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Archive for 2014

A Look Back at Internet Librarian 2014

Friday, November 21st, 2014

Internet Librarian 2014

Each October librarians from across the United States and Canada gather at the Monterey Conference Center, the original home of TED Talks, to share ideas and learn about new and interesting technology related to library services. This year I was lucky enough to have a proposal I submitted on Moodle and Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) selected for presentation at the conference. For my presentation I shared ways the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region (NN/LM SCR) had used new Moodle features to transform the online version of the Super Searcher class allowing more and more people to take part in the class and learn new content each year.

I also attended other sessions at the conference and used the hashtag #internetlibrarian to share what I was learning. Below you will find find some of the topics, presenters, and links I found useful.

Tablets in Public Libraries

Jezynne Dene, Library Director for the Portneuf Library in Chubbuck, Idaho presented on the Gizmo Garage. The Gizmo Garage is a joint project with the Idaho Commission for Libraries and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The aim is to provide hands-on experience with mobile technologies for library staff and patrons. Dene’s presentation provided great information and ideas for getting your staff comfortable with mobile technology. Using the Gizmo Garage staff were allowed to take devices home for personal or work use and try them out. They were then required to provide a review of the product including information about why they liked the device or why they didn’t. The results were great, staff became familiar with different operating systems and then felt comfortable fielding questions from patrons with devices.

In addition the project also funds classes for library patrons. Some good advice from the presenter included having a list of core competencies for tablets and mobiles, including some basics like how to turn the device off and on, how to use the camera, how to find and download apps and more. Another good suggestions was to have users with the same devices or operating systems in one class. Instead of mixing up Android and Apple iOS offer classes focused on one or the other.

Website Security

Cyber Security is an issue that all organizations must continue to revisit, repair, and upgrade. A presentation by Tonia San Nicolas-Rocca and Richard Thomchick of San Jose State University provided some resources to ensure your website is secure. It is important for any organization to review their policies and standards when it comes to web security. It is also important that libraries continue to use web security measures to protect patron privacy. An important step an organization can take to ensure security and privacy is to use Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure or HTTPS to add a layer of encryption to ensure that information exchanges are kept private. Resources from HTTPS Everywhere can help you make sure your sites are secure. Another tool to check your website encryption and security is the SSL Server Test from Qualys.

Internet of Things

Evening session keynote speaker Lee Rainie from the Pew Research Internet Project provided an overview of the Internet of Things (IoT) and what the coming wave of connected things could mean to libraries. Rainie’s presentation left more questions than answers when it came to what the data is telling us about the IoT. While it is unclear if the IoT will lead to more job creation or result in the loss of jobs to new technology one things is clear, librarians will be able to help with training and education when it comes to the IoT. This new technology will require new skills and insights that libraries will be able to provide. In addition, global connectivity will create a larger marketplace for the exchange of goods, services, and ideas.

Another big issue related to the IoT will be concerns about privacy and the digital divide. Rainie theorized that librarians have the skills to help users understand issues related to privacy as well as the tools to bridge many people trapped by the digital divide.

Further information about the Internet of Things can be found in the May 14 report from Pew Research.

Update of DOCLINE 5.0 Changes

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Photo of a Jack Russell Terrier named Tugger, the DOCLINE mascot

In August 2014, NLM released DOCLINE Version 5.0 (release notes http://www.nlm.nih.gov/docline/docline_rel_info_v5_0.html).  The NN/LM SCR held a brief webinar demonstrating some of the changes in the new version of DOCLINE, particularly the information on entering journal embargo information into SERHOLD.

A recording of that webinar can be found here: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/p70dsror8zl/

Please contact Karen Vargas if you have any questions. karen.vargas@library.tmc.edu
 
 
 
 
 

New Version of Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) Available

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) Logo

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has released a new version of Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM)http://chemm.nlm.nih.gov/

New or updated content in CHEMM includes:

1) updated and enhanced content on Decontamination Procedures, Discovering the Event, and Training and Education

2) an NIH CounterACT program funded database with information on twenty-two medical countermeasures (including efficacy, relevant publications, research in progress, FDA and other global regulatory status information)

3) content for how emergency responders can recognize and handle events dealing with toxic gases generated by the combinations of consumer products or common household chemicals

4) a workshop report describing toxic chemical syndromes, or toxidromes, that lays the foundation for a consistent lexicon for use in CHEMM and for other uses that, if adopted widely, will improve response to chemical mass exposure incidents

5) a toxidromes outreach plan whose goal is to raise widespread awareness and encourage use of the toxidromes throughout the stakeholder community, and

6) an evaluation and validation plan for CHEMM’s Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST) that, once completed, will move CHEMM-IST from its current state as a prototype to a product ready for use in an operational response environment.

