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Archive for the ‘General (all entries)’ Category

NN/LM SCR Profile in NLM In Focus

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

NLM In Focus Logo

The work of the NN/LM SCR is profiled in the January 23, 2014 NLM In Focus.  The post includes accomplishments, funding highlights and demographic information on the five-state Region.  The NLM in Focus electronic newsletter gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at the National Library of Medicine and how its vast resources are being used to improve public health and safety, and advance science and medicine.

NLM in Focus features articles about events at NLM, the library’s programs and services, research projects, fascinating collections, and its outreach efforts in the US and abroad. The talents and efforts of the people at NLM, its partner libraries, and its grantees are showcased. The newsletter also explores trends and new technologies, and delivers helpful news you can use.

NN/LM SCR class: ToxWorld: Surveying the Landscape of NLM’s Environmental Health Resources

Monday, February 10th, 2014

The NN/LM SCR is happy to offer a new class ToxWorld: Surveying the Landscape of NLM’s Environmental Health Resources in Oklahoma, April 17 and 18, 2014.

Industrial Smokestack

This free, hands-on class is designed to introduce participants to the different environmental health and toxicology resources available from the National Library of Medicine. Attendees will gain experience with resources such as Hazardous Substances Data Bank, TOXMAP and the Enviro-Health Links. This class will cover resources about your environment including climate change, fracking and toxic chemicals.

Each participant who completes this class will receive 3 hours of continuing education credit from the Medical Library Association.

April 17, 2014 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

University of Oklahoma-Tulsa
Tulsa, OK

April 18, 2014 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
University of Central Oklahoma
Edmond, OK

To register for the class: http://tinyurl.com/scrclasses

This class is sponsored by the U.S. Government Information Division, Oklahoma Department of Libraries, and hosted by OU–Tulsa Schusterman Library and University of Central Oklahoma Max Chambers Library

Please contact Karen Vargas at 800-338-7657 or karen.vargas@exch.library.tmc.edu if you have any questions.

Physicians Called to Advance Health Literate Organizations

Monday, February 10th, 2014

A pharmacist explains a label to a patient

The Journal of General Internal Medicine published a commentary this month that gives physicians guidance on their role in implementing health literate health care organizations. Physicians’ responsibilities to address health literacy are not restricted to improving the clinical encounter, declared authors Cindy Brach, Benard Dreyer, and Dean Schillinger. For health care organizations to become health literate, physicians must also be willing to serve as health literacy champions.

The authors detail actions physicians can take to implement each of the ten attributes of health literate health care organizations, as described in an Institute of Medicine discussion paper by Brach et al. The article also points readers to the Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit to help physicians lead their practices in implementing health literacy universal precautions.

Access the commentary, Physicians’ Roles in Creating Health Literate Organizations: A Call to Action at: http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/971/art%253A10.1007%252Fs11606-013-2619-6.pdf?auth66=1392224038_081914330454b30acba3690809766fb9&ext=.pdf 

To access Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations, go to: http://iom.edu/~/media/Files/Perspectives-Files/2012/Discussion-Papers/BPH-Health-Lit-10-Attributes-of-Health-Lit-Orgs.pdf

To access the Health Literacy Universal PrecautionsToolkit, go to: http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/quality-resources/tools/literacy-toolkit/index.html

Public Health Hashtags and Tweet Chats

Friday, February 7th, 2014

hashtag public health

Looking for ways to connect to others interested in public health? Try Twitter! Tweet chats are a great way to interact with individuals and organizations involved in public health topics across the spectrum. Typically held on a regular basis, these chats are usually lively discussions between people approaching the subject from different perspectives. If you aren’t familiar with the topic or are hesitant to participate, simply following the hashtag makes it easy to lurk or monitor the chat.

Here are some hashtags and tweet chats to get you started (descriptions from Healthcare Tweet Chats):

#abcDrBchat – Chat with ABC News Chief Health/Medical Editor Dr. Richard Besser.

