Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About PSR | Contact PSR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research: He Huliau 2015 Conference in Honolulu

The Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research, Department of Native Hawaiian Health’s He Huliau 2015 Conference will be held on September 12, 2015, at the Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort & Spa in Honolulu, HI. The conference theme is Native Hawaiian Health: Looking Back as We Move Forward. Objectives include integrating the knowledge of past foundations in Native Hawaiian health into their practice; implementing culturally models of health care service and delivery in improving the health and wellness of Native Hawaiians; and integrating into the efforts of the existing programs in workforce development for culturally competent providers. This program should be of interest to physicians, physicians-in-training, social scientists, nurses and health care providers who serve Native and Pacific populations. The program brochure and registration information are available on the conference website. Early registration ends on August 28, 2015.

Medicare Facebook Page Launched!

As part of the 50th anniversary celebration of Medicare and Medicaid, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has just launched the official Medicare Facebook page, which will serve as an informational resource for those who will soon enroll in Medicare and people currently on Medicare. The Medicare and Medicaid programs were signed into law on July 30, 1965, by President Lyndon B. Johnson. For 50 years, these programs have been protecting the health and well-being of millions of American families, saving lives, and improving the economic security of our nation. Though Medicare and Medicaid started as basic insurance programs for Americans who didn’t have health insurance, they have changed over the years to provide more and more Americans with access to the quality and affordable health care they need.

During the summer of 2015, CMS will mark the anniversary of these programs by recognizing the ways in which these programs have transformed the nation’s health care system over the past five decades. Use the following resources to help spread the word!

Hashtags:

  • #KeepingUpWithGrandma
  •  #Medicare
  • #KeepingUSHealthy

Medicare 50th anniversary pages:

New Report from US-México Border Health Commission: Healthy Border 2020

U.S.-México Border Health Commission has released a new report, Healthy Border (HB) 2020 (PDF). HB 2020 is a binational initiative that focuses on the public health issues prevalent among binational border populations and establishes the Commission’s border regional agenda on health promotion and disease prevention. HB 2020 comprises measurable and binationally relevant goals and objectives that bring together key regional partners to develop and support policy change and culturally appropriate, evidence-based interventions. It addresses five public health priorities of binational concern, including chronic and degenerative diseases; infectious diseases; maternal and child health; mental health and addiction; and injury prevention. These priorities reflect the work of a diverse group of public health professionals, academicians, and other border stakeholders and organizations assembled to serve as a border binational technical work group tasked to develop a binational strategic plan that border stakeholders can use to coordinate public health responses at the binational, state, and local levels.

The main purpose of HB 2020 is to provide a framework for border region public health goals and the actions needed to improve the health of U.S. and México border residents. This is aligned with the Commission’s mission to provide international leadership that optimizes health and quality of life along the U.S.-México border. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the México Secretariat of Health, as integral to the structure of the U.S.-México Border Health Commission, support this initiative with the goal of eliminating health disparities and improving the quality of life of all border region residents.

Call for Applications: AAHSL 2015-2016 New Directors Symposium

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) has announced its call for applications for the 2015-2016 New Directors Symposium, to take place from November 2015 through May 2016. It is designed to help new directors be successful as leaders in their institutions and to enhance familiarity with the community of their AAHSL peers. The Symposium includes sessions on administrative skills, meetings with leadership of selected organizations, and opportunities for discussion among newly appointed and experienced directors. It is an opportunity for new directors to learn more about leading AAHSL libraries in times of great change, and to forge connections with colleagues and leaders in the field. Directors having permanent or interim appointments since January 2014 are invited to apply. For earliest consideration, applications should be received by July 27, 2015.

This is the fourth time AAHSL will offer its Symposium, which has been praised by past participants for its rich content and for connecting new permanent and interim directors to a professional community that will contribute to their success at their own institutions and as members of AAHSL. The format of the symposium will be a series of events over a six-month period and will combine virtual meetings with in-person meetings. The in-person meetings will be held in conjunction with annual AAMC and MLA conferences to make attendance more feasible for participants. There will be no registration fee for the Symposium, but participants are expected to pay their own travel and MLA registration costs. Anyone interested in participating in the Symposium should apply electronically by submitting a curriculum vitae and letter of application to office@aahsl.org. Questions about the Symposium may be directed to Carol Jenkins, AAHSL Leadership Program Director, or Tania Bardyn, Future Leadership Committee Chair.

July 2015 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of a man and woman painting the walls of a nursery room.Check out the July issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Pregnancy Problems? Boost the Chance of Having a Baby
    For those who dream of being parents, pregnancy problems can be tremendously frustrating and disappointing. In recent decades, scientists have developed a wide range of approaches to help struggling couples have healthy babies. And NIH-funded studies are continuing to search for even better ways to overcome the challenges of infertility.
  • Minding Your Metabolism: Can You Avoid Middle-Age Spread?
    As you age, you may notice you have less muscle and energy and more fat. Carrying those extra pounds may be harming your health. It’s easy to be confused by advice about diet and exercise, but they’re key to avoiding weight gain as you get older. As you move through your 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond, you can take steps to help fight the flab that can come with age.
  • Milk Gland “Remembers” Past Pregnancy
    A team of NIH-funded scientists found that an animal’s first pregnancy can lead to lasting changes in how genes are turned on and off in the milk-making mammary gland. The finding may help explain why humans and other mammals make more milk faster during second pregnancies.
  • Protect Your Skin from Sun Damage
    The sun helps your skin make vitamin D to keep your bones healthy. The sun can also help improve your mood and keep your sleep schedule regular. But too much sun can lead to sunburns and other damage that you can’t see. A new video from NIH — So Far and Yet So Close: The Sun and Your Skin — can help you learn how to avoid the sun’s harmful effects.
  • Featured Website: Alcohol Calculators
    So what’s in that drink, exactly? Summer cocktails may be stronger, more caloric, and more expensive than you realize. NIH’s alcohol calculators can help you assess calories, drink size, alcohol spending, blood alcohol levels, and the number of standard drinks in each cocktail.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Nominations and Applications Being Accepted for Seven IHTSDO Advisory Groups

