Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About SCR | Contact SCR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

July 2014 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available

NIH News in Health Fun in Sun

The July issue of NIH News in Health,
the monthly newsletter bringing practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research is now available:

Features:

Sun and Skin: The Dark Side of Sun Exposure
Sunlight is essential to many living things, but it also has a dangerous side. The good news is you can take simple steps to protect your skin from sun damage.
Read more about sun and skin.

Fight Off Food Poisoning: Food Safety for Warmer Weather
It can be hard to keep foods safe to eat during warmer weather. Learn how to handle food properly to avoid the misery of food poisoning.
Read more about food poisoning.

Health Capsules:
Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile
Kidney Failure and Its Treatment
Featured Website: Bionic Man

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.
Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!
Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

Online Super Searcher Class Offered in August

The NN/LM SCR is pleased to offer the online version of “Super Searcher: Enhancing Your Online Search Super Powers” class.

Woman wearing a cape flying holding a computerThis self-paced online class will open August 4, 2014 and remain open until September 14, 2014.

This self-paced online course offering focuses on the advanced search features of web search engines and online searching. Participants will use various search engines, compare the features of each and broaden their knowledge of search strategies and online search techniques. Participants will develop search strategies that will increase the precision and scope of their online searching ability. In the online version of the class, participants will view short video demonstrations, engage in online discussions and complete exercise sets focused on improving online search skills. The class includes: information about web search engines, strategies for searching for online media including images, videos and books. The class concludes with a discussion on real-time search, mobile search and what the future of search holds.

The class content has recently been updated to address the launch of the Google Search Algorithm Hummingbird and additional topics on the future of search engines.

Participants will work at their own pace during this class but are expected to interact with other class participants in discussion forums and complete practice exercises.

Upon successful completion of this class, each participant will receive 4 hours of continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association.

Registration for this class is required.

As always, all NN/LM SCR classes are free and open to anyone.

Discarding Journals? Check with NLM first

Hand reaching for bound journal on a shelf

Are you weeding your collection?  Don’t immediately throw the journals away.   Check with NLM to see if they need missing journals.

NLM’s Journal Donation System makes it possible for libraries to determine whether NLM needs any volumes of the print journals they plan to discard.  The system can be used by DOCLINE and non-DOCLINE libraries to offer any title, including titles not owned by NLM.   The system can be accessed at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/journaldonation/ or by searching “Journal Donation System” on NLM’s home page.   In the system, click on “Help” for detailed instructions.  For additional assistance, contact NLM at (301) 496-0081 or NLMJournalDonation@mail.nlm.nih.gov .   NLM will pay shipping for volumes we need. To donate pre-1871 journal volumes to the History of Medicine Division, see http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/about/donate.html.

Since the beginning of the online donation system in April 2009, over 10,000 gifts have been added to the collection.  With the help of libraries planning to discard journal volumes, NLM can build on the success achieved to date.

 

TALL Texans 2014

TALL2014The TALL Texans Leadership Development Institute provides advanced leadership and management education in service to all the libraries of Texas and the communities they serve. Participants study strategic planning, risk-taking, conflict negotiation, team building, coaching, ethics, advocacy, personal career planning, and more. This transformational program helps attendees learn and embrace their potential to take new initiative for their institutions, their profession, and their stakeholders. This year’s Institute was held June 15-18 at the Montserrat Retreat Center, Lake Dallas, TX. During the days of the Institute, participants learned about these topics in a variety of formats, including large group instruction, small group discussions, and time for individual assessment and planning.

This year’s class of 24 students, included librarians from public libraries, elementary, middle, and high school libraries, and college and university libraries. Emily Hurst (Technology Coordinator) and Cheryl Rowan (Consumer Health Coordinator) from the NN/LM South Central Region office were also part of this year’s class. In addition, six mentors joined the group for all sessions and were available for one-on-one conversation with participants. The mentors were:  Sharon Amastae, recently retired from Ysleta ISD in El Paso (TLA President 2014-15); Susan Mann, Library Director at Hillsboro City Library,  and TLA 2014-2015 President Elect; Dan Burgard, Library Director at the UNT Health Science Center; Dr. Martin Halbert, Dean of the University of North Texas Libraries; Dr. Loriene Roy, Professor at the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin and also a past president of ALA; and Susan Geye, Coordinator of Library Services at Everman ISD.

