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Archive for the ‘Web 2.0 Tools’ Category

NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Webinar Offerings in October & November!

The Regional Office of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is offering several webinars during the months of October and November. All sessions offer MLA continuing education credit.

  1. Introduction to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center Library (Boost Box)
    Tuesday, October 13, 9:00 – 10:00 AM PDT
    Description: This presentation will introduce librarians and others to the extensive, unique collections of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSRVC) Library. Providing resources to researchers, advocates, medical professionals, law enforcement, allied organizations, and the public since 2000, the NSVRC Library may be considered the largest collection of materials on sexual violence and prevention in the world, currently housing a collection of over 35,000 unique titles. Learn how NSVRC can provide valuable resources and training materials for the medical profession, public health practitioners, and academic institutions nationwide. No registration is required.
  2. HIV/AIDS Resources
    Wedneday, October 14, 9:00 – 10:00 AM PDT
    Description: AIDSinfo offers access to the latest, federally approved HIV/AIDS medical practice guidelines, HIV treatment and prevention clinical trials, and other research information for health care providers, researchers, people affected by HIV/AIDS, and the general public. AIDSource was developed by NLM to ensure that those seeking information about HIV/AIDS have a source of quality reviewed current content, and provides access to HIV/AIDS-related information both within and outside of the federal government. The presentation will cover the many features of AIDSinfo and AIDSource, including the portfolio of AIDSinfo mobile apps. No registration is required.
  3. Wearable Technology: If the Tech Fits, Wear It
    Wednesday, October 28, 8:00 – 9:00 AM PDT
    Description: “Wearable technology” and “wearable devices” are phrases that describe electronics and computers that are integrated into clothing and other accessories that can be worn comfortably on the body. Examples of wearable devices include glasses, watches, headbands, and jewelry. While these technologies show great influence in fashion and entertainment, they have the largest impact in the areas of health, medicine, and fitness. Librarians are also exploring wearable technology’s potential for enhancing services and expanding outreach to their organizations. No registration is required.
  4. Building Collections and Connections for LGBT Health Awareness: Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Persons
    Tuesday, November 10, 12:00 – 1:30 PM PST
    Description: NN/LM MAR Outreach Coordinator Kate Flewelling will teach this new course. As a result of the session, participants will develop a better understanding of the health information needs of the LGBT community; have an increased awareness of the importance of LGBT education for health care providers and the role of implicit bias in healthcare; discover resources that can be utilized in reference interactions; be able to identify electronic, print, and other resources for building a LGBT collection; and gain ideas for outreach strategies to the LGBT community. Registration is required.

Apple’s “iWork for iCloud” Now Available to Everyone!

Apple recently made its “iWork for iCloud” app suite available to all users at no cost, even those without an Apple device. iWork for iCloud is web-only access and features web versions of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations. To access this trio of productivity apps, you will need to create an Apple ID on, if you don’t already have one. Sign-up is free and includes 1GB of free storage for saving documents.

To create an Apple ID:

  1. Go to
  2. Click Create Apple ID.
  3. Fill out the required account information including your email address, a strong password, and security questions.
  4. Verify your email address by entering the 6-digit code that Apple sends you.
  5. Accept the iCloud Terms of Service. supports recent versions of Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer. Learn more about the system requirements for iCloud.

NLM Launches Web Collecting Initiative to Capture and Preserve Selected Ebola-Related Content

Transmission Electron Micrograph (TEM) of the Ebola virus,The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has launched a Web collecting initiative to capture and preserve selected born-digital content documenting the 2014 Ebola outbreak. This initiative is a part of its previously-announced Web content collecting effort, which is guided by the NLM Collection Development Manual and other strategic collecting efforts. Initiated on October 1, 2014, selected content related to the current Ebola outbreak includes Web sites and social media from Government and non-government organizations, journalists, healthcare workers, and scientists in the United States and around the world, with an aim to collect and preserve a diversity of perspectives on this unfolding health crisis.

The content is part of the NLM’s broader Web collection on “Global Health Events.” The NLM will continue to develop, review, describe, and add content to the collection, as it also expands its overall capacity to collect Web content. With this initiative NLM has taken a major new step in its mission to collect pertinent health care information of today for the benefit of research in the future. Increasingly, that information is found on the Web, which is a rapidly changing environment where valuable and interesting materials can surface and then quickly disappear!