#hchlitss – Discussing health, health communication, health care, health and social media, health care disparities and social determinants of health. Every Thursday at 8pm EST. Moderators: @drkdhoffman @rv_rikard

#medlibs - The Medlibs Twitter chat occurs weekly on Thursday evenings at 6pm Pacific/9pm Eastern times. Topics are selected and published at the #medlibs chat blog, http://medlibschat.blogspot.com/ Inaugural chat held June 21, 2012. Coordinated by @eagledawg

#mladisparities - The Health Disparities SIG of the Medical Library Association’s monthly twitter chat about ways for medical libraries to be involved with raising awareness of healthcare disparities. Healthcare providers, librarians and others welcome.

#pubHT - The purpose of this chat is to establish a platform where public health professionals can have the opportunity to share their experiences and resources, while also learning and networking. All are invited to join the conversation, yet the target audience includes public health professionals from NGOs, government, academia, etc. Add @PubHealthTalks or follow #PubHT for updates and or visit www.pubht.com. Established August 2012 and co-founded by @NinaJTweets and @SaraRubin.

#RWJF1stFri - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s First Friday Google+ Hangouts are broadcast live the first Friday of every month at 12 pm ET. Moderated by Susan Dentzer, senior policy adviser, this initiative keeps friends of the Foundation up to speed on its activities.

#sm4ph - #sm4ph is a Twitter hashtag dedicated to exploring aspects of social media use and how it affects public health, including Public Health the field and the public’s health at large. Moderated by Jim Garrow, the #sm4ph chat is held every Wednesday evening at 9pm Eastern Time, and is open to anyone interested in public health or social media. @phsocmed

#smem - Social media for emergency management is a live Twitter chat on Fridays at 12:30 PM Eastern Time. It begin and persists as a regular hashtag.

For a full list of healthcare tweet chats, descriptions, and transcripts visit the Healthcare Tweet Chats page via Simplur.

For a list of healthcare hashtags visit the Healthcare Hashtag Project.

NN/LM SCR Funding Opportunities Now Open

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Computer with dollar sign

The NN/LM SCR is pleased to announce the funding opportunities for 2014-2015:

Digital Preservation and Access (DiPA) Award
The purpose of the Digital Preservation and Access (DiPA) Award is to increase accessibility to historically significant and unique items in the South Central Region by providing funding for Network members to digitize portions of their collections. Collections considered for digital preservation under this award should increase accessibility of health/medical collections. These digital collections will then be made freely available online.
Amount of funding: $20,000

Disaster Preparedness Award
The purpose of the Disaster Preparedness Award is to help libraries prepare for disasters so that they can assist their communities with health information and other recovery needs after an emergency. Approaches can include, but are not limited to, activities that will integrate the library into their community’s emergency preparedness, response and recovery plan; equipment that will allow the library to have more flexibility in responding to the Internet needs of the community; and partnerships with city emergency planning groups, hospitals, public health organizations to enhance health information access in library settings.
Amount of funding: $8,000

Electronic Consumer Health Outreach Award
The purpose of the Electronic Consumer Health Outreach Award is to connect health professionals, their patients and the general public to the health information resources from the National Library of Medicine. This solicitation will focus on projects designed to improve access to electronic health information for such groups and organizations as consumers, the underserved and minority health care professionals, public health workers, public libraries, and community-based and faith-based organizations.
Amount of funding: $25,000

Emerging Leaders Award
The NN/LM SCR is partnering with the South Central Academic Medical Libraries Consortium (SCAMeL) to offer the Emerging Leaders Award. The purpose of this award is to motivate and prepare a junior librarian (2-5 years of experience) for a position of leadership in an academic health sciences library. The award will pair a librarian with an academic health sciences library director who will serve as his or her mentor.  The award will include visits to the mentor’s library, the SCAMeL meeting at SCC/MLA, and the NN/LM SCR office.
Amount of funding: $3,500

Express Outreach Award
The purpose of the Express Outreach Award is to support a wide range of outreach projects aimed at improving access to and use of the National Library of Medicine’s databases to improve access to health information.
Amount of funding: Multiple awards up to $5,000 each

Health Disparities Information Outreach Award
The purpose of the Health Disparities Information Outreach Award is to support a wide range of outreach projects aimed at improving access to and use of the National Library of Medicine’s databases by populations which experience significant health disparities, including, but not limited to minority, rural and other medically underserved populations.
Amount of funding: $5,000

