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Archive for the ‘Social networking’ Category

A New Look for the NN/LM EP&R Toolkit!

Based on feedback provided from the Toolkit Usability Report, the NN/LM Emergency Preparedness & Response Toolkit now has a new look, with a “cleaner” presentation of content. New features have been added, including a section for EP&R related Twitter feeds, and easier access to weather alerts and warnings. There’s also a new tutorial on how to navigate the toolkit.

Use the “Add This” Button to Share NewsBits & Latitudes articles

Add This Widget On the upper right of our web page is the “Add This” social bookmarking widget. It allows you to share our NewsBits and Latitudes articles on popular social networking sites — or any other web sites — such as Facebook and Twitter. Just click on the button and choose from a list of popular services.

Social Media Policies

Are you curious about the social media policies of other institutions? Take a look at the growing list at HLWIKI:

http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/Social_media_policies

It includes links to policies for health care institutions.

Follow, Fan and Connect with NLM

Check out all of the ways that you can communicate with NLM using social networking services like Facebook and Twitter on NLM’s “Follow, Fan and Connect with NLM” page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/socialmedia/index.html.

The page includes Facebook, Twitter, RSS feeds, and e-mail lists.

NLM Launches Facebook Fan Page

The National Library of Medicine has launched a Facebook fan page. The goal of the new page is to share news, information, fun facts and important links with interested readers.

To become a fan, log in to your Facebook account and type “National Library of Medicine” in the search box. For more information, see http://www.nlm.nih.gov/news/facebook_nlm.html.

How to Present with Twitter (Free Online Book)

Have you thought about using Twitter to engage the audience during a presentation? If so, you may wish to download a free, online book on how to use Twitter in presentations. The book discusses benefits in using Twitter in your presentations. Sections include how to “survive the experience” and how to respond to the audience. To download, see http://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewMaterial.htm?id=433746.

Evaluating New Social Networking Services: Google Buzz and Foursquare

Two new online services have made the news lately:  Google Buzz and Foursquare.

Google Buzz is a good example of why it’s not always a good idea to immediately go out and try a new service.  Give it a week and let the “dust settle.”

At first, Google Buzz seemed like a great idea:  Facebook-like interaction with your contacts integrated directly into Gmail.  Unfortunately, reports of privacy issues and too many “automatic” features began almost immediately.  For instance, users reported that all their Gmail contacts were now public for everyone to see.  Google has now been forced to admit it made a mistake and to try to fix the system.  See this blog post entitled, “Google: We Screwed Up with Buzz, Stay Tuned” for a summary.

Meanwhile, a mobile service called “Foursquare” has been getting a lot of attention. Foursquare is a “geo-location” app for mobile phones.  People can share their location with their friends and offer “tips” about particular places in their city.  The Krafty Librarian has an interesting post about the service and whether it has any application to libraries.  For now, it appears to be mostly a “fun” application but it’s worth keeping an eye on for future library applications.

Social Networking in Hospitals

Keep up with hospitals that are participating in social networking with the “HospitalGroup” Twitter feed: http://twitter.com/hospitalgroup.

Learn About the Rise of the E-Patient

Did you know that close to 20% of adults searching online for health information visit Internet and social networking sites to talk with medical experts and other patients? These e-patients are looking for tools to connect and share their medical data online. Listen to the National Public Radio interview with Susannah Fox of the Pew Internet and American Life Project regarding this growing trend.

Also, learn how librarians can find new ways to engage e-patients and their families with the Pew Internet online presentation The Rise of the E-Patient: Trends in the use of digital technology for health purposes.

Curious about Google Wave?

Google released Google Wave, a new real-time collaboration and communication tool, to 100,000 beta testers yesterday. If you’re not one of the early testers but are curious about what Google Wave can do, check out this detailed description in the LifeHacker blog:

http://lifehacker.com/5370738/google-wave-first-look

The Ribbit Wave gadget for conducting conference calls sounds particularly interesting!