Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About SCR | Contact SCR | Feedback | Help | Bookmark and Share

Healthy Eye Care Habits Equates to Healthy Eyes For People Who Wear Contact Lens

Adapted from:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s article “Healthy Contact Lens Wear”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) more than 40 million people in the U.S. wear contact lenses. While contact lenses are generally a safe and effective form of vision correction, they are not entirely risk-free-especially if they are not cared for properly. The key to reap the benefits of wearing contact lenses, it is necessary to practice healthy eye care habits. Enjoy the comfort and benefits of contact lenses while lowering your chance of complications. Failure to wear, clean, and store your lenses as directed by your eye doctor raises the risk of developing serious infections and other complications. Your habits, supplies, and eye doctor are all essential to keeping your eyes healthy. Follow the following tips:

See CDC infographic http://www.cdc.gov/contactlenses/pdf/contact-lens-infographic-508.pdf

Healthy Habits For Contact Lens Wearers 

  • Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well with a clean cloth before touching your contact lenses every time.
  • Don’t sleep in your contact lenses unless prescribed to do so by your eye doctor.
  • Keep water away from your contact lenses. Avoid showering in contact lenses, and remove them before using a hot tub or swimming
  • Rub and rinse your contact lenses with contact lens disinfecting solution—never water or saliva—to clean them each time you remove them.
  • Never store your contact lenses in water.
  • Replace your contact lenses as often as prescribed by your eye doctor.
  • Rub and rinse your contact lens case with contact lens solution—never water—and then empty and  dry with a clean tissue. Store upside down with the caps off after each use.
  • Replace your contact lens case at least once every three months.
  • Don’t “top off” solution. Use only fresh contact lens solution in your case—never mix fresh solution with old or used solution.
  • Use only the contact lens solution recommended by your eye doctor your Eye Doctor
  • Carry a backup pair of glasses with a current prescription—just in case you have to take out your contact lenses.

    Check out CDC’s health promotion materials, including posters, podcasts, a social media library, and more!

    What the CDC is Doing

    CDC is working with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), eye care providers, contact lens and product manufacturers, and academic partners on a collaborative effort to improve how people wear and care for their contact lenses.

    Learn more about these partnerships.

    Visit your eye doctor yearly or as often as he or she recommends.Ask your eye doctor if you have questions about how to care for your contact lenses and case or if you are having any difficulties.Remove your contact lenses immediately and call your eye doctor if you have eye pain, discomfort, redness, or blurred vision.

Fundamentals of the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care Webinar

Adapted from: NLM Outreach and Special Populations Branch

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health is offering the first webinar in a series on the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care on March 17, 2016 at 2 pm CT. The featured speaker will be: Dr. J. Nadine Garcia, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health, Director, Office of Minority of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Culturally and linguistically appropriate services refers to facilities that are respectful of and responsive to individual cultural health beliefs, practices, preferred languages, health literacy levels and communication needs.

The National CLAS Standards provide a blueprint for individuals and health care organizations to serve the nation’s diverse communities through culturally and linguistically appropriate services.  Furthermore, those in attendance will learn about culturally and linguistically appropriate services and the National CLAS Standards.

Attendees are encouraged to register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1124444526228357633

After registering, you will receive a conformation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Adults Do Not Get Enough Sleep: A Good Night’s Sleep Is Critical For Good Health

Adapted from: Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Newsroom

More than a third of American adults are not getting enough sleep on a regular basis, according to a new study in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. This is the first study to document estimates of self-reported healthy sleep duration (7 or more hours per day) for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults aged 18–60 years sleep at least 7 hours each night to promote optimal health and well-being. Sleeping less than seven hours per day is associated with an increased risk of developing chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and frequent mental distress. “As a nation we are not getting enough sleep,” said Wayne Giles, M.D., director of CDC’s Division of Population Health. “Lifestyle changes such as going to bed at the same time each night; rising at the same time each morning; and turning off or removing televisions, computers, mobile devices from the bedroom, can help people get the healthy sleep they need.” Prevalence of healthy sleep duration varies by geography, race/ethnicity, employment, marital status CDC researchers reviewed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based, random-digit–dialed telephone survey conducted collaboratively by state health departments and CDC.

