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NAL Unveils New Search Engine for Published USDA Research!

The National Agricultural Library (NAL) has unveiled PubAg, a user-friendly search engine that provides public enhanced access to research published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists. NAL is part of USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS), and has one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive compilations of agricultural information available.

PubAg is a new portal for literature searches and full-text access of more than 40,000 scientific journal articles by USDA researchers, mostly from 1997 to 2014. New articles by USDA researchers will be added almost daily, and older articles may be added if possible. There is no access fee, and no requirement for a username, password or any other form of registration to use PubAg. Phase I of PubAg provides access for searches of 340,000 peer-reviewed agriculturally related scientific literature, mostly from 2002 to 2012, each entry offering a citation, abstract and a link to the article if available from the publisher. This initial group of highly relevant, high-quality literature was taken from the 4 million bibliographic citations in NAL’s database. Phase II of PubAg, planned for later in 2015, will include the remainder of NAL’s significant bibliographic records. PubAg has been specifically designed to be easy to use and to serve a number of diverse users including the public, farmers, scientists, academicians and students.

SciENcv Enhancements: NIH and NSF Biographical Sketch Formats

SciENcv enhancements will include the new NIH biographical sketch format as a choice for creating SciENcv profiles. SciENcv will continue to support the current NIH biographical sketch format; however, NIH encourages researchers to use the new format with their grant submissions. Researchers will be required to employ the new NIH biographical sketch starting May 25, 2015. Users will be able to utilize their existing Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv) profiles to create profiles in the new NIH biographical sketch format, as well as be able to select the new NIH biographical sketch format when creating profiles manually or through a data feed from an external source. The Personal Statement section of the NIH biographical sketch has been updated to include an option to list up to four peer-reviewed citations. A new section, Contribution to Science, replaces the former section Selected Peer-Reviewed Publications, and it aims to give researchers a place where they can describe five of their most significant contributions to science.

SciENcv users will also soon be able to create profiles in the National Science Foundation (NSF) biographical sketch format. This newly added format will be available to download in PDF, MS Word or XML, and users will be able to share their SciENcv NSF profiles through a public URL. In addition, by linking your NSF account to an NCBI account, you will be able to populate SciENcv profiles with information stored in your NSF account. The NSF biographical sketch is the official format used for grant submissions to the NSF and consists of five sections: Professional Preparation, Appointments, Products, Synergistic Activities, and Collaborators & Other Affiliations.

For more information visit the NLM Technical Bulletin articles: My NCBI – New NIH Biographical Sketch Available in SciENcv and My NCBI – National Science Foundation Biographical Sketch and Data Integration with SciENcv.

Public Access Compliance Monitor

The Public Access Compliance Monitor (PACM or “compliance monitor”) is a service from the National Library of Medicine that helps users at NIH-funded institutions locate and track the compliance of funded papers with the NIH Public Access Policy at an institutional level. Whether you are looking for a quick snapshot of your institution’s compliance rate or want to take an active role in helping your investigators comply with the policy, PACM can help you get the information you need.

To gain access to the compliance monitor, users must first be assigned a compliance reports role (“PACR”) role by an administrator at their institution who is authorized to assign roles in the NIH eRA Commons grants administration system. Users with a PACR role will then have access to the compliance reports for their institution.

PACM provides users with a list of all PubMed citations associated with an institution’s NIH funding and classifies the articles according to compliance status (i.e., Compliant, Non-Compliant, In Process). The compliance monitor also provides detailed information about each article including:

  • a full citation including the PMID (PubMed ID) and link to the PubMed record
  • associated grants and principal investigators
  • NIHMSID (NIH Manuscript Submission Reference Number), where available
  • PMCID (PubMed Central ID), where available
  • key names and dates in the NIHMS, where available
  • article compliance status
  • method A status
  • journal publisher

Compliance reports can be downloaded from these lists and the data filtered based on an institution’s needs.

For more information on the PACR role, the compliance monitor, and the available reports, see the User Guide. Additonally, an overview video of PACM from The NIH Public Access Policy for Librarians Webinar and a four-minute Look at the NIH Public Access Policy Compliance Monitor are available.

DOCLINE Annual and Quarterly Statistical Reports Now Available!

NLM has released the following DOCLINE quarterly statistical reports for October-December 2014:

  • Summary DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Reports 1-1A, 1-11A, 1-1AT)
  • Summary DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-1B)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Reports 1-2A, 1-22A)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-2B)
  • Resource Library Quarterly Report – Fill Rate (Report 2-14)
  • Loansome Doc Detailed Lender Statistics (Report 5-1A)
  • Loansome Doc Summary Statistics (Report 5-1B)

NLM has also released the following DOCLINE yearly statistical reports for January-December 2014:

  • Ranked List of Serial Titles – Borrower (Report 1-8B)
  • Ranked List of Serial Titles – Lender (Report 1-8D)
  • Summary DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Report 1-1AY)
  • Summary DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-1BY)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Borrower Statistics (Report 1-2AY)
  • Detailed DOCLINE Lender Statistics (Report 1-2BY)

Please note: Reports 1-11A, 1-1AT and 1-22A are only distributed to libraries that have entered requests in DOCLINE for other libraries. Report 2-14 is only distributed to resource libraries.

DOCLINE statistical reports are available by going to Requests, then Reports in the DOCLINE menu. Instructions for downloading and printing reports may be found in the “Request Reports” section of the online manual (click the Help link at the top of the DOCLINE screen) or in the Reports section of DOCLINE’s FAQ page.

