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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

NIAMS Launches New Spanish-Language Website

NIAMS websiteThe National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a new Spanish-language website that provides free health information on conditions of the bones, joints, muscles and skin. The site is being launched to coincide with National Hispanic Heritage Month. Increasingly, website traffic to NIAMS’ Spanish-language content represents about 50% of its total visits in a given month. To meet this high demand, the new site features quick and easy navigation tools to help Spanish-speaking individuals identify and locate NIAMS health topics. It also includes landing pages that provide all of the information offered on a given topic in one place. The website also offers:

  • New site features navigation tools to help Spanish-speaking individuals locate NIAMS health topics
  • Improved access to NIAMS’ Spanish-language health information and related federal resources
  • Information on participating in clinical research studies
  • Responsive design that makes the site easier to read on mobile devices

NIAMS is committed to providing health information that is culturally and linguistically appropriate for diverse populations, including underserved racial and ethnic communities. The NIAMS Spanish-language materials complement the institute’s entire suite of health resources that are part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative, many of which are also available in Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese.

Apply Now to Host NLM “Native Voices” Traveling Exhibition!

Native Voices Banner

The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, on behalf of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), invites applications for Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries. The exhibit explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

This opportunity is open to public libraries, academic libraries, tribal libraries, tribal college libraries and special libraries. Libraries serving Native populations are especially invited to apply, and partnerships between libraries and Native-serving organizations are encouraged. The exhibition will tour from February 2016 through June 2020 at up to 104 institutions for six-week periods. For full guidelines and exhibit specifications, visit the online application site. Applications are due by November 6!

Selected sites will receive:

  • the traveling exhibition for a six-week loan period;
  • a $250 programming grant;
  • training through a required project webinar and online project support materials; and
  • a publicity kit to help with local promotion.

The traveling exhibit requires 35 linear feet of display space and comprises six standing banners, six iPads pre-loaded with video content, and six iPad stands. No internet connection is required, but an electrical connection is needed. Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness was displayed at the NLM from 2011 to 2015. Visit the site to learn more about content from the exhibition.

New NLM Resource for Nursing Standards and Interoperability

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has released a new web page, Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability. The page is a resource for nurses, students, informaticians, and anyone interested in nursing terminologies for systems development. It describes the role of SNOMED CT and Laboratory Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) in implementing Meaningful Use in the United States, specifically for the nursing care domain.

NLM has provided this resource in response to the position statement released by the American Nurses Association (ANA) that reaffirms support for use of recognized terminologies in coding nursing problems, interventions and observations (SNOMED CT), and in nursing assessments and outcomes (LOINC). In addition to SNOMED CT and LOINC, the Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability page provides information about other highly utilized nursing terminologies. The resource page provides a new two-minute video tutorial that describes how to use the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus Browser to find Concept Unique Identifiers (CUIs) and extract concept-level synonyms between SNOMED CT and other nursing terminologies. Additionally, links to other NLM Terminology resources and helpful resources are provided.

NLM welcomes feedback on the Nursing Resources for Standards and Interoperability page. Please send comments to NLM Customer Service.

NLM Announces New Traveling Exhibition!

Banners from the NLM Traveling Exhibition The Exhibition Program at the National Library of Medicine has announced its newest traveling exhibition, Confronting Violence: Improving Women’s Lives, that is now available for six-week booking periods. The exhibition explores the story of nurses and activists who during the late 20th century worked with passion and persistence to reform a medical profession that overwhelmingly failed to acknowledge violence against women as a serious health issue. Beginning in the late 1970s, nurses were in the vanguard as they pushed the larger medical community to identify victims, adequately respond to their needs, and work towards the prevention of domestic violence. To book this exhibition or learn more about other available traveling exhibitions, visit the NLM Exhibition Program web site.

The online adaptation of the exhibit incorporates a Digital Gallery of videos about domestic violence from the NLM’s collection. Education resources are also featured in the online exhibition, including K-12 lesson plans, a higher education module; an online activity and a robust selection of resources including K-12 suggested readings. In addition, the web feature, Related Resources at NLM, includes a selection of published articles on domestic violence and forensic nursing available through PubMed Central.

New Mobile App Connects HIV Providers, Advocates, and People Living with HIV/AIDS to NLM HIV-Related Websites

Logo for Go2NLM Mobile App

HealthHIV, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has announced the launch of the Go2NLM mobile application. Building on its Navigate to Learn More publication, HealthHIV created the Go2NLM app to provide information about and direct access to NLM’s authoritative HIV-related websites to HIV providers, advocates, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The app features dynamic content, including updates about new and highlighted HIV technical assistance and capacity building tools and resources promoted by NLM.

