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Professional Development Awards Available for PSR Hospital Librarians!

Professional development funding is available to support Network Member hospital librarians in the Pacific Southwest Region wishing to attend workshops or conferences, to develop their skills and knowledge in health information access and delivery. We expect to fund three awards, with a maximum award amount per person of $1,000, to cover registration fees and travel expenses. The activity and any associated travel must be completed by April 30, 2016. Applications submitted by Friday, October 16, will receive priority consideration. The award guidelines and application form, including submission instructions, are available on the NN/LM PSR Funding webpage. Awardees are expected to submit a Latitudes article reporting on the activity and associated benefits, after attending the event.

NLM LocatorPlus Bibliographic Data Addition/Modification Form: New Online Version for DOCLINE Reporting

On October 1, NLM will implement a new method for requesting changes or additions to bibliographic data in LocatorPlus for DOCLINE reporting. The paper-based request form, NLM LocatorPlus Bibliographic Data Addition/Modification Form, will be replaced by a new online request form, DOCLINE Journals Data Addition/Modification Form. There will be a permanent redirect to the new form. Requesters should fill out the form with the required and other relevant information. Supporting documentation may be attached. When the form is complete, click the “Send Message” button to submit the request. Requesters will receive an automated receipt confirmation via email. Another email will be sent when the request has been processed and completed by NLM.

DOCLINE users should begin using the online request form on October 1, 2015. New requests for bibliographic changes and additions must be submitted online. Requests using the paper form, sent by mail or fax, or requests sent to NLM customer service, will not be accepted after October 15, 2015, and will be returned to the sender. NLM anticipates that this change will allow for speedier processing of requests and more accurate data in LocatorPlus and the NLM Catalog. Please note that the policy for addition of journal titles to LocatorPlus has not changed. For further details, refer to the NLM Policy Statement on the Addition of Non-NLM Titles to the NLM LocatorPlus Database for DOCLINE Reporting.

Bohr Thru: a Chemistry-Themed Mobile Game from NLM’s Specialized Information Services

Bohr ThruThe Bohr Thru video game, developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), is designed to teach the Bohr model of the atom, by using a 3-match game style to collect protons, neutrons, and electrons to create the first 18 elements on the periodic table. The model describes how protons and neutrons form an atom’s nucleus, surrounded by electrons in orbit at different energy levels. Element structures are further reinforced during bonus rounds where players that successfully build Bohr models earn “power-ups” to use in the 3-match game. Atom, the game’s mascot, travels along with you and provides fun and interesting facts about the chemical elements. The game supports entry level chemistry curricula. Short (five-minute), meaningful, in-class game sessions are possible.

Bohr Thru was crafted under the technical lead of SIS computer scientist Ying Sun, working with SIS intern Wendy Sparks and the SIS K-12 team, who partnered with Xin Wu, a graduate student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute majoring in Interactive Media and Game Development. Bohr Thru is freely available for iPhone and iPad devices, and can be downloaded from iTunes.

Give Your Elevator Pitch a Lift!

Forget about elevator speeches. Think elevator conversations instead. Elevator pitches are one of a number of strategies you may use to stealthily promote your organization’s successful programs and services, which generally consist of little promotional speeches of elevator-ride length that you can slip into small talk when you run in to “someone influential.” You can add nuggets of evaluation findings to these mini-speeches to demonstrate program value. But you may be missing a key element in the elevator pitch exchange: the other person. For insight, review the article by Tim David, Your Elevator Pitch Needs an Elevator Pitch, which appeared in the Harvard Business Review (10 December 2014), and emphasizes the importance of engaging your fellow elevator traveler, rather than talking “at” him or her. This leads to a conversation rather than a speech. It is notable how the author seamlessly slips in evidence to support his low-key pitch. For example, he surreptitiously inserts a statistic that he must have obtained from a follow-up evaluation with one of his client organizations that productivity and morale increased 38% after his training, to help underscore the value his service provided to the organization.

Here are several other tips from the article:

  • Answer polite but perfunctory questions (such as “what does your office do?”) with a surprising answer.
  • Use questions to draw your elevator companion into the conversation. David suggests that you talk no more than 20% of the time. Yield the remainder of the time to the other traveler, but use questions to keep the conversation rolling.
  • Don’t worry too much about that 20-second time frame traditionally recommended for elevator pitches. If you successfully engage your fellow rider, he or she will hold the elevator door open to continue the chat.

The elevator pitch format is a good addition to your story-telling tool kit. But it may take some practice to be able to present an elevator pitch casually and conversationally. If you’re up for that challenge, then check out Tim David’s article for some excellent guidelines!

NLM Releases New Research Resource for Domestic Violence

The National Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has released a new health services research resource on domestic violence, to complement the new NLM exhibition, Confronting Violence, Improving Women’s Lives. The new resource can be found on the Web portal, Health Services Research Information Central (HSR Info Central). It is intended to support health services researchers, policymakers, administrators, and practitioners involved in detection, prevention and treatment services for this underserved and often unnoticed community. The scope of this “topic page” includes Intimate Partner Violence, Reproductive and Sexual Coercion, Child Abuse and Maltreatment, and Elder Abuse.

