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Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

Job Ad: Digital Archivist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016

Digital Archivist – Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center
(“Office of the Library” in HR  listing)

Job Number: 520685
Categories: Professional
Location:  Dallas, TX
Department: Library
Full/Part Time/PRN: Full-Time
Regular/Temporary: Regular

Security

This position is security-sensitive and subject to Texas Education Code 51.215, which authorizes UT Southwestern to obtain criminal history record information

Salary

Salary Negotiable

Experience and Education

MLS/MLIS from an ALA-accredited graduate school or equivalent degree.  Three years of experience working with assigning metadata, digitizing materials, managing a digital collection or other digital library-related work. Experience with digitizing materials and managing a digital collection and other digital library-related tasks. Experience working with CONTENTdm or equivalent digital assets management system. Archives management background. RDA experience or training. Experience with constructing survey instruments. Experience with Open Archives Initiative (OAI) harvesting.   Experience with grant writing and project management.

Job Duties

  1. Responsible for the acquisition and appraisal, records, arrangement and description, and preservation of an organization’s long-term digital collections.
  2. Conducts an appraisal of existing digital archives in all media formats.
  3. Accessions records and decides which to retain and how to retain them for periods exceeding three to five years.
  4. Makes decisions about storage media, along with classification, indexing and metadata assignment.
  5. Preserves digital records and supervises the systematic cataloging and retention work around legacy information stores, including offline media and paper.
  6. Supports and participates in the e-discovery process.

**Other Duties:  Performs other duties as assigned. 

This person will work in the Digital Collections Unit of the Library.  They will primarily be responsible for digitizing the physical paper archives of the university.  They will also work with the department of Marketing and Communications to do the same for them.

To the extent provided by applicable law, no person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity sponsored or conducted by The University of Texas System or any of its component institutions, on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, veteran status, or disability.

NIH News In Health February 2016

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Adapted from: NIH News in Health, February 2016 issue

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. To search for more trusted health information from NIH, bookmark http://health.nih.gov.

 

Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove Cancer NIH-funded researchers are developing new technologies to help surgeons figure out exactly where cancerous tumors end and healthy tissue begins. Read more about technologies for cancer surgery.
 
Focusing on Fibromyalgia A Puzzling and Painful Condition Fibromyalgia is a long-term condition marked by pain and fatigue. It can be hard to diagnose, but treatment can help. Read more about fibromyalgia.

Health Capsules:

Infertility Treatments and Children’s Development

Help for Rare and Undiagnosed Conditions

Featured Website: NIH Office of Dietary Supplements 

Please NIH’s website http://www.nih.gov/ for current authoritative health information.

 

NLM Announces Pill Image Recognition Challenge

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

From NLM:

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) announced its Pill Image Recognition Challenge January 19, 2016 in the Federal Register at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/01/19/2016-00777/announcement-of-requirements-and-registration-for-pill-image-recognition-challenge. The Pill Image Recognition Challenge will also be posted on Challenge.gov. The submission period for the Challenge is April 4, 2016 to May 31, 2016, with winners announced August 1, 2016. More information about the Challenge itself can be found on the Web site at http://pir.nlm.nih.gov/Challenge

Summary: The Pill Image Recognition Challenge is a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Challenge under the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Reauthorization Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-358). Through this Challenge, the National Library of Medicine (NLM), part of NIH, seeks algorithms and software to match images of prescription oral solid-dose pharmaceutical medications (pills, including capsules and tablets). The objective of the Challenge is the development and discovery of high-quality algorithms and software that rank how well consumer images of prescription pills match reference images of pills in the authoritative NLM RxIMAGE database. NLM may use all or part of any Challenge entry (i.e., algorithm and software) to create a future software system and a future API (Application Programming Interface) for pill image recognition; the system will be freely usable and the API will be freely accessible.

FDA Launches precisionFDA a Cloud-Based, Portal for Scientific Collaboration and Next-Generation Sequencing

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

Adapted from: FDA Voice Blog

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday December 15, 2015 has launched the beta version of precisionFDA, its a new collaborative platform designed to foster innovation and to develop the science behind a method of “reading” DNA also known as Next-Generation Sequencing (or NGS).  Next Generation Sequencing allows scientists to compile data on a person’s exact order or sequence of DNA. The precisionFDA includes more than 20 public and private sector participants including National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and more. Dr. Francis Collins, NIH’s Director stated on https://precision.fda.gov/ that “PrecisionFDA, is a bold and innovative step towards advancing the regulatory science for precision medicine”.

PrecisionFDA allows users to access tools such as “Genome in the Bottle“https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing-technology/nist-genome-bottle-release-first-reference-material-assessing-genome, a reference sample of DNA for validating genome sequences developed by NIST. These results can be compared with results of previously validated references, and shared with other users, who can track changes and obtain immediate feedback from precisionFDA users. In FDA Voice http://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/, Tasha A. Kass-Hout, MD, chief informatics officer at the FDA wrote, “His hope is to grow the community of platform participants and improve the usability of precisionFDA in the coming months and years by placing the code for the precisionFDA portal on the world’s largest open source software repository, GitHub”.

 

NCBI Webinar: “Accessing 1000 Genomes Project Data”

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015

Adapted from the NLM Tech Bull. 2015 Nov-Dec;(407):b9.

To automatically receive the latest news and announcements regarding major changes and updates to NCBI resources and tools please see the subscribe page.

NCBI Webinar: “Accessing 1000 Genomes Project Data” on December 17, 2015

December 17, 2015, NCBI staff will demonstrate how to access 1000 Genomes data through SRA, dbVar, SNP and BioProject, as well as through tracks on annotated human sequences in the graphical sequence viewer and Variation Viewer. Attendees will also learn how to display, search, and download individual and genotype level data through the dedicated 1000 Genomes Browser that allows searching by chromosomal position, gene names and other genome markers.

