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Coming in January: New DOCLINE Password Security Requirements

Beginning January 7, 2016, DOCLINE account passwords will need to meet new complexity requirements. On January 6, all DOCLINE libraries will receive email instructions on how to change passwords to meet the new requirements. The notification will include the specifics of what constitutes a valid password, as will the “change password” dialog. The specific instructions will not be made publically available. Passwords should be changed on January 7 or shortly thereafter. Passwords not changed by February 1, 2016, will be automatically changed. The DOCLINE system must be changed to accept the new password requirements, and these changes will not be made until January 7. Therefore, passwords changed prior to January 7 will not meet the new requirements and will need to be changed again. As part of this security update, User IDs not used to log in during 2015 will be deleted on February 1, 2016, and libraries without User IDs active in 2015 will be set to non-participant status.

New NLM VSAC Collaboration Tool Launched

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Value Set Authority Center (VSAC) has just launched VSAC Collaboration; a tool to support communication, knowledge management and document management by value set authors and stewards. VSAC Collaboration provides a central site where value set authors can post value sets for collaborative discussion. In that site, teams can share threaded discussions about the value sets, view recent value set expansions posted by site members, organize their value sets by usage and by team’s workflow needs, and receive activity and change notifications from VSAC.

VSAC Collaboration Tool training webinars and slides are available. Access to the VSAC and to the VSAC Collaboration Tool requires a free Unified Medical Language System® Metathesaurus License.

Registration Available for the Free NTC Hybrid Class “PubMed for Trainers”

Gain new skills, brush up on existing PubMed skills, and collaborate with colleagues to help create effective training strategies! Join the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) for the hybrid class, PubMed for Trainers, offered at various locations across the country, including the University of California at Davis, on February 25.

PubMed for Trainers is held in four sessions: three online sessions and one in-person session. The course consists of live demonstrations, hands-on exercises, group work and discussions, networking opportunities, and approximately 2-3 hours of independent homework. Thirteen MLA CE credits are available for the PubMed content. An optional instructional design component of the class is worth an additional 3 MLA CE credits. The class is offered at no cost to participants. Class space is limited, so register now! For questions, contact the National Library of Medicine Training Center.

Search PubMed with 2016 MeSH!

As of December 15, PubMed/MEDLINE citations (including the backlog of citations indexed since November 18 with 2016 MeSH), the MeSH database, and the NLM Catalog were updated to reflect 2016 MeSH. The MeSH translation tables were also updated on December 15. Now that end-of-year activities are complete, MEDLINE/PubMed may be searched using 2016 MeSH vocabulary. See MEDLINE Data Changes — 2016 for details on the data changes. On December 16, NLM resumed daily MEDLINE updates to PubMed.

Order Your Free NIAMS 2016 A Year of Health Planners Today!

Cover of A Year of Health: A Guide to a Healthy 2016 for You and Your FamilyThe National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the NIH, has developed a set of 2016 health planners – A Year of Health – tailored for four multicultural communities as part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative (NMOI). The 2016 planners provide research-based health tips and information about staying healthy and managing conditions of the bones, joints, muscles and skin. The four health planners, created with community input, are tailored for the following audiences:

Each organization can order up to 150 copies of the health planner free of charge for their communities, while supplies last. Individuals who would like to receive 10 copies or less of the 2016 health planner can place an order directly through the NIAMS online ordering system.

PubMed for Nurses: New Tutorial Available

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial is available now from the PubMed Online Training page on the NLM Web site. This tutorial was created specifically to help nurses efficiently find literature using PubMed. Its concise, targeted content consists of five videos with exercises to test your knowledge. The tutorial was designed to be completed in less than 30 minutes.

The PubMed for Nurses Tutorial was researched, designed and developed by Megan Kellner from Maryland’s iSchool, the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, in consultation with nurses and librarians who serve nurses around the United States.

Updated PMC Journal Review Process and Minimum Requirements

The PMC Overview and FAQ have been updated to provide more information on the Scientific Quality Review Process for journals that apply to participate in PMC. In 2014, PMC implemented a scientific and editorial quality review procedure whereby expert consultants from outside the National Library of Medicine (NLM) conduct an independent review of journals seeking to participate in PMC. This was in response to a significant increase in new publishers and journals applying to participate in PMC, many of which are unknown to NLM in terms of quality and publishing practices. The independent review, which was approved by the PMC National Advisory Committee (see minutes from June 10, 2014), follows an assessment by NLM that the journal meets NLM’s criteria for its collection, as outlined in the Collection Development Manual.

