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Webinars and Workshops about Outreach Evaluation!

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) offers a range of webinars and workshops upon request by network members and coordinators from the NN/LM regions. Take a look at the list and see if one of the options appeals to you. To request a workshop or webinar, contact Susan Barnes. The workshops were designed as face-to-face learning opportunities, but can be tailored to meet distance learning needs by distilling them to briefer webinars or offering them in series of one-hour webinars. If you don’t see what you’re looking for on the list, then contact Susan and let her know!

Patient Safety Awareness Week: March 2-8, 2014!

March 2-8, 2014, is Patient Safety Awareness Week, established by the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF), which supports “Creating a world where patients and those who care for them are free from harm.” The National Library of Medicine (NLM) supports the work to keep patients and healthcare providers free from harm by making available quality health information. Following is information from the NLM MedlinePlus Patient Safety health topic Web page that describes actions patients can take:

You can help prevent medical errors by being an active member of your health care team. Research shows that patients who are more involved with their care tend to get better results. To reduce the risk of medical errors, you can:

  • Ask questions if you have doubts or concerns. Take a relative or friend to your doctor appointment to help you ask questions and understand answers.
  • Make sure you understand what will happen if you need surgery.
  • Tell your health care provider(s) about all the medicines you take, including over-the-counter drugs and dietary supplements. Tell them if you have any allergies or bad reactions to anesthesia. Make sure you know how to take your medications correctly.
  • Get a second opinion about treatment options.
  • Keep a copy of your own health history.

Three Million Articles are Now in PMC!

PMC logoAs of February 21, 2014, PMC (formerly known as PubMed Central) became home to three million articles! PMC is a free archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine. The content has been provided in part by 1,445 full participation journals, 277 NIH Portfolio journals, and 2,477 selective deposit journals. PMC hit the one million milestone in 2007, and the two million milestone in 2010. Congratulations PMC!

New DIMRC Topic Page: Influenza Pandemic Preparedness and Response!

A new topic page is available from the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC), Influenza: Pandemic Preparedness and Response. The page focuses on flu outbreaks that exceed the predicted prevalence of seasonal flu, threaten to overwhelm medical resources, and could affect the everyday functioning of communities. The page highlights resources that health professionals and emergency planners may find useful in planning for and responding to pandemics; an important part of all-hazards planning for many institutions and government agencies. DIMRC provides topic pages on a wide range of disaster types and related topics, including a page on Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus.

March 2014 Issue of NIH News in Health is Now Available!

Cartoon of a smiling liver next to the stomach and intestines within the body.Check out the March issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Your Liver Delivers: Protect It From Harm
    Your liver works hard to protect your health. But alcohol, drugs, viruses, and excess weight can damage your liver. Learn how to help keep your liver healthy for a lifetime.
  • Diet Drinks and Body Weight
    Overweight and obese adults who drink diet beverages take in more calories from solid foods—especially snacks—than those who drink sugary beverages, according to a new study. The findings raise questions about using diet drinks for weight control in heavier adults.
  • Looking at the Heart
    Heart disease is the leading cause of death nationwide, and it’s a major cause of disability. Finding heart problems early can help prevent more serious troubles later and save lives. Doctors have many techniques for diagnosing heart disease. Among these are imaging tests that take “pictures” of your heart.
  • Featured Website: COPD: Learn More Breathe Better
    COPD is a serious lung disease that makes it hard to breathe. It’s a leading cause of death in the United States. Many people with COPD don’t realize they have a disease. Learn more about how to spot and treat COPD. Get printable fact sheets, and find COPD-related events and networks that may be in your neighborhood or online.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S.

Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Trials in PubMed Linking to Systematic Reviews

PubMed Health’s curated collection of systematic reviews now has an important new role: enabling PubMed users to go straight from a clinical trial to systematic reviews that have considered it. Visitors to records of many thousands of trials will now see a new section to the right, called a portlet. It will show links to systematic reviews in PubMed that have cited that trial. This new portlet does not replace “Related citations in PubMed”: that will follow as usual. All of PubMed Health’s 31,100 systematic reviews since 2003 are not yet included. If there is no portlet showing, it does not mean for certain that there is no systematic review that includes the trial. There are enough reviews included, though, that this portlet should become a familiar sight when using PubMed. For additional information, visit the latest issue of the NLM Technical Bulletin.

