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Archive for the ‘Network Member Spotlight’ Category

Project Spotlight: Environmental Health Student Portal

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Guest author: David Duggar, MLIS, Reference Librarian and Will Olmstadt, MSLS, MPH, Associate Director, LSU Health Shreveport, Health Sciences Library

David Duggar Presents at a ConferenceIn 2011 the National Library of Medicine debuted the  The Environmental Health Student Portal.

In May 2012 the LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport Library (LSUHSC-S) received an Express Outreach Award to promote the Environmental Health Student Portal (EHSP) through the Caddo Parish public school science teachers and librarians. Caddo Parish had 23 public schools covering 7th grade life science, high school biology, or environmental science. Working with the District Science Supervisors and the Supervisor of Libraries for Caddo Parish Schools, 22 science teachers and librarians from 15 middle and high schools received in-service training during the June 18-19 Explore the Common Core Mini-Conference. The new portal’s purpose was displayed on the homepage, Connecting Middle School Students to Environmental Health Information, and the site defined environmental health as the interrelationship between human health and the environment, either natural or manmade. The online reliable environmental health information resources and career information would assist in meeting the new common core objectives coming to Louisiana.

Attendees were encouraged to work as a team (teacher and librarian together) to create a classroom program that would use the EHSP, and submit it for a one-hour share-a-thon presentation at the November 2012 Joint Louisiana Science Teachers Association – Louisiana Association of Teachers of Mathematics (LSTA-LATM) Conference. Registration for teachers was paid for the meeting and presenters would have a chance to receive an iPad for their classroom or library. One school participated in the team classroom project for the fall conference and another school requested to conduct the team classroom project in the spring semester.

David and Charles at an exhibit booth

The LSUHSC-S librarians exhibited the EHSP over 15.5 hours at the November 12-14 Joint LSTA-LATM Conference talking to educators from a minimum of 14 parishes in Louisiana. The one-hour presentation on the EHSP was given on the 14th.

A surprise outcome from exhibiting was the request from the members of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries to come to the February 22-23, 2013 Louisiana Environmental Education Symposium in Baton Rouge to present and exhibit on the portal, specifically mentioning ToxTown.  The LSUHSC-S Librarians exhibited the EHSP over 8 hours during the two days and talked to environmental health and science educators from a minimum of 12 parishes. On the 23rd a one hour presentation was given incorporating all of the information and materials from the share-a-thon presentation.

The last planned method of promoting the Environmental Health Student Portal was the creation of metric rulers at the request of the District Science Supervisors inscribed with the name and URL of the portal. These were given to educators for use in their classrooms at all of these activities during the 2012-2013 year.

LSUHSC-S Librarians have been asked to continue to exhibit at future LSTA Conferences and Environmental Education Symposia.

Project Spotlight: School Nurses

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

Guest author: April Schweikhard, MLIS, Reference and Instructional Services Librarian, University of Oklahoma-Tulsa, Schusterman Library

School Nurse with Student

The school nurse — I, myself, have fond memories of my childhood school nurses who conducted our health screenings and oversaw our health from elementary school through high school. I must admit that I was more than once guilty of faking ailments in order to escape class to visit the school nurse. But beyond our memories, what do we, as library professionals, know about school nurses? What are their needs and how might we be able to support them through health information outreach? Within the information sciences literature, very little is documented pertaining to school nurses and their information needs; however, two projects awarded through the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region (NN/LM SCR) are attempting to fill this gap.

In 2012, the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa Schusterman Library received the NN/LM SCR Health Information Needs Assessment Award, School Health Connection: A Health Information Needs Assessment of School Nurses in Tulsa County. As the goal of the project, the library hoped to attain an understanding of the information needs and behaviors of public school nurses in Tulsa County in order to later design and implement targeted information outreach services specific to this population. The project consisted of an electronic survey to assess the types of information frequently sought, sources currently used, and perceptions regarding their ability and need. The survey was followed by a small focus group session. Of the approximate eighty-seven public school nurses in Tulsa County, fifty-eight completed the survey and five participated in the focus group session.

