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Archive for the ‘NLM Announcements’ Category

New Version of Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) Available

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) Logo

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has released a new version of Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM)http://chemm.nlm.nih.gov/

New or updated content in CHEMM includes:

1) updated and enhanced content on Decontamination Procedures, Discovering the Event, and Training and Education

2) an NIH CounterACT program funded database with information on twenty-two medical countermeasures (including efficacy, relevant publications, research in progress, FDA and other global regulatory status information)

3) content for how emergency responders can recognize and handle events dealing with toxic gases generated by the combinations of consumer products or common household chemicals

4) a workshop report describing toxic chemical syndromes, or toxidromes, that lays the foundation for a consistent lexicon for use in CHEMM and for other uses that, if adopted widely, will improve response to chemical mass exposure incidents

5) a toxidromes outreach plan whose goal is to raise widespread awareness and encourage use of the toxidromes throughout the stakeholder community, and

6) an evaluation and validation plan for CHEMM’s Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST) that, once completed, will move CHEMM-IST from its current state as a prototype to a product ready for use in an operational response environment.

CHEMM is a Web-based resource that can be downloaded in advance to Windows and Mac computers to ensure availability during an event if the Internet is not accessible.

CHEMM’s content is also integrated into the NLM Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER), which is Web-based and downloadable to Windows computers.  CHEMM’s content is also available in WISER’s iOS and Android apps. The new CHEMM content will be incorporated into the next release of WISER. http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/index.html

For more information see the “What’s New on CHEMM?” section of CHEMM.

NN/LM SCR Update Recording Now Available

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

Did you miss the November 5 NN/LM SCR Update?   Listen to the recording and find out more about:

  • NLM’s responsive design-based databases
  • The redesign of DailyMed
  • New features of DOCLINE 5.0
  • NN/LM SCR staff updates
  • New classes
  • Available funding opportunities

Have any questions after the webinar?  Contact Michelle Malizia.

NIH Director’s Statement on Dr. Lindberg’s Retirement

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Dr. Donald Lindberg

From: Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director, National Institutes of Health:

It is my honor to recognize and congratulate one of the longest-serving leaders at NIH and a pioneer in applying computer and communications technology to biomedical research, health care, and the delivery of health information wherever it is needed.  Don Lindberg, M.D., who has been the director of the National Library of Medicine for more than 30 years, has informed me that he plans to retire at the end of March 2015.  I want to thank Don for his outstanding service to NIH, to the global biomedical research community, and to health professionals, patients, and the public.  Trained as a pathologist, Don re-invented himself as an expert and groundbreaking innovator in the world of information technology, artificial intelligence, computer-aided medical diagnosis, and electronic health records.  As the first President of the American Medical Informatics Association, many consider Don the country’s senior statesman for medicine and computers.

Don has created programs that changed fundamentally the way biomedical information is collected, shared, and analyzed.  Think about it—when Don began, NLM had no electronic journals in its collection, few people owned personal computers, and even fewer had access to the Internet.  He introduced numerous landmark projects such as free Internet access to MEDLINE via PubMed, MedlinePlus for the general public, the Visible Human Project, ClinicalTrials.gov, the Unified Medical Language System, and more.  Don also created the National Center for Biomedical Information (NCBI).  NCBI has been a focal point for “Big Data” in biomedicine for decades, providing rapid access to the data generated by the Human Genome Project and now to massive amounts of genetic sequence data generated from evolving high-throughput sequencing technologies.  GenBank, PubMed Central, and dbGaP are just some of the many NCBI databases that support and enable access to the results of research funded by NIH and many other organizations.

Betsy Humphrey and Donald Lindberg

While serving as NLM’s director, Don was drafted to lead important interagency programs.  He was the founding Director of the National Coordination Office for High Performance Computing and Communications in the President’s Office of Science and Technology Policy and was named by the HHS Secretary to be the U.S. National Coordinator for the G-7 Global Healthcare Applications Project.  He has always been ahead of the curve in taking advantage of new developments in computing and networking, ensuring that the NLM computer center has the reliability, security, and high speed connections necessary to keep pace with rapidly rising demands.

Don has been equally concerned with delivering high quality health information to everyone, including health professionals and the public in disadvantaged rural areas and inner cities.  He established NLM’s important outreach initiatives, expanding the scope of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and entering into longstanding and successful partnerships with minority serving institutions, tribal and community-based organizations, and the public health community.  Don is not a self-promoter, so sometimes these trailblazing efforts seem to appear magically.  Those of us who know better, however, understand they came about because of Don’s tireless energy, scientific acumen, and unwavering focus and determination.  We will miss Don as a preeminent leader at NIH, who brought NLM into the modern age of biomedical information.  We also, however, will continue to benefit from his wisdom, drive, and accomplishments.  Please join me in congratulating Don on a job extraordinarily well done and wishing him the best in his future pursuits.

Update on Important Resource: RHIN Becomes HealthReach

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

HealthReach logoThe Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) was a national collaborative partnership whose principal focus was to create and make available a database of quality multilingual/multicultural, public health resources to professionals providing care to resettled refugees and asylees.

Earlier this month, the National Library of Medicine (Specialized Information Services Division) broadened the scope of RHIN by rebranding it HealthReach. This was done to better meet the needs of the diverse non-English and English as a second language speaking audiences. HealthReach continues to recognize the importance of providing refugee and asylee specific information while expanding the information provided to meet the needs of most immigrant populations.