The Domestic Violence topic page assists researchers, both novice and advanced, by providing detailed search queries for key NLM databases: PubMed, PubMed Health, HSRProj (Health Services Research Projects in Progress), and HSRR (Health Services and Sciences Research Resources). These searches will enable users to readily discover relevant published medical literature, clinical effectiveness research, ongoing HSR projects, and related datasets, instruments and other tools. In addition, the resource identifies important guidelines, assessment instruments and measures, and includes a structured query for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s National Guidelines Clearinghouse.

Change to Subject Headings in Distributed NLM CATLINE and SERLINE Products

In June 2015, NLM proposed discontinuing distribution of its bibliographic records with artificially reconstructed subject strings in CATLINE and SERLINE products, as detailed in the NLM Technical Bulletin article Discontinuing Distribution of Cataloging Bibliographic Records with Artificially Reconstructed Subject Strings—Comment by August 31, 2015. This proposal was sent to the Regional Medical Libraries, MEDLIB, and MEDCAT discussion lists, as well as to subscribers of the NLM MARC21 files. Responses to the proposal were unanimously in favor of discontinuing the distribution of subject strings and having the records in the distributed files match the records as they appear in LocatorPlus and the NLM Catalog.

Therefore, NLM is pleased to announce that beginning with the December 2015 distribution of new records in CATFILE and SERFILE, NLM subject terms will be distributed with topical subjects recorded in 650 $a or 650 $a $x; geographic subjects recorded in 651 $a or 651 $a $x; and publication type/genre terms record in 655 $a. In January 2016, the entire CATFILE and SERFILE databases will be released with these updates made to all the records. Libraries that want their data to be consistent with the NLM files are encouraged to download the full update.

NLM Resource Update: TOXMAP Has Updated Per Capita Personal Income Data

Per capita personal income data is now complete for 1988-2013 in the National Library of Medicine’s TOXMAP beta resource. To overlay income data, navigate to the “Income” tab of the “US Census & Health” window, accessible via the Welcome window or the toolbar at the top of the page, and then select a year from the list. The United States Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is part of the US Department of Commerce. It produces “economic accounts” statistics that enable government and business decision-makers, researchers, and the American public to follow and understand the performance of the nation’s economy. To do this, the BEA collects source data, conducts research and analysis, develops and implements estimation methodologies, and disseminates statistics to the public. TOXMAP is a Geographic Information System (GIS) from the Division of Specialized Information Services of the NLM that uses maps of the United States to help users visually explore data from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Superfund Program, as well as some non-EPA datasets.

NIAMS Launches New Spanish-Language Website

NIAMS websiteThe National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a new Spanish-language website that provides free health information on conditions of the bones, joints, muscles and skin. The site is being launched to coincide with National Hispanic Heritage Month. Increasingly, website traffic to NIAMS’ Spanish-language content represents about 50% of its total visits in a given month. To meet this high demand, the new site features quick and easy navigation tools to help Spanish-speaking individuals identify and locate NIAMS health topics. It also includes landing pages that provide all of the information offered on a given topic in one place. The website also offers:

  • New site features navigation tools to help Spanish-speaking individuals locate NIAMS health topics
  • Improved access to NIAMS’ Spanish-language health information and related federal resources
  • Information on participating in clinical research studies
  • Responsive design that makes the site easier to read on mobile devices

NIAMS is committed to providing health information that is culturally and linguistically appropriate for diverse populations, including underserved racial and ethnic communities. The NIAMS Spanish-language materials complement the institute’s entire suite of health resources that are part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative, many of which are also available in Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese.

Apply Now to Host NLM “Native Voices” Traveling Exhibition!

Native Voices Banner

The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, on behalf of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), invites applications for Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries. The exhibit explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

This opportunity is open to public libraries, academic libraries, tribal libraries, tribal college libraries and special libraries. Libraries serving Native populations are especially invited to apply, and partnerships between libraries and Native-serving organizations are encouraged. The exhibition will tour from February 2016 through June 2020 at up to 104 institutions for six-week periods. For full guidelines and exhibit specifications, visit the online application site. Applications are due by November 6!

Selected sites will receive:

  • the traveling exhibition for a six-week loan period;
  • a $250 programming grant;
  • training through a required project webinar and online project support materials; and
  • a publicity kit to help with local promotion.

The traveling exhibit requires 35 linear feet of display space and comprises six standing banners, six iPads pre-loaded with video content, and six iPad stands. No internet connection is required, but an electrical connection is needed. Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness was displayed at the NLM from 2011 to 2015. Visit the site to learn more about content from the exhibition.

September 2015 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of a family making a healthy salad.Check out the September issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Thinking About Your Thyroid: Get to Know This Small but Mighty Gland
    You’ve probably heard of the thyroid gland, but do you know what it does? You might not give it a second thought unless something goes wrong. Thyroid trouble can cause a range of seemingly unrelated problems, including drastic changes to your weight, energy, digestion, or mood. Learn to recognize signs of thyroid disorder, so you can get treatment if needed.
  • Checking the Symptom Checkers
    When something’s ailing you, do you turn to the Internet or an app on your phone to help figure out what’s wrong? Free symptom checking programs usually don’t give the correct diagnosis first, a study found, and their advice on when to seek help usually errs on the side of caution.
  • Featured Website: Body Weight Planner
    This online tool can accurately forecast how your body weight changes when you alter your diet and exercise habits. It’s based on a mathematical model developed by NIH researchers and is now part of USDA’s SuperTracker, an online goal-setting resource to help people achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!