Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About PSR | Contact PSR | Feedback | Help | Bookmark and Share

Teaching & Learning in New Library Spaces Symposium Presentation Materials and Session Recordings Now Available!

Presentation materials, including PowerPoint slides and video recordings, from the Teaching and Learning in New Library Spaces: The Changing Landscape of Health Sciences Libraries symposium are now available. The symposium, co-sponsored by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Middle Atlantic Region (NN/LM MAR), the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic Region (NN/LM SE/A), was held on April 18 in Philadelphia, PA.

Tox Town Updates the Farm Scene!

If you are looking for possible environmental health risks in a typical farm or need information on agricultural runoff, feeding operations, or barns and silos, check out the newly updated Tox Town Farm scene. The Farm joins previously updated City, Town and Southwest scenes with an updated, photorealistic look to allow users to better identify with real-life locations. Each scene was also moved from Flash to HTML 5 platform, to allow viewing on a variety of personal electronic devices, including iPads, iPad minis, and tablets. All location and chemical information remains the same.

BD2K Updates: Funding and Learning Opportunities

Data Science Funding Opportunities

  • The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) launches the Biomedical Data Translator program: Applications due June 1. Awards will be made by September 30. NCATS intends to commit $5,000,000 in FY 2016 to fund 2-5 awards. Future year support is contingent upon the availability of funds. For more information visit https://ncats.nih.gov/files/NCATS-Translator-FY16-FOA.pdf. Please direct all inquiries to: translator-questions@nih.gov.

Data Science Workshops

  • The Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics invites participants for a two-day workshop on the challenges of applying scientific inference to big data. For more information, including the preliminary program, visit the workshop website. The dates are June 8-9, 2016, at the Keck Center, Room 100, 500 Fifth St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. The workshop will be professionally webcast. To join either in person or online, please register by Monday, June 6. For questions about the workshop, please contact Michelle Schwalbe.

Data Science Articles and Blog posts

AHRQ Report Shows Gains in Access to and Affordability of Health Insurance

More people have health care coverage, have a usual place to go for medical care and can more easily afford medical bills after the Affordable Care Act’s provisions have taken effect, according to a new report released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), 2015 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report and 5th Anniversary Update on the National Quality Strategy. The report finds that the rate of uninsured Americans under age 65 decreased from 18% to 10%. For 18- to 29-year-olds, the uninsured rate declined even further, falling by more than half, from 31% to 15%. Among poor people ages 18-64, the uninsured rate fell from 44% to 25%. Substantial gains in health care coverage also were found for Hispanic and black adults ages 18-64. The cost of health care coverage also became more affordable as fewer people overall reported having trouble paying medical bills within the past year. Poor people (below the federal poverty level) ages 18-64 saw the greatest benefit, and all racial and ethnic groups showed a decline in payment problems during this period.

The report features annual trends on more than 250 measures of care quality, access and disparities that cover a broad array of health care services and settings. Overall, the report shows that quality of care is improving, particularly in hospitals, and for measures that are being publicly reported by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. However, quality of care is still less than optimal overall for many Americans. Disparities related to race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status continue to impact the care that many people receive. For example, the quality of care for blacks, Hispanics and American Indians and Alaska Natives was worse than that for whites for about 40% of the report’s measures.

CDC Preventive Health and Health Services (PHHS) Block Grants

In January the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Library of Medicine announced that public health departments can now use funding from the CDC Preventive Health and Health Services (PHHS) Block Grant to access journals, publications, the latest evidence and additional resources through the Public Health Information Access Project (PHIAP) of the National Library of Medicine. The mechanism was developed through the Centers for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services at the Centers for Disease Control working with partners inside CDC and outside the agency. The goal of the project is to provide low-cost access to high-value, evidence-based resources to improve public health practice in state public health departments. Costs must be tied to state work plans. To obtain access to library services for your state health department, refer to the list of state block grant contacts about including this item in the state work plan.

