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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

Funding Opportunity for Librarians to attend APHA

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

APHA logo

Librarians with an interest in public health, make this the year you attend the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting.  Stipends funded by The Grace and Harold Sewell Memorial Fund for this purpose will be awarded to at least 10 librarians in 2014.  This year’s APHA meeting will take place in New Orleans, LA from November 15-19, 2014. Its theme is Healthography: How Where You Live Affects Your Health and Well-Being. For more information on the meeting see APHA’s website.

Applications are now being accepted.  The deadline for application is July 24, 2014, 5pm EST.  For the complete Call for Applicants, application forms, and FAQs, go to the Public Health/Health Administration section of the MLA website.

For more information on the 2014 APHA meeting see annual meeting information page.

For more information on the Sewell Fund, see the Sewell Fund website

What is the Value of Attending APHA as a Sewell Stipend recipient?

The mission of the Fund is to increase librarians’ identification with medical and health care professionals.  Stipends have been awarded annually since 2001.  Past participants testify to the value of attending APHA:

“Connecting with my fellow library and information professionals and public health colleagues was energizing…The spirit of true collaboration shone through the programs.”  (Feili Tu)

“Many of the things I learned were not specific, as in tangible facts, more of an understanding of what Public Health is. I learned it covers just about everything…for Public Health you need to be knowledgeable about the issues, the potential impact of legislation, and knowledgeable about the ‘agendas’ of the interested parties…” (Kristin Kroger)

“Overall the conference really helped me to better understand the scope of public health as well as the latest development in the areas of public health that I am most likely to have to deal with as a librarian….It was an incredible learning experience.” (Manju Tanwar)

“The fact that I’m working on a Masters in Public Health was very interesting to her (public health colleague) because she didn’t realize that some librarians also have another graduate degree. I think this helped solidify the idea that librarians could be peers to teaching faculty.” (Amber Burtis)

“As a result of the meeting I gained a deeper understanding of my patrons’ needs”  (Peggy Gross)

“I feel like I now have a cohort of people to whom to turn when I have questions about what I am doing as I move into supporting my institution’s public health program.” (Laure Zeigen)

The committee is looking forward to reading your applications!

Barbara Folb, Chair, Client Relations Committee
folb@pitt.edu

Helena VonVille, Chair-elect, Client Relations Committee
Helena.M.Vonville@uth.tmc.edu

Public Health/ Health Administration Section
Medical Library Association

June is LGBT Pride Month

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

rainbow caduceus

In celebration of LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bixesual, and Transgender) Pride Month, we have put together a list of LGBT health information resources. Often an underserved population, people who identify as LGBT have health needs that are widely varied. The compiled list, although far from comprehensive, covers resources for LGBT individuals from youth to older adult. If you are unfamiliar with LGBT health resources or just want a refresher, start here.

The first of these resources is from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (or SAMHSA). SAMHSA’s LGBT health page includes a wealth of information, including links to resources like “A Practitioner’s Resource Guide: Helping Families to Support Their LGBT Children”, “Top Health Issues for LGBT Populations Information & Resource Kit” as well as links to federal initiatives and resources.

The second of these resources is from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). ACOG has two particularly useful resources for LGBT health; one is a committee opinion piece from the Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women on Health Care for Lesbians and Bisexual Women , and the other is a Transgender Resource Guide from the same committee. Although these pages are not to be “construed as dictating an exclusive course of treatment or procedure”, they offer quality information concerning barriers to health care, routine health visits, as well as mental health considerations and more.

The third resource is the LGBT Community Field Guide from the Joint Commission. The purpose of the LGBT Community Field guide is to advance and improve effective communication, cultural competence, and patient- and family-centered care. This field guide includes sections on how to use the guide, an explanation of terminology, as well as chapters on provision of care and patient/family engagement. Also included are checklists, designed to help practitioners stay in line with Joint Commission standards and mission.

The final resource is the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health page from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The introduction to the page states “The perspectives and needs of LGBT people should be routinely considered in public health efforts to improve the overall health of every person and eliminate health disparities.” This resource features specific health topic pages for gay and bisexual men, youth, lesbians and bisexual women,  and transgender persons. In addition to these health topic pages, the CDC also offers information on health services as well as data and statistics.

For additional links to LGBT health resources, visit the MedlinePlus Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender health topic page.

New NN/LM SCR Class: From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health

Monday, June 9th, 2014

SONY DSC

The NN/LM SCR is pleased to announce a new class:

“From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health”

http://nnlm.gov/training/ebph/

Description

Curious about evidence-based public health (EBPH) but not sure where to start? This class will explain the basics of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and highlight essentials of the EBPH process such as identifying the problem, forming a question, searching the literature, and evaluating the intervention.  The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the world of evidence based public health and to give those already familiar with EBPH useful information that can be applied in their practices.

