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January NIH News In Health

Check out the January issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov.

woman getting her blood pressure checkedHealth Capsules:
Blood Pressure Matters
Keep Hypertension in Check

Early diagnosis and simple, healthy changes can keep high blood pressure from seriously damaging your health. Read more about hypertension.

Online Weight Management Gets Personal
NIH Body Weight Planner

It’s always a good time to resolve to eat better, be more active, and lose weight. NIH now offers a free, research-based tool to help you reach your goals. Read more about the NIH Body Weight Planner.

Breastfeeding May Help Health After Gestational Diabetes

Substance Abuse in Women

Featured Website: Health E-cards

Click here to download a PDF version for printing. Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!

Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

If you’re an editor who wishes to reprint our stories, please see http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/about.htm for information.

If you manage a website or blog, NIH has a new way for you to get trusted, up-to-date health information added directly to your site. It’s called “content syndication,” and it’s an easy way to share high-quality articles, including NIH News in Health stories. Read more about NIH content syndication.

Free Online Training Opportunity: Teaching Topics

Reposted from:  NNLMALL announcement dated January 5, 2015.

Join members of the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) for a free, hour-long presentation that covers three teaching topics.

  1. Jessi Van Der Volgen will discuss tips and tools for creating video tutorials.
  2. Cheryl Rowan will talk about including audience culture and diversity in your training sessions.
  3. Rebecca Brown will demonstrate how to use Zaption in your online training to add interactivity to videos.

Where: Online

When: February 19, 2016 at 10:00 am PT, 11:00 am MT, noon CT, 1:00 pm ET

Registration: http://nnlm.gov/ntc/classes/register.html?schedule_id=3731

View other free training opportunities by the NTC and NN/LM at: http://nnlm.gov/training-schedule/all/NTC

MeSH Webinar: “2016 MeSH Highlights” on January 20, 2016

Adapted from: NLM Technical Bulletin January 5, 2015  MeSH Webinar: “2016 MeSH Highlights” on January 20, 2016. 2016 Jan-Feb;(408):b1.
On January 20, 2016, join NLM staff for a highlights tour of the 2016 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). A 30-minute presentation will feature a MeSH tree clean-up project; a new Clinical Study publication type; changes to the trees for diet, food and nutrition; restructuring in pharmacology and toxicology; and new terms in psychology and health care. Following the presentation, Indexing and MeSH experts will be available to answer your questions.

Date and time: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. MT; 11:00p.m. CST

To register: Go to https://nih.webex.com/nih/onstage/g.php?MTID=e3e7492af438d67d6137642d7bd2efbe9

A recording of the presentation will be posted following the event.

For more information about 2016 MeSH, see What’s New for 2016 MeSH and the Introduction to MeSH – 2016.

Working in the Cold: Be Prepared and Aware

Adapted from the CDC:

If you happen to work outside during the winter months, there are many risks. Some of these risks may be easier to detect than others; therefore, it is important to be prepared.

Be Prepared

If you work in the cold, several layers of loose clothing is recommended. Layering provides better insulation than otherwise.

Wear gloves to protect your hands, and a hat/hood for your head. If your environment is wet, waterproof shoes with good traction are recommended. It is also important that your clothing does not interfere with your eyesight.

Be prepared for cold weather, even if the temperature currently seems pleasant. Conditions may change quickly and you could suffer from cold-related illnesses and injures in 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Be Aware

Hypothermia can be hard to recognize and can occur when your body temperature drops below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Mild hypothermia can result in confusion and lack of judgment. Early symptoms include shivering, fatigue, and loss of coordination. Due to the loss of heat, your body will stop shivering, skin may turn blue, eyes will dilate, breathing will slow and loss of conscious will occur. To prevent hypothermia, it is recommended to wear clothes in layers.

Frostbite occurs when a part of the body such as fingers, toes, nose and ears, freezes to the point in which tissue is damaged. If the body tissue cannot be saved, removal is recommended. You can avoid frostbite by being alert in a cold environment with layered clothing and hat, gloves, etc.

