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Archive for 2010

OLDMEDLINE Back to 1946

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

OLDMEDLINE now includes citations from 1946.  The National Library of Medicine  has been converting pre-1966 citations into PubMed over the last few years.  Now there are 20 years worth of citations (about 2 million) in OLDMEDLINE.

OLDMEDLINE is Another Year Older with the Addition of the 1946 CLML Citations. NLM Tech Bull. 2010 Nov-Dec;(377):e1.

PubMed Author ID Project

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

From the Nov-Dec 2010 NLM Technical Bulletin:

The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is developing a system that will address the problem of ambiguous author names within PubMed and facilitate accurate search and retrieval of a participating author’s works. The specifics of PubMed Author ID, as the system is now known, are still evolving. It is currently envisioned that authors (or their designees) would register for the service through My NCBI and identify their research articles in PubMed using provided tools; this identification of articles will allow NCBI to link alternate names/spellings associated with an individual. The anticipated launch for PubMed Author ID is in mid-2011.

PubMed® Author ID Project. NLM Tech Bull. 2010 Nov-Dec;(377):e2.

PubMed Enhanced with Images

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Citations in PubMed now include images from the new NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) Images database. The database has more than 2.5 million images and figures from medical and life sciences journals. Images is expected to have a wide range of uses for a variety of user groups. These include the clinician looking for the visual representation of a disease or condition, the researcher searching for studies with certain types of analysis, the student seeking diagrams that elucidate complex processes such as DNA replication, the professional or educator looking for an image for a presentation, and the patient wanting to better understand his disease. Currently the only the images from PubMed Central are available.

The images display in the PubMed Abstract view as a strip of thumbnails.  Mousing over the image will show a preview image.

For more details, see: Canese K. PubMed® Display Enhanced with Images from the New NCBI Images Database. NLM Tech Bull. 2010 Sep-Oct;(376):e14.

For more about the Images database, see the press release.

My NCBI’s My Bibliography

Monday, November 1st, 2010

PubMed citations can now be added to My NCBI’s My Bibliography using Send to.

Canese K. Enhanced PubMed® My Bibliography Feature. NLM Tech Bull. 2010 Sep-Oct;(376):e13.

Call for Participation: Value of Hospital Libraries Study

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Do you want to demonstrate the impact of your library on patient care? Join a study on the Value of Library and Information Services in Patient Care sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) and conducted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:

http://nnlm.gov/mar/about/value.html

Using an online survey and interviews, the study will investigate the impact of library resources and services on clinical decision-making. Study facilitators will be asked to identify an institutional champion to help promote the study, and to distribute the online survey to physicians, residents, and nurses in their institution. The survey will be launched in March 2011.

If you are interested in participating, please complete the Study Participation Interest Form today. You will be contacted by the study team regarding your library’s eligibility, and about how to get started.  If you would like a mentor to provide support and answer questions, one of the study team members will be happy to work closely with you.

For questions about the study, contact MAR Network Services Coordinator Neil Romanosky (neil.romanosky@med.nyu.edu) or MAR Planning and Evaluation Coordinator Sue Hunter (sue.hunter@med.nyu.edu)

50th Anniversary of MeSH Videocast

Friday, October 29th, 2010

On November 18th, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) marks the 50th anniversary of MeSH with a talk by Robert Braude, PhD. The talk entitled MeSH at 50 – 50th Anniversary of Medical Subject Headings will be videocast with captioning at http://videocast.nih.gov/ The event is scheduled from 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm.

MeSH was first published in 1960; in 2010 we observe 50 years of this subject control authority. The seeds of MeSH were planted in December 1947. The Army Medical Library, the NLM predecessor, sponsored a Symposium on Medical Subject Headings in 1947. Participants, who included Seymour Taine, Thelma Charen, and Eugene Garfield, considered the challenges of the bibliographical control of publications. It was noted that the increasing complexity of scientific literature necessitated increasingly sophisticated approaches to organization and access. The participants recognized that the issue of a subject authority was not an academic exercise. Rather, subject cataloging and the subject indexing of journal articles were acknowledged as the essence of bibliographic control. The needs of the user of scientific information was to be always at the forefront in creating a set of medical subject headings that were made equally for subject description of books and for indexing of journal articles.