Key Findings:

  • Healthy sleep duration was lower among Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (54 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (54 percent), multiracial non-Hispanics (54 percent) and American Indians/Alaska Natives (60 percent) compared with non-Hispanic whites (67 percent), Hispanics (66 percent), and Asians (63 percent).
  • The prevalence of healthy sleep duration varied among states and ranged from 56 percent in Hawaii to 72 percent in South Dakota.
  • A lower proportion of adults reported getting at least seven hours of sleep per day in states clustered in the southeastern region of the United States and the Appalachian Mountains. Previous studies have shown that these regions also have the highest prevalence of obesity and other chronic conditions.
  • People who reported they were unable to work or were unemployed had lower healthy sleep duration (51 percent and 60 percent, respectively) than did employed respondents (65 percent). The prevalence of healthy sleep duration was highest among people with a college degree or higher (72 percent).
  • The percentage reporting a healthy sleep duration was higher among people who were married (67 percent) compared with those who were never married (62 percent) or divorced, widowed, or separated (56 percent).

Healthy Sleep Tips:

  • Healthcare providers should routinely assess patients’ sleep patterns and discuss sleep-related problems such as snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness.
  • Healthcare providers should also educate patients about the importance of sleep to their health.
  • Individuals should make getting enough sleep a priority and practice good sleep habits.
  • Employers can consider adjusting work schedules to allow their workers time to get enough sleep.
  • Employers can also educate their shift workers about how to improve their sleep.

For more information on CDC’s Sleep and Sleep Disorders Program, please visit www.cdc.gov/sleep.

What is FDA Doing to Improve the Health of African-Americans?

Adapted from  posted  on  

By: Jovonni Spinner, M.P.H., C.H.E.S. Public Health Advisor in FDA’s Office of Minority Health

Every February, Black History Month is celebrated as a time to reflect, celebrate, and honor the contributions of African-Americans to our society. Achieving and maintaining good health is a long-standing issue for this group, many of whom may experience worse health outcomes in critical areas like heart disease and diabetes. By focusing on the positive and providing consumers with health education materials to support healthy behavior changes the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Minority Health www.fda.gov/minorityhealth have made progress in eradicating the health equity gap, and the gap has narrowed over time, but there is still significant room for improvement. Here are few things that the Food and Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov/ (FDA) and the Office of Minority Health www.fda.gov/minorityhealth (OMH) have done over the past year to reduce health disparities. More than 29.2 million blacks/African-Americans are on social media — and we want to meet consumers where they are. FDA and OMH are using Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms and electronic communications (e.g. our newsletter and e-blasts) to educate African- Americans on issues such as heart disease, diabetes, and sickle cell disease among others, and also provide tangible solutions to help manage these chronic conditions. For example, to mark American Heart Month in February, we developed a social media toolkit to help our stakeholders engage with their members and partnered with the Association of Black Cardiologists to spearhead an http://www.abcardio.org/articles/lovemyheart.html #ILoveMyHeart social media campaign. The FDA and OMH  have cultivated relationships with a core set of partners to better understand their health needs, aligned our priorities to meet those needs, and worked together to leverage each other’s resources for the common good. By doing so, the FDA and OMH have increased the stakeholder’s capacity to communicate with the agency on regulatory issues. For example, multicultural stakeholders are now better able to make their voice heard in FDA-sponsored public meetings and on open dockets.  In regards, to Minority Health Research  FDA and OMH has worked with academia to fund African-American-based research projects (e.g. HIV/AIDs and triple negative breast cancer) and research fellows working on topics like genomics and digital communications. This allows us to increase the knowledge base on these issues and ensure a diverse workforce is in place to solve these complex health problems. FDA and OMH’s Minority Health education Resources , offer infographics and fact sheets, tailored to African Americans. The FDA website has valuable information on sickle cell disease and lupus, both of which affect African Americans more than any other racial/ethnic group. FDA and OMH are working to continue to work toward increasing clinical trial diversity, to ensure that medical products are safe and effective for everyone!

President Obama has said, “If you’re walking down the right path and you’re willing to keep walking, eventually you’ll make progress.” OMH will continue walking down the path to improving health equity and we want you to join us, because this work cannot be done alone.

Visit FDA’s OMH at: www.fda.gov/minorityhealth

Follow us on Twitter @FDAOMH

Jovonni Spinner

National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

Adapted from:  National Library of Medicine’s News and Events dated 2/05/16

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The URL is https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/.

