Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About SCR | Contact SCR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for February, 2014

Resources Update on the ACA

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

As we approach March and the final month of open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) health insurance marketplaces, there are many excellent resources to help you and your patrons remain informed about accessing new healthcare options. Please read on for information on upcoming webinars and new tools, and feel free to share this message with others. Please note that if the dates and/or times are not convenient, most webinars are being archived.

Health Insurance Marketplace

Farewell Angela Ruffin

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Angela Ruffin

Angela B. Ruffin, Ph.D, Head of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, National Network Office is retiring at the end of February 2014.  Angela has been the Head of the National Network Office (NNO) for over 14 years.  Prior to becoming the Head of the NNO, she had 10 years of experience coordinating outreach programs for the NN/LM Office.  Her tremendous leadership and dedication to outreach has helped the NN/LM program, and the NN/LM SCR in particular, provide superior health information services to a myriad of communities, including healthcare providers, health sciences librarians, public librarians, community based organizations, public health departments, and members of the general public.

Prior to coming to NLM in 1990, she taught at several Schools of Library and Information Science and served as media coordinator for the Durham City Schools. Angela received her B.A. from Spelman College, her M.S.L.S. from Atlanta University (now Clark-Atlanta University), and her Ed.M in educational psychology from Boston University. She then received her Ph.D. in Information and Library Science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Please join us in congratulating Angela on her retirement!

Net Neutrality and Libraries

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Internet Browser Network Neutrality (often called Net Neutrality) has been in the news recently as the result of the January 14 ruling by the US Court of Appeals which struck down most of the Open Internet Order. But what is net neutrality and what does it have to do with libraries? According to the American Library Association (ALA) net neutrality “is the concept of online non-discrimination. It is the principle that consumers/citizens should be free to get access to – or to provide – the Internet content and services they wish, and that consumer access should not be regulated based on the nature or source of that content or service.” The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) uses the concept of “Open Internet” to reflect net neutrality.

The Open Internet Rules adopted by the FCC included the following:

  • Transparency. Broadband providers must disclose information regarding their network management practices, performance, and the commercial terms of their broadband services.
  • No blocking. Fixed broadband providers (such as DSL, cable modem, or fixed wireless providers) may not block lawful content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices. Mobile broadband providers may not block lawful websites, or applications that compete with their voice or video telephony services.
  • No unreasonable discrimination. Fixed broadband providers may not unreasonably discriminate in transmitting lawful network traffic over a consumer’s broadband Internet access service. Unreasonable discrimination of network traffic could take the form of particular services or websites appearing slower or degraded in quality.

According to a recent post by ALA member Larra Clark, the recent ruling struck down most of the FCC’s Open Internet Rules and would in essence allow “commercial companies the legal authority to block Internet traffic, give preferential treatment to certain Internet services or applications, and steer users to or away from certain web sites based on their own commercial interests.” The court ruling did encourage the FCC to “act to preserve the free and open Internet.”

Net Neutrality is an important concept for libraries for several reasons. ALA presents the case that libraries are important access points for information for many people. The ALA itself advocates for “intellectual freedom, which is the ‘right of all peoples to seek and receive information from all points of view without restriction.'” The Internet is a tool which can be used to connect people and allows for the free flow of information and ideas. While many libraries are access points for the Internet, libraries are also looking at ways to leverage technology such as the Internet to better connect, inform, and inspire their users. In higher education unrestricted access to information on the Internet may lead to research and development which will have an impact on society. By allowing business and service providers to determine who has access to the Internet, what content can be viewed, or what type of quality of access a user can have the limitless possibilities of Internet connectivity and research which are supported by Net Neutrality and the principles of the Open Internet are restricted.

Organizations including ALA, EDUCAUSE, and ARL have released a joint letter to the FCC advocating for the preservation of the Open Internet.

On January 19, 2014 FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler issued a statement on plans to update the FCC’s Open Internet Rules and continue to support the goals of the Open Internet.