Since completing the information needs assessment award project, the library received an Express Outreach Award to further work with the Tulsa County school nurses. The projects outlined in this award are directly related to the findings from the information needs assessment. One of these projects consists of 2- to 3-hour workshops attended by school nurses employed in the five largest Tulsa County public school districts. These nurses comprise approximately 80% of the school nurse sample. The section topics of the workshop, the resources included, and even the activities conducted have all been directed by data and information collected in the survey or focus group session. To date, the library has conducted three of the five sessions, and the final two are scheduled for early 2014.

Probably the most important lesson that I have learned from these two projects is the value of knowing your service group and their specific needs. By immersing myself in the world of the school nurse, I have an understanding of the challenges she faces and how to best provide information service to combat these challenges. And, as I begin each training session with the school nurses, I sense that they recognize and appreciate this fact.

Project Spotlight: CTSA Community Engagement Award

Monday, October 28th, 2013

Guest Author: Pegeen A. Seger, Head of Outreach Services, UT Health Science Center San Antonio Libraries

In August of 2012, in partnership with the South Central and the Lower Rio Grande Valley Area Health Education Centers (AHECs), the University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries was granted a CTSA Community Engagement Pilot Project Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region (NN/LM SCR). The project was intended to allow librarians to participate in brainstorming about how librarians can take a more active role at CTSA Institutions particularly in the area of community engagement.

The proposed project had two components: 1) to host two Asset-Based Community Development workshops at UT Health Science Center Libraries in San Antonio and Harlingen in order to support community engagement efforts in these areas and in the other CTSA funded areas within the NN/LM SCR region by training CTSA librarians and others in the concepts of Asset-Based Community Development and 2) to host a strategic planning session for CTSA librarians in the NN/LM SCR region with the goal of developing a strategic plan to promote librarian interactions with their CTSA Key Function Groups, especially the Community Engagement Key Function Groups.

Workshop attendees sit at a table and create a map

On February 21, 2013, the UT Health Center Science Center Libraries hosted an Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) Workshop as part of the pilot project. Attendees of the workshop learned how to build community connections and partnerships in support of medical research, education and practice in order to impact community health. Participants included CTSA librarians, researchers and administrators, public health workers, area health professionals, public and academic librarians, community health workers, and AHEC Translational Advisory Boards (TABS).

Librarians sit at tables and discuss topoics

On the following day, a Strategic Planning Workshop was held for librarians and other personnel from CTSA institutions to brainstorm about how librarians can be actively involved with CTSA key functions, CTSA administration, grant applications, research output and impact tracking, community engagement, and other CTSA initiatives.

Out of the strategic planning session came a roadmap for librarian contributions and engagement with the work of the CTSAs. A report based on the strategic planning session was prepared and distributed to the librarians who attended the planning workshop; library directors at CTSA funded institutions in the NN/LM SCR, and to CTSA administrators.

 

Project Spotlight: Vaccines, Epidemics and Ethics

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Guest author: Kate Krause, Digital Projects and Institutional Repository Coordinator, Texas Medical Center Library, Houston, Texas

Medical Ethics Series Banner

The Texas Medical Center Library received the Regional Symposium Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region (NN/LM SCR) in 2012 to expand our annual Medical Ethics lecture series.

The Regional Symposium Award enabled us to expand from one lecture in one auditorium to a year-long series of six lectures at four venues. The series was on Vaccines, Epidemics, and Ethics, a very pertinent topic in Texas right now with many new research programs and faculty. The award allowed us to attract national speakers, host an archival exhibit, and advertise the events. We also were able to promote a fun interactive quiz for students to learn how to use National Library of Medicine (NLM) databases.

Rear Admiral Anne Schuchat, M.D.One of the speakers was Rear Admiral Anne Schuchat, M.D. Acting director of the CDC’s Center for Global Health. National Center for Immunization and Diseases.  Actress Kate Winslet’s Oscar-winning character in the film Contagion is modeled after Schuchat.