Maureen Sullivan and Jack Siggins served as instructors and facilitators. Maureen Sullivan is an organizational development consultant to libraries and other information organizations. Sullivan is currently on the faculty of the annual ACRL/Harvard Leadership Institute and is a professor of practice in the new Ph.D./Managerial Leadership in the Information Professions program at the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science.  Sullivan is also a past president of ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries) and LLAMA (Library Leadership, Administration, and Management Association), and is Past President of the American Library Association in 2013-14.Her husband, Jack Siggins, has recently retired as head of the Gelman Library at George Washington University in Washington, D.C, since 1995. Previously he served for ten years as Deputy University Librarian at Yale University. He has also held positions at the Library of Congress, the University of Maryland-College Park and the University of Chicago. This year marked the 20th year that Maureen and Jack have served as facilitators for TALL Texans.

The Leadership Development Institute is the major activity by which the Texas Library Association  (TLA) endeavors to provide a statewide impetus for expanded leadership education opportunities for all TLA members. More information is available from the TLA website: TALL Texans.

IMG_2522Reflections from TALL Texans - Emily Hurst and Cheryl Rowan

Both Emily and Cheryl expressed gratitude at the opportunity to be a part of this community of Texas Library leaders.

Reflections from Emily: “The TALL Texans Leadership Institute endeavors to provide leadership minded librarians with an overview of many different aspects of leadership. Facilitators do an excellent job of distilling information on leadership and leading discussions for the group. I have always been aware the writing on leadership seems voluminous and then even knowing what research to trust on this topic seems daunting. Maureen and Jack were excellent guides on the leadership literature. Sharing their wealth of experience and research with the group provided us all with valuable resources and information for further review.

During my time at TALL Texans I began to appreciate the challenges all librarians have to contend with. No matter what type of library; school, public, academic, or special all of the leadership information provided was relatable and relevant. During each session attendees had the opportunity to ask probing questions of the facilitators and to share experiences. Mentors as well as other attendees provided insights into aspects of leadership in their everyday life. There were so many moments to learn and grow together through the training.

Some of my favorite activities including an exercise on coaching where groups were able to practice the role of the coach, the client, and the listener. This exercise made me aware that some of the reactions that I have that seem to come naturally are valuable leadership qualities. In addition taking time to reflect on the topics or exercises was invaluable. In our busy day-to-day lives taking time to reflect on our activities is often neglected. Overall found the reflection time to be some of the best for arranging my thoughts and taking of ways the information that was just covered would be applicable in everyday life.

All in all the information provided at the institute was very valuable or anyone interested in leadership roles in professional organizations or management positions. It is important that anyone moving into these types of positions have the proper training and experience so that they can provide those they lead or management with a safe, organized, and effective environment in which to learn and grow. Without strong leaders with proper leadership training institutions and organizations can falter.”

Comments from Cheryl: “The TALL Texans Institute was a great time to learn from both theory and practice of the instructors, mentors, and participants. I especially enjoyed the time for personal reflection and assessment and the opportunities to meet and learn from fellow students. I look forward to developing deeper relationships with many of these individuals. I loved seeing our SCC/MLA mascot “up close and personal too!”

NIH launches 3D Print Exchange

NIH 3D Print Exchange Logo

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, a public website that enables users to share, download, and edit 3D print files related to health and science. These files can be used, for example, to print custom laboratory equipment and models of bacteria and human anatomy. The NIH 3D Print Exchange also provides video tutorials and additional resources with instruction on 3D modeling software to enable users to customize and create 3D prints.