Just Added: New Titles in the Lending Library

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

Lending Library Books

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region (NN/LM SCR) is happy to announce the addition of eight new titles to the Lending Library. New titles have been selected after review and are designed to support the mission of the NN/LM SCR. Books from the Lending Library may be requested by Network Members or those who are employed by Network Member institutions. This post provides an overview of the books which have been added. Visit the Lending Library page to request any of these exciting new titles.

Archiving/Digitization

Personal Archiving: Preserving Our Digital Heritage. Edited by Donald T. Hawkins. Hawkins and his expert contributors cover a range of innovative projects and practical topics including:

  • Archiving individual and family histories
  • New and nascent services and software products
  • Social media and email applications
  • Legal issues including digital inheritance and privacy
  • Evolving formats and media considerations
  • Academic research projects
  • Library of Congress initiatives
  • The pioneering role of the Internet Archive
  • Research at Microsoft
  • Case studies of digital archiving in practice

Hawkins and his contributors are passionate about personal archiving, their enthusiasm matched only by their expertise in this must-read text for genealogists, historians, archivists, librarians, collectors, creators, and anyone with a mass of digital information they want to organize and preserve.

 Education

Design for How People Learn. Julie Dirksen. Products, technologies, and workplaces change so quickly today that everyone is continually learning. Many of us are also teaching, even when it’s not in our job descriptions. Whether it’s giving a presentation, writing documentation, or creating a website or blog, we need and want to share our knowledge with other people. But if you’ve ever fallen asleep over a boring textbook, or fast-forwarded through a tedious e-learning exercise, you know that creating a great learning experience is harder than it seems. Design For How People Learn will teach you how to leverage the fundamental concepts of instructional design both to improve your own learning and to engage your audience.

The Teaching Librarian: Web 2.0, Technology, and Legal Aspects. Kris Helge and Laura F. McKinnon. Librarians need to utilize web 2.0 tools to generate rich-text learning environments, creating enriching, challenging, and supportive learning platforms for students. The Teaching Librarian shows how to utilize wikis, mindmaps, and Second Life to improve pedagogy for librarians. Topics include how to obtain administration approval to implement web 2.0 tools, how to deal with and prevent technological glitches, and remain aware of relevant legal issues in the UK and the USA. The book also outlines how to create learning interfaces that meet the needs of nontraditional students. The six chapters cover key areas of pedagogy and web 2.0, including: the relevance of LibGuides and its uses for pedagogy; using cloud computing and mobile apps in teaching; teaching with Wikis, Second Life, and Mind Maps; practical issues with web 2.0 technology; and a chapter on the legal issues surrounding the use of web 2.0 for pedagogy.

Evaluation/Assessment

Research, Evaluation and Audit: Key Steps in Demonstrating Your Value. Edited by Maria J. Grant, Barbara Sen and Hanna Spring. Written by academics and practitioners from a diverse selection of libraries throughout the world, this handbook provides library and information professionals with the guidance they need to undertake research projects in the workplace in order to inform their own practice and improve service delivery. It guides readers step by step through the key phases of planning, doing, and disseminating research. Novices as well as those experienced with evaluations, audits, or research will benefit from the text’s thorough and common-sense approach, which includes

  • An introduction to the concepts, ethics, and planning stages of research projects
  • Coverage of the fundamentals of projects, such as literature review, qualitative and quantitative research methods, data analysis, and research tools
  • Pointers on writing up the project, putting the results of the project findings into practice, and disseminating the project to the wider community
  • Case studies drawn from a broad range of LIS contexts and applicable to any institution.

This is the essential handbook for any librarian or information professional who wants to undertake research in the workplace in order to inform their own practice and the wider evidence base for library and information science. It’s also a useful guide for undergraduate and postgraduate LIS students undertaking their final year research project.

Management

Managing Incompetence: An Innovative Approach for Dealing with People. Gabriel Ginebra. Day-in, day-out, managers and supervisors face a myriad of personalities in the workplace. Managing these individual characters can sometimes drive even the calmest boss into a frenzy. Here, for the first time in English, is a humorous, yet practical and effective title on how to deal with all those seemingly ‘incompetent’ people on your staff. Step-by-step, author Gabriel Ginebra guides you through the ‘Fougi Model’ to diagnose inefficiencies; and through this process, you’ll learn how to discern and improve people’s behaviors in the workplace. Business readers the world over have been impressed with this innovative approach to managing staff; you too, can benefit from this wisdom.

