Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About SCR | Contact SCR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Professional Development Award Report: The 29th NASIG Annual Conference

North American Serials Interest Group

Guest Author: Yumi Yaguchi, MSIS, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) – Amarillo, Harrington Library of the Health Sciences

I was fortunate to be able to attend the 29th North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) Annual Conference in Fort Worth, TX, May 1-4, 2014. My attendance was funded by an NN/LM SCR Professional Development Award.

NASIG is an independent organization that promotes communication, information, and continuing education about serials and continuing resources and the issues of scholarly communication since 1985. Serving as a supervisor of Serials and ILL Specialists, this professional development project increased my awareness and practical knowledge and skills in serials and continuing resource management.

The NASIG annual meeting consists of two parts, preconference (intensive training courses for library personnel) and conference (sessions and presentations, vendor exhibits, receptions, business meetings, etc.). Among those valuable programs, I am reporting on two preconference intensive training classes and one conference session.

Building Your Licensing and Negotiation Skills Toolkit (taught by Claire Dygert, Assistant Director for Licensing and E-Resources, Florida Virtual Campus)

The training class consisted of two parts, (1) licensing electronic resources, and (2) cultivating good negotiation skills for dealing with vendors.

In the first part, I learned what a license agreement is and why the contract is needed for library electronic resources. Related laws and regulations that the license agreements rely on were introduced. Recommended practice guidelines for electronic resources were also addressed (e.g., Shared Electronic Resource Understanding (SERU), Florida Virtual Campus Guidelines for E-Resource License Agreements. In the second part, the negotiation process for electronic resources was explained step-by-step, from planning and information gathering to developing a proposal based on the information collected. Several tips for cultivating good negotiating skills, which are required for successful deals, were introduced.

There was also a very informative discussion among participants about emerging license issues, including concerns in health sciences libraries. The ambiguous definition of “authorized” users (e.g., physicians work for an affiliated teaching hospital for a local medical school) in the legal agreement is one example. Electronic book ILL issues were also addressed, including the ongoing electronic book ILL project at Texas Tech University and the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, through Greater Western Library Alliance, in collaboration with Springer.

In addition to numerous practical tips in transactions in electronic resource licensing, the presenter’s unique approach and perspectives on licensing negotiations impressed me.  Good negotiation skills are required for successful deals. To achieve the goal, the lecturer emphasized the importance of building a negotiation support system. The assistance can be obtained outside of the library such as through the Office of Finance on campus or even external resources such as negotiation skill seminars offered by private sectors. Librarians sometimes overlook “out-of-library” resources. Learning from unsuccessful deals or mistakes will be beneficial for the next contract renewal or new contract review. The lecturer introduced her personal experiences, such as managing “problematic” vendor representatives and the importance of keeping all the records throughout the transaction and negotiation processes. The lecturer also recommended a book titled The Librarian’s Legal Companion for Licensing Information Resources and Services as “the Bible” for licensing negotiation . I am currently reading it and, as recommended, it is a good resource for librarians who need to read and interpret license agreement documents and prepare for a successful negotiation.

Big Deals and Squeaky Wheels: Taking Stock of Your Stats (taught by Angie Rathmel, Electronic Resources Librarian, and Lea Currie, Head of Content Development, University of Kansas (KU))

The training class taught a wide variety of tools, technologies, and techniques in electronic resource assessment for decision making in collection development. The hands-on activity of generating resource usage statistics using actual data and spreadsheets was included. Several key concepts and initiatives in electronic resource usage and statistics were addressed, such as COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources), SUSHI (Standardized Usage Harvesting Initiative) protocol, and PIRUS (Publisher and Institutional Repository Usage Statistics). Throughout this in-class experience, the analysis of publishers’ “Big Deal” electronic journal packages was the focus.

What made this training class unique was that (1) KU invented their own methods and criteria to evaluate their collection based on the resource usage data, and (2) based on the criteria, KU created their own formula and worksheet to do statistical analysis. They do not rely on vendors’ electronic resource assessment products. In the hands-on session, participants used the Excel spreadsheet developed by KU to generate the “custom” statistics they desire. They also mentioned their collaboration with ILL librarians to decide how ILL usage data is incorporated in the statistical analysis.