National Library of Medicine Joins The Commons on Flickr!

Nurse wearing a uniform

The National Library of Medicine has announced that it is now a participating institution of the Commons on Flickr. The Commons on Flickr was launched in 2008 as a pilot project in partnership with the Library of Congress in order to increase access to publicly-held photography collections and to invite the general public to provide information about the collections. The National Library of Medicine now joins a distinguished, international group of nearly one hundred cultural institutions in providing greater access to its collection and inviting public use of and engagement with these images held in the public trust through The Commons on Flickr.

Images from the historical collections of the History of Medicine Division, including public health posters, book illustrations, photographs, fine art work, and ephemera, have always been available through the Images from the History of Medicine database, which includes over 70,000 images illustrating the social and historical aspects of medicine dated from the 15th to the 21st century. Now, they can also be accessed through the Commons on Flickr via a photostream, where visitors can contribute information about the images by adding comments and tags. By adding a new way to see its collections through Flickr NLM hopes to learn more details about its collections, create dialog about its holdings, and share knowledge with the public. The collection of images on Flickr will continue to grow so visitors can check back regularly for new content!

NLM Launches Web Content Collecting Initiative to Preserve Health-Related Blogs and Other Media

Screenshot from the blog of Dave deBronkart, known as The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has launched a Web content collecting initiative. The Library is selecting Web content as part of its mission to collect, preserve, and make accessible the scholarly biomedical literature, as well as resources that illustrate a diversity of philosophical and cultural perspectives not found in the technical literature. New forms of publication on the Web, such as blogs authored by doctors and patients, illuminate health care thought and practice in the 21st century. In launching this initiative, the Library is capturing and providing a unique resource for future scholarship.

The Library’s inaugural collection of Web content is “Health and Medicine Blogs,” presenting the perspectives of physicians, nurses, hospital administrators and other individuals in health care fields. The collection also includes patients chronicling their experiences with conditions such as cancer, diabetes and arthritis. The site currently contains 12 blogs, including, “social media’s leading physician voice;” Not Running a Hospital, a blog by a former CEO of a large Boston hospital; e-patient Dave, a cancer survivor and leader in the participatory medicine movement; and Wheelchair Kamikaze, who writes about his personal experience living with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Guided by the NLM Collection Development Manual and other strategic collecting efforts, NLM will continue to expand its capacity to collect Web content. With this initiative NLM has taken a major new step in its mission to collect pertinent health care information of today for the benefit of research in the future. Increasingly, that information is found on the Web, which is a rapidly changing environment, where valuable and interesting materials can surface and then quickly disappear. The Library is working to ensure it can effectively collect new material in a Web environment, and guarantee the material’s permanence and availability to current and future patrons.

In launching this initiative, NLM joins many other national, state and public libraries and archives that have acknowledged the importance of preserving Web content for future generations. In addition to the Internet Archive, which has been broadly archiving the Web since 1996, dozens of libraries and cultural heritage institutions have been engaged in thematic or event-based collecting. This community has contributed to the development and use of common tools, techniques, and standards that enable the creation of Web archives. NLM has benefitted from this work and from local partners such as the Library of Congress, which is actively engaged in collecting and preserving Web content. The NLM has already been archiving portions of its own Web domain considered to be of enduring value. With this new effort, the Library is now collecting Web content that others have created.

Seven iPad Keyboard Tricks

Dan Miller, editor of, recently posted a video illustrating seven keyboard tricks that are helpful for every iPad user. A complete transcript and video link are featured in this article. The seven tips are summarized below. Tips 1 and 3-6 also work on the iPhone.