The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984. In the early 1990s, as radiology was moving from film to digital imaging, there was simultaneously a merger of the diagnostic imaging residency programs of the two premier military hospitals: Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center. In the summer of 1999, a Web-based digital teaching file based on the radiology study tool was built at USUHS to allow the two military training programs to share teaching file cases, a training requirement. Soon, other military hospitals and several civilian institutions joined MedPix. Over the past 16 years, MedPix has amassed an impressive collection of over 53,000 images from over 13,000 cases.

The MedPix collection categorizes and classifies the image and patient data for each of several subsets of image database applications (e.g. radiology, pathology, ophthalmology, etc.). The content material is both high-quality and high-yield and includes both common and rare conditions. Most cases have a proven diagnosis (pathology, clinical follow-up). The teaching file cases are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Panel.

As a public education service, the NLM and MedPix provide the storage service, indexing, and Web server hosting. Individuals as well as institutions may participate. Contributed content may be copyrighted by the original author/contributor. No additional software required—your Internet browser is all you need!

The primary target audience includes resident and practicing physicians, medical students, nurses and graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees. The material is organized by disease category, disease location (organ system), and by patient profiles.

At this time, the new MedPix website is up. Existing users can login, but there is no access to CME credits yet, no new registration, no submitting a case and no search.

NOTE: MedPix provides a quick summary of medical information with images. It is not intended to be encyclopedic.

WARNING: This is not a substitute for medical advice, and the reader is responsible for confirming the accuracy of this information before beginning or changing any therapy or treatment.

For more information see:  MedPix Home Page https://medpix.nlm.nih.gov/  – NLM’s Medical Image Database

Since its founding in 1836, the National Library of Medicine https://www.nlm.nih.gov has played a pivotal role in translating biomedical research into practice and is a leader in information innovation. NLM is the world’s largest medical library, and millions of scientists, health professionals and the public around the world use NLM services every day.

 

Job Ad: Digital Archivist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Digital Archivist – Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center
(“Office of the Library” in HR  listing)

Job Number: 520685
Categories: Professional
Location:  Dallas, TX
Department: Library
Full/Part Time/PRN: Full-Time
Regular/Temporary: Regular

Security

This position is security-sensitive and subject to Texas Education Code 51.215, which authorizes UT Southwestern to obtain criminal history record information

Salary

Salary Negotiable

Experience and Education

MLS/MLIS from an ALA-accredited graduate school or equivalent degree.  Three years of experience working with assigning metadata, digitizing materials, managing a digital collection or other digital library-related work. Experience with digitizing materials and managing a digital collection and other digital library-related tasks. Experience working with CONTENTdm or equivalent digital assets management system. Archives management background. RDA experience or training. Experience with constructing survey instruments. Experience with Open Archives Initiative (OAI) harvesting.   Experience with grant writing and project management.

Job Duties

  1. Responsible for the acquisition and appraisal, records, arrangement and description, and preservation of an organization’s long-term digital collections.
  2. Conducts an appraisal of existing digital archives in all media formats.
  3. Accessions records and decides which to retain and how to retain them for periods exceeding three to five years.
  4. Makes decisions about storage media, along with classification, indexing and metadata assignment.
  5. Preserves digital records and supervises the systematic cataloging and retention work around legacy information stores, including offline media and paper.
  6. Supports and participates in the e-discovery process.

**Other Duties:  Performs other duties as assigned. 

This person will work in the Digital Collections Unit of the Library.  They will primarily be responsible for digitizing the physical paper archives of the university.  They will also work with the department of Marketing and Communications to do the same for them.

To the extent provided by applicable law, no person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity sponsored or conducted by The University of Texas System or any of its component institutions, on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, veteran status, or disability.

Million Hearts: Learn the ABCs of Heart Health to Prevent Heart Disease and Stroke

Adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Million Hearts http://millionhearts.hhs.gov/learn-prevent/  initiative is a national public-private partnership that aims to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017 by using clinical and community prevention to improve the ABCS.