Health Information Literacy Award
Health information literacy refers to the ability to read and understand health information and use it effectively. The purpose of the Health Information Literacy Award is to support Network member projects, particularly those from community-based organizations (CBOs), faith-based organizations (FBOs) and other organizations that serve minority populations, to develop innovative and creative ways to promote health literacy to these target populations.
Amount of funding: $5,000

Health Information Needs Assessment Award
The purpose of the Health Information Needs Assessment Award is to improve health information outreach through increased knowledge of community needs. Thorough needs assessments serve to analyze community needs in depth, with respect to the community’s cultural, social, economic and physical situations. This award is designed to give organizations an opportunity to study a community in detail and to subsequently design strategies that promote the National Library of Medicine’s databases.
Amount of funding: $5,000

Hospital Library Promotion Award
The purpose of the Hospital Library Promotion Award is to support projects that promote the value of the hospital library to the hospital administrators and staff. As hospitals expand their services and programs, hospital librarians can play a significant role in areas such as: education and training to address knowledge management, clinical information systems, patient safety programs, electronic health records, health literacy, or patient education.
Amount of funding: $5,000

Library Student Outreach Award
The purpose of the Library Student Outreach Award is to promote the value of outreach to library school students interested in health sciences librarianship.The award provides funding for students to attend the Quint Chapter Medical Library Association Meeting in October 12-16, 2014 in Denver CO and participate in meetings, conference sessions and other activities designed for them to learn about the importance of health information outreach and services conducted by librarians in the South Central Region.
Amount of funding $1,800 per student

Mobile Applications Project (MAP) Award
The purpose of the Mobile Applications Project (MAP) Award is to provide an opportunity for Network members to provide outreach and increase access to health information utilizing mobile technologies. Projects may target health professionals, public librarians, public health workers, consumers, or the general public. Recipients are encouraged to promote awareness and utilization of mobile sites and services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mobile/). Potential applicants may consider using free Application Program Interface (API) from the National Library of Medicine for the creation or development of mobile applications (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/api/).
Amount of funding: $5,000

Outreach to Healthcare Providers Award
The purpose of the Outreach to Healthcare Providers Award is to ensure improved access to health information and Health Information Technology for those health providers without adequate access to library and information services. This solicitation will focus on projects designed to improve access to electronic health information for such groups and organizations as: unaffiliated healthcare providers located in rural, inner city, and Medically Underserved Areas (MUA), public health workers, minority health practitioners, and those who serve minority populations.
Amount of funding: $8,000

Professional Development Award (PDA)
The purpose of the Professional Development Award (PDA) is to enable individuals at NN/LM SCR Network member institutions to expand professional knowledge and experience to provide improved health information access to healthcare providers and consumers.
Amount of funding: Multiple awards up to $1,500 each

More information on proposal writing tips and previously funded projects is available on the NN/LM SCR Funding page.

Tablets vs Smartphones for Physicians

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014

doctor stands and points a tablet people watch him

According to a recent study by the advertising agency WPP’s Kantar Media 28% of physicians use tablets and 21% percent use smartphones to to read articles in medical journals. These numbers are low compared to 74 % that use a desktop or laptop computer and the 55% still reading paper journals. The survey results were the result of a questionnaire sent to physicians in 2013.

According to the results,  about 51% of physicians told Kantar they use a tablet device for professional purposes. While only 19% reported the use of a tablet device for personal use only. With 78% of those surveyed reporting the use of a smartphone for professional and personal tasks, and less than 1% reporting use for personal tasks only, the results show that the adoption rate was higher for smartphones.

smartphone

The study also showed that reading medical journals is one of the few tasks for which doctors are more likely to employ tablets than smartphones. Overall Kantar found that doctors are still more likely to use a smartphone than a tablet for professional tasks, including researching specific clinical situations and getting professional news updates.

Kantar also investigated application (app) use among physicians surveyed. Kantar found a significantly different list for smartphones than for tablets. For smartphone apps, 56% of doctors reported the use of diagnostic or clinical reference tools, 51% report the use of drug coding or reference apps, 37% reported the use of apps for medical journal, magazine, or newspaper access, and 31%t reported the use of workflow tools. In terms of tablet apps, though, 37% used medical journal, newspaper, or magazine apps, 30% of doctors used diagnostic or clinical reference apps, 27% used electronic medical record apps and 22% used drug and coding reference apps. Accessing the Internet and checking email, however, were still the top use cases for both tablets and smartphones.

