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Archive for the ‘General (all entries)’ Category

August SCR CONNECTions: Metadata: The Key to Linking Data

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Stanford Medicine Logo

Please join us tomorrow, Wednesday, August 20, 2014, from 10:30 – 11:30 am (CT) for the NN/LM SCR’s free monthly webinar, SCR CONNECTions

Topic: Metadata: the Key to Linking Data

Presenters: Dick Miller, Thea S. Allen and Joanne Banko from Lane Medical Library, Stanford University.

Description: This session will feature an overview of metadata identities and relationships, real-life applications demonstrating how Stanford University’s Lane Medical Library staff use metadata to link data within the catalog and library website, helping the user utilize both seamlessly, and how the work behind the scenes helps those on the front end search, identify and find information sought. We will also touch upon ways in which metadata and linked data can be used in the future.

This webinar will be available for 1 hour of Medical Library Association (MLA) Continuing Education credit and will be archived for future viewing.

How to Log In

Go to https://webmeeting.nih.gov/scr/, on the log in screen, choose “Enter as a Guest” and type in your name.

Once the room is open the system will be able to call you (please enter your phone number) to connect to the audio.

Use *6 to mute or unmute your phone.

**Do Not Place Call on Hold**

Problems?
Contact the Regional Medical Library (RML) office at 713-799-7880, or 800-338-7657 (AR, LA, NM, OK, TX only).

As always, our webinars are free of charge and open to anyone.

Flip Your Classroom

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Librarian at computer with students

The concept of the flipped classroom has been around since the 1990′s but today’s technology is helping educators more easily adapt their teaching environments to the flipped or blended learning style. With a flipped classroom students learn new concepts and content by watching video lectures and then doing “homework” in the classroom, allowing the teacher to have more guidance and interaction with students. This model inverts the traditional education model in which content is delivered via lectures in class and reinforced through homework outside of the classroom. The flipped classroom concept has also been seen as one the top educational trends for the near future, as outlined by the 2014 Horizon Report. Current trends demonstrate the success of the flipped classroom model in areas of high school math and science. Learders of the flipped classroom movement, Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, recently released their book Flip Your Classroom, which is now available form the NN/LM SCR Lending Library.

Using flipped classroom techniques can be challenging, especially when applying the concepts to library workshops and instruction. A recent post on ACRL’s Keeping Up With… Series focused on flipped classrooms and highlighted some ways to bring flipped concepts into library instruction. Authors Candice Benjes-Small and Katelyn Tucker provide sound advice for librarians interested in flipping library instruction. They suggest working closely with teaching faculty and ensure that students complete online assignments before coming to the class or workshop. Additionally it will be important that students who come to class be held accountable by the teaching faculty and in the preparation process some plans should be made for what to do with students who come to the class unprepared. Can they use a computer and headphones to view the content and catch up? Is there an alternative way to get them involved in the class if they did not complete the assignment?

In preparation for flipping library instruction librarians may want to consider the use of online tutorials or materials that they or others have already created. A quiz or worksheet may need to be created to ensure that students have completed the online preparation assignments before diving into class work. Once students are ready class time with the librarian can be devoted to searches that the students are considering using for their research topic. The librarian then becomes a “guide on the side”, standing by to provide examples and collaborate with students for successful searching.

New to Lending Library August 2014

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Cover of books described in this post

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region is pleased to add six new titles to the lending library this quarter. New titles on diverse topics have been selected after review and are designed to support the mission of the NN/LM SCR. This post provides an overview of the recently added titles.

Books from the Lending Library may be requested by Network Members or those who are employed by Network Member institutions. Visit the Lending Library page to request any of these exciting new titles. If there is no response through the online system please contact our office directly to request a title.