We learned a lot during the course of the year. Our main take-aways were:

  • It’s difficult to plan a year-long event. Airfare and other prices change, lecturers change jobs and locations and have to cancel, media contacts change, other campus events are scheduled that compete with our events.
  • One of our speakers changed jobs and cancelled at the last moment. We had to scramble to find a replacement speaker for him and change all our advertisements. From now on we will create lists of B-list speakers and other back-up plans.
  • Because a speaker cancelled, we had to recalculate our costs and submit a revised budget to the NN/LM SCR. Luckily this happened only half-way through the award period and we had plenty of time to develop new plans. The NN/LM SCR was very understanding and helpful.
  • Speakers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are free! They pay their own way and are not allowed to accept honoraria. They are also very good speakers with interesting stories to tell. We will definitely be inviting them again in the future.
  • Emailing students directly and reaching out to faculty and research groups involved in our topic really bolstered attendance. These advertising approaches were much more worthwhile than the money we spent on traditional advertisements in newsletters and other media.
  • As expected, location played a very large part in attendance. For example, when we did a presentation on the south side of campus most of our audience came from institutions nearby on the south side.

We very much appreciate the opportunity the NN/LM SCR gave us to expand our lecture series and learn how to give better ones in the future.

Project Spotlight: Preserving Pasteur

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Guest Authors: Robert O. Marlin, IV, Archivist, Truman G. Blocker Jr. History of Medicine Collections and Mira Green, Head of Technical Services, Moody Medical Library, UTMB

Drawing of Pasteur with rabbits

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region’s Digital Preservation and Access (DiPA) Award enabled the Truman G. Blocker Jr. History of Medicine Collections (Blocker Collections) at the Moody Medical Library at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, TX to create a digital repository containing materials from the personal library of Louis Pasteur (1822-1895). The goal of this project was to increase the awareness and accessibility to the thoughts of one of the world’s most celebrated scientists through the digitization and translation of unique materials such as original letters, manuscripts, and a number of rare offprints of articles originally published in French medical and scientific journals.

The material covers a variety of topics: a description of the process for the “pasteurization” of wine; a plea to the French government for the reimbursement of 2000 francs for research paid for personally by Pasteur; and a request for funding to build a new bio-chemistry laboratory at the École Normale. The remaining items are: rare offprints that were prepared in editions of fewer than 100 copies, one of which covers his early work on crystals; and a five-page lecture given by Pasteur in 1850 in which he presented his research results on molecular dissymmetry.

The Louis Pasteur Collection has been added to the Blocker Collections website, and contains original handwritten letters and their translations that are accessible as viewable and downloadable PDF files. This site also displays additional documents including journal articles that date from 1861-1889. Included are two items written by Pasteur, Theories Des Germes, 1878 and La Maladie Des Vers A Soie, 1867. Also available on this page is a brief biography of Louis Pasteur with his portrait and additional links to original papers written in French. This information can be found using the navigational menu button for digital collections.

Images of items from an exhibit

In an effort to assist those interested in the life of Pasteur, considerable time was dedicated to compiling the Pasteur Bibliography of secondary resources. Only high-quality material covering all age groups was considered. Several works in the bibliography were also annotated including Patrice Debré’s monograph written for the 100 year anniversary of Pasteur’s death that offered the reader a helpful chronology and focused on Pasteur’s discoveries and the controversies surrounding his work.

The DiPA award enabled us to create a major exhibit utilizing as many original source documents from the Collection as possible. For the creation of the exhibit, accessibility, target audience, informative content, and aesthetics were of paramount importance. The overall concept for design and structure began with months of research transpiring into a timeline of influential events derived from the life and legacy of Pasteur. The timeline, as the design approach, allowed for the creation of various sized pieces containing unified graphical elements, imagery and descriptions, and informative content pertaining to each titled display panel measuring 36”x 36” in size.

Metadata was created for the collection by researching the individual(s) mentioned in the letters. Name authorities were researched and added accordingly. Subject headings were chosen from both the Library of Congress and MeSH headings.

The Pasteur Collection metadata and items were also added to our institutional repository in the Texas Digital Library in early April 2013. The permanent URL for the collection is https://repositories.tdl.org/utmb-ir/handle/2152.3/491. The Texas Digital Library is indexed in Google as well as Google Scholar and the collection is already showing up in the results list when a search for Louis Pasteur is initiated. The collection statistics show that the highest number of views has been from the United States; however, Turkey, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, UK, Canada, Switzerland and Mexico show usage as well.

