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Applications Now Being Accepted for the Fourth CDC E-Learning Institute Fellowship

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in partnership with the Public Health Foundation (PHF), invites distance learning professionals who are responsible for developing online training products to apply to participate in the E-Learning Institute (ELI) Fellowship. The ELI Fellowship empowers education and training professionals from state and local health departments and public health organizations with the knowledge, skills, tools, and resources to create quality e-learning products. Applications will be accepted through November 13, and selected applicants will be notified by December 14. Space is limited.

This program will be conducted from February 8 to June 10, 2016. Participants will need to allocate approximately two hours per week during working hours for program activities. Participants may need to commit more time to complete the final project. Participants will also travel twice to Atlanta, GA, for the orientation and final showcase event. Fellows participate at no cost. Professionals from state, local, territorial, tribal, and international health departments responsible for developing online training products should apply. University and hospital learning professionals who are involved in public health are also encouraged to apply.

NLM Informatics Lecture Series on November 4: Use of Clinical Big Data to Inform Precision Medicine

The next session of the National Library of Medicine Informatics Lecture Series will be held on November 4, at 11:00am-12:00pm PST, with the feature presentation Use of Clinical Big Data to Inform Precision Medicine. The speaker will be Joshua Denny, MD, Associate Professor in the Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. This talk will be broadcast live and archived.

At Vanderbilt, Dr. Denny and his team have linked phenotypic information from de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) to a DNA repository of nearly 200,000 samples, creating a ‘virtual’ cohort. This approach allows study of genomic basis of disease and drug response using real-world clinical data. Finding the right information in the EHR can be challenging, but the combination of billing data, laboratory data, medication exposures, and natural language processing has enabled efficient study of genomic and pharmacogenomic phenotypes. The Vanderbilt research team has put many of these discovered pharmacogenomic characteristics into practice through clinical decision support. The EHR also enables the inverse experiment – starting with a genotype and discovering all the phenotypes with which it is associated – a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS). Dr. Denny’s research team has used PheWAS to replicate more than 300 genotype-phenotype associations, characterize pleiotropy, and discover new associations. They have also used PheWAS to identify characteristics within disease subtypes.

Dr. Denny is part of the NIH-supported Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network, Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN), and Implementing Genomics in Practice (IGNITE) networks. He is a past recipient of the American Medical Informatics Association New Investigator Award, Homer Warner Award, and Vanderbilt Chancellor’s Award for Research. Dr. Denny remains active in clinical care and in teaching students. He is also a member of the National Library of Medicine Biomedical Library and Informatics Review Committee.

Bring Gaming to Your Science Classroom

Screentshot of Bohr ThruThe use of gaming in the classroom provides a new medium for teachers to introduce or reinforce key concepts in the curriculum. How to incorporate this new medium seems to have taken online webinars for teachers by storm. Yet are there enough online games that both engage students and provide a real opportunity to learn? Over the summer, the NLM had the opportunity to work with a high school teacher to create two pilot iOS game apps. This was their first attempt to map a gaming app to curriculum objectives taught in high school science. Both games include attractive game design and interactive gameplay, and offer teachers the opportunity to “pause” the game at various times for “teachable moments.” Your students will love taking a break from whiteboards and lectures to try their hand at these fun yet educational games. In addition to these two games, a third game created for the K-12 community involves the reinforcement of concepts that relate to greenhouse gas reduction, the use of renewable energies, and the value of green product purchases.

Bohr Thru: A trip Through the First 18 Elements
In this game, students become familiar with the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons necessary to build each of the first 18 elements. With the help of “Atom,” the game’s main character, students learn fun and interesting facts about the chemical elements. To reinforce content during game play, students can earn “power-ups” when they successfully add electrons to complete Bohr Models for an element.

Base Chase: “A” is to “T” as “G” is to “C”
The basic goal of this game is to reinforce matching bases and the importance these pairs play in the development of a species DNA. The game uses a jumping mechanic to collect different animals found within the African Savanna. After a player has matched enough DNA the animal appears along with “DeeNA,” a whimsical DNA strand character that delivers important information concerning DNA.

Run4Green: Help to Keep our Environment Clean
In this Mario style game, our fun Earthly character tries to collect points (gold coins) in order to purchase green products to help save our environment. Along the way, the character tries to avoid products that produce greenhouse gases and identify those that can help to reduce our carbon footprint.

Bohr Thru, Base Chase, and Run4Green require iOS 7.0 or later, are compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, and are freely available for download.

New Videos Available on the NCBI YouTube Channel

Two new three-minute videos on the NCBI YouTube channel will provide information about how to view track sets in all of the NCBI genome browsers and Sequence Viewer displays and how to store and share custom sets of tracks in track collections. NCBI Recommended Tracks presents track sets, which allow you to instantly tailor your display to a specific need, while My NCBI Track Collections: Introduction shows how to store and share tracks in custom sets called track collections. To learn more about track sets and collections, visit the FAQ on the Sequence Viewer page. Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full webinar presentations.