Technology

Expert Internet Searching, 4th Edition. Phil Bradley. The highly anticipated new edition of Phil Bradley’s essential guide to internet search is here. This no-nonsense handbook will give you the tools to find the information that you need more quickly and effectively than ever before. Since the last edition was published internet search has changed dramatically, with both the amount of information to be found online and the diversity of tools to unlock it expanding exponentially. This new edition, rewritten from scratch, gives readers the information and guidance they need to choose the right search tools and strategies for each information need. From searching social media effectively to tracking down an expert or a news story, and from searching by image to searching multimedia, Bradley introduces the best search engines and tools and explains how to get the most out of them. Whether you are a casual searcher or an expert information retriever, you will find information on a wide variety of search engines that you’ve never tried before and lists of tools and resources that will make you an even better searcher than you already are. This book will be an invaluable guide for anyone searching the internet for information, whether you are taking your first steps or are becoming more expert. Those teaching others how to search the internet efficiently will find suggestions and strategies and an eloquent rebuttal of the claim that ‘it’s all on Google’.

Global Mobile: Applications and Innovations for the Worldwide Mobile Ecosystem. Edited by Peter A. Bruck and Madanmohan Rao. Editors Bruck and  Rao bring together an extraordinary cast of thought leaders and practitioners in this sweeping survey of mobile technology and its impacts on human life, work, and society. Global Mobile examines the foundations of the worldwide mobile ecosystem through an array of case studies and perspectives on how mobile is transforming human enterprise—from business and healthcare to education, employment, entertainment, government, and the media. Contributors describe how mobile can and is being used to expand economies, alliances, and partnerships, and assess legal, policy, and regulatory issues and challenges. Combining broad practical coverage with a pioneering vision, Global Mobile is the first essential guide to the worldwide mobile ecosystem.

Marketing with Social Media: A Lita Guide. Edited by Beth C. Thomsett-Scott. This guide offers to-the-point advice for getting up to speed with the world of social media. Ideal for newbies ready to get serious about marketing with social media, as well as practitioners on the lookout for ways to improve existing efforts, this guide will save readers time and effort by providing basic information on the most popular and cutting-edge marketing technologies. With best practices for engaging library users across multiple platforms, editor Beth C. Thomsett-Scott and her contributors:

  • draw from a range of experiences, with examples from different library types and sizes;
  • include case studies of successful social media efforts using Facebook, wikis, video-sharing sites, Pinterest, Google+, Foursquare, blogs, Twitter and QR codes;
  • offer tips for maintaining a steady flow of content, coordinating with colleagues, planning for sustainability and using built-in analytics for evaluation;
  • present numerous screen shots and illustrations;
  • provide a resource list at the end of every chapter, allowing readers to dig deeper.

NLM Health and Medicine Blog Collection Continues to Grow

Friday, February 21st, 2014

BlogLaunched in 2009 this unique collection of blogs is a growing array of insightful perspectives on health and healthcare. The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Health and Medicine Blog Collection was conceived of and is managed by the NLM Web Collecting and Archiving Working Group. The nine-member multidisciplinary team was tasked with not only looking for online content to archive but with creating the collection criteria, quality control standards, and much more. Since this was as new project and the field of born digital archives was also new standards for metadata and copyright also needed to be explored as the project moved forward.

Began as a pilot project, the initial focus included only 12 blogs but the collection has since expanded to include 31 blogs. The project utilizes Internet Archive’s Archive-It service. Archive-It is a subscription web archiving service that helps organizations to harvest, build, and preserve collections of digital content and is used by over 275 organizations across the globe.

Blogs currently archived in the project include e-Patient Dave and The Adventures of an Ambulance Riding Librarian. Both healthcare professionals as well as patients use blogs for communications and this project attempts to archive blogs from both perspectives. Some of the blogs include first hand perspectives about living with illness.