“3D printing is a potential game changer for medical research,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “At NIH, we have seen an incredible return on investment; pennies’ worth of plastic have helped investigators address important scientific questions while saving time and money. We hope that the 3D Print Exchange will expand interest and participation in this new and exciting field among scientists, educators and students.”

NIH uses 3D printing, or the creation of a physical object from a digital model, to study viruses, repair and enhance lab apparatus, and help plan medical procedures. The 3D Print Exchange makes these types of files freely available, along with video tutorials for new users and a discussion forum to promote collaboration. The site also features tools that convert scientific and clinical data into ready-to-print 3D files.

The 3D Print Exchange is a collaborative effort led by NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). “3D printing is helping to advance science at NIAID and beyond,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “The ability to design and print tangible models of pathogens, for example, can give researchers a fresh perspective on the diseases they study and open new and promising lines of investigation.”

Additional support is provided by other NIH components, including the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Library of Medicine. The 3D Print Exchange is funded in part by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through its Ignite External Web Site Policy and Ventures External Web Site Policy programs, which help support innovation within the agency.

Funding Opportunity for Librarians to attend APHA

APHA logo

Librarians with an interest in public health, make this the year you attend the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting.  Stipends funded by The Grace and Harold Sewell Memorial Fund for this purpose will be awarded to at least 10 librarians in 2014.  This year’s APHA meeting will take place in New Orleans, LA from November 15-19, 2014. Its theme is Healthography: How Where You Live Affects Your Health and Well-Being. For more information on the meeting see APHA’s website.

Applications are now being accepted.  The deadline for application is July 24, 2014, 5pm EST.  For the complete Call for Applicants, application forms, and FAQs, go to the Public Health/Health Administration section of the MLA website.

For more information on the 2014 APHA meeting see annual meeting information page.

For more information on the Sewell Fund, see the Sewell Fund website

What is the Value of Attending APHA as a Sewell Stipend recipient?

The mission of the Fund is to increase librarians’ identification with medical and health care professionals.  Stipends have been awarded annually since 2001.  Past participants testify to the value of attending APHA:

“Connecting with my fellow library and information professionals and public health colleagues was energizing…The spirit of true collaboration shone through the programs.”  (Feili Tu)

“Many of the things I learned were not specific, as in tangible facts, more of an understanding of what Public Health is. I learned it covers just about everything…for Public Health you need to be knowledgeable about the issues, the potential impact of legislation, and knowledgeable about the ‘agendas’ of the interested parties…” (Kristin Kroger)

“Overall the conference really helped me to better understand the scope of public health as well as the latest development in the areas of public health that I am most likely to have to deal with as a librarian….It was an incredible learning experience.” (Manju Tanwar)

“The fact that I’m working on a Masters in Public Health was very interesting to her (public health colleague) because she didn’t realize that some librarians also have another graduate degree. I think this helped solidify the idea that librarians could be peers to teaching faculty.” (Amber Burtis)

“As a result of the meeting I gained a deeper understanding of my patrons’ needs”  (Peggy Gross)

“I feel like I now have a cohort of people to whom to turn when I have questions about what I am doing as I move into supporting my institution’s public health program.” (Laure Zeigen)

The committee is looking forward to reading your applications!

Barbara Folb, Chair, Client Relations Committee
folb@pitt.edu

Helena VonVille, Chair-elect, Client Relations Committee
Helena.M.Vonville@uth.tmc.edu

Public Health/ Health Administration Section
Medical Library Association

June is LGBT Pride Month

rainbow caduceus

In celebration of LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bixesual, and Transgender) Pride Month, we have put together a list of LGBT health information resources. Often an underserved population, people who identify as LGBT have health needs that are widely varied. The compiled list, although far from comprehensive, covers resources for LGBT individuals from youth to older adult. If you are unfamiliar with LGBT health resources or just want a refresher, start here.

The first of these resources is from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (or SAMHSA). SAMHSA’s LGBT health page includes a wealth of information, including links to resources like “A Practitioner’s Resource Guide: Helping Families to Support Their LGBT Children”, “Top Health Issues for LGBT Populations Information & Resource Kit” as well as links to federal initiatives and resources.