DOCLINE Tip of the Month: Canceling a “Borrow” Request

Tugger the DOCLINE Mascot

Question: How do I cancel a DOCLINE request after it’s been submitted?

Answer: To cancel a request:

1. Log in to your DOCLINE account.
2. Select Requests from the DOCLINE main menu.
3. Select Status/Cancel.
4. Retrieve your request by entering the request number, patron name or email address under Request # or Patron, and click SEARCH, or under Define Search Limits, enter the date range you wish to search and click SEARCH.
5. Once the request(s) are displayed, select the checkbox(es) next to the request number for those you wish to cancel.
6. Click Cancel under Actions for Selected Requests.

Note: If the request has been received by a lender, the Cancel action will be marked “pending.” If the lender updates the “pending cancellation” request as “Not Filled,” the request will then be canceled.

Also, requests with the following statuses will be canceled immediately:

New – new request entered by borrower, but not yet received by a lender.
Rerouted Online – request was not filled by first lender, and rerouted to the next potential lender.
Rerouted TTA – rerouted because of DOCLINE time-triggered actions after first potential lender did receipt or act upon the request.

If you have any questions or need assistance, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-338-7657 or e-mail us at psr-nnlm@library.ucla.edu!

Exhibit evaluations with QuickTapSurvey

Exhibiting is a popular strategy for health information resource promotion, but exhibits can be challenging events to evaluate. Survey platforms for tablets and mobile phones can make it a little easier to collect feedback at exhibit booths. The NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) has explored QuickTapSurvey, which seems well-suited to getting point-of-contact responses from booth visitors. The application allows creation of short, touch-screen questionnaires on Apple or Android tablets. You simply hand the tablet to visitors for their quick replies. The same questionnaire can be put on multiple tablets, so you and your colleagues can collect responses simultaneously during an exhibit.

When you have an Internet connection, responses are automatically uploaded into your online QuickTapSurvey account. When no connection is available, data are stored on the tablet and uploaded later. You can use QuickTapSurvey’s analytics to summarize responses with statistics and graphs, and can also download the data into a spreadsheet to analyze in Excel. QuickTapSurvey is a commercial product, but there is a limited free version. The application is fairly user friendly, but it may be worthwhile to experiment with it before taking it on the road. Further information about QuickTapSurvey, including the different pricing options, is available on the web site.

Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Data Book: A Report to the Communities

Cover of Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Data BookA comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status; but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits. These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities.

The numerous findings described by the HCHS/SOL researchers confirmed some existing knowledge while also uncovering some new health trends. Among the items highlighting Hispanic diversity:

  • The percentage of people who reported having asthma ranged from 7.4 (among those of Mexican ancestry) to 35.8 (among those of Puerto Rican ancestry).
  • The percentage of individuals with hypertension ranged from 20.3 (South American) to 32.2 (Cuban).
  • The percentage of people eating five or more servings of fruits/vegetables daily ranged from 19.2 (Puerto Rican origin) to 55.0 (Cuban origin). Also, men reported consuming more fruit and vegetables than women.
  • Women reported a much lower consumption of sodium than men among all Hispanic groups represented in the study.

The full report, in English and Spanish, is available on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website.

A Tip-a-Day by and for Evaluators: The American Evaluation Association (AEA) 365 Blog!

Do you want to know more about great assessment resources, tools, and lessons learned from others with an interest in evaluation? Check out the American Evaluation Association (AEA) 365 blog, where anyone (not only AEA members) can subscribe via email or really simple syndication (RSS) feed. The established blog guidelines place a cap on contributions with a maximum of 450 words per entry. You will know at a glance what the subject is (Hot Tips, Cool Tricks, Rad Resources, or Lessons Learned) from the headers used within the entries, and all assumptions of prior knowledge and experience with evaluation and organizations are avoided, with clarification of all acronyms and no jargon allowed.

A handy tip is to scroll down the right sidebar of the website to locate subjects arranged by the AEA Topical Interest Groups (TIGs). Some of these that are likely to be of interest to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) members are Data Visualization and Reporting, Disabilities and Other Vulnerable Populations, Health Evaluation, Integrating Technology into Evaluation, and Nonprofits and Foundations Evaluation. Examples of recent items of potential interest include Conducting a Health Needs Assessment of People With Disabilities, with shared lessons learned from the needs assessment work done in Massachusetts, and the “rad resource” of Disability and Health Data System (DHDS), with state-level disability health data available from the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC).