Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About SCR | Contact SCR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for 2005

Two New Librarian Web Sites

Tuesday, December 6th, 2005

OA Librarian
Open access resources by and for librarians.
http://oalibrarian.blogspot.com/

This group blog also provides links to a number of open access resources.

Google Librarian
“Google Librarian is the ultimate guide to Google made especially for Librarians and information professionals.”
http://www.googlelibrarian.com/
This site has links discussing the various services provided by Google, and provides information on how they might be of interest to librarians. Also, there are tip sheets on advanced searching, how Google works, and others.

Ten Tips for Evaluating EBM Tools

Thursday, December 1st, 2005

The December 1, 2006 issue of iHealthBeat provides tips for evaluating evidence-based point-of-care tools. Among the recommendations: Understand the process; Know the source; and Check for the update policy.

To read the entire article: Ten Tips for Evaluating EBM Tools.

New Pew Internet Report: Search Engine Use

Monday, November 21st, 2005

The Pew Internet & American Life Project has released a new report on search engine usage stating the search engine usage is now approaching email as the primary Internet application:

http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/167/report_display.asp

From the report:

Search engines have become an increasingly important part of the online experience of American internet users. The most recent findings from Pew Internet & American Life tracking surveys and consumer behavior trends from the comScore Media Metrix consumer panel show that about 60 million American adults are using search engines on a typical day.

These results from September 2005 represent a sharp increase from mid-2004. Pew Internet Project data from June 2004 show that use of search engines on a typical day has risen from 30% to 41% of the internet-using population, which itself has grown in the past year. This means that the number of those using search engines on an average day jumped from roughly 38 million in June 2004 to about 59 million in September 2005 – an increase of about 55%. comScore data, which are derived from a different methodology, show that from September 2004 to September 2005 the average daily use of search engines jumped from 49.3 million users to 60.7 million users – an increase of 23%.

This means that the use of search engines is edging up on email as a primary internet activity on any given day. The Pew Internet Project data show that on a typical day, email use is still the top internet activity. On any given day, about 52% of American internet users are sending and receiving email, up from 45% in June of 2004.

“My Family Health Portrait” updated

Wednesday, November 16th, 2005

The Department of Health and Human Services has updated its family health history project, “My Family Health Portrait.” It is now web-based and does not need to be downloaded to your computer.

For more information, see Healthcare IT News http://www.healthcareitnews.com/NewsArticleView.aspx?ContentID=3989

To go directly to My Family Health Portrait: https://familyhistory.hhs.gov/

Podcasts in Libraries

Wednesday, November 16th, 2005

For those new to the topic, a podcast is simply an audio and/or video broadcast that can be subscribed to and downloaded from the Internet. Many sites post podcast content in a manner similar to blogs, often on a daily basis.

The Krafty Librarian has a good discussion on the use of podcasting in libraries, and in particular, health science libraries, an area not often discussed.

http://kraftylibrarian.blogspot.com/2005/11/adding-podcasts-to-library-collection.html

The NCBI search toolbar!

Wednesday, November 16th, 2005

The NCBI search toolbar has arrived! Like the Google toolbar and the Yahoo toolbar, the new NCBI toolbar is a small software application that installs a search toolbar on your browser (compatible with Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox).

After installation, users can enter a search for PubMed and other NCBI databases directly from the browser toolbar.

More information:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/toolbar/

Take a tour/tutorial:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/toolbar/demo.search.pubmed.htm

IMLS/CPBPartnership for a Nation of Learners Videoconference

Monday, November 7th, 2005

From Mary Chute, Acting Director of the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services:

On Wednesday, November 30th between 12:30 and 2:00 PM ET, the
Partnership for a Nation of Learners will sponsor a national/local
COMMUNITY COLLABORATION VIDEOCONFERENCE designed to help initiate,
strengthen or renew relationships among local museums, libraries, public
broadcasting stations and public radio stations. One-third of all
public television stations in the nation have agreed to downlink a
PBS-fed videoconference and to host a group of fellow participants from
these and other community organizations. Public television stations in
AK, AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, MA, MD, MI, MN, MT, NC, ND,
NE, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OR, PA, RI, SC, TN, TX, VA, WI, and Puerto Rico are
participating.

For a list of participating stations and to get in touch with the
station contact by NOVEMBER 17 if you’d like to attend, please visit the
Partnership for a Nation of Learners

The EULAlyzer

Friday, November 4th, 2005

Posted on Library Technology in Texas:

“The EULAlyzer will analyze those End User License Agreements (EULA) you have to accept before using any software. It looks for interesting words and phrases and lists them for you before you accept the agreement.

There is a free version (EULAlyzer Personal 1.0 for Windows) and a for-cost version (EULAlyzer Pro 1) for $19.95 per year. The Pro version will automatically detect a EULA and will give you results almost instantly.”

New Federal Government Flu Site

Thursday, November 3rd, 2005

The official U.S. government Web site for information on pandemic flu and avian influenza has just been released.

http://www.pandemicflu.gov/

Using PDAs in Libraries: A How-to-Do-It Manual

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005

Now available:

Using PDAs in Libraries: A How-to-Do-It Manual

From the MLA web site: “Using PDAs in Libraries helps librarans and information professionals understand how PDAs fit into day-to-day operations and how libraries can become more accommodating to PDA-using patrons.

Practical and easy to understand, this manual demystifies PDAs and prepares professionals to harness portable power.”

More Information (including purchase information):
http://www.mlanet.org/order/pdas_in_libraries.html