CHEMM is a Web-based resource that can be downloaded in advance to Windows and Mac computers to ensure availability during an event if the Internet is not accessible.

CHEMM’s content is also integrated into the NLM Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER), which is Web-based and downloadable to Windows computers.  CHEMM’s content is also available in WISER’s iOS and Android apps. The new CHEMM content will be incorporated into the next release of WISER. http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/index.html

For more information see the “What’s New on CHEMM?” section of CHEMM.

NN/LM SCR Update Recording Now Available

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

Did you miss the November 5 NN/LM SCR Update?   Listen to the recording and find out more about:

  • NLM’s responsive design-based databases
  • The redesign of DailyMed
  • New features of DOCLINE 5.0
  • NN/LM SCR staff updates
  • New classes
  • Available funding opportunities

Have any questions after the webinar?  Contact Michelle Malizia.

NIH Director’s Statement on Dr. Lindberg’s Retirement

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Dr. Donald Lindberg

From: Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director, National Institutes of Health:

It is my honor to recognize and congratulate one of the longest-serving leaders at NIH and a pioneer in applying computer and communications technology to biomedical research, health care, and the delivery of health information wherever it is needed.  Don Lindberg, M.D., who has been the director of the National Library of Medicine for more than 30 years, has informed me that he plans to retire at the end of March 2015.  I want to thank Don for his outstanding service to NIH, to the global biomedical research community, and to health professionals, patients, and the public.  Trained as a pathologist, Don re-invented himself as an expert and groundbreaking innovator in the world of information technology, artificial intelligence, computer-aided medical diagnosis, and electronic health records.  As the first President of the American Medical Informatics Association, many consider Don the country’s senior statesman for medicine and computers.

Don has created programs that changed fundamentally the way biomedical information is collected, shared, and analyzed.  Think about it—when Don began, NLM had no electronic journals in its collection, few people owned personal computers, and even fewer had access to the Internet.  He introduced numerous landmark projects such as free Internet access to MEDLINE via PubMed, MedlinePlus for the general public, the Visible Human Project, ClinicalTrials.gov, the Unified Medical Language System, and more.  Don also created the National Center for Biomedical Information (NCBI).  NCBI has been a focal point for “Big Data” in biomedicine for decades, providing rapid access to the data generated by the Human Genome Project and now to massive amounts of genetic sequence data generated from evolving high-throughput sequencing technologies.  GenBank, PubMed Central, and dbGaP are just some of the many NCBI databases that support and enable access to the results of research funded by NIH and many other organizations.

Betsy Humphrey and Donald Lindberg

While serving as NLM’s director, Don was drafted to lead important interagency programs.  He was the founding Director of the National Coordination Office for High Performance Computing and Communications in the President’s Office of Science and Technology Policy and was named by the HHS Secretary to be the U.S. National Coordinator for the G-7 Global Healthcare Applications Project.  He has always been ahead of the curve in taking advantage of new developments in computing and networking, ensuring that the NLM computer center has the reliability, security, and high speed connections necessary to keep pace with rapidly rising demands.

Don has been equally concerned with delivering high quality health information to everyone, including health professionals and the public in disadvantaged rural areas and inner cities.  He established NLM’s important outreach initiatives, expanding the scope of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and entering into longstanding and successful partnerships with minority serving institutions, tribal and community-based organizations, and the public health community.  Don is not a self-promoter, so sometimes these trailblazing efforts seem to appear magically.  Those of us who know better, however, understand they came about because of Don’s tireless energy, scientific acumen, and unwavering focus and determination.  We will miss Don as a preeminent leader at NIH, who brought NLM into the modern age of biomedical information.  We also, however, will continue to benefit from his wisdom, drive, and accomplishments.  Please join me in congratulating Don on a job extraordinarily well done and wishing him the best in his future pursuits.

November Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

NIH News in Health_Nov 2014

The November issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research is now available:

Features:

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: Steps Toward a Healthier Life

Diabetes raises your risk for heart disease, blindness, amputations, and other serious issues. But the most common type of diabetes, called type 2 diabetes, can be prevented or delayed if you know what steps to take.

Parkinson’s Disease: Understanding a Complicated Illness

Parkinson’s disease can rob a person of the ability to do everyday tasks that many of us take for granted. There’s no cure, but treatment can help.