Because online communications through blogs has become an important point of information exchange about the fast changing topics of health and medicine the NLM’s blog archive project continues to grow. In the future the NLM envisions collaborating with other groups to capture important but unpublished studies and other information including scientific news and content communicated during natural disasters and emergencies.

Classroom Activities and Lesson Plans for Native Voices

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Native Voices ExhibitionThe National Library of Medicine (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services K-12 Workgroup has released classroom activities and lesson plans to supplement the Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness Web site. 

 For grades 6-12, these classroom activities and lesson plans familiarize students to the health and medicine of Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.  The activities and lesson plans are available at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/resources/lesson-plans-list.html.    

 The activities and lesson plans use Native Voices exhibition Web site content material and other NLM online educational/science resources., composed of four units.  Each unit introduces a different way of exploring and learning about the Native Voices exhibition in about 1.5 to 3 hours.  These units are: 1) A scavenger hunt, 2) An environmental health science lesson, 3) A social science lesson, and 4) A biology lesson.

 While the activities and lesson plans can be used in science classrooms, clubs, and programs, they can be used also to reinforce the history and societal developments of Native peoples in social science and history classrooms.

About the Native Voices Web site

The Native Voices Web site (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices) allows people to experience an exhibition currently on display at NLM in Bethesda, Maryland.  Both versions explore the connection between wellness, illness and cultural life through a combination of interviews with Native people and interactive media.

For more about K -12 Resources from the National Library of Medicine, this month’s SCR CONNECTions featured an overview of this and other databases and online exhibitions which include classroom materials. Go to: http://nnlm.gov/scr/training/webmeeting.html#Archives for a recording of the session and presentation material.

Join Us for SCR CONNECTions Tomorrow on NLM K-12 Resources

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

bigstock-Cute-young-student-using-a-tab-23409365 Join us February 19, 2014 for the monthly SCR CONNECTions webinar.

Wednesday, February 19th from 10:30 – 11:30 am (CT)

Presenter: Cheryl Rowan, Consumer Health Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region

Topic: Off the Shelf: Free Classroom Resources from the National Library of Medicine”

This month’s webinar will highlight some of the free NLM resources which include materials designed to introduce, reinforce, and supplement K-12 curricula. Resources covered will include: NLM Online Exhibitions, ToxMystery, ToxTown, GeneED, Genetics Home Reference, and others.

 How to Log In

Go to https://webmeeting.nih.gov/scr/,  on the log in screen, choose “Enter as a Guest” and type in your name.

Once the room is open the system will be able to call you to connect to the audio. If this system does not work for you, a call-in number will be provided in the room.

Use *6 to mute or unmute your phone.

**Do Not Place Call on Hold**

Problems? Contact the Regional Medical Library (RML) office at 713-799-7880713-799-7880, or 800-338-7657800-338-7657 (AR, LA, NM, OK, TX only).

This webinar will be available for 1 hour of Medical Library Association (MLA) Continuing Education credit and will be archived for future viewing.

2014 Horizon Report

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

NMC Horizon Report 2014 Higher Education EditionWhat’s next on the horizon for technology and education? The 2014 Horizon Report from New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative provides researched insights what to expect over the next several years for technology trends in higher education. The Horizon Report has been produced annually since 2002 and amazingly many of the trends and rates of adoption continue to be accurate. With the ability work with leaders in higher education IT the creators of the Horizon Report provide an honest and accurate assessment of some of the trends to watch and adopt.

To provide a frame of reference for how fast these new technologies will impact education the Horizon report places important developments in educational technology into “time-to-adoption horizons.” This year’s six trends to watch include:

Time-to-Adoption: One Year or Less
Flipped Classrooms – “In the flipped classroom model, valuable class time is devoted to more active, project-based learning where students work together to solve local or global challenges — or other real-world applications — to gain a deeper
understanding of the subject.

Learning Analytics – “Learning analytics is an educational application of “big data,” a branch of statistical analysis that was originally developed as a way for businesses to analyze commercial activities, identify spending trends, and predict consumer behavior.”