 

Course Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Define and describe evidence-based public health
  • Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question
  • Locate and search applicable literature and resources (such as PubMed, PubMed Health, The Community Toolbox, and others)
  • Understand the importance of evaluation and locate helpful resources

This class is face-to-face.

This class will be available for 3 and 4 hours of continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association.

Interested in having this free class taught at your library?   Email us: http://nnlm.gov/scr/training/trainreq.html

$300 Million Available to Expand Services at Community Health Centers

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

bigstock_Health_Care_Costs_In_America_1437512

More than $300 Million has been made available to help the nation’s community health centers expand service hours, hire more medical providers, and add oral health, behavioral health, pharmacy, and vision services.

Nearly 1,300 health centers operate more than 9,000 service delivery sites that provide care to over 21 million patients in every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Pacific Basin.  The health center program is administered by HHS’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). These funds will allow health centers to expand services to better serve newly insured patients.

Health center grantees requesting expanded services funds must demonstrate how these funds will be used to expand primary care medical capacity and services to underserved populations in their communities.

For more information on this funding opportunity announcement, please visit
http://www.hrsa.gov/grants/apply/assistance/es/esinstructions.pdf.

To learn more about the Affordable Care Act and Community Health Centers, visit http://bphc.hrsa.gov/about/healthcenterfactsheet.pdf.

To learn more about HRSA’s Community Health Center Program, visit http://bphc.hrsa.gov/about/index.html.

To find a health center in your area, visit http://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov.

Measles Cases Reach 20-year High

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Needle and bottle

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the first five months of 2014 (January 1 – May 23) saw 288 cases of measles in 18 states and a total of 15 outbreaks — the highest number of cases in twenty years. Because the majority of these cases have been “associated with international travel by unvaccinated people”, the CDC’s concern is that those persons intending to travel internationally be sure that their vaccinations are up to date.

Measles is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus and spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. With the rise in cases, it is more important than ever to be familiar with the signs and symptoms. Often, it begins with a fever and soon a cough, runny nose, and red eyes develop. A rash of tiny red spots breaks out beginning at the head and soon spreads to the rest of the body. This disease is incredibly serious for children as it can often lead to a number of other complications, such as pneumonia or encephalitis and in some cases, even death.

Until recently, cases of measles in the United States have not been very common due to vaccination. However, measles is still common in many other countries so it is important to make sure that everyone in your family is vaccinated before travel. In particular, the CDC has issued a travel notice about measles in Philippines.

For more information about measles, vaccinations, and travel visit these pages from the CDC:

Measles Overview

Measles in the Philippines – Travel Notice

CDC Features – Measles Immunization

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Funding Opportunity

Friday, May 30th, 2014

Hmong woman carrying a babySummary

Funding Oppportunity Title: Ethnic Community Self Help Program
Funding Opportunity Number: HHS-2014-ACF-ORR-RE-0816
Program Office: Office of Refugee Resettlement
Funding Type: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Announcement Type: Initial
CFDA: 93.576
Post Date: 04/28/2014
Application Due Date: 06/27/2014

 

Description

The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) invites eligible entities to submit competitive grant applications for funding of the Ethnic Community Self-Help Program to provide services to newly arriving refugees. The objectives of this program are to strengthen organized ethnic communities comprised and representative of refugee populations, and to ensure ongoing support and culturally appropriate services to refugees within five years of their initial resettlement.
The populations targeted for services and benefits in the application must represent refugee groups who have arrived in the U.S. within the last five years.
ORR places a strong emphasis on projects with a two-fold aim: 1) strengthening of the applicant’s organizational capacity 2) provision of SMART services (Specific Measurable, Appropriate, Realistic, and Time-Bound) to refugees. Such services may include both direct and referral services.

For complete posting and link to apply, visit the HHS website

HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects 2014

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

HIV/AIDS Red Ribbon

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce the solicitation of quotations from organizations and libraries to design and conduct projects that will improve access to HIV/AIDS related health information for patients, the affected community, and their caregivers.

Projects must involve one or more of the following information access categories:

  • Information retrieval;
  • Skills development;
  • Resource development; and/or
  • Equipment Acquisition

Emphasis is placed upon the following types of organizations or arrangements for developing these programs:

  • Community-based organizations (CBOs) or patient advocacy groups currently providing HIV/AIDS related serves to the affected community;
  • Public libraries serving communities in the provision of HIV/AIDS-related information and resources;
  • Health departments or other local, municipal, or state agencies working to improve public health;
  • Faith-based organizations currently providing HIV/AIDS-related services; and/or
  • Multi-type consortia of the above-listed organizations that may be in existence or formed specifically for this project.

Awards are offered for up to $40,000.

Quotations are due to NLM on Friday, July 11, 2014.

The solicitation for the 2014 HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects is posted on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site.

