooms, in afterschool programs, in home school programs and by students for their academic research assignments.  We encourage you to use these resources and recommend them to interested groups.

NLM Environmental Health Student Resources:

  • ToxMystery (Grades 1-5): Interactive Web site that teaches elementary school students about toxic substances in the home.  Includes lesson plans and activities.  Also available in Spanish.
  • Environmental Health Student Portal (Grades 6-8): Provides middle school students and educators with information on common environmental health topics such as water pollution, climate change, air pollution, and chemicals.
  • Household Products Database (Grades 6-12+): Learn about the potential health effects of chemicals in common household products ranging from personal hygiene products to landscape care products.
  • ToxTown (Grades 6-12+): Interactive guide to commonly encountered toxic substances.  Includes classroom materials.  Also available in Spanish.
  • Native Voices Exhibition Lesson Plans & Activities (Grades 6-12): The lesson plans and activities familiarize students with Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian healthcare by using the NLM Native Voices exhibition Web site content materials.
  • TOXMAP (Grades 9-12+): Uses maps of the United States to visually explore Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) sites and data from the EPA.  Includes classroom materials.
  • Toxicology Tutorials (Grades 9-12+): Written at the introductory college student level; tutorials teach basic toxicology principles.

 

 

Share Your Success: Outreach Services and Support throughout South Carolina

cdrBy: Steven P Wilson, MLIS, AHIP, MA, Web Architect and Outreach Librarian, School of Medicine Library at University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, steve.wilson@uscmed.sc.edu

As Coordinator of the USC Center for Disability Resources Library, I feel proud to share the many small but significant successes that we have achieved over the past decade. The collection, which is comprised of nearly 5,300 books, videos, DVDs, and brochures focusing on disabilities in general, and especially developmental disabilities, is now being borrowed by families of those with special needs and the professionals that work with them, nationwide.
When I began working as the coordinator for the collection, we lent our items out to just South Carolina residents, mailing the books and videos to the patrons’ homes and offices with postage-paid mailers included, so that even those in far off parts of the state would be able to take advantage of the collection, and without having to make the drive to Columbia. This service, which is completely free and largely paid for by grant monies and collaborative efforts by such organizations as the Center for Disability Resources, BabyNet/First Steps to School Readiness, the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, and the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Library, has now lent out thousands of titles and responded to tens of thousands of information requests, to residents of South Carolina, many of whom lack adequate access to up-to-date disability and consumer health resources via their local public libraries plagued by insufficient budgets. Of course the same can often be said of similar patrons from other states who gradually began finding our web presence online and appealing to us to grant them access, as well. With approval from the CDR’s director, about seven years ago we began lending items out to those individuals as well, and I am especially proud of the fact that anyone in any of the fifty states may now take advantage of both our collection and our reference services, whether focused on developmental disabilities or consumer health topics.

Every month, in addition to the approximately 150 South Carolinians that directly benefit from our library, dozens of others outside of South Carolina do as well. For me this represents a wonderful break from the mold of primarily focusing on a single population’s needs, or of narrowly defining our library’s worth relative to just geographical location and regional influence. To be able to lend the collection to anyone, at any time–especially to able to let those selfsame folks know that they can even use us for their consumer health and disability resource needs from extremely up-to-date online resources that they might not be familiar with or have access to, such as MedlinePlus or the many excellent e-resources the USC School of Medicine subscribes to–is such an honor. It makes me really appreciate the “form” of librarianship, and the ideals that we as library students were taught to uphold back in school, learning about service, about finding ways to increase access to quality information for patrons, and to evaluating and championing the best in information in order to separate the wheat from the chaff, so to speak, for the users that come to us looking for such.

I keep a bulletin board on my wall, chocked full of cards and letters from my patrons, thanking us for providing a much needed information service that they wouldn’t have access to in their own regions. And I am thrilled to see an ever-growing number of post cards and letters and Thank You cards coming from outside my own state of South Carolina. This one small collection represents for me what librarianship is all about. Every new item I affix to my bulletin board with a pushpin feels like a small but significant success, each and every time.

PARTICIPATION IN FALL 2014 GROUP LICENSING OFFER IS OPEN TO ALL MAR AND SE/A LIBRARIES

PRINCETON, NJ (SEPTEMBER  23, 2014)—All medical librarians in the MAR and SE/A Regions are invited to participate in the Group Licensing Initiative (GLI), formed under the umbrella organization Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey (HSLANJ), through their Fall 2014 Offer. Nearly 500 resources from 11 vendors are available through the Offer, and at a cost savings of 15-70% off regular pricing, through the leveraging of group purchasing power.