Health Capsules:

Progress Toward a Bird Flu Vaccine

Participating in Alzheimer’s Research

Featured Website: Safe to Sleep

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.
Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!
Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

 

Updates and Important Dates Related to the ACA

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

5 steps screen shotNow that Halloween is past and we have turned the page to November, the next Open Enrollment Period for the Health Insurance Marketplace is just around the corner!
Open Enrollment at HealthCare.gov begins on November 15th, and concludes on February 15, 2015. Although the Open Enrollment Period targets consumers yet not enrolled in a health insurance plan, individuals who currently have coverage through the Marketplace will want to review their plan and decide whether to make changes during the Open Enrollment Period as well. The “5 Steps to Staying Covered through the Marketplace” has been created to help consumers better understand the renewal process. In brief, the steps are:

1.) Review

2.) Update

3.) Compare

4.) Choose

5.) Enroll

From Coverage to Care Screen ShotFrom Coverage to Care (C2C) is another initiative from CMS designed to help people with new health coverage understand their benefits and connect to the primary care and preventive services that are right for them. C2C resources are available to download and print in English and Spanish. Other resources include consumer tools and an 11-part video series.

Other Marketplace updates have already and will continue to take place as the date for the Open Enrollment Period gets closer. Several changes to the HealthCare.gov website and application process have been made which are designed to make the process simpler, faster, and more intuitive. You can visit the site today to begin to see these changes.

The NN/LM SCR is working to continue to provide information for our Network members on the Affordable Care Act and the Health Insurance Marketplace. The ACA Resources page on the website has been recently updated to include these and other resources.

Upcoming webinar: The NN/LM SCR office will be hosting a special webinar on November 18, 2014 presented by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Region VI Office on the topic of Preparing for Open Enrollment. Please watch our listserv and other sources for specifics on this webinar.

 

 

Update on Important Resource: RHIN Becomes HealthReach

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

HealthReach logoThe Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) was a national collaborative partnership whose principal focus was to create and make available a database of quality multilingual/multicultural, public health resources to professionals providing care to resettled refugees and asylees.

Earlier this month, the National Library of Medicine (Specialized Information Services Division) broadened the scope of RHIN by rebranding it HealthReach. This was done to better meet the needs of the diverse non-English and English as a second language speaking audiences. HealthReach continues to recognize the importance of providing refugee and asylee specific information while expanding the information provided to meet the needs of most immigrant populations.

Currently, there is not a great deal of change between the “old” RHIN and the “new” HealthReach; over the next several months new resources will be added.  This was intentional in order to help provide continuity of service throughout the transition.  Please use the new Twitter handle @NLM_HealthReach and the new URL http://healthreach.nlm.nih.gov .  Over the next several months the site will transition from the .org to the .gov site. Feedback is welcome through the “Contact Us” link on the website.

Professional Development Award Report: The 29th NASIG Annual Conference

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

North American Serials Interest Group

Guest Author: Yumi Yaguchi, MSIS, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) – Amarillo, Harrington Library of the Health Sciences

I was fortunate to be able to attend the 29th North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) Annual Conference in Fort Worth, TX, May 1-4, 2014. My attendance was funded by an NN/LM SCR Professional Development Award.

NASIG is an independent organization that promotes communication, information, and continuing education about serials and continuing resources and the issues of scholarly communication since 1985. Serving as a supervisor of Serials and ILL Specialists, this professional development project increased my awareness and practical knowledge and skills in serials and continuing resource management.

The NASIG annual meeting consists of two parts, preconference (intensive training courses for library personnel) and conference (sessions and presentations, vendor exhibits, receptions, business meetings, etc.). Among those valuable programs, I am reporting on two preconference intensive training classes and one conference session.

Building Your Licensing and Negotiation Skills Toolkit (taught by Claire Dygert, Assistant Director for Licensing and E-Resources, Florida Virtual Campus)

The training class consisted of two parts, (1) licensing electronic resources, and (2) cultivating good negotiation skills for dealing with vendors.

In the first part, I learned what a license agreement is and why the contract is needed for library electronic resources. Related laws and regulations that the license agreements rely on were introduced. Recommended practice guidelines for electronic resources were also addressed (e.g., Shared Electronic Resource Understanding (SERU), Florida Virtual Campus Guidelines for E-Resource License Agreements. In the second part, the negotiation process for electronic resources was explained step-by-step, from planning and information gathering to developing a proposal based on the information collected. Several tips for cultivating good negotiating skills, which are required for successful deals, were introduced.

There was also a very informative discussion among participants about emerging license issues, including concerns in health sciences libraries. The ambiguous definition of “authorized” users (e.g., physicians work for an affiliated teaching hospital for a local medical school) in the legal agreement is one example. Electronic book ILL issues were also addressed, including the ongoing electronic book ILL project at Texas Tech University and the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, through Greater Western Library Alliance, in collaboration with Springer.