Additionally, Kantar found that survey participants had downloaded an average of seven apps for professional or personal purposes in the past six months. Twenty-four percent had downloaded at least 10 apps in that time. Additional data analysis can be accessed in the original mobiehealthnews post on this survey.

Overall, these survey results provide a look into the use of mobile devices by physicians. It is clear that device adoption and app use continues to be import to those in the healthcare industry. As medical librarians look for ways to connect with physicians to better provide information services it is useful to consider how physicians are actually using the devices they have access to.

NLM Director Donald A.B. Lindberg to Receive Paul Evan Peters Award

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

Dr. Lindberg

The Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and EDUCAUSE are pleased to announce that Donald A.B. Lindberg, Director, National Library of Medicine, has been named the 2014 recipient of the Paul Evan Peters Award. The award recognizes notable, lasting achievements in the creation and innovative use of network-based information resources and services that advance scholarship and intellectual productivity.

“In terms of genuinely sustained, visionary, and high-impact leadership in using networked information to transform everything from consumer health care to fundamental research in molecular biology and related disciplines, I can’t think of any organization that can match the record of the National Library of Medicine under Don Lindberg’s leadership,” noted CNI executive director Clifford Lynch. “He has been responsible for an incredible string of strategic and often prescient commitments that have changed our world. Don is a wonderful choice for the Paul Evan Peters Award.”

Donald Lindberg has worked as a scientist for over 50 years, becoming widely recognized as an innovator in applying computer technology to health care, medical diagnosis, artificial intelligence, and educational programs. In 1984 he was appointed director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world’s largest biomedical library, a post that he still holds. As NLM’s director, he has spearheaded countless transformative programs in medical informatics, including the Unified Medical Language System, making it possible to link health information, medical terms, drug names and billing codes across different computer systems; the Visible Human Project, a digital image library of complete, anatomically detailed, three-dimensional representations of the normal male and female human bodies; the production and implementation of ClinicalTrials.gov, a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world; and, the establishment of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, a national resource for molecular biology information and genetic processes that control health and disease. Today, NLM has a budget of $327 million, more than 800 employees, and digital information services that are used billions of times a year by millions of scientists, health professionals, and members of the public.

Selection committee member George Strawn (director, National Coordination Office for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development [NITRD] Program) recounted, “I met Don Lindberg 20 years ago, when, in addition to his NLM duties, he was serving as the first director of the interagency National Coordination Office for what is now called NITRD. I have valued his vision and leadership since that time. For example, his long-term support for Semantic Medline predated the Semantic Web by at least a decade and now portends a revolutionary mode of scientific discovery.”

“It’s a pleasure to honor Donald Lindberg, who has contributed so much to the use of computers and information technology in health care,” stated EDUCAUSE president and CEO Diana Oblinger. “He was a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, and his visionary leadership at the National Library of Medicine has transformed the way we all access biomedical literature. I’m honored to join with CNI and ARL in recognizing his achievements with the Paul Evan Peters Award.”

Lindberg’s interest in the potential intersection between information technology and the biological sciences stretches back to the early days of his career. He joined the pathology faculty at the University of Missouri in 1960, where he developed the first automated lab system and an automated patient history acquisition system. He implemented an automated statewide system for interpreting electrocardiograms, as well as other medical applications for the computer. Around this time, Lindberg also began publishing articles in a field that would come to be known as medical informatics, including “The Computer and Medical Care,” which appeared in 1968.

As NLM director, Lindberg convinced the United States Congress that the Library was an essential information conduit, facilitating the decision-making process of scientists and pharmaceutical companies, and, ultimately, benefiting patients and the general public, thereby securing the organization’s robust future. “Don is a long-standing advocate for free public access to health information through NLM’s MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus Connect,” said Elliott Shore, ARL executive director. “His leadership continues to play a critical role in the integration of biomedical information systems and services, fostering a well-informed society.”

