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Archive for the ‘Non-NLM Resources’ Category

Register Now for Spanish Language Webinar on Promotores de Salud E-Learning Program on October 14!

In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), will host a Spanish-language webinar discussing Promoting Healthy Choices and Community Changes: An E-learning Program for Promotores de Salud on Wednesday, October 14, at 11:30 AM PDT. Registration is required to join the webinar. The e-learning program is designed to build the capacity of promotores de salud to promote better health among individuals and communities. The e-learning program is available in both Spanish and English at no cost to participants. It provides promotores de salud with basic knowledge to promote healthy choices, and strategies to motivate behavioral changes among the community members they serve. Speakers on the webinar will discuss how the e-learning program may help promotores de salud talk to community members about chronic disease management.

HHS Launches Resources System to Improve Disaster Preparedness

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), the Technical Resources, Assistance Center, and Information Exchange (TRACIE) features resource materials, a help line, just-in-time suggestions and tools to share information gleaned from real-life experiences in preparing for, responding to and recovering from disasters. This effort resulted from the collaborative efforts of local, state and federal government agencies, regional health-care coalitions, academia, and partners from the private sector and nongovernmental organizations.

TRACIE provides technical resources and a technical assistance center, a comprehensive national knowledge center, and multiple ways to share information between federal, state and local officials. TRACIE’s technical resources include a living library of audience-tailored and subject matter expert-reviewed topic collections and materials highlighting real-life tools and experiences. TRACIE’s resources include user rating and comments, which can be used to help choose the best resource for a particular need. Through TRACIE’s assistance center, state, tribal, local and territorial officials can reach subject matter experts for technical assistance and consultations on a range of topics. Technical assistance could vary widely, including pediatric preparedness resources, crisis standards of care, tools to assess the readiness of hospitals and health care coalition for emergencies, lessons learned about delivering dialysis care during disasters, and more. Officials also can find training related to preparedness, response and recovery. The assistance center is available through a toll-free number, email, and online.

TRACIE also includes an information exchange. Through this forum, health care emergency preparedness stakeholders can discuss, collaborate and share information about pending and actual health threats and promising practices. Users also can exchange templates, plans and other materials through this feature. Users can get advice, including just-in-time advice, from hundreds of health care, disaster medicine, public health and public safety professionals, through TRACIE. TRACIE’s free registration allows users to rate the usefulness of the resources and to access the information exchange.

Healthy People 2020 Public Comments Open October 15 – November 13

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is soliciting written comments regarding objectives proposed for inclusion in Healthy People 2020 since the last public comment period in fall 2014. Healthy People 2020 will continue to provide opportunities for public input periodically throughout the decade to ensure that Healthy People 2020 reflects current public health priorities. During the first phase of planning for Healthy People 2020, comments were received regarding the vision, mission, and implementation. Those comments helped establish the framework for Healthy People 2020. Comments from the public also helped determine the final set of Healthy People 2020 objectives. During this round of public comment, input is requested on the objectives proposed for the following topic areas: Family Planning, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health, Preparedness, and Social Determinants of Health. The public comment period will be open from October 15, 2015 through November 13, 2015.

These proposed objectives were developed by topic area workgroups, which are led by various agencies within the Federal government. They have been reviewed by the Federal Interagency Workgroup on Healthy People 2020 and are now presented for public review and comment. You are also invited to suggest additional objectives for consideration that address critical public health issues within the 42 existing topic areas of Healthy People 2020. All proposed objectives must meet the objective selection criteria. Please review these criteria prior to reviewing and commenting on objectives.

Photovoice Evaluation Guides

Photovoice is an evaluation method that engages program stakeholders (learners, service recipients, community members) in taking photographs and using them as springboards to express their experiences and points of view. With the prevalence of cameras in mobile devices, along with social media forums, many of us are already engaged in the foundational practices underlying photovoice: taking photos, posting them, and sharing our experiences. Add in some facilitators who provide systematic method design, project management and ethical oversight; and you have the potential to gather program insights that would go untouched through traditional methods. The following two practical resources are written by action researchers describing their lessons learned about conducting photovoice projects. The documents also show you or link you to photos and commentary from contributing participants.

One comprehensive guide comes from the Prairie Women’s Health Centre of Excellence (PWHCE), located in Canada. The center engages in collaborative, community-based research on social and other determinants of the health of women and girls. The center’s mission is to provide expert advice on social policies related to women’s health. The authors (Beverly Palibroda, Brigette Krieg, Lisa Murdock and Joanne Havelock) published A Practical Guide To Photovoice: Sharing Pictures, Telling Stories and Changing Communities, a nuts-and-bolts photovoice manual. It provides detailed advice, with periodic sidebars summarizing process. An appendix includes a helpful checklist. You will find sample photovoice entries throughout the document. The manual was written in 2009. Since then, the PWHCE has introduced digital story-telling into its portfolio of participatory methods. 