Date and Time: December 17, 2015 11:00a.m. – 12:00p.m. MT; 12:00p.m.-1:00p.m. CST
Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5168155820927556866

After the live presentation, the Webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page; you can also find information about future Webinars on this page.

Instructional Design for Medical Librarians webinar

Monday, December 7th, 2015

Our staff attended the Medical Library Association‘s recent webinar, entitled “Instructional Design for Medical Librarians.” Max Anderson, instructional designer at University of Illinois–Chicago (UIC) presented on instructional design principles, technologies, resources and tools.

A graduate of the University of North Texas’ Master of Science in Learning Technologies, Anderson gave a background of learning theories (of which there are hundreds) including the most popular, the ADDIE model. He also discussed Richard Mayer‘s instructional design principles. Anderson described his experiences working with his faculty at UIC and the opportunities and challenges that presented.

Several resources for lecture capture were highlighted such as: Explain Everything (Anderson’s favorite), ShowMe, both mobile apps; and for laptop/desktop: Reflector, Camtasia, and Captivate.

Be sure to watch MLA’s continuing education page for its upcoming webinar offerings! Typically, local health science libraries serve as host for these valuable continuing education opportunities.

Introducing iOS Educational Apps for Students from the National Library of Medicine

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

The National Library of Medicine‘s (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services is pleased to announce the launch of three interactive, educational iOS (iPhone, iPad) apps for middle/high school students studying biology, chemistry and environmental health.

  • Bohr Thru: This Candy Crush style game requires users to collect and organize protons, neutrons and electrons in order to form the Bohr Model first 18 elements on the periodic table, such as Carbon, Nitrogen and Lithium. With the help of the main character, Atom, players become familiar with a variety of chemical elements and their structures. Teachers can easily implement short, in-class game sessions to enhance their students’ understanding of the periodic table as well. Visit the NLM’s ChemIDplus for more information on over 400,000 chemicals. (Install Bohr Thru)

  • Base Chase: Learning the bases of DNA has never been as easy with this fast paced, educational app. Players grab bases of DNA in order to complete unique DNA strands for a variety of animals. DeeNA, the game’s cartoon mascot, assists players in completing each of the required tasks. A helpful video tutorial is accessible once the game is successfully downloaded. This resource goes hand-in-hand with the NLM’s GeneEd website. (Install Base Chase)

  • Run4Green: The importance of environmental conservation is reinforced through this interactive, Mario-style game. Topics, such as greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energies and green product purchases are emphasized throughout game play. Playing as a jolly, green and earth-shaped character, users collect coins and perform environmentally friendly tasks. The game is appropriate for students in grades 5-8. More information linking middle school classroom science to environmental health can be found on the NLM Environmental Health Student Portal. (Install Run4Green)

Visit the NLM K-12 homepage for additional resources and view the NLM’s iTunes page for other great NLM apps!

Run4green app

Run4Green app

Special NHGRI Seminar Series: “A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project’s Launch: Lessons beyond the Base Pairs”

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) was established originally as the National Center for Human Genome Research in 1989 to lead the International Human Genome Project. NHGRI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the nation’s medical research agency (http://www.nih.gov/about/). The Human Genome Project, which had as its primary goal the sequencing of the 3 billion DNA letters that make up the human genetic instruction book, was successfully completed in April 2003. Launched in 2012, the NHGRI History of Genomics Program aims to collect and organize historic materials related to the field of genomics and NHGRI as an organization. Efforts include digitization of relevant assets and database development, generation of oral histories chronicling the experiences of genomics leaders and NHGRI staff, production of scholarly work related to major genomics accomplishments, and expansion of the general knowledge about the history of genomics among the scholarly community and the general public. Efforts include digitization of relevant assets and database development, generation of oral histories chronicling the experiences of genomics leaders and NHGRI staff, production of scholarly work related to major genomics accomplishments, and expansion of the general knowledge about the history of genomics among the scholarly community and the general public.

SPEAKERS:

Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director, National Institutes of Health. Elke Jordan, Ph.D., Former Deputy Director, National Human Genome Research Institute. Mark Guyer, Ph.D., Former Deputy Director, National Human Genome Research Institute. Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., Director, National Human Genome Research Institute. TITLE:  “A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project’s Launch:  Lessons Beyond the Base Pairs” DATE:  Thursday, December 3, 2015 TIME:  2:00-3:00 p.m. EST LOCATION:  National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Building 10, Lipsett Amphitheater SPONSOR:  NHGRI History of Genomics Program 

The NHGRI History of Genomics Program: An Archival and Scholarly Initiative

nih genome project

 “Courtesy: National Human Genome Research Institute”

BD2K Updates from NIH and NSF

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) updates from NIH and NSF

The National Science Foundation recently posted an article on advances in big data and the management of chronic diseases.

The National Institutes of Health has released new Data Science Funding Opportunities: The new NIH Common Fund program Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity has released funding opportunities including one for a bioinformatics center. Applications are due March 18, 2016.

Article of Interest: How to hijack a Journal.

MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to Consumer Health Information

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

MedlinePlus Connect https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/overview.html is a free service of the National Library of Medicine (NLM)https://www.nlm.nih.gov/, National Institutes of Health (NIH)http://www.nih.gov/ , and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov/ that links patient portals, patient health record (PHR) systems, and electronic health record (EHR) systems with IT and health providers which provide relevant, authoritative patient health information from MedlinePlus.gov https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/  at the point of need.

MedlinePlus Connect Quick Facts

Resources and News

More Information

Find out more details about how MedlinePlus Connect works https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/howitworks.html, what codes it accepts, and what it looks like within an electronic health record or patient health portal.