Wangling Metadata from HathiTrust and PubMed to Provide Full-text Linking to The Cornell Veterinarian (presented by Steven Folsom, Metadata Librarian, Cornell University)

I thought this presentation was one of the most forward-thinking conference presentations.  Their ongoing project includes metadata addition and revision to provide full-text linking via LinkOut to the Cornell Veterinarian from HathiTrust Digital Library in PubMed. Several metadata additions and edits have been made to enable the linking. For example, to meet the requirement for the PubMed citation data, which must be formatted in XML, holdings information from the Hathi METS metadata files was normalized to communicate with the PubMed XML data files for the Cornell Veterinarian articles. The project is still in process, and I am very interested in how this ambitious project will go. Specifically, this experimental project will give some hints and insights to the institutions which prepare their own open access publication or plan how their open access digital publications, repositories, and archives will be truly accessed by end users in an easier and more cost effective manner.

For more information about the Meeting:
NASIG 2014 Program
NASIG 2014 Presenters’ Slides & Handouts: http://www.slideshare.net/NASIG/tag/nasig2014

For questions, please feel free to contact Yumi Yaguchi at 806-354-5581.

New MedlinePlus Mobile Sites in English and Spanish

M+ capture

Yesterday, MedlinePlus released new versions of the MedlinePlus Mobile sites in English and Spanish. The mobile site URLs are http://m.medlineplus.gov and http://m.medlineplus.gov/espanol

Like the original versions of the mobile sites, the redesigned sites are optimized for mobile phones and tablets. Unlike the original mobile sites that contained only a subset of the information available on MedlinePlus, the new sites have all of the content found on MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español. They also have an improved design for easier use on mobile devices.

The key features of the redesigned mobile sites are:
• Access to all the content available on MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español
• Improved navigation using “Menu” and “Search” menus to access search and major areas of the sites
• Enhanced page navigation with the ability to open and close sections within pages
• Updated look and feel with a refreshed design

This new version of MedlinePlus Mobile is the first step in redesigning MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español to behave responsively. Responsively designed Web sites automatically change their layouts to fit the screen of the device on which they are viewed, whether that is a desktop monitor or a mobile touchscreen.

In 2015, the MedlinePlus team will release a fully responsive version of MedlinePlus to provide a consistent user experience from the desktop, tablet, or phone. This will remove the need for a separate mobile site. Users will then have one destination for MedlinePlus (www.medlineplus.gov) when using any device.

Until then, try out this first offering of MedlinePlus’s responsive design on your smartphone at http://m.medlineplus.gov and http://m.medlineplus.gov/espanol. Send us your feedback and comments about the new site via the Contact Us link that appears on every page.

Cheryl Rowan named 2014 SCC Librarian of the Year

Cheryl RowanI am pleased to announce that Cheryl Rowan, the NN/LM SCR Consumer Health Coordinator, recently received the 2014 Librarian of the Year Award by the South Central Chapter of the Medical Library Association (SCC/MLA).  This award recognizes a mid-career librarian for outstanding contributions in health sciences librarianship.   Cheryl’s first encounter with the NN/LM SCR occurred in October 2008 when she was a recipient of the Library Student Outreach Award.   In June of 2009, she joined the NN/LM SCR office as the Public Health Coordinator.  In that position, she taught numerous classes on health literacy, statistics and outreach to minority and underserved populations.  It was due to these and other accomplishments that she was named a Mover and Shaker by Library Journal.  She conducted presentations at national and regional conferences including the Arkansas Health Literacy Partnership Conference, Oklahoma Health Literacy Summit, Eight National Conference on Quality Health Care for Diverse Populations, Texas Library Association and American Library Association.

In December of 2012, she moved into the Consumer Health Coordinator position where she has taken a lead role in the dissemination of information on the Affordable Care Act.  She has provided training on this topic to numerous library associations throughout the South Central Region.  During Cheryl’s tenure, she has created numerous classes including: Food for Thought: Exploring Nutrition Information Resources, From Beyond Our Borders: Providing Health Information to Refugee Populations, and Health Statistics on the Web: It’s as Easy as 1,2,3.

As the Associate Director of the NN/LM SCR, I want to publicly thank Cheryl for her contributions to the NN/LM SCR program and her impact on librarians, health professionals and consumers throughout the country.  This honor is well deserved.  I look forward to continuing to work with Cheryl in the future.

October Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available

NIH News in Health_Oct

The October issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research is now available:

Features:

Sweet Stuff:  How Sugars and Sweeteners Affect Your Health
Is sugar really bad for us? How about artificial or low-calorie sweeteners? Learn more about the sweet things most of us eat and drink every day.