Other cold related injures include trench foot and chilblains. Trench foot occurs when your feet are wet and it is cold for an extended period of time. Moisture causes the loss of heat and poor circulation. Chilblains can occur due to cold weather damaging an individual skin. The result is broken skin, swelling, blisters, redness, and itching. Trench foot and Chilblains can occur in 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Therefore, if you work in the cold, please wear appropriate clothing for outdoor conditions. It is also recommended to alert your supervisor if you are not warm enough and seek attention. Cold temperatures can affect your judgment and reaction time. For more information, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/features/workingincold/ and for additional information about hypothermia and other cold weather injuries, see the NIOSH Fast Facts card, Protecting Yourself from Cold Stress[PDF – 576KB].

FLU Prevention: Health Travel During the Winter Months

FLU Prevention: Health Travel During the Winter Months

Adapted from the CDC:

If you are traveling during the winter months, the CDC has a couple of recommendations to help prevent chances of contracting the flu before and during your trip.

Before Your Trip

Flu vaccination – Obtaining a flu vaccine is your most important step from becoming ill. There are various places that offer vaccinations including your doctor, pharmacies and health departments. If you are not sure in your area, the HealthMap Vaccine Finder is a great resource.

Travel health kit – Having a personal kit will relieve the stress of finding items on your journey. Items you may want to consider are tissues, pain and fever medicine, soap, hand sanitizer and cleaning wipes. For suggestions, please use the Pack Smart guide.

Illness – If you have the flu before traveling, it is highly recommended to seek a medical professional to evaluate your ability to travel. The correct treatment can shorten your illness and prevent others from becoming sick.

During Your Trip

A couple of recommendations when traveling include:

  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Cover your cough with tissue. If there is no tissue, remember to cough in your sleeve, not your hands.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. If these are not available, use an alcohol-based sanitizer. Then wash your hands when the opportunity occurs.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

The CDC also offers information if you are traveling outside of the United States during the winter months. For more information, please visit: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156430.html

National Network of Libraries of Medicine Accomplishments in 2015

We recently received an email from Dianne Babski, acting head of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) National Network Office, which listed some of the network’s accomplishment in 2015. There are some impressive numbers that could not have been achieved without the partnership of our valuable resource libraries in our network.

A few accomplishments in 2015 include:

  • The network increased membership to over 6,400 members (approximately 1,100 of those in the South Central region)
  • The network conducted almost 1,700 outreach activities, including training, exhibiting and conducting demonstrations.
    • NN/LM Staff and network members participated in over 30,000 training opportunities.
    • Regional Medical Library and network members conducted over 650 exhibits at the state, local and national levels.

Dianne’s email also cited some events from 2015, such as: Dr. Lindberg’s retirement from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in March, the delivery of the future of NLM report from the advisory committee to the NIH director, and behind the scenes, migrating all our NN/LM websites to the Drupal platform!

Together, all of us in the network work to bring health information to millions of people who count on support from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. This includes healthcare providers, researchers, the general public, and librarians who know they will find quality information services when we are at their service.

Thank you from the NN/LM SCR. Here’s to a great 2016!

NNLM Logo

Finding Information about Integrative and Complementary Medicine

The NN/LM SCR offers a popular class entitled “Will Duct Tape Cure My Warts? Examining Complementary and Alternative Medicine” that covers the history and statistics about complementary and integrative medicine, as well as the best resources to find information about these therapies and practices.

The authoritative website is the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), from the National Institutes of Health. Formerly called the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, it underwent a name change in December 2014 in order to reflect the Center’s research commitment to studying promising health approaches already in use by the American public.

The National Library of Medicine’s premiere consumer health website, MedlinePlus, is another excellent resource on this topic. MedlinePlus has a health topics page for Complementary and Integrative Medicine with several links to the NCCIH as well as to other authoritative organizations’ websites.

For finding research articles from medical journals, the NCCIH has partnered with PubMed on an automatic “complementary and alternative medicine” search filter, called “CAM on PubMed®.” When you type your search topic into this filter, PubMed will automatically retrieve scientific research articles in the area of complementary and integrative medicines.

So enjoy learning about acupuncture, magnets, zinc and everything in between! Keep an eye out for our “Will Duct Tape Cure My Warts?” class as a possible future activity, which we teach both in person and online via Moodle.

12 Ways to Have A Healthy Holiday Season

Group of people with snowmanTake steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy. Brighten the holidays by making your health and safety a priority. Take steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy—and ready to enjoy the holidays.