The second of these resources is from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). ACOG has two particularly useful resources for LGBT health; one is a committee opinion piece from the Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women on Health Care for Lesbians and Bisexual Women , and the other is a Transgender Resource Guide from the same committee. Although these pages are not to be “construed as dictating an exclusive course of treatment or procedure”, they offer quality information concerning barriers to health care, routine health visits, as well as mental health considerations and more.

The third resource is the LGBT Community Field Guide from the Joint Commission. The purpose of the LGBT Community Field guide is to advance and improve effective communication, cultural competence, and patient- and family-centered care. This field guide includes sections on how to use the guide, an explanation of terminology, as well as chapters on provision of care and patient/family engagement. Also included are checklists, designed to help practitioners stay in line with Joint Commission standards and mission.

The final resource is the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health page from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The introduction to the page states “The perspectives and needs of LGBT people should be routinely considered in public health efforts to improve the overall health of every person and eliminate health disparities.” This resource features specific health topic pages for gay and bisexual men, youth, lesbians and bisexual women,  and transgender persons. In addition to these health topic pages, the CDC also offers information on health services as well as data and statistics.

For additional links to LGBT health resources, visit the MedlinePlus Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender health topic page.

The Importance of NIH Funding to Each State

Screenshot of factsheet for Louisiana

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is the nation’s medical research agency. The NIH is made up of 27 Institutes and Centers including the National Library of Medicine (NLM). According to the NIH website, NIH-funded medical research has significant positive impacted the health of Americans today. The NIH is the largest source for funding for medical research in the world. This funding creates hundreds of thousands of high-quality jobs by funding thousands of scientists in universities and research institutions in every state across America and around the globe. Budget cuts at the national level can greatly impact the funding that important medical research receives at the NIH.

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) was funded in 1912 and today is the nation’s largest coalition of biomedical researchers and is now recognized as the policy voice of biological and biomedical researchers. FASEB recently updated their NIH State Information Factsheets which provide information on NIH funding in each state. The factsheets are presented as easy to read and print PDFs with a summary of funding information and how this funding benefits the economy of the state.

Additional tools about the impact of NIH funding are available from FASEB. FASEB makes available tools for advocating for resources for scientists as well as a toolbox for those visiting or writing their Congressional representative.

 

 

 

 

New TOXNET SCR CONNECtions webinar recording now available

toxnet

TOXNET has had a complete redesign. What are the changes?  Where are your favorite databases?  Can you still search all databases at once?

On the June 18th SCR CONNECTions webinar, Karen Vargas answered all these questions and many more.  Did you miss the webinar?  A recording of the session is now available along with a link to presentation materials.

Join us July 16th for the next SCR CONNECTions webinar!  As always the webinars are free and open to all.

Navigator Funding Opportunity Announcment for 2014-15

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced a recent funding opportunity intended to support Navigators providing health insurance enrollment assistance in Federally-facilitated and State Partnership Marketplaces in 2014 – 2015. Navigators provide unbiased information to consumers about health insurance, the Health Insurance Marketplace, qualified health plans, and public programs including Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).   You may learn more about this opportunity here: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=93.332 

Many libraries have actively partnered with Navigator organizations in their communities to support outreach, education, and enrollment in the health insurance Marketplace established as part of the Affordable Care Act. Libraries have contributed in many ways, such as providing space for Navigator information sessions, making library computers available for enrollment sessions, and sharing resources from Navigators in person and online. HealthCare.gov defines Navigators as: An individual or organization that’s trained and able to help consumers, small businesses, and their employees as they look for health coverage options through the Marketplace, including completing eligibility and enrollment forms. These individuals and organizations are required to be unbiased. Their services are free to consumers.

The funding opportunity is available to all eligible individuals, as well as public and private entities, applying to serve as Navigators in states with a Federally-facilitated or State Partnership Marketplace. It is open to new and returning Navigator applicants; applications are due July 10, 2014.

Health Insurance Marketplace