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NLM Updates MEDLINE/PubMed Health Literacy Information Resources

The MEDLINE/PubMed Search and Health Literacy Information Resources page and its preformulated Health Literacy Special Query have been updated to keep pace with the growing body of relevant literature. The Health Literacy Special Query now retrieves additional citations to articles about numeracy, comprehension of informed consent, and health insurance comprehension. The dynamic MEDLINE/PubMed health literacy search retrieves more than 8,000 citations to English language journal articles related to Health Literacy. PubMed filters can be used to limit to particular years, research or publication types. To limit citations to a particular subject (such as “decision making”) use the Advanced Search features.

Sometimes called Quantitative Literacy (QL) or Quantitative Reasoning (QR), numeracy involves skills needed to select a health insurance plan, choose treatments, and understand medication instructions. MEDLINE/PubMed may contain citations to articles that discuss numeracy skills of clinicians—physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who must communicate with patients and the public. Informed consent comprehension is of great interest to health literacy advocates and researchers who are concerned with how effectively health care providers communicate disease and treatment risks and benefits to patients. Among the more than 16,000 citations to articles with Informed Consent as a major descriptor, many citations don’t explicitly use the phrase “health literacy,” but are conceptually tied to it.

The selected resources on the right side of the MEDLINE/PubMed Search and Health Literacy Information Resources page includes new links, such as:

DOCLINE Quarterly Statistical Reports Now Available!

NLM has released the following DOCLINE quarterly statistical reports for January-March 2015:

  • Summary DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Reports 1-1A, 1-11A, 1-1AT)
  • Summary DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-1B)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Reports 1-2A, 1-22A)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-2B)
  • Resource Library Quarterly Report – Fill Rate (Report 2-14)
  • Loansome Doc Detailed Lender Statistics (Report 5-1A)
  • Loansome Doc Throughput Report (Report 5-1B)

Please note: Reports 1-11A, 1-1AT, and 1-22A are only distributed to libraries that have entered requests in DOCLINE for other libraries. Report 2-14 is only distributed to resource libraries. DOCLINE statistical reports are available by going to Requests, then Reports in the DOCLINE menu. Instructions for downloading and printing reports may be found in the “Request Reports” section of the online manual (click the Help link at the top of the DOCLINE screen) or in the Reports section of DOCLINE’s FAQ page.

PubMed Mobile Updated

​PubMed Mobile has been updated with several new features including additional filters, sort selections, trending articles, and related searches. Illustrations are included in a recent article published in the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Filters include: Article types (Books and documents, Clinical trials, Meta-analysis, Randomized controlled trials, Review articles, Systematic reviews); Text availability (Free full text, Full text); and Publication dates (5 years, 10 years). “Trending Articles” appears on the homepage. Discovery tools display below the results on mobile devices with smaller screen sizes.

Betsy L. Humphreys named Acting Director of the National Library of Medicine!

Betsy L. Humphreys was appointed the National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Acting Director effective April 1, 2015, following the retirement of Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg. She has served as NLM’s deputy director since 2005, sharing responsibility with the Director for overall program development, program evaluation, policy formulation, direction and coordination of all Library activities. As Deputy Director of the Library, Ms. Humphreys also coordinated NLM’s extensive activities related to health data standards, serving as US Member and founding Chair of the General Assembly of the International Health Terminology Standards Organisation. She has contributed to the development of NIH and HHS policy on a range of matters, including health information technology, public access to research results, clinical trial registration and results reporting.

Ms. Humphreys, who joined the NLM in 1973, previously led the NLM’s Library Operations Division and directed the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) project, which produces knowledge sources to support advanced processing, retrieval, and integration of information from disparate electronic information sources. She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, and a Fellow of the Medical Library Association. She is the recipient of a number of awards, including the Morris F. Collen Award of Excellence from the American College of Medical Informatics, considered the highest honor in the field of medical informatics, the Marcia C. Noyes Award, which is the Medical Library Association’s highest honor, and the first Cornerstone Award conferred by the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. Ms. Humphreys received a B.A. from Smith College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and an M.L.S. from the University of Maryland, College Park.

April 2015 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of a man and a woman reading the NIH News in Health newsletterCheck out the April issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Sharing Reliable Health Information: 10 Years of NIH News in Health
    You hear and read health advice all the time—from friends, online sources, radio, TV, and more. How do you know what health information you can trust? This issue marks the 10-year anniversary of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter based on research supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health—the nation’s medical research agency. Every article in this newsletter is carefully reviewed by NIH experts, so you can be confident that the health news you read here is trustworthy.
  • Readers’ Favorite Online Health Stories: Rashes, Sore Throats, Kidneys, and More
    NIH News in Health aims to bring you a wide range of health-related stories, including articles about healthy lifestyles and both common and rare diseases. Some topics are consistently popular, viewed by hundreds or thousands of people month after month on the NIH News in Health website. Here are 5 reader favorites, representing our most-viewed Web articles over the past 2 years. See if any of these topics might be useful to you or someone you know.
  • Cleaner Air Tied to Healthier Lungs in Kids
    As air quality improved in a once-smoggy region of California, lung function also improved in children during a critical period of growth and development. The findings point to the potential long-term effects of air quality on human health.
  • What Do You Know About Sarcoidosis?
    Many people with sarcoidosis don’t realize they have it. The disorder often has no signs or symptoms, or only mild ones. Sarcoidosis is a chronic (long-term) disorder that causes inflammation and lumps called granulomas in the body’s organs. The lungs are usually involved, although the condition can affect any organ, including the skin, eyes, liver, and brain.
  • Featured Website: National DNA Day
    Join the celebration of National DNA Day on Friday, April 24. The day honors 2 major achievements: the first paper describing the DNA double helix in April 1953, and the completion of the Human Genome Project in April 2003. This site links to classroom tips, activities, and a Pinterest challenge for K-12 teachers and students—all aimed at sparking an enthusiasm for genetics, genomics, and scientific pursuits.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Nominations for 2015 Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award