NLM is announcing on behalf of the IHTSDO (International Health Terminology Standards Development Organization) the formation of seven new IHTSDO Advisory Groups (AGs). The AGs are the successors of the IHTSDO Standing Committees, which will allow for a more agile and flexible structure. The AGs will conduct specific activities that will contribute to the fulfillment of the IHTSDO Management Team’s responsibilities or the organization’s mandate.

The IHTSDO is seeking volunteers to serve on the following AGs:

  1. Content Managers Advisory Group
  2. E-Learning Advisory Group
  3. Modeling Advisory Group
  4. SNOMED CT Editorial Advisory Group
  5. Software Developers Advisory Group
  6. Terminology Release Advisory Group
  7. Tooling User Advisory Group

For additional information on the different Advisory Groups as well as the nomination and application process, please see the IHTSDO news note, Join an Advisory Group. The nomination period is open until August 14, 2015.

Story Builder Tool for Program Success Stories

This story builder tool available from the CDC Injury Prevention and Control web site involves three steps to produce an attractive, well-written program success story. Each step offers downloadable Microsoft Word documents to walk you through the process.

  • Step 1: The worksheets are designed to gather and organize project information for your story. This step could be used as a participatory activity, for example you could pull together your project team or a group of stakeholders to talk through questions in this worksheet. The discussion would help group members articulate the program’s value from their perspective.
  • Step 2: This step provides a story builder template to write your story, section by section. Each section has a field to develop a paragraph of your story, with some tips for writing in a compelling, user-friendly way. Each completed field prepares you for the final step.
  • Step 3: Here, you can download a layout template, where you transfer the paragraphs from your story builder template into the layout. Because this is a Word document, you can change background design, font, or even the size and placement of pictures and call-out quote boxes.

HHS Office of Minority Health Releases E-Learning Program for Promotores de Salud

An e-learning program to develop culturally and linguistically competent messengers, advocates and educators to promote health and wellness among their peers and within their communities is now available. Launched by the Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Promoting Healthy Choices and Community Changes program is a key component of the HHS Promotores de Salud Initiative, launched in 2011 as part of the HHS Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. The initiative recognizes the important contributions of community health focused efforts to reach low-income, vulnerable members of Latino/Hispanic communities. While promotores de salud have intimate knowledge of their communities’ cultures and needs, the training resource launched today offers more tools, knowledge and skills to strengthen community health and to narrow the health equity gap.

Promoting Healthy Choices and Community Changes aims to build upon the capacity of promotores de salud to improve community health. Available in Spanish and English at no cost, this e-learning program is designed for any promotor de salud, regardless of years of experience or the type of outreach in which they are engaged (e.g., nutrition, cancer or diabetes). It is comprised of four units that provide promotores de salud with the basic knowledge to promote healthy choices at the individual and community levels; to apply principles and strategies to motivate behavioral changes among the community members they serve; and to empower those individuals to create change in their communities. Learners will receive a Certificate of Completion upon completing each unit.

Telling Good Stories about Good Programs

Sometimes program successes are a well-kept secret, buried deeply in final reports under pages of statistics, tables, and descriptive details. There is a way to shine a stronger light on positive program impacts: program success stories. These are short (1-2 page) narratives designed to educate policy makers, attract partners, and share effective practices among colleagues. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deserves credit in leading a program success story movement within the public health sector. Many resources for developing program success stories are available from the CDC’s website. And a quick Google search will turn up many success story web pages from public health departments, such as the following three examples:

If you want to create success stories for your program or organization, you need to start with a plan, and establish a routine to collect information in a timely manner. To get started, check out the CDC Division of Oral Health’s Tips for Writing an Effective Success Story. For more details, the CDC offers the workbook Impact and Value: Telling Your Program’s Story. The CDC Division of Adolescent and School Health also has a how-to guide for writing success stories: How to Develop a Success Story. And lastly, you might find Success Story Data Collection Tool to be helpful for organizing and writing your program story. A data collection sheet could be particularly useful if multiple team members are involved in collecting success story data. The data collection tool is available in PDF or Word formats.

NLM Toxicology and Environmental Health Resource Update: ChemIDplus Interfaces

The National Library of Medicine’s ChemIDplus Lite and ChemIDplus Advanced interfaces have been enhanced with the following features:

  • Valid chemical names and CAS RN completions are displayed as the user types in the search box. If no data are found, suggestions are provided.
  • The ChemIDplus Registry Number field now includes the FDA UNII code.
  • The InChIKey is now directly searchable. It can be used for the interchange of structural data and as input for search engines such as Google.
  • The ChemIDplus Formula field now accepts molecular formulas with spaces between elements and their counts and without the hyphens previously required.

Examples of these new features may be viewed at the ChemIDplus Help pages. ChemIDplus is a free, web search system that provides access to the structure and nomenclature authority files used for the identification of chemical substances cited in National Library of Medicine (NLM) databases, including the TOXNET® system. ChemIDplus also has structure searching and direct links to resources at NLM, federal agencies, U.S states, and scientific sites. The database contains more than 400,000 chemical records, of which over 300,000 include chemical structures.