  • Every year, Americans suffer more than 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes. We’re all at risk for heart disease and stroke. People of all ages, genders, races, and ethnicities are affected. However, certain groups—including African Americans and older individuals are at higher risk than others.
  • Each day, approximately 2,200 people die from cardiovascular disease—that’s more than 800,000 Americans each year, or 1 in every 3 deaths.
  • Together, heart disease and stroke account for more than $316.6 billion in health care costs and lost productivity annually—and these costs are rising. On a personal level, families who experience heart disease or stroke not only have to deal with medical bills but also lost wages and the potential of a decreased standard of living.
  • Nearly half of all African American adults have some form of cardiovascular disease that includes heart disease and stroke.
  • High blood pressure is the leading cause of heart attack and stroke in the United States. About 2 out of every 5 African American adults have high blood pressure, and less than half of them have it under control. African American adults are much more likely to suffer from high blood pressure (hypertension), and heart attack and stroke deaths than white adults. Individuals living below the federal poverty level are more likely to have high blood pressure compared with those living at the highest level of income.

You can lower your chance of heart disease and stroke by taking simple steps.

  • Eat a healthy diet with fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products. Choose foods low in saturated fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.
  • Exercise regularly. Adults needs 2 hours and 30 minutes (or 150 minutes total) of exercise each week. You can spread your activity out during the week, and can break it up into smaller chunks of time during the day.
  • Do not smoke. 
  • Limit alcohol use, which can lead to long-term health problems, including heart disease and cancer. If you do choose to drink, do so in moderation, which is no more than one drink a day for women and two for men.
  • Know your family history. There may be factors that could increase your risk for heart disease and stroke.
  • Manage any medical condition you might have. Know the ABCS of heart health. Keep them in mind every day and especially when you talk to your physician:
    • Appropriate aspirin therapy for those who need it
    • Blood pressure control
    • Cholesterol management
    • Smoking cessation

For more information:  See the CDC Division for Heart and Stroke Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/.

Five Ways To Protect Your Eyes From AMD

Adapted from:  Harvard Medical School’s This Week @ Harvard Health

amg-vision-loss-eyes-macular-degneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a condition in which the macula, the part of the eye that’s responsible for your sharpest and most detailed vision, begins to thin and break down, causing vision loss. If left untreated, it can lead to blindness.

There is no surefire way to prevent AMD. However, there are things you can do to delay its onset or reduce its severity. Here are 5 of our favorites:

  1. Smoking can speed up AMD damage. If you smoke, quit.
  2. Sunlight is thought to possibly promote AMD. Protect your eyes from the sun by wearing sunglasses and broad-brimmed hats.
  3. Research also suggests that certain nutrients help prevent macular degeneration. Eat a diet rich in fresh fruits and dark-green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, collard greens, and kale. The latter are especially rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, which are key for eye health.
  4. If you have intermediate or advanced dry AMD, or any stage of the “wet” form of AMD, ask your doctor about supplements. For example, people at high risk of developing the advanced stages of the “wet” form of AMD may lower their risk by taking high-dose combinations of antioxidant vitamins and minerals.
  5. It’s unclear whether omega-3 supplements are beneficial for AMD. But eating fish and other foods high in these nutrients may still be worthwhile for preserving optimal vision and overall good health.

For more information on keeping your eyes healthy, see The Aging Eye, a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.

 

U.S. Task Force Recommends Doctors Should Screen Teens for Major Depression

Adapted from MedlinePlus (Health Day)

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends primary care doctors should screen patients between 12 and 18 years for major depression, but not in younger children. The task force believes that the screening of young adults should be accompanied by diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Experts believe major depression can hinder an adolescent school and work performance as well as developing positive relationships with family and friends. If the situation persists, there is an increased risk of suicide. For more information, please visit: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157131.html

Additional Resources:

Depression

Teen Mental Health

Study Shows Direct Relation Between Asthma-Flair Ups and School Year Calendar

Adapted from MedlinePlus (Health Day)

A recent study may explain why children with Asthma tend to suffer cold systems after a school long holiday or break. Experts believed that environmental factors, such as air quality was the culprit. Researchers analyzed asthma-related hospitalizations of children across Texas for seven years. The study concluded that the school year calendar was the primary cause. Researchers found that when children are not at school for a long period, they will be less likely exposed to other children with colds and their immunity decreases. When they return to school, there is an increase in their exposure to cold viruses and their immune systems are not ready. For more information, please visit: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157134.html

Additional Resources:

Asthma in Children

Common Cold

School Health