The Friends of the National Library of Medicine seek your nominations for this year’s Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award:

  • Nominees must be currently employed as a health sciences librarian and have worked in such a position for at least five years immediately preceding the award.
  • Nominations may be made for contributions by the librarian as demonstrated by excellence and achievement in leadership, publications, teaching, research, special projects, or any combination of these.
  • Nomination must be made in writing and include the following information:
    1. Official nomination form
    2. Five-page description of the nominee’s achievements
    3. Current resume or curriculum vitae
    4. Additional information (no more than 5 pages double-spaced) that would assist the jury in the evaluation of the nomination and selection of the recipient
  • Self-nominations are accepted and encouraged.
  • Nominations must be received by June 1.

NLM to Host “Images and Texts in Medical History: An Introduction to Methods, Tools, and Data from the Digital Humanities”

On April 11-13, 2016, NLM will host the workshop Images and Texts in Medical History: An Introduction to Methods, Tools, and Data from the Digital Humanities. The event will be funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), part of the NLM’s ongoing partnership with NEH, and held in cooperation with Virginia Tech, The Wellcome Library and The Wellcome Trust. Images and Texts in Medical History will involve presentations by leading scholars in digital humanities, who will demonstrate and discuss how emerging approaches to the analysis of texts and images can be used by scholars and librarians in the field of medical history. Images and Texts in Medical History will engage key issues in the history of medicine that have contemporary and future relevance including, but not limited to, the spread of disease, the rise of health professions, scientific research, health policy, and cultural definitions of health and disease.

Images and Texts in Medical History will be a unique public forum involving a hands-on instruction interdisciplinary workshop and sessions open to the public that will provide historians of medicine and interested others with an opportunity to learn about tools, methods, and texts in the digital humanities that can inform research, teaching, scholarship, and public policy. Participation in Images and Texts in Medical History will be free to workshop attendees and members of the public who wish to attend the open sessions, but registration will be required in order to manage space and related requirements. Registration details will be announced this summer.

New Edition of the “Women of Color Health Data Book” Available

The NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) has announced the publication of the Women of Color Health Data Book, 4th Edition. The Women of Color Health Information Collection presents data on race/ethnicity and disease. Through data, clues about how culture, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic background, and geographic location contribute to the health status of women of color can be identified. In order to explore sex differences, scientists need data about the similarities and differences between women and men in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other conditions.

Learn more about women of color and their unique health needs, and how the Women of Color Health Data Book, 4th Edition, can assist clinicians in providing person-centered care for diverse populations of women. Check out the pull-out Data Book collections on breast cancer and HIV/AIDS, and a podcast from the Academy of Women’s Health. Also visit ORWH Director Dr. Janine Clayton’s blog for a commentary introducing the Data Book. More information on women’s health is available from the the NLM Women’s Health Resources website.

NLM @ MLA 2015: Annual Meeting of the Regional Medical Libraries and Centers

The NLM National Network Office of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) invites anyone interested to attend the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Regional Medical Libraries (RML) and Centers on May 15 in Austin, TX. Come and learn about the work and accomplishments of the Network, get your 2016-2021 Cooperative Agreement questions answered, or just catch-up with fellow medical librarians!

When: Friday, May 15, 2015
Where: Austin Convention Center, 500 E Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX 78701
Time: 9:00 am—5:30 pm

Agenda:

9:00 am—12:00 pm: Breakout Sessions

9:00 am—10:15 am: Room 15, Consumer Health Coordinators
9:00 am—10:15 am: Room 12A , Outreach Coordinators
10:30 am—12:00 pm: Room 12A, Joint Session Consumer Health and Outreach Coordinators
9:00 am—12:00 pm: Room 14, Directors and Associate Directors [CLOSED SESSION]

1:00 pm—1:15 pm: Room 12A, NLM Update, Joyce Backus, Associate Director for Library Operations, NLM
1:15 pm—3:00 pm: Room 12A, RML and Center Highlights from 2011-2015
3:30 pm—5:30 pm: Room 12A, Applying for Regional Medical Libraries Cooperative Agreements (UG4)
Q&A session with NLM Extramural Program [This session will be recorded.]

National Library of Medicine Launches TOXinvaders Game!

The Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has launched TOXinvaders, an environmental health and toxicology game for the iPhone and iPad. It is available from the Apple Store. TOXinvaders supports middle school science concepts pertaining to chemistry, the environment, and health. It can serve as an engaging classroom or homework activity for middle and high school students, as well as an entertaining learning activity for gaming aficionados of all ages. In the classroom environment, TOXinvaders works best as a supplement to NLM’s Tox Town, Environmental Health Student Portal, TOXMAP, and ChemIDplus Web sites.

The game consists of four fast-paced levels, in which a launcher is used to annihilate toxic chemicals falling from the sky and earn protective shield points by capturing “good chemicals.” To move on to the next level, players must take a brief quiz about the chemicals. These dynamically generated tests provide an excellent opportunity to learn more about environmental health and toxicology from the game’s chemical information sheet and from NLM Web sites. Quiz questions and answers can also serve as a starting point for classroom discussions, as well as for Tox Town, TOXMAP, and Environmental Health Student Portal activities and experiments.