The ContentDM institutional repository was created and customized. The URL for the UTMB repository is http://utmb.contentdm.oclc.org/. Metadata and files were the same as the submission to the Texas Digital Library institutional repository.

Scholars across a variety of disciplines, including general history, may request the materials for publications, scholarly papers, presentations, and exhibits.

Professional Development Award: The Evolving Librarian

Friday, September 27th, 2013

Guest Author: Lisa Huang, Central Park Campus Library, Collin College, McKinney, TX

Logo for Krafty Librarian Blog showing a purse and computer coming out of a large purse

I am grateful to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region (NN/LM SCR) for providing the Professional Development Award, which enabled me to attend the all day workshop “The Evolving Librarian:  Responding to Changes in the Workplace and Healthcare” held at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Library, in Tulsa, OK on April 18, 2013.   The workshop was taught by one of the leaders in medical librarianship, Michelle Kraft, senior medical librarian at the Cleveland Clinic and current candidate for MLA President-elect.  Kraft is also renowned for her Krafty Librarian blog http://kraftylibrarian.com/.

Kraft discussed current and emerging forces shaping the healthcare landscape such as the Affordable Care Act (ACA), electronic health record (EHR), local community benefit, new tax laws, numerous technological changes and evolving expectations of administrators and library clients.  The Great Recession has accelerated these issues as hospitals are being funded differently now.  Non-profit hospitals must turn a profit to stay afloat due to increasing technological costs of the EHR implementation.  Kraft’s lecture was immensely informative and explained why the local hospitals have accelerated their community engagement efforts to maintain their tax exemption.

I was struck by the similarities of funding between Collin College, a community college district, and hospitals.  Collin is no longer being funded by student enrollment numbers; funding is dependent on graduation, completion, and retention rates of students.  For hospitals, funding is dependent on patient satisfaction and success rate of providing health care services instead of the number of services performed or provided to patients.  Compounding these changes is the shrinking number of personnel as institutions have their reduced staffing.  Kraft encouraged the attendees to re-evaluate traditional time honored activities such as cataloging books for hospital libraries with a small print collection.  Libraries must evolve with society and its nomadic client expectations of on demand services and resources.

An issue addressed repeatedly at the workshop is that librarians need to demonstrate value to their home administration because libraries are expensive or as someone calls them, a “black hole.”  Administrators are not sure about the value of libraries because they do not bring in money; librarians need to change the perception of the library as an asset.  Amid fiscally challenging times, the notion of libraries as time honored institutions is antiquated; libraries are up for staff reduction or closure.  Kraft argued that librarians need to re-align library operations and goals with the administration’s goals, regardless if you work for a hospital, academic health sciences center, or a community college.  Libraries need to conduct qualitative research that measures their return on investment and the impact of all their services such as literature reviews, library instruction; or, the value of their books to the clients. ROI calculators and library narratives should be common knowledge for librarians. Librarians tend to shy away from research or simply don’t have the time to conduct research, but they need to conduct mini-research projects to demonstrate value and track impact.  Possible projects include literature searches that lead to improved patient care or decreased length of stay.

Other takeaways from the workshop:

  • The need to be aware of healthcare legislation changes from the local to national level.
  • Staying abreast of new roles for librarians such as data management, emerging roles with the EHR, patient education, and embedded librarianship. The profession is evolving and new identities of librarians are being written.
  • Be flexible as change is constant and inevitable.
  • Understanding when technology is disruptive or you’ve allowed it to be disruptive in your library?

I appreciated the opportunity to attend this workshop and much appreciation goes to Stewart Brower and the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Library staff for their gracious hospitality.

Award Funding Provides First Hand Look at mHealth Summit

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

Guest Author: Maureen “Molly Knapp, Research Support & Education Librarian at Tulane University Rudolph Matas Library of the Health Sciences

mHealth Summit Logo

In December 2012 I had the opportunity to attend the mHealth Summit in Washington, DC, thanks to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region’s (NN/LM SCR’s) Professional Development Award. The mHealth Summit is an annual event sponsored by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS), with strategic support from mHIMSS (a division of HIMSS interested in mobile tech), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the mHealth Alliance (an international group with a global focus on the use of mobile devices in health care).

