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Archive for the ‘Social networking’ Category

MedlinePlus Launches Facebook Pages!

Looking for the latest information on diseases, condition, and wellness issues? MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español have joined Facebook! Feel free to “Like” these new pages!

MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health’s Web site for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library, it brings you information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues in language you can understand. MedlinePlus offers reliable, up-to-date health information, anytime, anywhere, for free. For any questions about MedlinePlus, including its social media accounts, please use the Contact Us link that appears at the top of every MedlinePlus page to send the MedlinePlus team a message.

Measuring What Matters in Your Social Media Strategy

We’re all trying to find ways to improve evaluation of our social media efforts. It’s fun to count the number of retweets and “likes.” But are these numbers meaningful? A recent program at the American Evaluation Association Conference in Chicago, “Do Likes Save Lives? Measuring What Really Matters in Social Media and Digital Advocacy Efforts,” presented by Lisa Hilt and Rebecca Perlmutter of Oxfam, provided a presentation designed to build knowledge and skills in planning and measuring social media strategies, setting digital objectives, selecting meaningful indicators and choosing the right tools and approaches for analyzing social media data. The presenters did not want to rely solely on what they called “vanity metrics,” for example the number of “impressions” or “likes.”  Alone these metrics show very little actual engagement with the information. Instead they chose to focus on specific social media objectives based on their overall digital strategy.

Develop a digital strategy:

  • Connect the overall digital strategy to campaign objectives: (for example: To influence a concrete change in policy, or to change the debate on a particular issue.)

Develop social media objectives:

  • You want people to be exposed to your message.
  • Then you want people to engage with it (for example, sharing your message) or make them work with it (for example: sign an online petition after reading it.)

Collect specific information based on objectives:

  • Collect data about social media engagement supporting your objectives that can be measured (for example “the Oxfam Twitter campaign drove 15% of the readers to signing its petition” vs. “we got 1500 likes”.)

The presenters suggested some types of more meaningful metrics:

  • On Twitter you can look at the number of profiles who take the action you want them to take, and then the number of tweets or retweets about your topic.
  • For Facebook, the number of likes, shares and comments mean that your audience was definitely exposed to your message.
  • Changes in the rate of likes or follows (for example if you normally get 5 new followers to your fan page a week, but due to a particular campaign strategy, you suddenly started getting 50 new followers a week.)
  • Number of “influential” supporters.
  • Qualitative analysis: Consider analyzing comments on Facebook posts, or conversation around a hashtag in Twitter.

Overall, the goal is to have a plan for how you would like to see people interact with your messages in relation to your overall organizational and digital strategies, and find metrics to see if your plan worked.

Structured Abstracts in MEDLINE: Newly Identified and Mapped Labels Available

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has updated its list of structured abstract labels. This updated list, along with the NLM-assigned broader category mappings, can be downloaded for free from the Structured Abstracts resource page which also provides NLM guidelines and other background information to assist licensees or researchers. A grand total of 4,702 citations (whether in process, MEDLINE, or PubMed-not-MEDLINE status) were revised so that the new labels include the NLM Category mapping in the XML data, effective on or about October 26, 2015. Of interest, the new label ‘TWEETABLE ABSTRACT’ (mapped to the NLM Category ‘CONCLUSIONS’) illustrates the impact of social media. Read more about Structured Abstracts in MEDLINE/PubMed.

NIH Observes National Native American Heritage Month in November

November is National Native American Heritage Month (NNAHM), a time to recognize the accomplishments of this country’s first inhabitants. As the early inhabitants of this land, the native peoples of North America have their own tribal orientations, language origins, and cultural histories. Today, many healing techniques that are practiced have been adopted from traditions that originate from various Native American tribes. This year’s NNAHM theme, Tribal Diversity: Weaving Together Our Traditions, highlights spirituality as an inseparable element of healing in medicine. Healing the physical parts of a patient is not enough; one must acknowledge the importance of emotional wellness, as influenced by Native American rituals and traditions.

This month is dedicated to building new avenues of opportunity for Native Americans by making critical investments to improve health, to strengthen tribal communities, and to promote educational opportunities at the NIH. Maintaining an inclusive biomedical research workforce with a diversity of talent is critical to the NIH mission of fostering new discoveries and promoting the highest level of scientific integrity to improve the nation’s health. NNAHM allows the opportunity for every individual to learn more about the distinctive backgrounds and heritages of Native Americans. You can show support during National Native American Heritage Month by actively engaging with the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion’s (EDI’s) social media campaign, including the month-long NIH Twitter campaign. More information is located on the Strategist for the Native American Portfolio website.

New Videos Available on the NCBI YouTube Channel

Two new three-minute videos on the NCBI YouTube channel will provide information about how to view track sets in all of the NCBI genome browsers and Sequence Viewer displays and how to store and share custom sets of tracks in track collections. NCBI Recommended Tracks presents track sets, which allow you to instantly tailor your display to a specific need, while My NCBI Track Collections: Introduction shows how to store and share tracks in custom sets called track collections. To learn more about track sets and collections, visit the FAQ on the Sequence Viewer page. Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full webinar presentations.

Medicare Facebook Page Launched!

As part of the 50th anniversary celebration of Medicare and Medicaid, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has just launched the official Medicare Facebook page, which will serve as an informational resource for those who will soon enroll in Medicare and people currently on Medicare. The Medicare and Medicaid programs were signed into law on July 30, 1965, by President Lyndon B. Johnson. For 50 years, these programs have been protecting the health and well-being of millions of American families, saving lives, and improving the economic security of our nation. Though Medicare and Medicaid started as basic insurance programs for Americans who didn’t have health insurance, they have changed over the years to provide more and more Americans with access to the quality and affordable health care they need.