Another guide was produced based on a photovoice project for Brainline.org, an educational website providing authoritative information about brain injury symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. The project featured the stories of eight members with traumatic brain injury, with a gallery of essays. Facilitators Laura Lorenz and Barbara Webster developed a succinct facilitator guide based on this project.

NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Webinar Offerings in October & November!

The Regional Office of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is offering several webinars during the months of October and November. All sessions offer MLA continuing education credit.

  1. Introduction to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center Library (Boost Box)
    Date:
    Tuesday, October 13, 9:00 – 10:00 AM PDT
    Description: This presentation will introduce librarians and others to the extensive, unique collections of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSRVC) Library. Providing resources to researchers, advocates, medical professionals, law enforcement, allied organizations, and the public since 2000, the NSVRC Library may be considered the largest collection of materials on sexual violence and prevention in the world, currently housing a collection of over 35,000 unique titles. Learn how NSVRC can provide valuable resources and training materials for the medical profession, public health practitioners, and academic institutions nationwide. No registration is required.
  2. HIV/AIDS Resources
    Date:
    Wedneday, October 14, 9:00 – 10:00 AM PDT
    Description: AIDSinfo offers access to the latest, federally approved HIV/AIDS medical practice guidelines, HIV treatment and prevention clinical trials, and other research information for health care providers, researchers, people affected by HIV/AIDS, and the general public. AIDSource was developed by NLM to ensure that those seeking information about HIV/AIDS have a source of quality reviewed current content, and provides access to HIV/AIDS-related information both within and outside of the federal government. The presentation will cover the many features of AIDSinfo and AIDSource, including the portfolio of AIDSinfo mobile apps. No registration is required.
  3. Wearable Technology: If the Tech Fits, Wear It
    Date:
    Wednesday, October 28, 8:00 – 9:00 AM PDT
    Description: “Wearable technology” and “wearable devices” are phrases that describe electronics and computers that are integrated into clothing and other accessories that can be worn comfortably on the body. Examples of wearable devices include glasses, watches, headbands, and jewelry. While these technologies show great influence in fashion and entertainment, they have the largest impact in the areas of health, medicine, and fitness. Librarians are also exploring wearable technology’s potential for enhancing services and expanding outreach to their organizations. No registration is required.
  4. Building Collections and Connections for LGBT Health Awareness: Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Persons
    Date:
    Tuesday, November 10, 12:00 – 1:30 PM PST
    Description: NN/LM MAR Outreach Coordinator Kate Flewelling will teach this new course. As a result of the session, participants will develop a better understanding of the health information needs of the LGBT community; have an increased awareness of the importance of LGBT education for health care providers and the role of implicit bias in healthcare; discover resources that can be utilized in reference interactions; be able to identify electronic, print, and other resources for building a LGBT collection; and gain ideas for outreach strategies to the LGBT community. Registration is required.

Webinar Recording Available: NIH Common Data Element (CDE) Initiatives Overview

NIH encourages the use of common data elements (CDEs) in clinical research, patient registries, and other human subject research in order to improve data quality and opportunities for comparison and combination of data from multiple studies and with electronic health records. The NIH Common Data Element Resource Portal provides access to information about NIH-supported CDEs, as well as tools and resources to assist investigators developing protocols for data collection. In addition, the session recording and presentation slides for the 90-minute webinar “NIH Common Data Element (CDE) Initiatives – Overview,” held on September 8, are available for viewing.

Give Your Elevator Pitch a Lift!

Forget about elevator speeches. Think elevator conversations instead. Elevator pitches are one of a number of strategies you may use to stealthily promote your organization’s successful programs and services, which generally consist of little promotional speeches of elevator-ride length that you can slip into small talk when you run in to “someone influential.” You can add nuggets of evaluation findings to these mini-speeches to demonstrate program value. But you may be missing a key element in the elevator pitch exchange: the other person. For insight, review the article by Tim David, Your Elevator Pitch Needs an Elevator Pitch, which appeared in the Harvard Business Review (10 December 2014), and emphasizes the importance of engaging your fellow elevator traveler, rather than talking “at” him or her. This leads to a conversation rather than a speech. It is notable how the author seamlessly slips in evidence to support his low-key pitch. For example, he surreptitiously inserts a statistic that he must have obtained from a follow-up evaluation with one of his client organizations that productivity and morale increased 38% after his training, to help underscore the value his service provided to the organization.