A member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, Lindberg has received numerous honors and awards, including the prestigious Morris F. Collen, MD, Award of Excellence of the American College of Medical Informatics, and the Surgeon General’s Medallion of the US Public Health Service. He received his medical degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, and an undergraduate degree from Amherst College.

Data Privacy Month

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Data Privacy Day LogoJanuary 28th through February 28th is Data Privacy Month (DPM).  This month is designed to raise awareness and empower people to protect their privacy and control their digital footprint. As we move to a more mobile, connected, and always-on society the increasing amount of data being shared can put your privacy at risk. By taking proactive measures everyone can more easily control their data and information.

On Thursday, January 30, 2014 from 12-1 pm central time EDUCAUSE will host a free webinar with privacy expert Robert Ellis Smith of Privacy Journal (registration is required).

StaySafeOnline.org is a resource site with information and tips for securing your data online.

According to the 2013 National Online Safety Study:

  • 14% of American use one password or PIN across all online accounts,
  • 58% say they have three or more passwords and PINs across their online accounts,
  • Nearly 19% said they had never changed their password or PIN without prompting,
  • Fewer than 30% reported changing their password or PIN without prompting within the past month.

Using the principles of Stop.Think.Connect are just one way to help you remain aware and safe online.

  • STOP: Before you use the Internet, take time to understand the risks and learn how to spot potential problems.
  • THINK: Take a moment to be certain the path ahead is clear. Watch for warning signs and consider how your actions online could impact your safety, or your family’s.
  • CONNECT: Enjoy the Internet with greater confidence, knowing you’ve taken the right steps to safeguard yourself and your computer.

 

Educational Technology Trends for 2014

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

What’s new and what’s next for educational technologies? iLibrarian Ellyssa Kroski recently compiled a list of 7 Ed Tech Trends to Watch in 2014. The list includes technologies that are impacting both higher ed and K-12 classrooms. As these technologies continue to make an impact on education, librarians should also consider how the use of these technologies will impact learning styles. These new educational technology trends may also help librarians transform their own teaching styles.

The seven trends include:

  • 3D Printing
  • MOOCs
  • Big Data
  • Digital Textbooks
  • Gamification
  • The Flipped Classroom
  • Mobile Learning

Several of these trends have been discussed in previous Blogadillo posts, but the discussion provided in the blog post linked above provides more in-depth information about each of these trends.

Many of these trending topics having been gaining attention over the course of 2013 and are expected to be more widely implemented this year. Several were listed as part of the New Media Consortium’s (NMC) 2013 Horizon Report.

Are you seeing these technologies impact medical librarians and health professionals? If so how? Share your experiences in the comments section below.

Flu Season Still in Full Swing

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Elbow Cough

With flu season still in swing, it’s more important than ever to get that flu shot and practice good health behavior! As of the week ending on January 4, 2014 at least 35 states are now showing widespread geographic influenza activity according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In addition to the activity across the country, every state in the South Central Region is showing the highest level of influenza activity. The unusually high number of those affected by the flu prompted the CDC to issue an official health advisory notice to clinicians.

The health advisory notice states:

From November through December 2013, CDC has received a number of reports of severe respiratory illness among young and middle-aged adults, many of whom were infected with influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 (pH1N1) virus. Multiple pH1N1-associated hospitalizations, including many requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and some fatalities have been reported. The pH1N1 virus that emerged in 2009 caused more illness in children and young adults, compared to older adults, although severe illness was seen in all age groups.

One common misconception of the flu is that fatalities are more likely to occur in the very young and very old–this is not the case with the pH1N1 strain. According to the Influenza Associated Hospitalizations in the CDC FluView Weekly Index, those ages 18-64 account for 61% of hospitalizations. This means everyone is at risk for catching the flu, regardless of age and health status. Despite these numbers, those in 18-64 age range are still the least likely to get vaccinated.

To do your part in preventing the spread of flu germs, here are the CDC’s Good Health Habit tips:

1. Avoid close contact.
Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
2. Stay home when you are sick.
If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. You will help prevent others from catching your illness.
3. Cover your mouth and nose.
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.
4. Clean your hands.
Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
6. Practice other good health habits.
Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.