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2016 HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects Solicitation Announced!

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has announced the solicitation of proposals for the 2016 HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects, from organizations and libraries to design and conduct projects that will improve access to HIV/AIDS related health information for patients, the affected community, and their caregivers. Awards are offered for up to $50,000. Quotations are due to NLM by June 13, 2016! The solicitation for the 2016 HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects is posted on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site.

Projects must involve one or more of the following information access categories: information retrieval; skills development, resource development and dissemination; and/or equipment acquisition. Emphasis will be placed upon the following types of organizations or arrangements for developing these programs: community-based organizations (CBOs) or patient advocacy groups currently providing HIV/AIDS-related services to the affected community; public libraries serving communities in the provision of HIV/AIDS-related information and resources; health departments or other local, municipal, or state agencies working to improve public health; faith-based organizations currently providing HIV/AIDS-related services; and/or multi-type consortia of the above-listed organizations that may be in existence or formed specifically for this project.

Patients and the affected community need access to the most up-to-date and accurate health information to effectively manage and make informed decisions about their health. Health care providers and health educators also need access to the most current information to provide the highest quality of care. NLM is committed to assisting organizations in accessing the spectrum of information resources and services that are currently available, and is particularly interested in proposals with creative and different approaches to disseminate information to populations that have a disproportionate prevalence of HIV/AIDS infections in the United States. Emphasis is on increasing the awareness and utilization of NLM online health and medical resources in the HIV/AIDS Community through the use of innovative and evidence-based projects.

The NLM primary point of contact for the solicitation is Greg Benedict, Contract Specialist, and the secondary point of contact is Suet Vu, Contracting Officer.

Applying Cultural Competence to Outreach Evaluation

The American Evaluation Association’s Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation describes the importance of cultural competence in terms of ethics, validity of results, and theory.

  • Ethics – quality evaluation has an ethical responsibility to ensure fair, just and equitable treatment of all persons.
  • Validity – evaluation results that are considered valid require trust from the diverse perspectives of the people providing the data and trust that the data will be honestly and fairly represented.
  • Theory – theories underlie all of evaluation, but theories are not created in a cultural vacuum. Assumptions behind theories must be carefully examined to ensure that they apply in the cultural context of the evaluation.

The Statement also makes some recommendations for essential practices for cultural competence, including the following examples:

  • Acknowledge the complexity of cultural identity. Cultural groups are not static, and people belong to multiple cultural groups. Attempts to categorize people often collapse them into cultural groupings that may not accurately represent the true diversity that exists.
  • Recognize the dynamics of power. Cultural privilege can create and perpetuate inequities in power. Work to avoid reinforcing cultural stereotypes and prejudice in evaluation. Evaluators often work with data organized by cultural categories. The choices you make in working with these data can affect prejudice and discrimination attached to such categories.
  • Recognize and eliminate bias in language: Language is often used as the code for a certain treatment of groups. Thoughtful use of language can reduce bias when conducting evaluations.

Two recent entries on the Evergreen Blog on data visualizations and how they can show cultural bias illustrate how these principles can be applied to the evaluation of an outreach project. The first case, How Dataviz Can Unintentionally Perpetuate Inequality: The Bleeding Infestation Example, shows how using red to represent individual participants on a map made the actual participants feel like they were perceived as a threat. The more recent blog post, How Dataviz Can Unintentionally Perpetuate Inequality Part 2, shows how the categories used in a chart on median household income contribute to stereotyping certain cultures and skew the data to show something that does not accurately represent income levels of the different groups.

March Midday at the Oasis Recording Now Available!

On March 16, NN/LM PSR presented What the heck is Data Visualization and why should a librarian care?! for the Midday at the Oasis monthly webinar. Jackie Wirz, PhD, Research Data Ninja and Assistant Professor at Oregon Health & Science University, discussed the basic principles of presenting data with good visual design. You can view the webinar by visiting the Midday at the Oasis Archives page or by clicking on the YouTube video player below.

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NN/LM PSR Job Opportunity for Data and Technology Services Coordinator

The UCLA Library has initiated recruitment for the position of Data and Technology Services Coordinator, in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Southwest Region, Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library, and is actively seeking nominations and applications. The application deadline for first consideration is April 18, 2016. The complete posting is available for viewing.

Anyone wishing to be considered for this position should apply online. Applications should include: a cover letter describing qualifications and experience; a current curriculum vitae detailing education and relevant experience; and the names and addresses for three professional references, including a current or previous supervisor. UCLA welcomes and encourages diversity and seeks applications and nominations from women and minorities. UCLA seeks to recruit and retain a diverse workforce as a reflection of our commitment to serve the people of California, to maintain the excellence of the university, and to offer our students richly varied disciplines, perspectives, and ways of knowing and learning.

For questions about the position, please contact NN/LM PSR Associate Director Alan Carr.

Applications Available for Office of Dietary Supplements Research Practicum June 7-9 at NIH Main Campus

The Office of Dietary Supplements is now accepting applications for the Mary Frances Picciano Dietary Supplement Research Practicum on June 7–9, 2016, to be held at the NIH main campus in Bethesda, MD. This three-day practicum will provide a thorough overview on the issues, concepts, unknowns, and controversies about dietary supplements and supplement ingredients. It will also emphasize the importance of scientific investigations to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and value of these products for health promotion and disease prevention as well as how to carry out this type of research. The application deadline is Monday, April 4. About 80 individuals will be selected to participate.