So what is mHealth, you wonder? According to the mHealth Alliance FAQ page:

Mobile Health, or mHealth, can be defined as medical and public health practice supported by mobile devices, such as mobile phones, patient monitoring devices, tablets, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and other wireless devices.

Some uses of mHealth include:
• Education and Awareness – Messaging in support of public health and behavioral change campaigns
• Diagnostic and Treatment Support – Mobile phone as point-of-care device
• Disease and Epidemic Outbreak Tracking – Sending and receiving data on disease incidence, outbreaks and public health emergencies
• Supply Chain Management – Using mobile solution to improve stock-outs and combat counterfeiting
• Remote Data Collection – Collecting real-time patient data with mobile applications
• Remote Monitoring – Maintaining care giver appointments or ensuring medication regime adherence
• Healthcare Worker Communication and Training – Connecting health workers with sources of information

Rest assured, all of these topics and more were addressed at the 2012 mHealth Summit. One of the more provocative keynote sessions I attended was Vinod Khosla’s “Can we have Health and Healthcare without Doctors?” Khosla is a venture capitalist and co-founder of Sun Microsystems. His answer – yes – is detailed in the article “Technology will replace 80% of what doctors do“.

Another interesting panel discussion addressed patient advocacy, featuring Donna Cryer, president & CEO of the American Liver Foundation (@DCpatient) & and Mary Anne Sterling (@SterlingHIT), a health IT consultant and family caregiver. (On a side note, there is a growing role for librarians in patient advocacy, as future MLA programming may soon reveal.)

ZombiePox Game Logo

My favorite, final ‘find’ of the summit was in the Gaming Pavilion in the exhibit hall. There I discovered Tiltfactor Games, specifically a game called ZombiePox, which explores group immunity and the need to vaccinate…WITH ZOMBIES. Tiltfactor was demoing an iPad version of the game, which is unavailable at this time. (Perhaps it was too infected?) With gamification a growing trend in libraries, awareness of companies providing educational, health related games is definitely relevant for collection development. (Also: zombies.)

Overall, the mHealth Summit was heavier on entrepreneurship and investment opportunities and lighter on science. I attended several contributed paper sessions that were hit and miss. Honestly, I don’t know that many librarians would find this type of summit useful to their everyday practice, as it was geared more towards bringing together business and industry. However, for those interested in trends in mobile health technologies and its application to public health and health care, or those who have a really cool app or website in need of a wealthy investor, the mHealth Summit is definitely your scene.

Librarians at LSU Health Shreveport Win MLA Research Award

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Guest Author: Donna Timm, Head of Education & Outreach, LSU Health Shreveport Medical Library

Deidra Woodson, Metadata & Digitization Librarian; Dee Jones, Head of Cataloging; and Donna Timm, Head of Education & Outreach, were awarded first place for best research poster at the 2013 Medical Library Association (MLA) Annual Meeting. Their poster, “Playing Online Interactive Games for Health Education: Evaluating Their Effectiveness,” describes their research on health-related online games for children. The poster was selected for the award by MLA’s Research Section from among 162 research posters.

Out of the 46 games evaluated for this project, the 22 that met the evaluation criteria were added to the “For Kids” section of healthelinks, which is LSU Health Shreveport’s consumer health Web site. The games are organized into the following three categories — “Nutrition,” “Exercise,” and “Germs” – and are ready to be played and enjoyed! Also included in the Games section is a link to a page for parents, explaining how these games were selected and evaluated.

The healthelinks was originally created under the auspices of a subcontract award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region (NN/LM SCR). LSU Health Shreveport librarians regularly update the site and feature a variety of resources to support outreach projects funded by the NN/LM SCR.

HealtheLinks for Kids Banner

Three Librarians from Region Visit Lister Hill Center

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Group of people poses around table at Lister Hill Center

Recently three librarians from the South Central Region were invited to Bethesda, Maryland for an inside look at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), Lister Hill Center for Biomedical Communications. Through the support of the South Central Academic Medical Libraries (SCAMeL) Consortia and their libraries, John Goodell, Reference and Outreach Librarian at the University of Arkansas for Health Sciences Library, Mark Hopkins, Library Technology Manager at University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Robert M. Bird Library, and Jason Bengtson, Emerging Technologies/R&D Librarian at the University of New Mexico Health Science Library and Informatics Center were able to travel to Maryland for an informative tour and learning session at the NLM. Provided below they have shared a few of the take-away points from their experience.