Currently, there is not a great deal of change between the “old” RHIN and the “new” HealthReach; over the next several months new resources will be added.  This was intentional in order to help provide continuity of service throughout the transition.  Please use the new Twitter handle @NLM_HealthReach and the new URL http://healthreach.nlm.nih.gov .  Over the next several months the site will transition from the .org to the .gov site. Feedback is welcome through the “Contact Us” link on the website.

New MedlinePlus Mobile Sites in English and Spanish

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

M+ capture

Yesterday, MedlinePlus released new versions of the MedlinePlus Mobile sites in English and Spanish. The mobile site URLs are http://m.medlineplus.gov and http://m.medlineplus.gov/espanol

Like the original versions of the mobile sites, the redesigned sites are optimized for mobile phones and tablets. Unlike the original mobile sites that contained only a subset of the information available on MedlinePlus, the new sites have all of the content found on MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español. They also have an improved design for easier use on mobile devices.

The key features of the redesigned mobile sites are:
• Access to all the content available on MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español
• Improved navigation using “Menu” and “Search” menus to access search and major areas of the sites
• Enhanced page navigation with the ability to open and close sections within pages
• Updated look and feel with a refreshed design

This new version of MedlinePlus Mobile is the first step in redesigning MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español to behave responsively. Responsively designed Web sites automatically change their layouts to fit the screen of the device on which they are viewed, whether that is a desktop monitor or a mobile touchscreen.

In 2015, the MedlinePlus team will release a fully responsive version of MedlinePlus to provide a consistent user experience from the desktop, tablet, or phone. This will remove the need for a separate mobile site. Users will then have one destination for MedlinePlus (www.medlineplus.gov) when using any device.

Until then, try out this first offering of MedlinePlus’s responsive design on your smartphone at http://m.medlineplus.gov and http://m.medlineplus.gov/espanol. Send us your feedback and comments about the new site via the Contact Us link that appears on every page.

Input Embargo Periods In DOCLINE

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

Frustrated by the number of requests your library gets for articles that are embargoed? Now you can enter journal embargo periods in DOCLINE. Here is more information about the DOCLINE 5.0 Release http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/so14/so14_docline_release.html

Screen Capture of DOCLINE embargo period

NCBI Bioinformatics Course Applications Accepted

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

NCBI logo

From the NLM Technical Bulletin:

Health science librarians in the United States are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC).

The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution.

Online Pre-Course and In-Person Course Components
There are two parts to “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” listed below. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

  1. “Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching” an online (asynchronous) course, January 12-February 13, 2015
  2. A five-day in-person course offered onsite at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda MD, March 9-13, 2015

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.
  • Applicants will be accepted both from libraries currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services.

Enrollment is limited 25 participants.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for the classes. Travel and lodging costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant.

Important Application Dates

  • Application deadline: November 17, 2014
  • Acceptance notification: On or about December 15, 2014

More information on the course and the application form are located on the NLM Technical Bulletin.

NN/LM Ends Support for Internet Explorer 8

Tuesday, September 16th, 2014

Internet Explorer 10 logoDue to recent software updates on National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) websites at nnlm.gov,  Internet Explorer 8 (IE8) is no longer supported. Some read-only sections of nnlm.gov will continue to be available via IE8. However, anyone using IE8 will probably not be able to submit assignments in online courses utilizing the NN/LM Moodle framework, and may not even be able to access and log into Moodle courses. Other nnlm.gov services that require data to be posted to the server are also likely to fail. In addition, DOCLINE will not support IE8 after the end of 2014.

Please visit the NN/LM System Requirements page to see a complete list of supported browsers. For best usability, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) recommends that libraries begin talking to their local IT departments about upgrading their browsers to at least Internet Explorer 10.

Starting January 12, 2016, Microsoft will drop support, including security updates, for older Internet Explorer browser versions. Only the most recent version of IE for a supported operating system will receive technical support and security updates. Microsoft’s Stay up-to-date with Internet Explorer blog page provides a good explanation of why IE users should upgrade to the most current version.

NLM activates the Emergency Access Initiative

Friday, August 15th, 2014

National Library of Medicine Logo

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) has been activated to support healthcare professionals working on the Ebola public health emergency in West Africa.

The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from over 650 biomedical journals and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users. It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster. EAI is not an open access collection. It is only intended for those affected by the disaster or assisting the affected population. If you know of a library or organization involved in healthcare efforts in response to the Ebola outbreak, please let them know of this service. EAI was activated four times in the past, including following the earthquake and subsequent cholera epidemic in Haiti, flooding in Pakistan and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

The free access period is from August 12, 2014 – September 11, 2014

For more information on the Ebola virus visit MedlinePlus.

For updates on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

NLM System Shutdown August 13

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

Update: August 14: 9:30AM all NLM systems were restored.

 

Beginning at 6:00PM, ET, Wednesday, August 13, 2014, the National Library of Medicine will begin a systems shutdown to allow for the emergency repair of the chilled water supply to the NLM Data Center. These systems may be restored as early as 8:00 AM ET Thursday, August 14, 2014, but possibly as late as 11:00 AM.

Most of the databases and systems on the NLM network are expected to be impacted.

Please check the NLM website for updates.