Collection Development

Introduction to Reference Sources in the Health Sciences, Sixth Edition (Medical Library Association Guides). Prepared in collaboration with the Medical Library Association, this completely updated, revised, and expanded edition lists classic and up-to-the-minute print and electronic resources in the health sciences, helping librarians find the answers that library users seek. Included are electronic versions of traditionally print reference sources, trustworthy electronic-only resources, and resources that library users can access from home or on the go through freely available websites or via library licenses. In this benchmark guide, the authors

  • Include new chapters on health information seeking, point-of-care sources, and global health sources
  • Focus on works that can be considered foundational or essential, in both print and electronic formats
  • Address questions librarians need to consider in developing and maintaining their reference collections

When it comes to questions involving the health sciences, this valuable resource will point both library staff and the users they serve in the right direction.

Education & Training

Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. Learn what a flipped classroom is and why it works, and get the information you need to flip a classroom. You’ll also learn the flipped mastery model, where students learn at their own pace, furthering opportunities for personalized education. This simple concept is easily replicable in any classroom, doesn’t cost much to implement, and helps foster self-directed learning. Once you flip, you won’t want to go back!

Reflective Teaching, Effective Learning: Instructional Literacy for Library Educator. Whether or not “instruction” appears in their job titles, librarians are often in the position of educating their users, colleagues, and peers to successfully locate and evaluate information. Because MLIS education tends to offer less-than-comprehensive preparation in pedagogy and instructional design, this much-needed book tackles the challenge of effective teaching and training head-on. Char Booth, an avid library education and technology advocate, introduces a series of concepts that will empower readers at any level of experience to become better designers and presenters, as well as building their confidence and satisfaction as library educators. Laying the foundation for effective teaching, Booth outlines a four-part framework of Instructional Literacy, which includes

  • Reflective Practice: tools for improving learning in the moment and developing a teacher identity, as well as approaches to collaboration and creating communities of practice
  • Educational Theory: evidence-based strategies in learning and instructional research
  • Teaching Technologies: evaluating and integrating technology in learning using a practical “toolkit” approach
  • Instructional Design: a systematic and outcomes-based strategy for developing and assessing learning experiences

Evaluation

Measure What Matters: Online Tools For Understanding Customers, Social Media, Engagement, and Key Relationships. This book explains simple, step-by-step procedures for measuring customers, social media reputation, influence and authority, the media, and other key constituencies.

  • Based on hundreds of case studies about how organizations have used measurement to improve their reputations, strengthen their bottom lines, and improve efficiencies all around
  • Learn how to collect the data that will help you better understand your competition, do strategic planning, understand key strengths and weaknesses, and better respond to customer preferences
  • Author runs a successful blog and serves as a measurement consultant to companies such as Facebook, Southwest Airlines, Raytheon, and Allstate

General

The Atlas of New Librarianship. Libraries have existed for millennia, but today the library field is searching for solid footing in an increasingly fragmented (and increasingly digital) information environment. What is librarianship when it is unmoored from cataloging, books, buildings, and committees? In The Atlas of New Librarianship, R. David Lankes offers a guide to this new landscape for practitioners. He describes a new librarianship based not on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning; and he suggests a new mission for librarians: to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities. The vision for a new librarianship must go beyond finding library-related uses for information technology and the Internet; it must provide a durable foundation for the field. Lankes recasts librarianship and library practice using the fundamental concept that knowledge is created though conversation. New librarians approach their work as facilitators of conversation; they seek to enrich, capture, store, and disseminate the conversations of their communities.

DVD

Librarians Collaborating to Produce Systematic Reviews: Project Launch to Publication. What is a systematic review? What are the practice guidelines? How do I negotiate my contribution? Join our panel of speakers as they discuss what is really needed and resources for improving your skills. They will tackle these issues and discuss opportunities for librarians to be part of the team.

NLM activates the Emergency Access Initiative

Friday, August 15th, 2014

National Library of Medicine Logo

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) has been activated to support healthcare professionals working on the Ebola public health emergency in West Africa.