The group spent two days interacting with the team responsible for the development of an impressive new literature based discovery tool. Semantic MEDLINE is a visual literature based discovery tool used for identifying previously unrecognized relationships in the biomedical literature. It provides a new approach for hypothesis generation and creativity enhancement.

The group not only discussed how Semantic MEDLINE functions as a product or works with the literature, but how librarians can become more active and use Semantic MEDLINE to support users in new ways that will enhance their research capacity, making librarians even more integral in the research process. The group found this to be an extremely rewarding and positive experience and left feeling energized, having set in motion a good relationship that will allow them to continue working closely with NLM so that their libraries and the Region can be leaders as these new products become available to everyone.

Text provided by: Jon Goodell, Jason Bengtson, and Mark Hopkins
Photo by: Mark Hopkins

The Health Effects of Fracking

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Photo of natural gas frac wells

By Steve Beleu, Director, U.S. Government Information Division, Oklahoma Department of Libraries

The immense growth in our nation of enhanced natural gas and oil recovery via the process popularly known as “fracking,” and more precisely known as “Hydraulic Fracturing,” has created an economic boom. “Shale oil” and “shale gas” is trapped within shale formations; injecting combinations of water, sand, and chemicals at high pressure causes the shale to crack which then releases the gas or oil. But mismanaged fracking can also release hazardous chemicals into drinking water and air, and also cause small earthquakes. Here are some links to information about fracking in general and its potential adverse health effects.

Basic information about hydraulic fracturing for natural gas and oil.
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Website updated on May 9, 2012.
http://water.epa.gov/type/groundwater/uic/class2/hydraulicfracturing/wells_hydrowhat.cfm

Basic information about shale gas. It includes a chart that shows the current and projected future growth of shale gas production from about 2005 through 2040. EIA estimates that there will be a 44% increase in fracking.
Source: U.S. Energy Information Agency. Website updated on December 5, 2012.
http://www.eia.gov/energy_in_brief/article/about_shale_gas.cfm?src=email

Map of “Lower 48” State Shale “plays” (a “play” is the name for a formation that contains trapped natural gas).
Source: U.S. Energy Information Agency. May 9, 2011.
http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/rpd/shale_gas.pdf

Report about fracking and the risks to public health of fracking. Recommended for its technical explanations of fracking. September 5, 2012.
Source: U.S. General Accountability Office.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-732

Report about the regulations of federal government and six states about the potentially hazardous effects of fracking.
Source: U.S. General Accountability Office. September 5, 2012.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-874

Congressional report from the U.S. House of Representatives about the chemicals in fracking and their potential adverse health effects.
Source: U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce. April 2011.
http://democrats.energycommerce.house.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Hydraulic%20Fracturing%20Report%204.18.11.pdf

Charts and graphs about fracking.
Source: U.S. Energy Information Agency. June 27, 2012.
http://www.eia.gov/pressroom/presentations/staub_06272012.pdf

The EPA project to study the effects on fracking on drinking water; widely reported by national and state media. Their report is due to Congress in 2014, but this is a website about it. Website updated on December 7, 2012/
http://www.epa.gov/hfstudy/

EPA’s web page about the basics of fracking. Website updated on October 2, 2012
http://www.epa.gov/hydraulicfracture/

Selected free, full-text articles about fracking from the National Institute of Health’s PubMed Central (PMC) database. Using the search term “hydraulic fracturing” currently retrieves 89 articles; these are three of them. Basic web address of PubMed Central: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/

—“Methane Contamination of Drinking Water Accompanying Gas-Well Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing”. Published in May 2011.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3100993/

—“The Future of Fracking: New Rules Target Air Emissions for Cleaner Natural Gas Production”. Published in July 2012.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3404676/

—“Blind Rush? Shale Gas Boom Proceeds Amid Human Health Questions”.  Published in August 2011.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3237379/