Mobile Data Solutions Online Course

Are you curious about the use of smart phones, tablets, or other mobile data resources to collect data for your assessment project, but are seeking more information on how to determine if this is the right approach for your project or program and how to process the data you collect using this method? Then check out Mobile Data Solutions, which was created as part of the Mobile Solutions Technical Assistance and Research (mSTAR) project, with expertise provided by U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Digital Development Lab and designed by TechChange.

The primary goal of this freely available and accessible online course (free registration is required) is to learn more about mobile tools, processes, and strategies for data collection in order to use mobile devices (referred to as mobile data solutions) to their full potential. The course will take about two hours to complete and can be done at your own pace over time. Progress in the course is saved so you’ll be taken to the point where you stopped to continue learning the next time you access it.

The learning objectives of the course are:

  • Describe examples of mobile data solutions from collection through visualization
  • Articulate the benefit of using these solutions
  • Analyze the challenges and limitations associated with mobile data solutions
  • Assess whether or not particular mobile data solutions are appropriate for a project, program or problem
  • Outline how to design a project or activity to include mobile data solutions
  • Explain the steps involved in implementing mobile data solutions
  • Summarize how to analyze, visualize, and share mobile data

NLM HIV/AIDS Portal Now Offers Multilingual Content Search!

NLM’s HIV/AIDS Portal now offers the ability to search for multilingual content. The new Multilingual Search interface searches specifically for HIV/AIDS related topics from the multilingual and multicultural content of HealthReach (formerly RHIN). HealthReach offers easy access to quality health information to individuals for whom English is not the primary language. It is also an important resource for health professionals as well as public health administrators. Users can search by subject/topic, language, and format. The default for the search is always HIV/AIDS so there is no need for these terms to be included in the search. There is also an Advanced Search capability to further refine retrieval. The content is available in audio and video formats as well as text. For text documents there is a feature that allows viewing the document in a split screen with one side being English and the other being the language requested in the search.

Evaluation “Coffee Breaks” from the CDC

Want to build your repertoire of evaluation skills? Check out this library of evaluation-related podcasts and webinars from the CDC’s Division of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention. These are archived documents from 20-minute presentations about evaluation. The usual basic topics are represented, such as Making Logic Models Work for You and How Do I Develop a Survey? But a number of the presentations cover topics that are not standard fare. Here are a few titles that stand out:

Most presentations consist of PDFs of PowerPoint slides and talking points, but there are a few podcasts as well. All presentations seem to be bird’s-eye overviews, but the final slides offer transcripts of Q&A discussion and a list of resources for more in-depth exploration of the topic. It’s a great way to check out a new evaluation interest!

January 2015 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of 2 people playing tennis.Check out the January issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Osteoporosis in Aging: Protect Your Bones with Exercise
    Bones feel solid, but the inside of a bone is actually filled with holes like a honeycomb. Bone tissues are broken down and rebuilt all the time. While some cells build new bone tissue, others dissolve bone and release the minerals inside.
  • Listen Up! Noises Can Damage Your Hearing
    Sounds surround us. We enjoy many of them—like music, birdsong, and conversations with friends. But loud or long-lasting noises—from motors, power tools, and even headphones—can permanently damage your hearing. Take steps to protect your ears from harmful noises.
  • Ebola Vaccine Prompts Immune Response
    An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it. Based on these results, researchers are planning further studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine.
  • Detect Glaucoma Early To Protect Vision
    Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve, which carries visual signals from the eye to the brain. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to vision loss or blindness. But many people with early-stage glaucoma have no symptoms. By the time they’re diagnosed, they may have already noticed changes to their side, or peripheral, vision.
  • Featured Website: Rethinking Drinking
    Have you taken a look at your drinking habits and how they may affect your health? Some people have symptoms of an alcohol use disorder without recognizing them. Others don’t know where to find help to cut back or quit. This site offers research-based information about how alcohol affects your health and tips for making changes.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

NLM Selected as a Host Site for the 2015 National Digital Stewardship Residency

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce its participation in the second year of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR), a significant partnership of the Library of Congress (LC) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), to build a dedicated community of stewards capable of managing, preserving and making accessible the nation’s digital assets. The NDSR enables recent Master’s program graduates in relevant fields to complete a paid 12-month residency at host institutions in the Washington DC area, where they work on significant digital stewardship projects. Similar NDSR programs are on-going in Boston and New York.

NLM’s NDSR project proposal, to select and preserve an NLM-produced software product, was chosen in a highly competitive process from about 15 other proposals. NLM will join the American Institute of Architects, the DC Public Library, the Government Publishing Office and the U.S. Senate, Historical Office as a host institution beginning in June, 2015. A detailed list of all five projects can be found at the NDSR website. This is the second year that NLM has been chosen as an NDSR host site, evidence of NLM’s commitment and support of digital stewardship.

NDSR is now accepting applications for qualified applicants for places in the five Washington DC host institutions. The residency application period is open from December 17 to January 30. The application instructions and list of requirements can be found on the NDSR website. Candidates may apply online for one of the five residencies.

TOXNET Provides Permalinks to Individual Records

Permanent links to National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXNET records are now provided for the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), TOXLINE, LactMed, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART), Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER), Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS), and GENE-TOX.

To create a permanent link, click on the “Permalink” button found in the upper right of a TOXNET record. This provides a pop-up window with a URL to share or to save for retrieving the record at a later time.

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