During the summer of 2015, CMS will mark the anniversary of these programs by recognizing the ways in which these programs have transformed the nation’s health care system over the past five decades. Use the following resources to help spread the word!

Hashtags:

  • #KeepingUpWithGrandma
  •  #Medicare
  • #KeepingUSHealthy

Medicare 50th anniversary pages:

Padlet: A Free Virtual Bulletin Board and Brainstorming Tool

A recent AEA365 Evaluation Tip-a-Day featured a review and several hot tips for Padlet, a freely available web-based bulletin board system. The hot tips include the use of Padlet as an anonymous brainstorming activity in response to a question or idea, and as a backchannel for students or conference attendees to share resources and raise questions for future discussion. Padlet’s bulletin board configuration settings are intuitive and easy to use with various backgrounds and freeform, tabular, or grid note arrangement display on the bulletin board. Free Padlet accounts can be created by either signing up directly or by linking to an existing Google or Facebook account. Padlet includes many privacy options that are clearly explained, including “Private” mode, requiring the use of a password for you and those you invite to participate to access the Padlet, and “Public” mode to view, write or moderate. A new update feature includes a variety of ways to share Padlet data, ranging from choosing the icon for six different social media channels to downloading data as a PDF or Excel/CSV file for analysis. For a trial run of this resource, visit the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center’s Padlet about the OERC Evaluation Series booklets and leave your input! Posts will be moderated on the Padlet before they display publicly.

NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) has been activated to support healthcare professionals working on the Ebola public health emergency in West Africa. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from over 650 biomedical journals and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users. It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster. EAI is not an open access collection. It is only intended for those affected by the disaster or assisting the affected population. If you know of a library or organization involved in healthcare efforts in response to the Ebola outbreak, please let them know of this service. EAI was activated four times in the past, including following the earthquake and subsequent cholera epidemic in Haiti, flooding in Pakistan and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

NLM thanks the numerous participating publishers for their generous support of this initiative: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists, ASM Press, B.C. Decker, BMJ, EBSCOHost, Elsevier, FA Davis, Mary Ann Liebert, Massachusetts Medical Society, McGraw-Hill, Merck Publishing, Oxford University Press, People’s Medical Publishing House, Springer, University of Chicago Press, Wiley and Wolters Kluwer.

Resources on Ebola

NLM has several other resources that will be helpful for people working on Ebola:

HHS agencies, including CDC and ASPR, also provide the latest Ebola information available through social media, including Twitter@phegov, @CDCgov, @CDCEmergency and Facebook Public Health Emergency, CDC, CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response. The CDC also has a comprehensive set of resources on its Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever web page.

How to Use Hashtags to Increase Social Media Presence

If you have determined that the use of social media channels is appropriate for your organization, you will quickly encounter hashtags, which are user-controlled categories prefaced with a pound sign. Hashtags were once limited to Twitter but are now used on most social media sites, including Facebook and Google+. Conversational, concise, and consistent use of up to two hashtags per social media message can result in double the amount of user engagement compared to messages without them. For more statistics specific to Twitter and user engagement, Buffer’s blog provides an excellent overview.

What are some of the ways to show that hashtags increase user engagement with your organization’s message? Look for performance indicators of reposts (the use of ‘Share’ on Facebook or retweets on Twitter), replies (comments under the message from Facebook followers, replies to the tweet from Twitter users), the number of clicks to any links included in your message (ideally to your organization’s website and resources), and hashtag usage frequency. For tips on how to track these performance indicators and additional statistics regarding hashtag creation and use, check out this helpful infographic.

Evaluating Social Media Activities

For public sector and nonprofit organizations, social media can be a cost effective way to engage with users and supporters. However, social media is not without its cost, particularly in terms of staff time. So organizations have an interest in assessing the value of their social media activities.

One great resource for social media evaluation is Paine’s book, Measure What Matters. The book contains detailed guidance for evaluating social media use by different types of organizations. A great supplement to Paine’s book is The Nonprofit Social Media Decision Guide, by Idealware, which has worksheets that will help plan social media strategies and implement recommendations in Measure What Matters.

Below are the key elements of Paine’s evaluation framework:

  • Begin with a solid social media plan that identifies specific goals and objectives. As with any project, you need a plan for social media that links strategies to the organizational mission and includes objectives with targets and key performance indicators. Objectives for social media in the public sector often belong in one of two categories: helping users find information they need; or building user awareness, engagement, or loyalty. (The Nonprofit Social Media Decision Guide provides a list of potential objectives on page 52.)
  • Define your target audience: Organizations often have many stakeholder groups, so it’s important to identify the groups most attuned to social media. On page 54 of The Nonprofit Social Media Decision Guide, there is a worksheet for narrowing down stakeholder audiences to those most receptive to social media activities.
  • Pick your metrics: Metrics such as views, followers, and measures of engagement with online content will help monitor your reach. Conversions, defined as the actions you want your social media followers to complete, might include becoming members of your organization or actively recommending your organization to colleagues or friends.
  • Identify a source for benchmarks. Benchmarks provide a basis for comparison to assess progress. Organizations often use their own histories as benchmarks, comparing progress against baseline measures. You also may have access to data from a competing or peer organization that you can use for comparison.
  • Pick a measurement tool: Paine’s book describes different measurement methods for evaluating social media, such as content analysis, web analytics, or surveys.

For more information, check out the resources mentioned in this blog post:

  • Katie Delahaye Paine, Measure What Matters: Online Tools For Understanding Customers, Social Media, Engagement, and Key Relationships. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 2011.
  • Idealware. The Nonprofit Social Media Decision Guide, 2013.