Time-to-Adoption: Two to Three Years
3D Printing – “Known in industrial circles as rapid prototyping, 3D printing refers to technologies that construct physical objects from three dimensional(3D) digital content such as 3D modeling software, computer-aided design (CAD) tools, computer-aided tomography (CAT), and X-ray crystallography.”

Games and Gratification – “Gameplay has long since moved on from solely being recreational and has found considerable traction in the military, business and industry, and increasingly, education as a useful training and motivation tool. While a growing number of educational institutions and programs are experimenting with game-play, there has also been increased attention surrounding gamification — the integration of gaming elements, mechanics, and frameworks into non-game situations and scenarios.”

Time-to-Adoption: Four to Five Years
Quantified Self – “Quantified self describes the phenomenon of consumers being able to closely track data that is relevant to their daily activities through the use of technology. The emergence of wearable devices on the market such as watches, wristbands, and necklaces that are designed to automatically collect data are helping people manage their fitness, sleep cycles, and eating habits. Mobile apps also share a central role in this idea by providing easy-to-read dashboards for consumers to view and analyze their personal metrics. Empowered by these insights, many individuals now rely on these technologies to improve their lifestyle and health.”

Virtual Assistants – “Virtual assistants are a credible extension of work being done with natural userinterfaces (NUIs), and the first examples are already in the marketplace. The concept builds on developments in interfaces across the spectrum of engineering,
computer science, and biometrics. The Apple iPhone’s Siri and Android’s Jelly Bean are recent mobile-based examples, and allow users to control all the functions of the phone, participate in lifelike conversations with the virtual assistant, and more.”

The 2014 Horizon Report provides some other areas of insight that are new to the reporting format. For instance the report also includes information on key trends that are accelerating technology adoption as well as significant challenges impeding technology adoption in higher education. Both of these factors are important for educators and IT professionals be aware of as they will greatly impact how a trend can be adopted by a user group.

Watch the video below for a brief overview of the report:

In a recent medical librarians Twitter chat the subject of the Horizon Report and it’s impact on medical librarians was addressed. Many questions and ideas came from the chat, the transcript is available for review.

NN/LM SCR Profile in NLM In Focus

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

NLM In Focus Logo

The work of the NN/LM SCR is profiled in the January 23, 2014 NLM In Focus.  The post includes accomplishments, funding highlights and demographic information on the five-state Region.  The NLM in Focus electronic newsletter gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at the National Library of Medicine and how its vast resources are being used to improve public health and safety, and advance science and medicine.

NLM in Focus features articles about events at NLM, the library’s programs and services, research projects, fascinating collections, and its outreach efforts in the US and abroad. The talents and efforts of the people at NLM, its partner libraries, and its grantees are showcased. The newsletter also explores trends and new technologies, and delivers helpful news you can use.

NN/LM SCR class: ToxWorld: Surveying the Landscape of NLM’s Environmental Health Resources

Monday, February 10th, 2014

The NN/LM SCR is happy to offer a new class ToxWorld: Surveying the Landscape of NLM’s Environmental Health Resources in Oklahoma, April 17 and 18, 2014.

Industrial Smokestack

This free, hands-on class is designed to introduce participants to the different environmental health and toxicology resources available from the National Library of Medicine. Attendees will gain experience with resources such as Hazardous Substances Data Bank, TOXMAP and the Enviro-Health Links. This class will cover resources about your environment including climate change, fracking and toxic chemicals.

Each participant who completes this class will receive 3 hours of continuing education credit from the Medical Library Association.

April 17, 2014 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

University of Oklahoma-Tulsa
Tulsa, OK

April 18, 2014 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
University of Central Oklahoma
Edmond, OK

To register for the class: http://tinyurl.com/scrclasses

This class is sponsored by the U.S. Government Information Division, Oklahoma Department of Libraries, and hosted by OU–Tulsa Schusterman Library and University of Central Oklahoma Max Chambers Library

Please contact Karen Vargas at 800-338-7657 or karen.vargas@exch.library.tmc.edu if you have any questions.