  1. Wash hands often to help prevent the spread of germs. It’s flu season. Wash your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds.
  2. Manage stress. Give yourself a break if you feel stressed out, overwhelmed, and out of control. Some of the best ways to manage stress are to find support, connect socially, and get plenty of sleep.
  3. Don’t drink and drive or let others drink and drive. Whenever anyone drives drunk, they put everyone on the road in danger. Choose not to drink and drive and help others do the same.
  4. Bundle up to stay dry and warm. Wear appropriate outdoor clothing: light, warm layers, gloves, hats, scarves, and waterproof boots.
  5. Be smoke-free. Avoid smoking and secondhand smoke. Smokers have greater health risks because of their tobacco use, but nonsmokers also are at risk when exposed to tobacco smoke.
  6. Fasten seat belts while driving or riding in a motor vehicle. Always buckle your children in the car using a child safety seat, booster seat, or seat belt according to their height, weight, and age. Buckle up every time, no matter how short the trip and encourage passengers to do the same.
  7. Get exams and screenings. Ask your health care provider what exams you need and when to get them. Update your personal and family history. Get insurance from the Health Insurance Marketplace if you are not insured.
  8. Get your vaccinations. Vaccinations help prevent diseases and save lives. Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine each year.
  9. Monitor children. Keep potentially dangerous toys, food, drinks, household items, and other objects out of children’s reach. Protect them from drowning, burns, falls, and other potential accidents.
  10. Practice fire safety. Most residential fires occur during the winter months, so don’t leave fireplaces, space heaters, food cooking on stoves, or candles unattended. Have an emergency plan and practice it regularly.
  11. Prepare food safely. Remember these simple steps: Wash hands and surfaces often, avoid cross-contamination, cook foods to proper temperatures and refrigerate foods promptly.
  12. Eat healthy, stay active. Eat fruits and vegetables which pack nutrients and help lower the risk for certain diseases. Limit your portion sizes and foods high in fat, salt, and sugar. Also, be active for at least 2½ hours a week and help kids and teens be active for at least 1 hour a day.

Be inspired to stay in the spirit of good health! Listen to The 12 Ways to Health  Holiday Song or a holiday health podcast.

Adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Website (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/features/healthytips/index.html

FDA Launches precisionFDA a Cloud-Based, Portal for Scientific Collaboration and Next-Generation Sequencing

Adapted from: FDA Voice Blog

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday December 15, 2015 has launched the beta version of precisionFDA, its a new collaborative platform designed to foster innovation and to develop the science behind a method of “reading” DNA also known as Next-Generation Sequencing (or NGS).  Next Generation Sequencing allows scientists to compile data on a person’s exact order or sequence of DNA. The precisionFDA includes more than 20 public and private sector participants including National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and more. Dr. Francis Collins, NIH’s Director stated on https://precision.fda.gov/ that “PrecisionFDA, is a bold and innovative step towards advancing the regulatory science for precision medicine”.

PrecisionFDA allows users to access tools such as “Genome in the Bottle“https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing-technology/nist-genome-bottle-release-first-reference-material-assessing-genome, a reference sample of DNA for validating genome sequences developed by NIST. These results can be compared with results of previously validated references, and shared with other users, who can track changes and obtain immediate feedback from precisionFDA users. In FDA Voice http://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/, Tasha A. Kass-Hout, MD, chief informatics officer at the FDA wrote, “His hope is to grow the community of platform participants and improve the usability of precisionFDA in the coming months and years by placing the code for the precisionFDA portal on the world’s largest open source software repository, GitHub”.

 

A Year of Health Calendar – Free Download/Order

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the NIH, has developed a set of 2016 health planners – A Year of Health – tailored for four multicultural communities as part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative. The Hispanic/Latino Health Planner is also bilingual! An organization can order up to 150 copies of the health planner free of charge for their communities, while supplies last.

NIAMS is prAsian amerian health planneroviding also some great images you can use in their social media toolkit for promotional purposes and have offered the following tweets:

  • Each day is a chance to get healthier. Order your free 2016 health planners from @NIH_NIAMS today! http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016
  • Have you thought about your #health goals for 2016? @NIH_NIAMS can help with free 2016 health planners http://1.usa.gov/1FU4Hh2 #NMOI2016

The 2016 A Year of Health planners offer information on staying healthy and managing conditions of the bones, joints, muscles, skin, and pain based on proven studies. The planners also include information about other free publications that you can order or download if you want to find out more.