In addition to numerous practical tips in transactions in electronic resource licensing, the presenter’s unique approach and perspectives on licensing negotiations impressed me.  Good negotiation skills are required for successful deals. To achieve the goal, the lecturer emphasized the importance of building a negotiation support system. The assistance can be obtained outside of the library such as through the Office of Finance on campus or even external resources such as negotiation skill seminars offered by private sectors. Librarians sometimes overlook “out-of-library” resources. Learning from unsuccessful deals or mistakes will be beneficial for the next contract renewal or new contract review. The lecturer introduced her personal experiences, such as managing “problematic” vendor representatives and the importance of keeping all the records throughout the transaction and negotiation processes. The lecturer also recommended a book titled The Librarian’s Legal Companion for Licensing Information Resources and Services as “the Bible” for licensing negotiation . I am currently reading it and, as recommended, it is a good resource for librarians who need to read and interpret license agreement documents and prepare for a successful negotiation.

Big Deals and Squeaky Wheels: Taking Stock of Your Stats (taught by Angie Rathmel, Electronic Resources Librarian, and Lea Currie, Head of Content Development, University of Kansas (KU))

The training class taught a wide variety of tools, technologies, and techniques in electronic resource assessment for decision making in collection development. The hands-on activity of generating resource usage statistics using actual data and spreadsheets was included. Several key concepts and initiatives in electronic resource usage and statistics were addressed, such as COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources), SUSHI (Standardized Usage Harvesting Initiative) protocol, and PIRUS (Publisher and Institutional Repository Usage Statistics). Throughout this in-class experience, the analysis of publishers’ “Big Deal” electronic journal packages was the focus.

What made this training class unique was that (1) KU invented their own methods and criteria to evaluate their collection based on the resource usage data, and (2) based on the criteria, KU created their own formula and worksheet to do statistical analysis. They do not rely on vendors’ electronic resource assessment products. In the hands-on session, participants used the Excel spreadsheet developed by KU to generate the “custom” statistics they desire. They also mentioned their collaboration with ILL librarians to decide how ILL usage data is incorporated in the statistical analysis.

Wangling Metadata from HathiTrust and PubMed to Provide Full-text Linking to The Cornell Veterinarian (presented by Steven Folsom, Metadata Librarian, Cornell University)

I thought this presentation was one of the most forward-thinking conference presentations.  Their ongoing project includes metadata addition and revision to provide full-text linking via LinkOut to the Cornell Veterinarian from HathiTrust Digital Library in PubMed. Several metadata additions and edits have been made to enable the linking. For example, to meet the requirement for the PubMed citation data, which must be formatted in XML, holdings information from the Hathi METS metadata files was normalized to communicate with the PubMed XML data files for the Cornell Veterinarian articles. The project is still in process, and I am very interested in how this ambitious project will go. Specifically, this experimental project will give some hints and insights to the institutions which prepare their own open access publication or plan how their open access digital publications, repositories, and archives will be truly accessed by end users in an easier and more cost effective manner.

For more information about the Meeting:
NASIG 2014 Program
NASIG 2014 Presenters’ Slides & Handouts: http://www.slideshare.net/NASIG/tag/nasig2014

For questions, please feel free to contact Yumi Yaguchi at 806-354-5581.

New MedlinePlus Mobile Sites in English and Spanish

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

M+ capture

Yesterday, MedlinePlus released new versions of the MedlinePlus Mobile sites in English and Spanish. The mobile site URLs are http://m.medlineplus.gov and http://m.medlineplus.gov/espanol

Like the original versions of the mobile sites, the redesigned sites are optimized for mobile phones and tablets. Unlike the original mobile sites that contained only a subset of the information available on MedlinePlus, the new sites have all of the content found on MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español. They also have an improved design for easier use on mobile devices.

The key features of the redesigned mobile sites are:
• Access to all the content available on MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español
• Improved navigation using “Menu” and “Search” menus to access search and major areas of the sites
• Enhanced page navigation with the ability to open and close sections within pages
• Updated look and feel with a refreshed design

This new version of MedlinePlus Mobile is the first step in redesigning MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español to behave responsively. Responsively designed Web sites automatically change their layouts to fit the screen of the device on which they are viewed, whether that is a desktop monitor or a mobile touchscreen.

In 2015, the MedlinePlus team will release a fully responsive version of MedlinePlus to provide a consistent user experience from the desktop, tablet, or phone. This will remove the need for a separate mobile site. Users will then have one destination for MedlinePlus (www.medlineplus.gov) when using any device.

Until then, try out this first offering of MedlinePlus’s responsive design on your smartphone at http://m.medlineplus.gov and http://m.medlineplus.gov/espanol. Send us your feedback and comments about the new site via the Contact Us link that appears on every page.