Group Licensing is a creative solution to the escalating cost of high-quality electronic resources—medical journals, books and databases. More than 100 hospitals and medical facilities regularly participate in the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative, known as the first consortium of its kind in the nation.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Mid-Atlantic Region (MAR), and Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SE/A) fully recognize and endorse the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative as the lead organization capable of assisting libraries in their efforts to utilize multi-dimensional electronic resources. Managed by medical librarian and HSLANJ Executive Director Robert Mackes, MLS, AHIP, the GLI is guided by a committee comprised of librarians from different-sized health facilities in the regions served.

To receive a copy of the Fall Offer, please contact Robert Mackes at 570-856-5952 or rtmackes@gmail.com. The deadline to participate in the Fall Offer is Friday, October 31. New this fall: See the HSLANJ website, under “News” for articles previewing vendors’ new resources available through the Offer (http://hslanj.org/news).

For additional information on the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative, come meet with the GLI’s Robert Mackes in October at any of the following chapter meetings:

  • October 19-21: MAC, Alexandria, VA
  • October 22-23: UNYOC, Saratoga Springs, NY
  • October 24: NYNJ Chapter, NY, NY
  • October 27-29: Southern Chapter, Mobile, AL

Feel free to contact Robert about scheduling a meeting or presentation about the GLI, at your next chapter, state organization or local consortium meeting, as well.

The HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative is funded in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00003-C with the University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Library System. This project is also funded in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the University of Maryland Baltimore.

Share Your Success: Impacting Patient Care Through Evidence-Based Practice

inspiringpeople

By Emily Brennan, MLIS, Research Informationist, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Library, Charleston, SC, mmbrennane@musc.edu

In my role as Research Informationist at MUSC Library, I teach and employ evidence-based practice (EBP) thus impacting patient care on both an individual and systematic level. As Co-Director of the Pediatrics Residency EBP Curriculum, I round with interprofessional teams on the inpatient wards, providing answers to clinical questions that arise at the point-of-care. I am also involved in the weekly EBP noon conference in which residents present on an EBP topic. Clinical rounding, informal training, and structured instruction are also a part of the Year 3 College of Medicine Pediatrics Clerkship, in which I am a preceptor. Throughout their pediatrics rotation, medical students work in teams to complete a project that involves developing a clinical question based on a patient, then finding and appraising an article that answers that question. My involvement in the pediatrics residency program and clerkship ensure that evidence-based research is integrated into clinical expertise, leading to better patient care.

As a member of MUSC’s Center for Evidence-Based Practice, I am also involved with EBP on a more systematic level. The Center is housed jointly in the Library and the Quality Management department of the MUSC Hospital, and includes a Director, Elizabeth Crabtree MPH, PhD(c), librarian (myself), and Clinical EBP Analyst. The Center develops evidence-based hospital guidelines, clinical decision support tools, and provides EBP education for MUSC clinicians, staff and students. The Center for EBP uses interprofessional content expert teams to develop evidence-based order sets for the electronic health record (EHR).
In my role as lead librarian in the Center for EBP, I am responsible for performing literature searches on clinical questions of interest for a given disease process or topic. My expertise in conducting comprehensive literature searches ensures that the best research evidence is integrated into practice. Once I complete the search, I share the search strategy and relevant references with the Director of EBP through a shared reference management account. The Director then critically appraises, evaluates and summarizes the evidence. The content expert teams then review the evidence and develop recommendations that drive the development of order sets. This framework helps ensure the delivery of comprehensive, coordinated, evidence-based care across the clinical spectrum.

The Center teaches clinicians, staff and students about the theory, practice and dissemination of EBP through educational courses. Three courses focus on the process of EBP: 1) Nurse Scholars Course, 2) Interprofessional Pediatrics Course, and 3) College of Medicine Year 2 Students EBM Curriculum. The primary outcome assessment for these courses is the completion of an evidence summary that requires participants to formulate clinical questions, search the literature, appraise the evidence, identify quality measures, and develop practice recommendations that drive care for a particular clinical topic. The final evidence summary leads to either an updated hospital policy or clinical decision support tool, such as an EHR order set. I teach how to formulate a clinical question, differentiate study designs, search the literature, and manage references. The Director of EBP describes how to identify stakeholders, interpret statistics, appraise the evidence, select quality measures, and translate the evidence.

Participants who have completed either the Nurse Scholars or Interprofessional Pediatrics Course may participate in an Evidence-Based Practice Leadership Program. This program, starting in fall 2014, will equip clinicians to lead change, and implement and disseminate evidence. My responsibility in this course will be to prepare participants to disseminate the evidence, including writing an abstract, selecting a journal for publication or conference for presentation, and creating a professional poster.
In my roles as Research Informationist and a member of the Center for EBP, I am uniquely positioned to equip clinicians, staff and students with the skills necessary to make evidence-based decisions during every day clinical practice, as well as impact and standardize patient care on a systematic level.

Last updated on Friday, 22 November, 2013

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under contract HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the Health Sciences and Human Services Library of the University of Maryland