The websites featured on the Go2NLM app are:

The application will soon be available for download from HealthHIV, as well as the Apple and Google app stores. For more information about the Go2NLM project, please contact HealthHIV.

Inaugural National Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease in Native American Communities October 15-16 in Scottsdale, AZ

The Banner Alzheimer’s Institute Native American Program will host the first National Native American Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia in Native American Communities on Thursday and Friday, October 15-16, at the Scottsdale (AZ) Plaza Resort. Targeting urban and tribal health care and social service professionals, this two-day conference will provide eight plenary and more than 30 concurrent sessions from stellar Native American and dementia specialists from across the U.S. This conference is designed to provide the opportunity to learn best practices in the diagnosis, treatment and care available for Native American families affected by Alzheimer’s disease.

Updates for NLM’s Tox Town City Neighborhood

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Tox Town City neighborhood now has updated graphics with a new photorealistic look. The City, Town, and Southwest scenes are now in HTML 5. Location and chemical information remains the same, but the new graphics allow users to better identify with real-life city locations. Tox Town can be accessed on a variety of personal electronic devices, including iPads, iPad minis, and tablets. Regardless of where you live, check out the updated Tox Town City neighborhood and learn about potential environmental health risks!

Toxicology and Environmental Health Highlight: Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology (DART)

The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology (DART) is a bibliographic resource on NLM’s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET). It covers teratology and other aspects of developmental and reproductive toxicology and includes more than 200,000 references to literature published since the early 1900s. DART may be searched using MeSH terms/keywords, title words, chemical name, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (RN), and author. Search results are displayed in relevancy ranked order, but may also be sorted by publication date, entry month, author, or title.

DART was initially funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Center for Toxicological Research of the Food and Drug Administration, and NLM. Some meeting abstracts and non-MEDLINE literature are historically included in DART; however, new citations come only from PubMed, based on a search strategy profile. New references are added weekly.

Request for Information (RFI) for NIH-wide Five-Year Strategic Plan: Comments Due by 8/16/15!

In response to a request from the US Congress, NIH is developing a 5-year NIH-wide Strategic Plan to advance its mission and outline a vision for biomedical research that ultimately extends healthy life and reduces illness and disability. NIH senior leadership and staff have developed a proposed framework for the Strategic Plan that identifies areas of opportunity across all biomedicine and unifying principles to guide NIH’s support of the biomedical research enterprise. The Strategic Plan is due to Congress in late December 2015.

NIH has issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking input from stakeholders throughout the scientific research community and the general public regarding the proposed framework for the NIH-wide Strategic Plan. You are invited to review the framework and submit feedback by visiting the NIH web site or the RFI submission site. Comments are due by August 16.

Stakeholder organizations (e.g., patient advocacy groups, professional societies) are urged to submit a single response reflective of the views of the organization/membership as a whole. NIH will also be hosting webinars to gather additional input in early to mid-August. Your feedback is vital to ensuring that the NIH Strategic Plan positions biomedical research on a promising and visionary path!

HHS Unveils First Compendium of Resources for Health Emergencies

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched the first online collection of the federal resources and capabilities available to mitigate the health impacts of emergencies. The HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) sponsored the HHS Response and Recovery Resources Compendium to aid state, tribal, territorial, and local officials in health and emergency management as they guide communities in responding to and recovering from disasters.

The compendium offers an easy-to-navigate, comprehensive, web-based repository of HHS products, services and capabilities available to state, state, tribal, territorial, and local agencies before, during, and after public health and medical incidents. The information spans 24 categories, and each category showcases the relevant disaster resources available from HHS and partner agencies, a brief description of each resource and information on accessing each one. Categories range from patient movement to hospital care and from situational awareness to decontamination. Resources include platforms such as GeoHEALTH and the HHS emPOWER Map that use Geographic Information System capabilities to support health response as well as consultation services, such as emergency planning, disease surveillance and tracking, and food, drug and device safety. Resources also include personnel, such as medical staff from the U.S. Public Health Service and National Disaster Medical System who can deploy to communities to augment local hospital, shelter or public health staff. The compendium will be updated regularly and expanded as federal agencies add products, capabilities and services to help communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from the health impacts of disasters.