Here are several other tips from the article:

  • Answer polite but perfunctory questions (such as “what does your office do?”) with a surprising answer.
  • Use questions to draw your elevator companion into the conversation. David suggests that you talk no more than 20% of the time. Yield the remainder of the time to the other traveler, but use questions to keep the conversation rolling.
  • Don’t worry too much about that 20-second time frame traditionally recommended for elevator pitches. If you successfully engage your fellow rider, he or she will hold the elevator door open to continue the chat.

The elevator pitch format is a good addition to your story-telling tool kit. But it may take some practice to be able to present an elevator pitch casually and conversationally. If you’re up for that challenge, then check out Tim David’s article for some excellent guidelines!

NIAMS Launches New Spanish-Language Website

NIAMS websiteThe National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a new Spanish-language website that provides free health information on conditions of the bones, joints, muscles and skin. The site is being launched to coincide with National Hispanic Heritage Month. Increasingly, website traffic to NIAMS’ Spanish-language content represents about 50% of its total visits in a given month. To meet this high demand, the new site features quick and easy navigation tools to help Spanish-speaking individuals identify and locate NIAMS health topics. It also includes landing pages that provide all of the information offered on a given topic in one place. The website also offers:

  • New site features navigation tools to help Spanish-speaking individuals locate NIAMS health topics
  • Improved access to NIAMS’ Spanish-language health information and related federal resources
  • Information on participating in clinical research studies
  • Responsive design that makes the site easier to read on mobile devices

NIAMS is committed to providing health information that is culturally and linguistically appropriate for diverse populations, including underserved racial and ethnic communities. The NIAMS Spanish-language materials complement the institute’s entire suite of health resources that are part of its National Multicultural Outreach Initiative, many of which are also available in Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese.

Online Survey Tools: A Review of Reviews

Recently the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) investigated web sites offering reviews of multiple online survey tools, yielding the following list of five resources as a starting point. In addition, there are individual reviews of online survey products on a variety of websites and blogs, which are not included in this list.

Zapier.com’s Ultimate Guide to Forms and Surveys, Chapter 7 “The 20 Best Online Survey Builder Tools”
This resource compares 20 different online survey tools. There is a chart with a brief statement of what each survey tool does best, what you get for free, and the lowest plan cost. Additionally, there is a paragraph description of each tool and what it does best. Note: this is part of an eBook published in 2015 which includes chapters like “The Best Online Form Builders for Every Task.”

Appstorm.net’s “18 Awesome Survey & Poll Apps”
This review was posted on May 27, 2015, which reassures that the information is most likely up to date. While there are very brief descriptions, it is good for a quick comparison of the survey products. Each review includes whether or not there is a free account, if the surveys can be customized, and whether or not there are ready-made templates.

Capterra.com’s “Top Survey Software Products”
This resource appears almost too good to be true. However, no date shown means that the specificity in the comparisons might not be accurate. Nevertheless, this website lists over 200 survey software products, has separate profile pages on each product (with varying amounts of detail), and lists features that each product offers. You can even narrow down the surveys you are looking for by filtering by feature. Hopefully the features in Capterra’s database are kept updated for each product. One thing to mention is that at least two fairly well-known survey products are not in their list.

AppAppeal.com’s “Top 31 Free Survey Apps”
Another review site with no date listed. This one compares 31 apps by popularity, presumably in the year the article was written. One thing that is unique about this review site is that the in-depth review includes the history and popularity of the app, the differences of each app to other apps, and recommended users for each app. Many of the reviews include videos showing how to use the app. 

TopTenReviews.com’s 2015 Best Survey Software Reviews and Comparisons
This website has the feel of Consumer Reports. It has a long article explaining why you would use survey software, how and what the reviewers tested, and the kinds of things that are important when selecting survey software. Also like Consumer Reports, it has ratings of each product (including the experiences of the business, the respondents, and the quality of the support), and individual reviews of each product showing pros and cons. With the date included in the title of the review, the information is most likely current.

Improve Your Data Storytelling in 30 Days!

Juice Analytics has developed a practical guide to explore how data visualization and storytelling techniques can mix, 30 Days to Data Storytelling. The guide provides a checklist of daily activities lasting no longer than 30 minutes per day. Activities include articles to read, videos to watch, or small projects to complete. The guide links to data visualization and storytelling resources from sources as varied as Pixar, the Harvard Business Review, Ira Glass, the New York Times, and Bono, the lead singer of U2. Use the techniques in this guide to tell a story to report your evaluation data so it gets the attention it deserves!