Full and Open:
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=72096960b3a499911a1c11cba24f8334&tab=core&_cview=0

Small Businesses can apply to a specific set-aside:
https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=58c7ca4bbb0feb9c38579a930c85cb53&tab=core&_cview=1

Primary Point of Contact:
Elena Leon
Contract Specialist
chaparre@mail.nlm.nih.gov
Phone: 301.435.4394
Fax: 301.402.8169

Secondary Point of Contact :
Robin Hope
Branch Chief, Contracting Officer
Robin.Hope@nih.gov
Phone: 301.496.6546
Fax: 301.402.8169

Please Note: Refer to the Federal Business Opportunities Web site for notices, updates, and modifications to the HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Project 2014 RFQ.

MERS-CoV Spreads to the United States

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Microscopic image of coronavirus

On May 2, 2014 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the first case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (or MERS) in the United States. The virus was found in a man who had traveled from Saudi Arabia to Indiana at the end of April.

MERS-CoV is a viral respiratory illness that first begin infecting humans in Saudi Arabia in 2012. All reported cases since have been linked to 7 different countries, and all have originated within the Arabian Peninsula. The symptoms are similar to that of the flu: fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. MERS is unusually deadly, however; around 30% of the people infected have died. Despite the name, MERS is not the same coronavirus that caused Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003.

The CDC has not yet advised any travel changes and recommends the following to those traveling to the Arabian Peninsula:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, and help young children do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact, such as kissing, sharing cups, or sharing eating utensils, with sick people.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs.

If you develop symptoms of respiratory illness within 14 days of travel, the CDC recommends visiting your healthcare provider. For more information regarding MERS-CoV, coronaviruses, and the recent case in the United States, visit the links under Resources.

Resources:

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

MERS CoV First US Case Announced / Press Release / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Frequently Asked Questions about MERS CoV / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

About Coronaviruses / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

UPDATE 5/13/2014

A second case of MERS-CoV was confirmed on May 12, 2014 in Orlando, Florida. As with the previous case, the patient was a healthcare worker who had recently traveled to Saudi Arabia. In a press conference, CDC Director Dr. Tom Friedan and Dr. Anne Schuchat, Director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, iterated that so far MERS is not considered easily transmissible. The two US cases have occurred in health workers that were in close contact with those already infected with MERS. 

For the complete press conference transcript, visit the CDC’s Media page.

 

2014/2015 Health Information Literacy Award Recipients

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

multicolored hands meeting in the middle

The NN/LM SCR is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2014-2015 Health Information Literacy Awards:

Institution: LSU Health Shreveport – Health Sciences Library
Project Title: Health Literacy with Comics: Using a Comic Book Format to Help Families Prevent Childhood Obesity
Project Director: Talicia Tarver

The project will allow the Louisiana State University Health Shreveport Health Sciences Library to partner with the LSU Department of Pediatrics in creating a  health literacy comic book that addresses the obesity epidemic and is aimed at young readers in the Caddo Parish area.

Institution: OU-Tulsa Schusterman Library
Project Title: Social Work Students and Health Literacy Interventions in a Clinic Library
Project Director: Toni Hoberecht

The project will provide health literacy outreach to patients and their families in the Schusterman Center Clinic through health literacy interventions provided by a graduate assistant from the University of Oklahoma Anne & Henry Zarrow School of Social Work. Clinic patients and students will also become familiar will the Morningcrest Health Library as a source of consumer health information.

Congratulations to Toni and Talicia and their libraries!

More information on all NN/LM SCR Funded Projects are available at our Previously Funded Projects website.

Disaster Health Information Outreach Funding Opportunity Available from NLM

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Hand holding money on laptop screen

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) announces a funding opportunity for small projects to improve access to disaster medicine and public health information for health care professionals, first responders and others that play a role in health-related disaster preparedness, response and recovery.

NLM is soliciting proposals from partnerships in the U.S. that include at least one library and at least one organization that has disaster-related responsibilities, such as health departments, public safety departments, emergency management departments, pre-hospital and emergency medical services, fire/rescue, or other local, regional, or state agencies with disaster health responsibilities; hospitals; faith-based and voluntary organizations active in disaster; and others.

NLM encourages submission of innovative proposals that enhance mutually beneficial collaboration among libraries and disaster-related agencies. For example, projects may increase awareness of health information resources, demonstrate how libraries and librarians can assist planners and responders with disaster-related information needs, show ways in which disaster workers can educate librarians about disaster management, and/or include collaboration among partners in developing information resources that support planning and response to public health emergencies.

Contract awards will be offered for a minimum of $15,000 to a maximum of $30,000 each for a one-year project.

The deadline for proposals is Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 5 pm ET.

For more information and instructions about the “Disaster Health Information Outreach and Collaboration Project 2014”  and summaries of the previous years’ funded projects, visit the NLM Disaster Information Management Resource Center website.