Cold, Flu, or Allergy:  Know the Difference for Best Treatment
You’ve got sniffles, sneezing, and a sore throat. Is it a cold, flu, or allergies? Learn to tell them apart so you can choose the best treatment.

Health Capsules:

Genetic Clues to the 2014 Ebola Outbreak

NIH Health Information at Your Fingertips

Featured Website: It’s a Noisy Planet

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.
Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!
Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

 

Update on the 2014 Ebola Outbreak

Ebola

Since publishing our previous blog post on the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the South Central Region has seen the first official imported case of Ebola.

On September 30, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the first imported case of Ebola in the United States. The patient, a man who traveled from Liberia to Dallas, Texas, “did not have symptoms when leaving West Africa, but developed symptoms approximately five days after arriving in the United States”. After being given experimental treatments, the patient passed away on October 8, 2014. The CDC is currently monitoring the people that have come into contact with the patient, although the risk of infection is very low.

From the CDC:

Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth) with:

  • blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola
  • objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus
  • infected animals
  • Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, by food.

A person must be exhibiting symptoms in order for Ebola to spread. Ebola has an incubation period of up to 21 days and the average time for symptoms to appear is 8-10 days. These symptoms often include fever, severe headaches, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and unexplained hemorrhaging. Isolation precautions and proper sterilization are the primary methods of prevention.

As these developments impact our region, the NN/LM SCR is committed to connecting you with quality health information resources. To register for an upcoming webinar on Managing Health Information Resources regarding Ebola hosted by the National Library of Medicine’s Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC), visit their page.

An additional webinar, entitled Fighting Ebola and Infectious Diseases with Information, also featuring presenters from DIMRC will take place on October 14, from 1pm-2pm CT.

Free Antivirus Options

Computer virusAccording to PC Magazine “Not having antivirus protection isn’t just a personal risk: Unprotected computers can be springboards for attacks.” It is important that any computer you use have properly installed and updated antivirus software. Antivirus software is computer software used to prevent, detect and remove malicious software from an infected computer. In today’s connected computer world viruses can quickly spread from one machine to the next if antivirus is not properly used or updated.

While may large organizations rely on antivirus solutions such McAfee or Norton there are other solutions that work just as well for little or no cost.

The experts at PC Magazine recently provided an online comparison of several free antivirus products they were able to test in a lab environment. Free editions of antivirus options such as Bitedefender, AVG, and Panda Cloud Antivirus all scored well.

There are many choices for free antivirus solutions available and this review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of many. It is important to install and run antivirus protection not only for the security of your computer but also for the security of those you network with. Don’t let an unprotected computer infect others! Be sure that the antivirus software you use is updated regularly as new viruses are frequently created.

Input Embargo Periods In DOCLINE

Frustrated by the number of requests your library gets for articles that are embargoed? Now you can enter journal embargo periods in DOCLINE. Here is more information about the DOCLINE 5.0 Release http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/so14/so14_docline_release.html

Screen Capture of DOCLINE embargo period

NCBI Bioinformatics Course Applications Accepted

NCBI logo

From the NLM Technical Bulletin:

Health science librarians in the United States are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC).

The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution.

Online Pre-Course and In-Person Course Components
There are two parts to “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” listed below. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

  1. “Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching” an online (asynchronous) course, January 12-February 13, 2015
  2. A five-day in-person course offered onsite at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda MD, March 9-13, 2015

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.
  • Applicants will be accepted both from libraries currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services.

Enrollment is limited 25 participants.

What does it cost?
There is no charge for the classes. Travel and lodging costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant.

Important Application Dates

  • Application deadline: November 17, 2014
  • Acceptance notification: On or about December 15, 2014

More information on the course and the application form are located on the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Media-Smart Youth Teen Leaders Program: Call for Applications

Media-Smart Youth: Eat, Think, and Be Active!

The National Institutes of Health is now accepting applications from young adults ages 15 to 20 for its Media-Smart Youth (MSY) Teen Leaders Program.

MSY is a 10-lesson curriculum for youth ages 11 to 13 that explores media, nutrition, and physical activity. Throughout the program, youth analyze advertisements and make media messages of their own, try healthy snack recipes, and discover fun ways to be physically active.

MSY teen leaders commit to carrying out the program from start to finish. In return, they receive leadership experience, community service hours, and recognition from the NIH, plus training and $1,000 for program expenses.

Applications are due October 24, 2014. For more details and to apply, visit http://go.usa.gov/pCwY.

