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PubMed’s Send to Order Feature

PubMed users continue to report an issue where the menu choices do not display when using the PubMed “Send to” feature. When this was first reported, it was determined that the problem occurs for those using older browsers (Internet Explorer 7 and 8) not supported by PubMed, or using “Compatibility View” in newer browsers (IE10 or 11). Users encountering this issue should upgrade to a more current version of Internet Explorer (IE10 or IE11) or use Firefox. DOCLINE users with new or upgraded browsers should configure their browser settings according to DOCLINE System Requirements to ensure full functionality. PubMed users should refer to the Browser Advice for NCBI Web Pages site.

DOCLINE users who are unable to upgrade or change browsers at this time can work around the issue by opening two separate browser tabs or windows, one for PubMed and the other for DOCLINE. This will allow them to search PubMed in one window/tab, then copy & paste the PMIDs from PubMed into DOCLINE in the other window/tab. Users of IE10 or IE11 experiencing the issue should check that “Compatibility View” is turned off, as follows:

  1. Open Internet Explorer
  2. Click Tools
  3. Click Compatibility View settings
  4. Uncheck “Display all websites in Compatibility View” or remove DOCLINE from the list of “Websites you’ve added to Compatibility View”
  5. Close & reopen Internet Explorer

Note to QDPortal users – if you experience the PubMed “send to” issue with a current browser version, contact QuickDoc customer at support@nesurv.com, or by phone at (617) 738-1800.

NN/LM OERC Guide to Tools and Resources for Evaluation

Have you ever found yourself trying to do an evaluation activity, but needing that one helpful tool? Or perhaps you need a step-by-step guide on how to do a community assessment, or are looking for ways to build evaluation into a project that you are planning. The NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) has developed the online guide Tools and Resources for Evaluation to assist with program evaluation. Following are some of the types of tools and resources described in the Guide.

Community Oriented Outreach

  • Tips on successful collaborations and tools for improving collaboration with community networks.
  • Toolkits for practical participatory evaluation and processes for conducting outcome-based evaluations.

Evaluation Planning

  • Step-by-step guides on incorporating evaluation planning into your outreach projects.
  • Instructions on using logic models for program planning.

Data Collection and Analysis

  • Tips for questionnaire development.
  • Resources for statistical methods of data analysis.
  • Guides for analyzing qualitative and quantitative data.

Reporting and Visualizing

  • Help with creating popular data dashboards.
  • Descriptions of data visualization methods.
  • Tools and TED talks about how to present your data.

March 2015 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of 9 men and women of differing ages and ethnicities.Check out the March issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Be a Partner in Clinical Research: Help Others, Help Yourself
    Did you know that you can participate in clinical research? Whether you’re healthy or sick, young or old, male or female, you’re probably eligible to participate in some type of clinical study. Maybe you or a loved one has an illness, and you’d like to help scientists find a treatment or cure. If you’re healthy, you can help researchers learn more about how the body works or how sickness can be prevented.
  • Better Check Your Bowels: Screening for Colon and Rectal Cancer
    Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death nationwide. But it can usually be cured when caught early. Screening tests like colonoscopy can save lives by catching problems before symptoms even appear, when treatments might work best.
  • Are You at Risk for Alcohol-Medication Interactions?
    Many people may be both drinking alcohol and taking prescription drugs that interact with alcohol, according to an NIH-funded study. The finding highlights the need to talk with a health care professional about the risks of drinking alcohol while taking prescription medications.
  • Measles: Preventable with Vaccines
    Measles is a highly contagious disease caused by a virus. It starts with a fever, followed by a cough, runny nose, and red eyes. A rash of tiny, red spots then breaks out and spreads. Measles can be especially dangerous to children under 5 years old. It can lead to pneumonia, swelling of the brain, and even death. The good news is that measles can be prevented by getting a vaccine.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

MedlinePlus No Longer Providing Interactive Tutorial Modules

As of Friday, February 27, the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus resource is no longer providing a library of interactive tutorials from the Patient Education Institute. The Anatomy and Surgery videos remain available. This decision is based on trends NLM has observed from users, and the desire to provide information that most closely aligns with user needs. NLM welcomes feedback about how MedlinePlus information should be presented and what type of content is missing. Feel free to send suggestions or comments through the Contact Us form.