PMC also recently updated the minimum requirement on the number of substantive, peer-reviewed articles needed before a journal can apply to PMC. The new 25-article minimum ensures that the reviewers have a sufficient amount of content on which to base their recommendation for inclusion in PMC. The new minimum article requirement takes effect on January 1, 2016. Publishers are encouraged to use the 25-article minimum as a guideline in the interim when submitting applications.

New PubMed Health Resources!

Earlier this year PubMed Health was expanded with research on research methods. These are studies and guidance for doing systematic reviews and helping them make an impact. A new resource takes this process a step further; the PubMed Systematic Review Methods Filter, as well as a new section at PubMed Health “For Researchers.” Also available are new glossary pages especially for research methods for anyone who wants to understand more about the mechanics of health research. The glossary will grow to cover the most common research terms used in PubMed Health.

Whenever you search in PubMed Health, you also get results from PubMed using the new filter. They will appear to the right of the main search results, in a box called “Systematic Review Methods in PubMed.” It’s below a box called “Systematic Reviews in PubMed,” which is a search for systematic reviews themselves. The filter searches through a subset of PubMed records that are either research or guidance on systematic review methods. The publications could relate to the development or evaluation of any step in doing or using systematic reviews. To use the filter in PubMed, enter sysrev_methods [sb] in the search box. You can use it like any search term, for example, sysrev_methods [sb] AND “network meta-analysis.”

The methods filter is a result of collaboration between the PubMed Health team and the Scientific Resource Center (SRC) for the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The SRC team selects the publications, after scanning widely every day looking for new candidates. When you see a systematic review at PubMed Health, there will often be a methods box to the right. That links to the relevant methods guide from the organization behind the review. Six groups so far have started contributing their methods guidance and research to PubMed Health. You can see the list on the new “For Researchers” page.

Navigation isn’t the only part of PubMed Health with a new look. The homepage also has a new design. For further details, visit the PubMed Health Blog.

Check Out What’s New for 2016 MeSH!

MeSH, the National Library of Medicine’s controlled vocabulary thesaurus, is updated annually. It is used to index articles from thousands of biomedical journals for the MEDLINE/PubMed database and for the cataloging of books, documents, and audiovisuals acquired by NLM. Changes for 2016 MeSH include: 438 new Descriptors, 17 Descriptor terms replaced with more up-to-date terminology, 9 deleted Descriptors, and deletion of the Subheading “diagnostic use.” Content of MeSH now includes 27,883 Descriptors; 87,028 Descriptor entry terms; 82 Qualifiers (Subheadings); and 230,872 Supplementary Concept Records. Three new Publication Types were added for catalogers; Blogs, Graphic Novels, and Public Service Announcements. The Publication Type Clinical Study was added mainly for use by indexers. Additional changes involve the MeSH Trees and Scope Notes. For a complete list of changes, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

New PubMed and PMC Filters for Creative Commons Articles

Creative Commons (CC) licenses are types of copyright licenses that allow free distribution of a work. PubMed Central (PMC), the NLM archive of full text journal articles, includes articles that have a Creative Commons license or are in the public domain. The latter covers those articles authored by staff of U.S. government agencies. NLM now offers a filter for both PubMed Central and PubMed to find articles with unrestricted Creative Commons or public domain (CC0) licenses:

These filters are based on license information that is provided to PubMed Central by publishers. There are many more articles cited in PubMed but not deposited in PMC that have CC0 licenses, but that information is not part of PubMed. You can view the detailed copyright information for an article in PubMed Central by clicking on Copyright and License Information at the top:

Copyright information for an article in PubMed Central.

For more information, see the PubMed Central Open Access Subset page. You may use and reproduce these articles without special permission. It is requested that you properly cite and acknowledge the source. Please bear in mind that these articles, although made available under a CC0 license, may still contain photographs or illustrations copyrighted by other commercial organizations or individuals that may not be used without obtaining prior approval from the holder of the copyright.