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) suggests the following posts for promotion via social media.

Twitter:
• .@NICHD_NIH releases a call for applications for its #MediaSmartYouth Teen Leaders Program: http://go.usa.gov/pCwY
• Be a #MediaSmartYouth teen leader & teach kids in your community to analyze media, eat right, & move more: http://go.usa.gov/pCwY
• Funding opportunity for teens: Apply to lead a #MediaSmartYouth program in your community: http://go.usa.gov/pCwY

Facebook Posts:
• NICHD is accepting applications from young adults ages 15 to 20 for its #MediaSmartYouth (MSY) Teen Leaders Program. MSY is a 10-lesson curriculum that explores media, nutrition, and physical activity. Teen leaders carry out the program from start to finish. In return, they get leadership experience, community service hours, and recognition from the NIH, plus training and $1,000 for program expenses. Applications are due October 24. http://go.usa.gov/pCwY
• Heads up, teens! If you care about health in your community and are on the lookout for a unique service project, consider applying for the #MediaSmartYouth (MSY) Teen Leaders Program. Applications are due October 24. http://go.usa.gov/pCwY

For more information about Media-Smart Youth, visit: http://www.nichd.nih.gov/msy/Pages/index.aspx

Changes in the NN/LM SCR Office

Significant changes have recently occurred at the NN/LM SCR.

The NN/LM SCR main office has moved from the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library (HAM-TMC Library) building and relocated to the John P. McGovern Historical Research Center at 8272 El Rio Street, Houston TX 77054.  The Associate Director and support staff will be housed in this facility. The four Coordinators, Cheryl Rowan, Naomi Gonzales, Emily Hurst and Karen Vargas will be telecommuting employees.

The following is a message from L. Maximilian Buja, MD, Executive Director of the HAM-TMC Library and Director of the NN/LM SCR, explaining the rationale for the relocation.


8272 El Rio

The HAM-TMC Library (dba The TMC Library) has begun implementation of a key component of its Strategic Plan. This involves a reenvisioning of the current library into a contemporary Health Science Information Center. This will involve the downsizing of the space in the library building (JJL Building)from a net 70,000 sq. ft. to 50,000 sq. ft. This will be accomplished primarily by downsizing the book and current print journal stacks to create an open architecture for contemporary learning and research. The downsizing of the print collection is being accomplished in a careful manner so that important and unique print material will be retained either on-site or at secure off-site locations. The Library’s commitment to the NLM Print Retention program remains intact.

There is necessarily going to be less office and non-public space in the modernized library. The central administrative functions and offices as well as the core of the McGovern Historical Collection are to be maintained at the JJL  Building. Given the need to reduce the non-public space in the JJL Building and taking into consideration that the primary mission of the Regional Medical Library program is outreach, the decision has been made to move the base of operations of the NN/LM SCR to the Library’s annex where the archives are housed.This is in an 11,000 sq. ft. facility located at 8272 El Rio St., about 2 miles from the JJL Building. The rationale for this decision was discussed with the Associate Director, Michelle Malizia, and her input taken into consideration in going forward with the implementation.

Support Staff office

At the Archives building, space has been created for the NN/LM SCR that includes a 148 sq. ft. private office for the Associate Director, a 244 sq. ft. shared space for three administrative staff, as well as space for printers and storage of exhibit backdrops and equipment. Additional space for the administrative staff is under development. There is also a 168 sq. ft. conference room that will be shared by the NN/LM SCR and existing Archives staff. Appropriate connectivity for computers and internet has been established.

A plan is being implemented for the four coordinators to function as telecommuting employees. In the current work environment, telecommuting is an established form of doing business that has proven successful for a variety of enterprises. There is also a precedent for this approach previously established within operations of the RM Ls. The Library will ensure all necessary equipment and other support to make this approach successful.

Ongoing operations are to include regular meetings of the entire NN/LM SCR staff on a bi-weekly basis and regular meetings of the entire staff with the Director of the program. The Houston Academy of Medicine (HAM) established the Library in 1915. The current Library does business as a subsidiary of HAM. The HAM operates the JJL Building in the Texas Medical Center (TMC) and the Library rents space from HAM at cost. There is current consideration of transfer of the ownership of the building from HAM to another TMC entity. The Library has been given a firm guarantee that the Library of 50,000 sq. ft. will continue at the current site in perpetuity and at affordable rent.

Regardless of these considerations about the JJL building, the home of the NN/LM SCR will continue to be in the Library annex facility.