The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from over 650 biomedical journals and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users. It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster. EAI is not an open access collection. It is only intended for those affected by the disaster or assisting the affected population. If you know of a library or organization involved in healthcare efforts in response to the Ebola outbreak, please let them know of this service. EAI was activated four times in the past, including following the earthquake and subsequent cholera epidemic in Haiti, flooding in Pakistan and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

The free access period is from August 12, 2014 – September 11, 2014

For more information on the Ebola virus visit MedlinePlus.

For updates on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Webinar Series on the NIH Public Access Policy

Friday, August 15th, 2014

NIH Public Access Policy

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region will host two free Webinars on the NIH Public Access Policy and the role of libraries.

The NIH Public Access Policy – Information for Librarians
Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EDT
Presenters:
Dr. Neil Thakur, National Institutes of Health
Kathryn Funk, National Library of Medicine

We will discuss the following topics:

  • Review basics of the public access policy, and the role of librarians;
  • Present the Public Access Compliance Monitor;
  • Answer questions about the policy sent to us in advance via the online registration form;
  • Address issues and questions raised during the Webinar.

Register at https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/269124766. Space is limited, so reserve your seat now!

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

The NIH Public Access Policy – Views from the Library Trenches
Date: Tuesday, August 26, 2014
Time: 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT
Presenters:
Emily Mazure, Duke University Medical Center Library
Susan Steelman and Jessie Casella, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Library
Scott Lapinski, Harvard University, Countway Library of Medicine

You have heard the specifics of the NIH Policy. Now find out how librarians are responding to the need to get researchers up to speed on compliance with the policy. Join us to find out the following:

  • What strategies librarians are using to support their communities. What’s worked; and what hasn’t;
  • How to get started, and which groups to work with at your institution;
  • What tools librarians can use to help researchers and improve compliance rates;
  • How librarians can work with each other to improve outcomes.

This Webinar will feature presentations from three libraries with experience on the ground helping researchers with the NIH Public Access Policy, followed by a Q&A with the audience. The presenters will discuss their unique approaches in the trenches of supporting and providing outreach on the policy.

Join this Webinar at https://webmeeting.nih.gov/npap
Participation limited to 125 connections, so please consider group viewing.
For telephone audio, dial 1-800-605-5167, and enter participant code: 816440

NTC’s PubMed for Trainers offered in SCR in March 2015

Monday, August 11th, 2014

PubMed Logo

Would you like to gain new search skills, brush up on existing PubMed skills and collaborate with colleagues to develop training strategies? Join the National Library of Medicine Training Center for PubMed for Trainers in March 2015.

PubMed for Trainers offers an in-depth look at PubMed and provides an opportunity to share training ideas with fellow participants.

PubMed for Trainers is a 4-part series of classes; 3 online and 1 in-person class (at The Texas Medical Center Library, Houston, TX http://nnlm.gov/scr/about/welcome.html) (more…)

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

Monday, August 11th, 2014

National Immunization Awareness Month LogoAugust is National Immunization Awareness Month! This year, the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) has designated a specific population focus for each week:

August 3-9 — A Healthy Start: Babies and Pregnant Women

August 10-16 — Back to School: Children, Preteens & Teens

August 17-23 — Off to the Future: Young Adults

August 24-30 — Not Just for Kids: Adults

Immunizations are important for individuals of all ages. Often times there are concerns as to whether or not we should continue immunizing our children (and ourselves), however, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) maintains vaccinations are worthwhile:

It’s true, some diseases (like polio and diphtheria) are becoming very rare in the U.S. Of course, they are becoming rare largely because we have been vaccinating against them. But it is still reasonable to ask whether it’s really worthwhile to keep vaccinating.

It’s much like bailing out a boat with a slow leak. When we started bailing, the boat was filled with water. But we have been bailing fast and hard, and now it is almost dry. We could say, “Good. The boat is dry now, so we can throw away the bucket and relax.” But the leak hasn’t stopped. Before long we’d notice a little water seeping in, and soon it might be back up to the same level as when we started.

Unless we can “stop the leak” (eliminate the disease), it is important to keep immunizing. Even if there are only a few cases of disease today, if we take away the protection given by vaccination, more and more people will become infected and will spread disease to others. Soon we will undo the progress we have made over the years.