DOCLINE Quarterly Statistical Reports Now Available!

NLM has released the following DOCLINE quarterly statistical reports for July-September 2015:

  • Summary DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Reports 1-1A, 1-11A, 1-1AT)
  • Summary DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-1B)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Reports 1-2A, 1-22A)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-2B)
  • Resource Library Quarterly Report – Fill Rate (Report 2-14)
  • Loansome Doc Detailed Lender Statistics (Report 5-1A)
  • Loansome Doc Throughput Report (Report 5-1B)

Please note: Reports 1-11A, 1-1AT, and 1-22A are only distributed to libraries that have entered requests in DOCLINE for other libraries. Report 2-14 is only distributed to resource libraries.

DOCLINE quarterly statistical reports are available by going to Requests, then Reports in the DOCLINE menu. Request reports are not archived and should be saved quarterly by libraries who wish to have a historical record of statistics. Instructions for downloading and printing reports may be found in the “Request Reports” section of the online manual (click the Help link at the top of the DOCLINE screen) or in the Reports section of DOCLINE’s FAQ page.

Now Available: Presentation Slides and Session Recordings for 2015 Science Boot Camp West for Librarians

Video recordings and slide presentations for most sessions of the 2015 Science Boot Camp West for Librarians are now available. The meeting was held July 27-29, 2015, at Stanford University. Video files are large and best viewed by downloading rather than watching online. The full meeting agenda is also available.

Register Now for Spanish Language Webinar on Promotores de Salud E-Learning Program on October 14!

In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), will host a Spanish-language webinar discussing Promoting Healthy Choices and Community Changes: An E-learning Program for Promotores de Salud on Wednesday, October 14, at 11:30 AM PDT. Registration is required to join the webinar. The e-learning program is designed to build the capacity of promotores de salud to promote better health among individuals and communities. The e-learning program is available in both Spanish and English at no cost to participants. It provides promotores de salud with basic knowledge to promote healthy choices, and strategies to motivate behavioral changes among the community members they serve. Speakers on the webinar will discuss how the e-learning program may help promotores de salud talk to community members about chronic disease management.

NLM Releases Two New Video Tutorials: RxClass and VSAC

The National Library of Medicine has announced the release of the first video tutorial for the RxClass Web application. The five-minute Searching and Navigating Through Drug Classes Using RxClass Application tutorial describes the RxClass major interface elements and functionalities. RxClass allows users to explore drug classes and their members, links the drug classes to drug information in RxNorm, provides a browser interface for navigating the hierarchies of drug classes, and includes a search mechanism for locating specific drug classes or drugs. The tutorial is available from a link on the Learning Resources for NLM Clinical Terminology Artifacts and Tooling and the NLM Distance Education Resources pages.

NLM has also announced the release of the first video tutorial featuring the Value Set Authority Center (VSAC) REST API. The API allows remote retrieval of value set information through URL-based calls that contain functions and corresponding parameters. The API is based on the IHE Sharing Value Sets (SVS) Technical Framework. The new two-minute tutorial Authentication with the Value Set Authority Center (VSAC) SVS API demonstrates how to perform proper authentication when submitting requests to the VSAC REST API. The authentication process uses UMLS credentials (username and password) and consists of two steps. First request a Ticket Granting Ticket (TGT), then request the Service Ticket (ST). The TGT is valid for eight hours, while the ST is valid for five minutes and can be used to submit only one API request. Users must generate a new ST for each new API request. The tutorial is available from a link on the VSAC Support Center, Learning Resources for NLM Clinical Terminology Artifacts and Tooling, and the NLM Distance Education Resources pages.

“Write to the PubMed Help Desk” Customer Service Form Enhanced

On October 7, 2015, the “Write to the PubMed Help Desk” customer service form was revised. The new form includes prompts to provide necessary request information. This information will enable NLM to address customer needs more efficiently. For example, the “What are you writing about?” line has a drop down list of options for a user to select. One choice is “Misspelling or error in PubMed.” If this option is selected, the form prompts the user for the PMID of the citation. The form will display citation information for the user to confirm, and then require the “Current text in PubMed” and the “Correct text.” The selected topic, along with the PMID information when provided, automates the routing of the question for appropriate review and action at NLM. There are also information buttons that link to explanations of related NLM policies.

2016 NLM Georgia Biomedical Informatics Course Applications Now Being Accepted!

Applications are now being accepted for the 2016 National Library of Medicine (NLM) Georgia Biomedical Informatics Courses to be held April 3-9 and September 11-17 at Brasstown Valley Conference Center in Young Harris, Georgia. Applications will be accepted until December 7. All applicants will be notified by the end of January/early February of their application status. Successful applicants will be asked for a commitment to attend the entire course and all sessions. Travel, hotel, and meals of all successful applicants will be paid for by Georgia Regents University (soon to be Augusta University). For questions, feel free to contact Adrienne Hayes.