  1. Tap-and-hold for special characters. Tapping and holding on any vowel key and several consonants results in a pop-up to select variations on those characters, including accents and circumflexes. This is particularly useful for typing in languages other than English. Similarly, tapping and holding on several keys on the numeric keyboard accesses other special characters. For example, tap-and-hold on the dollar sign to see a variety of currency symbols.
  2. Swipe up on some keys to insert special characters. For example, swipe up on the dollar sign to get the cents symbol.
  3. Double-tap on the space bar at the end of a sentence to automatically insert a period and a space. Then begin the next sentence.
  4. In Safari, to get to a site that has a top-level domain other than .com, tap-and-hold on the .COM key to see a pop-up to select .ORG, .EDU, and other domains.
  5. Similarly, in Mail, to add a top-level domain at the end of an email address, tap-and-hold on the period; then select the top-level domain desired.
  6. To insert a number or punctuation mark after typing a string of letters, open the numeric keyboard and slide your finger to the number desired. Then release the finger to return to the alpha keyboard.
  7. Lastly, there’s the feature to split the keyboard and undock it. Tap-and-hold on the keyboard button in the lower right, and select “Undock.” Then slide the keyboard up and down to different positions on the screen. By tapping and holding the keyboard button and selecting “Split,” the keyboard will split in two. This is very handy when holding the iPad with two hands and typing with the thumbs.

Announcing Twitter feed from MedlinePlus en español

The National Library of Medicine is excited to announce a new Twitter feed from MedlinePlus en español  – @MedlinePlusEsp.  Follow @MedlinePlusEsp for trusted health information in Spanish.  Stay up to date on the latest health news, health observances, seasonal health issues, and healthy living tips, all in Spanish.  If you have any questions about @MedlinePlusEsp, contact the MedlinePlus team at NLM via the contact form linked from every page on MedlinePlus.

Here’s a Spanish translation of the above message, in case you want to post it for a Spanish-speaking audience:

La Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina de los EE.UU (NLM) se complace en anunciar el feed de Twitter para MedlinePlus en español: @MedlinePlusEsp. Siga @MedlinePlusEsp para encontrar información confiable de salud en español. Manténgase al día de las últimas noticias, datos oportunos en el área de salud y consejos para vivir una vida saludable ¡todo en español!

2012 Go Viral to Improve Health Challenge

2012 Go Viral to Improve Health Challenge PosterBased on the success of last spring’s event, the IOM and NAE are sponsoring the 2nd annual Go Viral to Improve Health: Health Data Collegiate Challenge. Working in interdisciplinary teams that meld technological skills with health knowledge, college students can generate powerful apps to improve health for individuals and communities. A video of last year’s first-place winners presenting their app, Sleep Bot, at the 2011 Health Data Initiative Forum is available online.

IOM and NAE need your help in reaching out to students about the challenge. Information about eligibility, judging criteria, and registration is available on the IOM website and Facebook page. A downloadable and printable flyer is available to help spread the message about this year’s student challenge. You are encouraged to help get the word out by “liking” the Go Viral to Improve Health Facebook page and forwarding information about the challenge to faculty and students who may be interested in participating. This year, a total of $10,000 in prizes will be available to the student teams who develop the best new health apps. Team registration is open until February 10, 2012.

To help teams get started, the National Library of Medicine provides API (Application Programming Interface), a set of routines that an application uses to request and carry out lower-level services performed by a computer’s operating system, for many of its resources and databases. The NLM Show Off Your Apps challenge utilized NLM API to create to create innovative software applications that use the Library’s vast collection of biomedical data, including downloadable data sets, application programming interfaces (APIs).

Health DATAbytes: A New Blog with Tips to Improve Community Health Using Data

Health DATAbytes is an online conversation featuring health experts and advocates providing examples of using data to make healthy changes to benefit communities and address health disparities. The blog postings are designed to help people with a wide range of data expertise to better understand and use data to seek funding, plan and evaluate programs, or advance public policies to promote healthier communities. In addition to the expert commentary, Health DATAbytes provides data tips and tricks, and links to upcoming data training sessions. Blog postings reflect a broad range of health topics. Recent listings include the health effects of living near major roadways, neighborhoods lacking healthy food outlets (food deserts), and the effect of state budget cuts on support services for the elderly and disabled.

Health DATAbytes is a new initiative from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, as part of its Health DATA (Data. Advocacy. Training. Assistance.) Program. The aim of this program is to make data easily understandable to a wide variety of public health and health advocacy personnel, as well as members of the general community. Another goal of the program is to increase capacity of these groups to locate and present credible data related to particular health programs.

Tools to Build a Free Website

The “Free Technology for Teachers” blog lists 10 tools that allow you to build a website for free. The posting explains, “websites are good for providing a static resource of information, blogs are good for frequent updates and communication, and a wiki is great for collaborating on the creation of a reference site” and then lists 10 tools for website creation.