For more information on vaccines and immunizations, visit the CDC website. On this page you’ll find topics such as Basic & Common Questions, information on Vaccine Side Effects & Safety, recommendations for parents, and immunization schedules for all populations.

To participate in National Immunization Awareness Month, download the toolkit from NPHIC and join the conversation on Twitter, using the hashtag #NIAM14.

August Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

August NIH News in HealthThe August issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research is now available:

Features:

Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What to Do When Every Moment Counts
How would you react to a medical emergency? When it comes to life-threatening conditions like heart attack or stroke, every minute counts.

Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response
Many people have never heard of sepsis, or they don’t know what it is. But sepsis is one of the top 10 causes of disease-related death in the U.S. The condition can arise suddenly, and it’s often hard to recognize.

Health Capsules:

Transplant Reverses Sickle Cell Disease

Mind and Body Therapy for Fibromyalgia

Featured Website: Diabetes Health Sense

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.
Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!
Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

 

Ebola and the West Africa Outbreak

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

Ebola

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ebola hemorrhagic fever or Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a severe and often deadly virus found in humans and primates such as chimpanzees and gorillas. It is still unknown how the virus first appears in humans at the start of an outbreak, although scientists believe an individual is infected through contact with an infected animal.

In humans, the virus can be passed from person to person in a number of ways including direct contact with the blood or other bodily fluids of an infected individual and exposure to objects (such as needles) that have been in contact with infected secretions

Because of the nature of transmission, Ebola can spread quickly within health care settings without adequate sterilization procedures and those working with infected individuals are at a higher risk of contracting the disease, as are friends and family. Symptoms of Ebola typically include fever, headache, joint and muscle aches, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain and lack of appetite. These symptoms can occur anywhere from 2-21 days after exposure to the virus, however most begin around days 8-10. Some infected individuals may recover, while many do not (Ebola outbreaks have a fatality rate of up to 90%). There is currently no cure for Ebola, therefore treatment is limited to balancing the patient’s fluids, maintaining oxygen status, and treating complicating infections. Isolation precautions and proper sterilization are the primary methods of prevention.

As of August 1, 2014, “the World Health Organization, in partnership with the Ministries of Health in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria announced a cumulative total of 1603 suspect and confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) and 887 deaths”. This is the largest Ebola outbreak in history and the first of its kind in West Africa. Because of this, the CDC has issues a number of level 3 travel notices and has set up a screening process for those traveling to and from Africa. 

Currently, no individuals have contracted Ebola in the United States, however two American healthcare professionals working in Liberia have contracted the virus and been transported for treatment to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. In light of this, a number of precautions have been put into place and the CDC has determined that the spread of Ebola poses no significant risk in the United States.

For the most recent updates on the Ebola outbreak in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, visit the CDC’s West Africa Outbreak page. Information for the public, travelers, and healthcare workers is also available from the CDC.

MLA Accepting Applications for Donald A.B. Lindberg Research Fellowship

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

MLA Logo

The Medical Library Association  (MLA) believes that access to high-quality information improves decision-making by health professionals, scientists, and consumers and is a major determinant in the quality of care and improved health for the nation and the world. MLA is interested in supporting individuals whose research will extend the underlying knowledge base of health sciences information management or enhance the practice of the information professions, particularly health sciences librarianship.

Areas of interest include the organization, delivery, use, and impact of information and knowledge on:

  • Health care access and delivery;
  • Public health services;
  • Consumers’ use of health information;
  • Biomedical research;
  • Education for the health professions.

To that end, MLA is accepting applications for the Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. Established in 2003, the annual fellowship provides a $10,000 grant to support research aimed at expanding the knowledge base linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and advances in biomedical research. Areas of interest include the organization, delivery, use, and impact of information and knowledge on healthcare access and delivery, public health services, consumers’ use of health information, biomedical research, and education for the health professions.

Deadline for Applications: November 15.