May 2-6 Is Air Quality Awareness Week

Air Quality Awareness Week (May 2 – 6) explores the connections between exposure to pollutants and human health. The National Library of Medicine offers several resources on air quality. The NLM Enviro-Health Links pages on Indoor Air and Outdoor Air are information guides linking to sites that have been reviewed for appropriate and trustworthy material. They provide background information, connections to laws and regulations, and pre-formulated searches of relevant National Library of Medicine databases. Indoor Air covers mold, radon and flame retardants, as well as second-hand and third-hand smoke. Outdoor Air covers common particulate matter and common air pollutant chemicals.

Asthma and other airway diseases can sometimes be caused by workplace exposure to hazardous chemicals. NLM’s Haz-Map offers information related to Occupational Asthma which examines symptoms, findings, and the job tasks or chemical agents most associated with occupational asthma. NLM’s Environmental Health Student Portal contains Air Pollution information for middle school students and teachers. The portal has videos, classroom activities and links to age appropriate sites for further exploration. NLM’s Tox Town, the interactive web site on community environmental health concerns, has non-technical information on indoor air and on outdoor air.

Hepatitis Awareness Month and NLM Resources

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) provides a number of resources to learn about hepatitis, a dangerous inflammation of the liver caused by a virus. The Outreach and Special Populations Branch (OSPB) at NLM also offers information on hepatitis for specific populations, such as Asian Americans and individuals suffering from HIV/AIDS.

Available resources include the following:

May 2016 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Silhouettes of a man and a woman showing the XY symbol next to the male and XX next to the maleCheck out the May issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Sex and Gender
    Men and women are similar in many ways, but sex and social factors can affect your risk for disease, your response to medications, and how often you seek medical care.
  • Going Gluten Free?
    With the growing popularity of gluten-free products at your local grocery store, you may have wondered if you should avoid eating gluten. Sidestepping gluten can be a lifestyle choice for many. But for those with a condition known as celiac disease, it’s a medical necessity.
  • Researchers Examine the Structure of Zika Virus
    Scientists found a structural detail on the surface of the Zika virus that distinguishes it from similar viruses. Continuing to study this tiny difference might help researchers develop targeted therapies and better ways to diagnose Zika infections.
  • Featured Website: Education: Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering
    Learn how fingers might be regrown, people with paralysis can stand, and what an MRI image of your brain looks like. You can play games, take quizzes, and explore interactive graphics on this science education website as you learn all about bioengineering and the cool medical technology now being developed at NIH.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Apply by May 5 for NCBI-Sponsored Hackathon at the University of California, Davis, June 13-15

NCBI will assist the University of California Davis in hosting a biomedical data science hackathon June 13-15 at the School of Veterinary Medicine in Davis, CA, focusing on advanced bioinformatics analysis of next generation sequencing data and metadata. This event is for students, postdocs, investigators and other researchers already engaged in the use of pipelines for genomic analyses from next-generation sequencing data or metadata. The event is open to anyone selected for the hackathon, and able to travel to Davis. Working groups of 5-6 individuals will be formed into five or six teams. These teams will build pipelines and tools to analyze large datasets within a cloud infrastructure.

Applications are due by May 5 at 5:00PM EDT. Participants will be selected from a pool of applicants based on the experience and motivation they provide on the form. Prior participants and applicants are especially encouraged to reapply. Applicants must be willing to commit to all three days of the event. No financial support for travel, lodging or meals is available.

AHRQ Issues New Comparative Effectiveness Review!

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare, Research and Quality (AHRQ) recently released its Comparative Effectiveness Review Improving Cultural Competence to Reduce Health Disparities for Priority Populations. This review examines existing system-, clinic-, provider-, and individual-level interventions to improve culturally appropriate health care for people with disabilities; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations; and racial/ethnic minority populations.

The National Library of Medicine’s Outreach and Special Populations Branch (OSPB) works to reduce health disparities within underserved and special populations by improving access to accurate, quality health information. OSPB manages Minority Health Information Outreach projects for specific populations, such as American Indian Health Web Portal for Native Americans and HealthReach for refugee populations.