American Evaluation Association Blog Theme: Qualitative Evaluation

The American Evaluation Association (AEA) just concluded a week-long blog theme about qualitative evaluation. Following are some highlights to consider using in your own assessment efforts:

  1. The Role of Context: the authors of this entry previously shared five high quality elements of qualitative evaluation, and this entry referenced them while emphasizing the need for evaluators to understand what role setting, relationships, and other context factors play in data as well.
  2. Purposeful Sampling: a great explanation on why to avoid convenience sampling (interviewing people because they happen to be around) and using caution with your qualitative evaluation terminology to consider not using the word ‘sampling’ due to peoples’ association of it with random probability.
  3. Interviewing People who are Challenging: establishing rapport leads to good qualitative data, but what does an interviewer do if there seems to be conflict with the interviewee? Details about how to manage your own feelings and approach with a curious mindset are very helpful!
  4. Asking Stupid Questions: this example from a bilingual HIV/AIDS training is especially insightful about the importance of clarifying sexual terms, putting aside concerns the evaluator may have about looking ‘stupid,’ and outcomes that led to deeper engagement and discussion from the group.
  5. Practical Qualitative Analysis: many helpful tips and lessons shared, including the reminder of being sure to group our participants’ responses that answer the same question together even if these replies come from different parts of the survey or interview.
  6. Providing Descriptions: sometimes there are concerns expressed that evaluation is ‘only looking at the negative,’ and by including full details about your qualitative inquiry collection and analysis as an additional resource or appendix you can help explain the steps of the process that otherwise may not be evident.

Apple’s “iWork for iCloud” Now Available to Everyone!

Apple recently made its “iWork for iCloud” app suite available to all users at no cost, even those without an Apple device. iWork for iCloud is web-only access and features web versions of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations. To access this trio of productivity apps, you will need to create an Apple ID on iCloud.com, if you don’t already have one. Sign-up is free and includes 1GB of free storage for saving documents.

To create an Apple ID:

  1. Go to iCloud.com.
  2. Click Create Apple ID.
  3. Fill out the required account information including your email address, a strong password, and security questions.
  4. Verify your email address by entering the 6-digit code that Apple sends you.
  5. Accept the iCloud Terms of Service.

iCloud.com supports recent versions of Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer. Learn more about the system requirements for iCloud.

Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award Nominations Due June 1!

The Friends of the National Library of Medicine is seeking nominations for this year’s Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award.

  • Nominees must be currently employed as a health sciences librarian and have worked in such a position for at least five years immediately preceding the award.
  • Nominations may be made for contributions by the librarian as demonstrated by excellence and achievement in leadership, publications, teaching, research, special projects, or any combination of these.
  • Nomination must be made in writing and include the following information:
    1. Official nomination form
    2. Five page description of the nominee’s achievements
    3. Current resume or curriculum vitae
    4. Additional information (no more than 5 pages double-spaced) that would assist the jury in the evaluation of the nomination and selection of the recipient
  • Self-nominations are accepted and encouraged.
  • Nominations must be received by June 1, and can be submitted via mail, email or fax.

Survey on Systematic Reviews: Respond by March 27

Information professionals who either serve medical/health sciences clientele or have job functions within a medical/health sciences environment are invited to participate in a research study entitled Challenges, Barriers, and Outcomes of Health Sciences Information Professional Involvement in Systematic Reviews, being conducted by librarians at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Library. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the experience, challenges, and outcomes of information professionals’ participation in systematic reviews. The online survey will ask questions about experience, challenges, barriers, and outcomes related to supporting and conducting systematic reviews. No prior experience with systematic reviews is necessary to participate in the study. The survey will take approximately 20-30 minutes to complete, and will be open through March 27, 2015. The study results will be presented as a poster at MLA 2015.

The National Library of Medicine Wants Your Stories!

Do you know any stories about people using NLM resources to find out something interesting, forge a new path, or improve their lives in a unique or dramatic way? Or, more simply, have you ever found just the right information at just the right time, for yourself or for a patron? For this year’s theater presentations at the Medical Library Association annual meeting in Austin, TX, NLM staff members who develop the resources are interested in teaming with the librarians who use them. They are interested in stories (great and small) about any NLM resource, but especially:

  • HSRProj
  • Health Services Research Resources on Comparative Effectiveness, Patient Centered Outcomes, Health Technology Assessment
  • DIMRC and other disaster resources
  • BIBFRAME and Linked Data
  • History of Medicine social media (e.g., Circulating Now)
  • MedlinePlus
  • PubMed Central
  • PubMed
  • PubMed Health

Anyone interested in sharing their story should contact Kate Majewski at NLM.

PHPartners.org Website Redesign: Volunteers Needed for Usability Testing!

The National Library of Medicine is currently assessing and redesigning the Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce website. PHPartners is a collaboration of U.S. government agencies, public health organizations, and health sciences libraries which provides timely, convenient access to selected public health resources on the Internet. To better serve and understand the needs of audiences, volunteers are being recruited for surveys and usability testing, involving participation in seven 15-30 minute sessions spread over a 12-16 month period. You are not required to participate in all seven sessions. Anyone interested in participating in the testing should complete an online form by March 5. Your feedback is invaluable to the improvement of the PHPartners.org website!