That first edition of MeSH  represented a departure from the then usual library practice. MeSH contained 4300 descriptors, and it was designed to be used for both indexing and cataloging. It is likely the first vocabulary engineered for use in an automated environment for production and retrieval.  MeSH continues to evolve and grow. The 2011 edition contains more than 26,000 subject headings in an eleven-level hierarchy and 83 subheadings. Annual revision and updating are ongoing to assure that MeSH remains useful as a way to categorize medical knowledge and knowledge in allied and related disciplines for retrieval of key information. MeSH is 50 years old and new each year.

The speaker: Robert M. Braude received his Masters of Library Science in 1964 from UCLA. In 1965, he attended MEDLARS training at the National Library of Medicine and his talk reflects on his 45 years of life with MeSH.   In 1987 he received a Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from the University of Nebraska and he was Director of the Mid-Continental RML. His career included positions as director of three academic health science libraries and he has served on many NLM Committees and Panels such as IAMS Review Committees, the Planning Panels on Medical Informatics and NLM Outreach Programs, and the Biomedical Library Review Committee. He is a past  Janet Doe Lecturer, a Fellow of the Medical Library Association and Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics.

The talk is co-sponsored by the Division of the History of Medicine and the Medical Subject Headings Section, National Library of Medicine.

The 50th Anniversary talk on MeSH will be available for later viewing.  A message will be sent later on the availability of the broadcast after November 18.

LinkOut for Libraries FAQ Page

Friday, October 29th, 2010

LinkOut now has a new LinkOut for Libraries Frequently Asked Questions page. On this page, librarians will find answers to questions such as “What is LinkOut?” and “What is the LinkOut Library Submission Utility?” Additional questions and answers will be added in the future.

Another resource for libraries interested in LinkOut is the Training and Educational Resources page.  It includes Quick Tours and other information for libraries using LinkOut.

CDC Releases Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

CDC Social Media Toolkit cover image

In an effort to better spread health information, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has experimented with many social media tools. From blogs to Twitter and everything in between, the CDC has tried various forms of social media for communication. With the rise of interest in social medial tools and Web 2.0 ideas, the CDC wanted to make sure that it was effectively using these channels to best communicate health information to people on a global scale. This week the CDC released their findings and recommendations for using social media to communicate about health issues.

The Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit provides information on how best to use social medial to share health information. In addition to overviews of various social media tools, the toolkit also provides insights into how inexpensive or costly the tools can be to implement.

This guide provides a great starting place for understanding and using social media to share health information. Information is relevant for health professionals, health organizations and libraries who want to pass on important health information to their patients, users or community.

New Look for NN/LM Emergency Preparedness and Response Toolkit

Monday, October 25th, 2010

current weather alerts mapBased on feedback provided from the Toolkit Usability Report, the NN/LM Emergency Preparedness & Response Toolkit (http://nnlm.gov/ep/) now has a new look. The site now features a “cleaner” presentation of content and some new features, including a section for Emergency Preparedness and Response-related Twitter feeds and easier access to weather alerts and warnings.

A new tutorial has also been created to assist users in navigating the toolkit: http://nnlm.gov/ep/toolkit-navigation-video/.

The EP & R Toolkit may also be accessed from the NN/LM SCR homepage through the Emergency Preparedness link under Member Services (http://nnlm.gov/scr/services/prepare.html).

Next Generation Learning Grants

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced the Next Generation Learning Challenges, a collaborative, multi-year initiative that aims to dramatically improve college readiness and college completion in the United States through the use of technology. The program will provide grants to organizations and innovators to expand promising technology tools to more students, teachers, and schools. It is led by nonprofit EDUCAUSE, which works to advance higher education through the use of information technology.

The program has released the first of a series of Requests for Proposals to solicit funding proposals for technology applications that can improve postsecondary education. This round of funding will total up to $20 million, including grants that range from $250,000 to $750,000. Applicants with top-rated proposals will receive funds to expand their programs and demonstrate effectiveness in serving larger numbers of students.  The first-wave RFP seeks proposals that address four specific challenges:

  1. Increasing the use of blended learning models, which combine face-to-face instruction with online learning activities;
  2. Deepening students’ learning and engagement through use of interactive applications, such as digital games, interactive video, immersive simulations, and social media;
  3. Supporting the availability of high-quality open courseware, particularly for high-enrollment introductory classes like math, science, and English, which often have low rates of student success; and
  4. Helping institutions, instructors, and students benefit from learning analytics, which can monitor student progress in real-time and customize proven supports and interventions.

The initiative will fund RFPs approximately every six to twelve months. The second wave of funding, anticipated in early 2011, will focus on secondary education.

The pre-proposal submission period for the initial RFP opens October 25, 2010, and closes November 19, 2010.