Early-Bird Registration and Travel Scholarships Now Available for National Diversity in Libraries Conference at UCLA in August!

Early registration is available for the National Diversity in Libraries Conference 2016 (NDLC ’16) through April 30 at the rate of $175. Save $50 off the regular rate! The student registration rate is $100. The meeting, co-sponsored by the UCLA Library and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), will take place on the UCLA campus August 10–13, 2016. The conference aims to articulate the value of and develop strategies for diversity and inclusion in the library, archive, and museum (LAM) fields in order to improve organizational excellence and community engagement. NDLC ’16 program and poster topics cover areas of diversity that affect staff, users, and institutions, including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Collections and Access
  • Programming, Outreach, and Advocacy
  • Personnel, Management, and Organization
  • Challenging Topics

To learn more about the conference, check out the UCLA Library’s NDLC ’16 event page!

In addition, ARL has announced availability of up to five $1,000 scholarships for individuals to attend NDLC ’16. Funds from the scholarships may be used to cover the cost of registration, travel to and from the conference, lodging, and meals. Anyone interested in this opportunity must apply online by Friday, April 29. Successful applicants will be notified by June 6.

NLM Lends Books and Images to Jewish Museum of Maryland Exhibition

The National Library of Medicine has announced that selected items from its collection are included in a new exhibition, Beyond Chicken Soup: Jews and Medicine in America, which opened March 13, 2016, and will run through January 16, 2017, at the Jewish Museum of Maryland in Baltimore. Beyond Chicken Soup uncovers the often-overlooked cultural history embedded in a scientific enterprise. It probes questions important to all Americans: how do medical categories shape identity; what are the impacts of medical authority; where did our current health care institutions come from; and how does culture influence the medical construction of biological difference.

Focusing on the Jewish experience in the United States, Beyond Chicken Soup demonstrates how the field of medicine has been a vehicle, by turns, for discrimination, acculturation, and strengthening Jewish identity. The experiences of Jews, as both practitioners and patients, offer a case study in the formative impact of medicine on cultural and social identity, as well as the impact of cultural values on medicine.

Among the NLM collection items featured in Beyond Chicken Soup are:

  • Ma’aseh Tuviyah, [The Acts of Tobias], by Tobias Kats (1652?–1729), published in Italy, likely Venice, in 1708 and representing one of the earliest attempts to compare graphically the healthy human body to a well-functioning physical structure: in this case, a properly-run house;
  • Sefer otzar hahayim [Book of the Treasures of Life], by Jacob ben Isaac Zahalon (1630–1693), published in Venice in 1693, and
  • Ueber das Lehren und Lernen der medicinischen Wissenschaften an den Universitäten der deutschen Nation [On the teaching and learning of the medical sciences at the universities of the German nation], by the famous surgeon Theodor Billroth (1829–1894), published in Vienna in 1876.

NLM will also be providing the museum with selected images from its collection, including an image from Isaac ben Solomon’s Opera Omnia [Complete Works], published in 1515, and from the Zwerdling Collection of Postcards on the History of Nursing. NLM joins a number of prominent organizations in loaning items to the Jewish Museum of Maryland for this important exhibition, including the American Philosophical Society, National Library of Israel, and Peabody Museum of Archeology & Ethnology at Harvard Univeristy. NLM loans items from its history of medicine collections for display in public exhibitions to qualifying institutions on a case by case basis. Details about this loan program, and loans which the NLM has arranged since 2012, are available on the NLM web site.

NIH Director Announces New Role for David Lipman

NIH Director Francis Collins, MD., Ph.D., has announced that David J. Lipman, M.D., will continue in his leadership role as Director of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM). In addition, he will take on an important additional position as Associate NIH Director for Biomedical Information Resources. Together, these actions will further strengthen NLM’s and NCBI’s efforts to expand their trans-NIH mission, as envisioned in the recent report of the NLM Working Group of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director.

WHO Launches the Zika App for Health Care Providers

The World Health Organization has created a Zika app that gathers all of WHO’s guidance for agencies and individuals involved in the response to Zika Virus Disease and its suspected complications such as microcephaly, and for health care workers such as doctors, nurses and community health workers. The English version of the app is now available both in Android and iOS versions. It will be soon be available in all United Nations’ official languages and Portuguese!

March 2016 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of a worried man standing apart from a circle of friends.Check out the March issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Understanding Anxiety Disorders: When Panic, Fear, and Worries Overwhelm
    Many of us worry from time to time. We fret over finances, feel anxious about job interviews, or get nervous about social gatherings. These feelings can be normal or even helpful. They may give us a boost of energy or help us focus. But for people with anxiety disorders, they can be overwhelming.
  • The Benefits of Walking
    Thinking about adding more physical activity to your day? Walking can be a great way to get more active.
  • Featured Website: Mind Your Risks
    Many people with high blood pressure know they could be at risk for stroke and heart attack. New studies also link high blood pressure—especially in midlife (ages 45 to 65)—to an increased risk for dementia in later years. Don’t take unnecessary risks. Learn how to keep blood pressure under control.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!